National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rcra facility assessment

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility assessment guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rastatter, C.; Fagan, D.; Foss, D.

    1986-10-01

    Facilities that manage hazardous wastes are required to obtain permits under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976. This guidance document informs RCRA permit writers and enforcement officials of procedures to be used in conducting RCRA Facility Assessments. The RCRA corrective-action program was established to investigate and require clean up of releases of hazardous wastes or constituents to the environment at facilities subject to RCRA permits. Releases to ground water, surface water, air, soil, and subsurface strata may be addressed.

  2. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL`s assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  3. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA)---Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are required to be in full compliance with all federal and state regulations. In response to this requirement, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established a Remedial Action Program (RAP) to provide comprehensive management of areas where past and current research, development, and waste management activities have resulted in residual contamination of facilities or the environment. This report presents the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) required to meet the requirements of RCRA Section 3004(u). Included in the RFA are (1) a listing of all sites identified at ORNL that could be considered sources of releases or potential releases; (2) background information on each of these sites, including location, type, size, period of operation, current operational status, and information on observed or potential releases (as required in Section II.A.1 of the RCRA permit); (3) analytical results obtained from preliminary surveys conducted to verify the presence or absence of releases from some of the sites; and (4) ORNL's assessment of the need for further remedial attention.

  4. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with the Baseline Risk Assessment for the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1997-08-25

    This document describes the RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation/Baseline Risk Assessment of the 716-A Motor Shops Seepage Basin.

  5. RCRA facility stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program`s management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies.

  6. Hanford Facility RCRA permit handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    Purpose of this Hanford Facility (HF) RCRA Permit Handbook is to provide, in one document, information to be used for clarification of permit conditions and guidance for implementing the HF RCRA Permit.

  7. RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) Oak Ridge National Laboratory addendum August 25, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    The RCRA Facilities Assessment (RFA) report identified approximately 250 Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) that were grouped into 20 Waste Area Groupings (WAGs) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Identification of each SWMU included information as to location, type, size, dates of operation, type of waste handled, and evidence of releases. Preliminary sampling studies were performed around each WAG to determine if there was evidence of releases beyond its perimeter. Analytical results from the surveys and historical information were the basis for recommendations concerning further actions for each WAG. Remedial investigations (RIs) were recommended for WAGs 1--10 and 17; for WAGs 14, 16, 18, and 20, it was suggested that they be removed from further consideration for remedial action. For the remaining WAGs (11, 12, 13, 15, and 19) the evidence concerning the possible release of contaminants was inconclusive and additional sampling was recommended. The purpose of this Addendum is to report the analytical data obtained from the additional surveys, to make recommendations concerning future remedial actions within these WAGs, and to provide descriptive information for additional sites listed in Table 1.2 of the RFA. Since information concerning the rationale for identifying releases, the sampling survey methodology, and background information for each WAG is presented in the RFA, it is not repeated in this Addendum.

  8. Location standards for RCRA Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities (TSDFs). RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This bulletin describes RCRA location standards for hazardous waste storage and disposal facilities.

  9. Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2005-09-20

    This document contains a revised and updated monitoring plan for RCRA interim status groundwater assessment, site hydrogeology, and a conceptual model of the RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal unit. Monitoring under interim status is expected to continue until the 216-U-12 crib is incorporated as a chapter into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit or administratively closed as proposed to EPA and Ecology.

  10. WIPP Documents - Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (RCRA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Waste Facility Permit The WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) effective April 15, 2011 WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to manage, store, and dispose of contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic mixed waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Mixed waste contains radioactive and chemically hazardous components. Information Repository Documents related to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit

  11. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 pond RCRA facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-06-01

    The 216-B-3 pond system was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation since 1945, the B Pond system has been a RCRA facility since 1986, with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994, discharges were diverted from the main pond, where the greatest potential for contamination was thought to reside, to the 3C expansion pond. In 1997, all discharges to the pond system were discontinued. In 1990, the B Pond system was elevated from detection groundwater monitoring to an assessment-level status because total organic halogens and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Subsequent groundwater quality assessment failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the exceedances, which were largely isolated in occurrence. Thus, it was recommended that the facility be returned to detection-level monitoring.

  12. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

  13. Phase report 1C, TA-21 operable unit RCRA Facility Investigation, Outfalls Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    This phase report summarizes the results of field investigations conducted in 1992 at Technical Area 21 of Los Alamos National Laboratory, as prescribed by the RCRA Facility Investigation work plan for the Technical Area 21 operable unit (also known as OU 1106). This phase report is the last part of a three-part phase report describing the results of field work conducted in 1992 at this operable unit. Phase Report lA, issued on l4 June l993, summarized site geologic characterization activities. Phase report 1B, issued on 28 January 1994, included an assessment of site-wide surface soil background, airborne emissions deposition, and contamination in the locations of two former air filtration buildings. The investigations assessed in Phase Report 1C include field radiation surveys and surface and near-surface sampling to characterize potential contamination at 25 outfalls and septic systems listed as SWMUs in the RFI work plan. Based on the RFI data, it is recommended that no further action is warranted for 8 SWMUs and further action is recommended for 3 SWMUs addressed in this phase report. For 14 SWMUs which represent no immediate threat to human health or environment, deferral of further action/no further action decisions is recommended until outstanding analytical data are received, sampling of adjacent SWMUs is completed, or decisions are made about the baseline risk assessment approach.

  14. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2000-11-28

    The 216-B-3 Pond was a series of ponds for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In 1990, groundwater monitoring at B Pond was elevated from "detection" to assessment status because total organic halides and total organic carbon were found to exceed critical means in two wells. Groundwater quality assessment, which ended in 1996, failed to find any specific hazardous waste contaminant that could have accounted for the isolated occurrences of elevated total organic halides and total organic carbon. Hence, the facility was subsequently returned to detection-level monitoring in 1998. Exhaustive groundwater analyses during the assessment period indicated that only two contaminants, tritium and nitrate, could be positively attributed to the B Pond System, with two others (arsenic and I-129) possibly originating from B Pond. Chemical and radiological analyses of soil at the main pond and 216-B-3-3 ditch has not revealed significant contamination. Based on the observed, minor contamination in groundwater and in the soil column, three parameters were selected for site-specific, semiannual monitoring; gross alpha, gross beta, and specific conductance. Total organic halides and total organic carbon are included as constituents because of regulatory requirements. Nitrate, tritium, arsenic, and iodine-129 will be monitored under the aegis of Hanford site-wide monitoring. Although the B Pond System is not scheduled to advance from RCRA interim status to final status until the year 2003, a contingency plan for an improved monitoring strategy, which will partially emulate final status requirements, will be contemplated before the official change to final status. This modification will allow a more sensible and effective screening of groundwater for the facility.

  15. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site 216-B-3 Pond RCRA Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Smith, Ronald M.; Chou, Charissa J.; McDonald, John P.

    2005-11-01

    The 216-B-3 Pond system was a series of ponds used for disposal of liquid effluent from past Hanford production facilities. In operation from 1945 to 1997, the B Pond System has been a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) facility since 1986, with RCRA interim-status groundwater monitoring in place since 1988. In 1994 the expansion ponds of the facility were clean closed, leaving only the main pond and a portion of the 216-B-3-3 ditch as the currently regulated facility. In 2001, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) issued a letter providing guidance for a two-year, trial evaluation of an alternate, intrawell statistical approach to contaminant detection monitoring at the B Pond system. This temporary variance was allowed because the standard indicator-parameters evaluation (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and accompanying interim status statistical approach is ineffective for detecting potential B-Pond-derived contaminants in groundwater, primarily because this method fails to account for variability in the background data and because B Pond leachate is not expected to affect the indicator parameters. In July 2003, the final samples were collected for the two-year variance period. An evaluation of the results of the alternate statistical approach is currently in progress. While Ecology evaluates the efficacy of the alternate approach (and/or until B Pond is incorporated into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit), the B Pond system will return to contamination-indicator detection monitoring. Total organic carbon and total organic halides were added to the constituent list beginning with the January 2004 samples. Under this plan, the following wells will be monitored for B Pond: 699-42-42B, 699-43-44, 699-43-45, and 699-44-39B. The wells will be sampled semi-annually for the contamination indicator parameters (pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, and total organic halides) and annually for

  16. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1996-03-01

    Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

  17. Savannah River Site RCRA Facility Investigation plan: Road A Chemical Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The nature of wastes disposed of at the Road A Chemical Basin (RACB) is such that some degree of soil contamination is probable. Lead has also been detected in site monitoring wells at concentrations above SRS background levels. A RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) is proposed for the RACB and will include a ground penetrating radar (GPR) survey, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of soil cores, installation of groundwater monitoring wells, collection and chemical and radiological analyses of groundwater samples, and collection of chemical and radiological analyses of surface water and sediment samples. Upon completion of the proposed RFI field work and chemical and radiological analyses, and RFI report should be prepared to present conclusions on the nature and extent of contamination at the site, and to make recommendations for site remediation. If contamination is detected at concentrations above SRS background levels, a receptor analysis should be done to evaluate potential impacts of site contamination on nearby populations.

  18. RCRA Subtitle C TSD facilities and solvent recovery facilities: Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. Toxic chemical release inventory; Industry guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this guidance document is to assist facilities in SIC code 4953 that are regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle C and facilities in SIC code 7389 that are primarily engaged in solvent recovery services on a contract or fee basis. This document explains the EPCRA Section 313 and PPA Section 6607 reporting requirements (collectively referred to as the EPCRA Section 313) reporting requirements, and discusses specific release and other waste management activities encountered at many facilities in these industries. The objectives of this manual are to: clarify EPCRA Section 313 requirements for industry; increase the accuracy and completeness of the data being reported by RCRA Subtitle C TSD and solvent recovery facilities; and reduce the level of effort expended by those facilities that prepare an EPCRA Section 313 report.

  19. Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2006-06-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post-closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report.

  20. RCRA facility investigation for the townsite of Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, A.M.; Conrad, R.C.; Nonno, L.M.

    1992-02-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was established as an ideal location for the secrecy and safety needed for the research and development required to design a nuclear fission bomb. Experiments carried out in the 1940s generated both radioactive and hazardous waste constituents on what is presently part of the Los Alamos townsite. Under the RCRA permit issued to Los alamos national Laboratory in 1990, the Laboratory is scheduled for investigation of its solid waste management units (SWMUs). The existing information on levels of radioactivity on the townsite is principally data from soil samples taken during the last site decontamination in 1976, little information on the presence of hazardous constituents exists today. This paper addresses pathway analysis and a preliminary risk assessment for current residents of the Los Alamos townsite. The estimated dose levels, in mrem per year, show that the previously decontaminated SWMU areas on the Los Alamos townsite will not contribute a radiation dose of any concern to the current residents.

  1. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  2. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2007-03-26

    WMA TX-TY contains underground, single-shell tanks that were used to store liquid waste that contained chemicals and radionuclides. Most of the liquid has been removed, and the remaining waste is regulated under the RCRA as modi¬fied in 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F and Washington State’s Hazardous Waste Management Act . WMA TX-TY was placed in assessment monitoring in 1993 because of elevated specific conductance. A groundwater quality assessment plan was written in 1993 describing the monitoring activities to be used in deciding whether WMA TX-TY had affected groundwater. That plan was updated in 2001 for continued RCRA groundwater quality assessment as required by 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(7). This document further updates the assessment plan for WMA TX-TY by including (1) information obtained from ten new wells installed at the WMA after 1999 and (2) information from routine quarterly groundwater monitoring during the last five years. Also, this plan describes activities for continuing the groundwater assessment at WMA TX TY.

  3. Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2003-09-29

    This plan provides updates the ongoing RCRA interim status groundwater monitoring program for the U-12 crib and provides a proposed RCRA final status post-closure groundwater monitoring program.

  4. 1993 RCRA Part B permit renewal application, Savannah River Site: Volume 10, Consolidated Incineration Facility, Section C, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molen, G.

    1993-08-01

    This section describes the chemical and physical nature of the RCRA regulated hazardous wastes to be handled, stored, and incinerated at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site. It is in accordance with requirements of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.13(a) and(b), and 270.14(b)(2). This application is for permit to store and teat these hazardous wastes as required for the operation of CIF. The permit is to cover the storage of hazardous waste in containers and of waste in six hazardous waste storage tanks. Treatment processes include incineration, solidification of ash, and neutralization of scrubber blowdown.

  5. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) inspection manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-22

    The RCRA Inspection Manual is intended to assist RCRA field inspectors in their performance of Compliance Evaluation Inspections of RCRA generators, transporters, and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities. Included in the document are inspection procedures for both interim status and permitted facilities. The guidance also provides inspection checklists to aid the inspectors in their review of facility compliance. The Manual will assist RCRA inspectors and enforcement personnel to: conduct RCRA inspections efficiently and professionally, to determine facility compliance with RCRA regulations, adequately prepare for and conduct inspections at RCRA generators, transporters and TSD's, review facility permits for inspection of permitted facilities, and prepare quality inspection reports.

  6. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

  7. Annual report for RCRA groundwater monitoring projects at Hanford Site facilities for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the annual hydrogeologic evaluation of 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. Although most of the facilities no longer receive dangerous waste, a few facilities continue to receive dangerous waste constituents for treatment, storage, or disposal. The 19 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act facilities comprise 29 waste management units. Nine of the units are monitored under groundwater quality assessment status because of elevated levels of contamination indicator parameters. The impact of those units on groundwater quality, if any, is being investigated. If dangerous waste or waste constituents have entered groundwater, their concentration profiles, rate, and extent of migration are evaluated. Groundwater is monitored at the other 20 units to detect leakage, should it occur. This report provides an interpretation of groundwater data collected at the waste management units between October 1994 and September 1995. Groundwater quality is described for the entire Hanford Site. Widespread contaminants include nitrate, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, tritium, and other radionuclides.

  8. RCRA Facility Investigation Plan K-1004 Area Lab Drain and the K-1007-B Pond - Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORGDP, Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc.

    1988-12-01

    Within the confines of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) are hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities; some are in operation while others are no longer in use. these solid waste management units (SWMUs) are subject to assessment by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI) Plans are scheduled to be submitted for all units during calendar years 1987 and 1988. The RFI Plan - General Document (K/HS-132) includes information applicable to all the ORGDP SMWUs and serves as a reference document for the site-specific RFI plans. This document is the site-specific RFI Plan for the K-1004 Area Lab Drain (ALD) and the K-1007-B Pond. This plan is based upon requirements described in the draft document, RFI Guidance, Vols. I-IV, December 1987 (EPA 530/SW-87-001). This unit is regulated by Section 3004(u) of the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Contained within this document are geographical, historical, operational, geological, and hydrological data specific to the K-1004 ALD and the K-1007-B Pond. The potential for release of contamination through the various media to receptors is addressed. A sampling plan is proposed to further determine the extent (if any) of release of contamination to the surrounding environment. Included are health and safety procedures to be followed when implementing the sampling plan. Quality control (QC) procedures for remedial action occurring on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are presented in 'The Environmental Surveillance Procedures Quality Control Program, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (ESH/Sub/87-21706/1), and quality assurance (QA) guidelines for ORGDP investigations are contained in The K-25 Remedial Actions Program Quality Assurance Plan, K/HS-231.

  9. Fall Semiannual Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. F. Gianotto N. C. Hutten

    2007-01-12

    The Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1998, the WCF was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the WCF to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  10. NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration: Policy vs. practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, R.P. ); Wolff, T.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Overwhelmed with environmental protection documentation requirements, a number of Federal agencies are grappling with the complexities of attempting to integrate'' the documentation requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). While there is some overlap between the general environmental policy objectives of NEPA, and the much more specific waste cleanup objectives of CERCLA and RCRA, there are also major differences and outright conflicts. This paper identifies both problems and opportunities associated with implementing emerging and evolving Federal agency policy regarding integration of the procedural and documentation requirements of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA. The emphasis is on NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration policy and practice at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The paper provides a comparative analysis of NEPA, CERCLA, and RCRA processes and discusses special integration issues including scoping, development and analysis of alternatives, risk assessment, tiering, scheduling, and the controversy surrounding applicability of NEPA to CERCLA or RCRA cleanup activities. Several NEPA/CERCLA/RCRA integration strategy options are evaluated and an annotated outline of an integrated NEPA/CERCLA document is included.

  11. RCRA post-closure permits. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalgate, J.

    1993-02-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires that hazardous waste management facilities operate in accordance with permits granted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a State authorized to carry out the RCRA Subtitle C program. Several categories of permits, including treatment,storage, and disposal permits; research, development and demonstration permits; post-closure permits; emergency permits; permits-by-rule; and trial burn and land treatment demonstration permits are issued under the RCRA Subtitle C program. This Information Brief focuses on post-closure permitting requirements under 40 CFR 270.1(c).

  12. EA-0820: Construction of Mixed Waste Storage RCRA Facilities, Buildings 7668 and 7669, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate two mixed (both radioactive and hazardous) waste storage facilities (Buildings 7668 and 7669) in accordance with...

  13. RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Grace Road Site (631-22G)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, E.

    1998-10-02

    This report summarizes the activities and documents the results of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation conducted at Grace Road Site on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

  14. RCRA post-closure permits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires that hazardous waste management facilities operate in accordance with permits granted by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a State authorized to carry out the RCRA Subtitle C program. Several categories of permits (including treatment, storage, and disposal permits; research, development, and demonstration permits; post-closure permits; emergency permits; permits-by-rule; and trial burn and land treatment demonstration permits) are issued under the RCRA Subtitle C program. This Information Brief focuses on post-closure permitting requirements under 40 CFR 270.1(c).

  15. Permanent total enclosures for VOC emission control at a RCRA transfer and storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, S.L.; Rozmus, G.F.; Mehta, J.; Ardzinski, E. |

    1997-12-31

    Rollins Environmental Services operates a Transfer and Storage facility at their Allworth site in Mt. Pleasant, Tennessee. VOC control was originally accomplished by the use of close capture vents routed through a Regenerative Thermal Oxidizer. Capture efficiencies at several locations in the plant where hazardous waste was sampled and processed had been inadequate to fully meet EPA Clean Air Act Amendments Best Available Control Technology (BACT) or the requirements of OSHA 1910 Subpart Z--Toxic and Hazardous Substances standards and OSHA 1910.120(p)(5)--New Technology Program without the use of high levels of personal protective equipment (PPE) and extensive Industrial Hygiene monitoring. Therefore, a program was instituted to install permanent total enclosures in these areas with the goal of 100% capture of VOC`s. This paper presents the methodology by which this program was conceived and managed and the findings of the Industrial Safety and Health monitoring studies performed before and after the installation of the Permanent Total Enclosures and balancing of air flows in the system.

  16. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation and Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGERS, P.M.

    2000-06-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the Hanford Site. Evidence indicates that releases at four of the seven SST waste management areas have impacted.

  17. Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hoesen, S.D.

    2001-07-09

    From mid-April through the end of June 2001, a Facility Environmental Vulnerability Assessment (FEVA) was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary goal of this FEVA was to establish an environmental vulnerability baseline at ORNL that could be used to support the Laboratory planning process and place environmental vulnerabilities in perspective. The information developed during the FEVA was intended to provide the basis for management to initiate immediate, near-term, and long-term actions to respond to the identified vulnerabilities. It was expected that further evaluation of the vulnerabilities identified during the FEVA could be carried out to support a more quantitative characterization of the sources, evaluation of contaminant pathways, and definition of risks. The FEVA was modeled after the Battelle-supported response to the problems identified at the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This FEVA report satisfies Corrective Action 3A1 contained in the Corrective Action Plan in Response to Independent Review of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Tritium Leak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) ORNL Site Office Manager on April 16, 2001. This assessment successfully achieved its primary goal as defined by Laboratory management. The assessment team was able to develop information about sources and pathway analyses although the following factors impacted the team's ability to provide additional quantitative information: the complexity and scope of the facilities, infrastructure, and programs; the significantly degraded physical condition of the facilities and infrastructure; the large number of known environmental vulnerabilities; the scope of legacy contamination issues [not currently addressed in the Environmental Management (EM) Program]; the lack of facility process and environmental pathway analysis performed by the accountable line management or facility owner; and poor

  18. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  19. Preparation of RCRA contingency plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of this guidance is to assist Department of Energy (DOE) field personnel in the preparation of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) contingency plans as set forth in 40 CFR 264/265 Subpart D and 270.42. The guidance will assist personnel in evaluating and ensuring facility compliance with the contingency plan requirements.

  20. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  1. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Patrick

    2014-02-14

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  2. Fall 2010 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility and the CPP 601/627/640 Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehmer, Ann

    2010-11-01

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under an approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a final HWMA/RCRA post-closure permit on September 15, 2003, with an effective date of October 16, 2003. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment. The post closure permit also includes semiannual reporting requirements under Permit Conditions III.H. and I.U. These reporting requirements have been combined into this single semiannual report, as agreed between the Idaho Cleanup Project and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality. The Permit Condition III.H. portion of this report includes a description and the results of field methods associated with groundwater monitoring of the Waste Calcining Facility. Analytical results from groundwater sampling, results of inspections and maintenance of monitoring wells in the Waste Calcining Facility groundwater monitoring network, and results of inspections of the concrete cap are summarized. The Permit Condition I.U. portion of this report includes noncompliances not otherwise required to be reported under Permit Condition I.R. (advance notice of planned changes to facility activity which may result in a noncompliance) or Permit Condition I.T. (reporting of noncompliances which may endanger human health or the environment). This report also provides groundwater sampling results for wells that were installed and monitored as part of the Phase 1 post-closure period of the landfill closure components in accordance with HWMA/RCRA Landfill Closure Plan for the CPP-601 Deep

  3. Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation & Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCARTHY, M.M.

    1999-08-01

    This document is the master work plan for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) Corrective Action Program (RCAP) for single-shell tank (SST) farms at the US. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Hanford Site. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) initiated the RCAP to address the impacts of past and potential future tank waste releases to the environment. This work plan defines RCAP activities for the four SST waste management areas (WMAs) at which releases have contaminated groundwater. Recognizing the potential need for future RCAP activities beyond those specified in this master work plan, DOE has designated the currently planned activities as ''Phase 1.'' If a second phase of activities is needed for the WMAs addressed in Phase 1, or if releases are detected at other SST WMAs, this master work plan will be updated accordingly.

  4. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.

    2006-01-15

    This plan describes the data quality objectives process used to guide information gathering to further the assessment at WMA T.

  5. Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PNNL-21698 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari 1 SJ Johnson 2 J Hockert 3 R Wigeland 4 EF Wonder 5 M.D. Zentner August 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory 2

  6. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  7. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Winterholler

    2007-01-31

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex (RTC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, to meet a further milestone established under the Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan for Tank System TRA-009. The tank system to be closed is identified as VCO-SITE-TANK-005 Tank System TRA-009. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods for achieving those standards.

  8. WIPP RCRA Documents menu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RCRA Documents Menu Permit Modifications Available for Public Comment Final Documents Draft Documents None currently available RCRA-Related Documents EEG Preliminary Comments on the Fundamental Bases of the Characterization Requirements for Disposal of Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Findings and Recommendations of the Transuranic Waste Characterization Task Force Final Report EEG Response to NAS WIPP Committee Questions for May 19, 2003 Meeting Quality Assurance Program

  9. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2006-09-29

    This document was prepared as a groundwater quality assessment plan revision for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area B-BX-BY at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with 40 CFR Part 265, Subpart F. In FY 1996, the groundwater monitoring program was changed from detection-level indicator evaluation to a groundwater quality assessment program when elevated specific conductance in downgradient monitoring well 299 E33-32 was confirmed by verification sampling. During the course of the ensuing investigation, elevated technetium-99 and nitrate were observed above the drinking water standard at well 299-E33-41, a well located between 241-B and 241-BX Tank Farms. Earlier observations of the groundwater contamination and tank farm leak occurrences combined with a qualitative analysis of possible solutions, led to the conclusion that waste from the waste management area had entered the groundwater and were observed in this well. Based on 40 CFR 265.93 [d] paragraph (7), the owner-operator must continue to make the minimum required determinations of contaminant level and rate/extent of migrations on a quarterly basis until final facility closure. These continued determinations are required because the groundwater quality assessment was implemented prior to final closure of the facility.

  10. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  11. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, C.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1999-10-06

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared for waste management area S-SX at the Hanford Site. Groundwater monitoring is conducted at this facility in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) Part 265, Subpart F [and by reference of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-400(3)]. The facility was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring program status after elevated waste constituents and indicator parameter measurements (i.e., chromium, technetium-99 and specific conductance) in downgradient monitoring wells were observed and confirmed. A first determination, as allowed under 40 CFR 265.93(d), provides the owner/operator of a facility an opportunity to demonstrate that the regulated unit is not the source of groundwater contamination. Based on results of the first determination it was concluded that multiple source locations in the waste management area could account for observed spatial and temporal groundwater contamination patterns. Consequently, a continued investigation is required. This plan, developed using the data quality objectives process, is intended to comply with the continued investigation requirement. Accordingly, the primary purpose of the present plan is to determine the rate and extent of dangerous waste (hexavalent chromium and nitrate) and radioactive constituents (e.g., technetium-99) in groundwater and to determine their concentrations in groundwater beneath waste management area S-SX. Comments and concerns expressed by the Washington State Department of Ecology on the initial waste management area S-SX assessment report were addressed in the descriptive narrative of this plan as well as in the planned activities. Comment disposition is documented in a separate addendum to this plan.

  12. Exclusions and exemptions from RCRA hazardous waste regulation. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.

    1993-05-01

    The provisions in 40 CFR 261 establish which solid waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Considered hazardous waste and are regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). These provisions also exclude or exempt certain wastes from regulation. Wastes are excluded or exempted from coverage for a variety of reasons. The original RCRA legislation excluded a number of wastes that did not present a significant threat to human health or the environment or that were managed under other environmental programs. Other wastes were excluded by EPA to encourage their recycling or reuse as feedstocks in manufacturing processes. Some exclusions or exemptions serve to establish when a waste material becomes subject to regulation or when waste quantities are too minimal to be fully covered by the Federal hazardous waste regulatory program. As new regulations have caused the universe of RCRA generators and facilities to increase, the number of exclusions and exemptions have increased as well. This information Brief provides an overview of the types of waste and hazardous waste management units/facilities that may be excluded or exempted from regulation under the Federal hazardous waste (RCRA) Subtitle C) regulatory program. These wastes and units/facilities may or may not be excluded or exempted from coverage under authorized State RCRA programs.

  13. The administrative record. RCRA/CERCLA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.

    1991-11-01

    EPA requires that an administrative record be established at facilities undergoing response actions under Sections 113(k) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). While an administrative record is established by the regulators under RCRA, DOE is recommending that DOE facilities also maintain all decision-making documentation. This information brief provides answers to questions regarding the administrative record requirements under CERCLA and under the proposed RCRA corrective action rulemaking.

  14. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2, Sections 4 through 9: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`s) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  15. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendixes 1 through 8: Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU`S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  16. RCRA groundwater monitoring data. Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between April and June 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the April through June quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  17. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  18. Assessing the Security Vulnerabilities of Correctional Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, G.S.; Spencer, D.S.

    1998-10-27

    The National Institute of Justice has tasked their Satellite Facility at Sandia National Laboratories and their Southeast Regional Technology Center in Charleston, South Carolina to devise new procedures and tools for helping correctional facilities to assess their security vulnerabilities. Thus, a team is visiting selected correctional facilities and performing vulnerability assessments. A vulnerability assessment helps to identi~ the easiest paths for inmate escape, for introduction of contraband such as drugs or weapons, for unexpected intrusion fi-om outside of the facility, and for the perpetration of violent acts on other inmates and correctional employees, In addition, the vulnerability assessment helps to quantify the security risks for the facility. From these initial assessments will come better procedures for performing vulnerability assessments in general at other correctional facilities, as well as the development of tools to assist with the performance of such vulnerability assessments.

  19. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. ); Pope, R.B. )

    1992-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

  20. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  1. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-16

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  2. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P. M.

    2013-02-21

    This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

  3. RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report - Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

  4. Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on fossil fuel-fired facilities: Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    Estimation of the costs associated with implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for non-hazardous and hazardous material disposal in the utility industry are provided. These costs are based on engineering studies at a number of coal-fired power plants in which the costs for hazardous and non-hazardous disposal are compared to the costs developed for the current practice design for each utility. The relationship of the three costs is displayed. The emphasis of this study is on the determination of incremental costs rather than the absolute costs for each case (current practice, non-hazardous, or hazardous). For the purpose of this project, the hazardous design cost was determined for minimum versus maximum compliance.

  5. Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Series Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities 35 data. The CBECS Energy Suppliers Survey remains the best source for estimates of district heating and cooling...

  6. Enterprise Assessments Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Fire Protection Systems Follow-up Review at the Savannah River Site - January 2016 Enterprise Assessments Salt Waste ...

  7. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

  8. Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

  9. Environmental assessment for the construction and operation of waste storage facilities at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-01

    DOE is proposing to construct and operate 3 waste storage facilities (one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for RCRA waste, one 42,000 ft{sup 2} waste storage facility for toxic waste (TSCA), and one 200,000 ft{sup 2} mixed (hazardous/radioactive) waste storage facility) at Paducah. This environmental assessment compares impacts of this proposed action with those of continuing present practices aof of using alternative locations. It is found that the construction, operation, and ultimate closure of the proposed waste storage facilities would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

  10. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period January 1--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This quarterly report contains data received between January and March 1995, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the January through March quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported. Nineteen Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater monitoring projects are conducted at the Hanford Site. These projects include treatment, storage, and disposal facilities for both solid and liquid waste. The groundwater monitoring programs described in this report comply with the interim-status federal (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulation [CFR] Part 265) and state (Washington Administrative Code [WAC] 173-303-400) regulations. The RCRA projects are monitored under one of three programs: background monitoring, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment.

  11. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period April 1, 1993 through June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungers, D.K.

    1993-10-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Project management, specifying data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, managing data, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between May 24 and August 20, 1993, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from samples collected during the April through June quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  12. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2006-03-03

    This document describes a groundwater assessment plan for the single-shell tank systems in Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site.

  13. RCRA Assessment Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area TX-TY at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, Floyd N.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-02-23

    A groundwater quality assessment plan was prepared to investigate the rate and extent of aquifer contamination beneath Waste Management Area TX-TY on the Hanford Site in Washington State. This plan is an update of a draft plan issued in February 1999, which guided work performed in fiscal year 2000.

  14. RCRA orientation manual, 1990 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clay, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the manual to provide introductory information on the solid and hazardous waste management programs under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The manual outlines the basic framework of the regulatory program for new EPA and State employees, those persons new to RCRA assignments, and others interested in the Act. The manual is not, however, meant to replace in-depth analysis of the statute and its associated regulations and Agency guidance. The manual is an update of the original RCRA Orientation Manual issued in 1986. Revisions contained in the update reflect the many regulatory changes that have resulted from both the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) of 1984 and the Medical Waste Tracking Act of 1988 (RCRA Subtitle J).

  15. HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSA/Nevada Site Office Facility...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division HOISTING & RIGGING Assessment Plan--NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative ...

  16. Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR) is planning, to design, construct and operate a Biomass Gasifier Facility (BGF). This facility will be located on a site easement near the Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar company (KC&S) Paia Sugar Factory on Maui, Hawaii. The proposed BGF Project is a scale-up facility, intended to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of emerging biomass gasification technology for commercialization. This Executive Summary summarizes the uses of this Environmental Assessment, the purpose and need for the project, project,description, and project alternatives.

  17. Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-11-01

    This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

  18. Uncertainties in risk assessment at USDOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (USDOE) has embarked on an ambitious program to remediate environmental contamination at its facilities. Decisions concerning cleanup goals, choices among cleanup technologies, and funding prioritization should be largely risk-based. Risk assessments will be used more extensively by the USDOE in the future. USDOE needs to develop and refine risk assessment methods and fund research to reduce major sources of uncertainty in risk assessments at USDOE facilities. The terms{open_quote} risk assessment{close_quote} and{open_quote} risk management{close_quote} are frequently confused. The National Research Council (1983) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA, 1991a) described risk assessment as a scientific process that contributes to risk management. Risk assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing and integrating data and information to identify hazards, assess exposures and dose responses, and characterize risks. Risk characterization must include a clear presentation of {open_quotes}... the most significant data and uncertainties...{close_quotes} in an assessment. Significant data and uncertainties are {open_quotes}...those that define and explain the main risk conclusions{close_quotes}. Risk management integrates risk assessment information with other considerations, such as risk perceptions, socioeconomic and political factors, and statutes, to make and justify decisions. Risk assessments, as scientific processes, should be made independently of the other aspects of risk management (USEPA, 1991a), but current methods for assessing health risks are based on conservative regulatory principles, causing unnecessary public concern and misallocation of funds for remediation.

  19. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S. K.

    2007-11-07

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

  20. Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities -- Index...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Use in Multibuildings Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuliding Facilities -- 1989 Overview Full Report Analysis of multibuilding facilities containing commercial buildings,...

  1. Manufacturing company faces $8 million penalty for alleged RCRA violations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    On October 7, 1994, EPA filed a complaint against Eastman Kodak Company for alleged RCRA violations at Kodak`s manufacturing and hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities located in Rochester, New York. A proposed consent decree accompanied the complaint filed in the US District Court for the Western District of New York (United States v. Eastman Kodak Company, Dockett Number: 94-CV-6503T). According to the terms of the proposed consent decree, Kodak is to pay an $8 million civil penalty by implementing six environmental projects. The company must also upgrade its industrial sewer system and bring all operations into compliance with RCRA regulations. This action indicates EPA`s intent to promote waste reduction and pollution prevention in addition to requiring compliance at large, aging manufacturing facilities.

  2. Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories Hazardous Waste (RCRA) Information Repository

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index Permit Documents in this category include the RCRA Facility Operating Permit, applications, modification requests, and correspondence. Some of these documents are also available through the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous Waste Bureau. Hazardous and mixed wastes are generated during ongoing operations at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). These wastes are stored or treated in one of nine on-site Permitted Units. The wastes and treatment residues are then packaged

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Hazardous Waste (RCRA) Information Repository

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index Reports The Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia Corporation (Sandia) prepare notifications, reports, and other correspondence about waste management activities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Operating Permit at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DOE and Sandia submit the documents to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). Documents in this category include reports, notifications, and correspondence between the DOE,

  5. Sandia National Laboratories Hazardous Waste (RCRA) Information Repository

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index Permit Information Repository Index The Information Repository is a collection of documents concerning hazardous and mixed waste management under the RCRA Facility Operating Permit at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), located in Albuquerque New Mexico. Hard copies of the documents are available for review at Zimmerman Library, located near Roma Avenue and Yale Boulevard on the University of New Mexico main campus in Albuquerque. Electronic copies will be available at a later date.

  6. WIPP RCRA Documents - Class 2 Mods for comment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RCRA Public Comments Menu Public Invited to Comment on Permit Modifications The public is invited to comment on the following proposed modifications to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Comments should be directed via e-mail to Ricardo.Maestas@state.nm.us or by regular mail to: Mr. Ricardo Maestas New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau 2905 Rodeo Park Drive, Building E Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 Temporary Authorization Requests: Temporary

  7. Environmental assessment: Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to close the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF). The WCF is a surplus DOE facility located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Six facility components in the WCF have been identified as Resource Conservation and Recovery Ace (RCRA)-units in the INEL RCRA Part A application. The WCF is an interim status facility. Consequently, the proposed WCF closure must comply with Idaho Rules and Standards for Hazardous Waste contained in the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) Section 16.01.05. These state regulations, in addition to prescribing other requirements, incorporate by reference the federal regulations, found at 40 CFR Part 265, that prescribe the requirements for facilities granted interim status pursuant to the RCRA. The purpose of the proposed action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce potential risks to human health and the environment, and to comply with the Idaho Hazardous Waste Management Act (HWMA) requirements.

  8. Radiological assessments for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Kou-John; Lazaro, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    The potential radiological impacts of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a proposed facility for fusion ignition and high energy density experiments, were assessed for five candidate sites to assist in site selection. The GENII computer program was used to model releases of radionuclides during normal NIF operations and a postulated accident and to calculate radiation doses to the public. Health risks were estimated by converting the estimated doses into health effects using a standard cancer fatality risk factor. The greatest calculated radiation dose was less than one thousandth of a percent of the dose received from natural background radiation; no cancer fatalities would be expected to occur in the public as the result of normal operations. The highest dose conservatively estimated to result from a postulated accident could lead to one in one million risk of cancer.

  9. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Facility Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) conducted an independent assessment of construction quality at ...

  10. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility/Effluent Treatment Facility Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simiele, G.A.

    1994-09-29

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility and Effluent Treatment Facility the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  11. Petroleum USTs: RCRA Subtitle 1, Underground Storage Tanks. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dailey, R.

    1994-01-01

    Underground tanks that contain petroleum or hazardous substances may be subject to the Federal Underground Storage Tank (UST) regulations. These regulations, issued by EPA under authority of Subtitle I of the Resource Conservation and Recovery (RCRA) [Section 9003 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 (HSWA)], establish standards for installation, operation, release detection, corrective action, repair, and closure. The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by Section 9007 of RCRA to implement these regulations at DOE facilities with USTs. DOE prepared a guidance document, Regulated Underground Storage Tanks (DOE/EH-231/0041/0191, June 1992), that describes the UST procedural requirements which regulate tanks and piping for both petroleum and hazardous substance USTs as well as USTs containing radioactive material regulated under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 USC 2011). This information Brief supplements the UST guidance by responding to critical questions concerning how the regulations apply to petroleum USTs. It is part of a series of information Briefs which address issues pertinent to specific categories of USTs.

  12. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) user manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Massaglia, J.L.; Williamson, D.A.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is describe the FICA computer software and to provide the FICA user with a guide on how to use the FICA system. The FICA computer software consists of two executable programs: the FICA Reactor Report program and the FICA Summary Report program (written in the Ca-Clipper version 5.2 development system). The complete FICA software system is contained on either a 3.5 in. (double density) or a 5.25 in. (high density) diskette and consists of the two FICA programs and all the database files (generated using dBASE III). The FICA programs are provided as ``stand alone`` systems and neither the Ca-Clipper compiler nor dBASE III is required to run the FICA programs. The steps for installing the FICA software system and executing the FICA programs are described in this report. Instructions are given on how to install the FICA software system onto the hard drive of the PC and how to execute the FICA programs from the FICA subdirectory on the hard drive. Both FICA programs are menu driven with the up-arrow and down-arrow keys used to move the cursor to the desired selection.

  13. Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quality - January 2015 | Department of Energy Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 Enterprise Assessments Review, Hanford K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality - January 2015 January, 2015 Review of the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Construction Quality The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) conducted an independent assessment of construction quality at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility. The

  14. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  15. Institutional Controls: A Site Manager's Guide to Identifying, Evaluating and Selecting Institutional Controls at Superfund and RCRA Corrective Action Cleanups, September 2000

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Site Manager, as used in this fact sheet, refers to both CERCLA sites and RCRA facilities. In RCRA, project managers are the equivalent to site managers in CERCLA. 2 This document provides guidance to EPA Regions and states involved in Superfund and RCRA corrective action cleanups. It also provides guidance to the public and the regulated community on how EPA intends to evaluate and implement institutional controls as part of a cleanup decision. The guidance is designed to implement national

  16. Workplan/RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground 643-E, S01-S22 - Volume I - Text and Volume II - Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, K.R.

    2000-12-12

    This document presents the assessment of environmental impacts resulting from releases of hazardous substances from the facilities in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground 643-E, including Solvent Tanks 650-01E to 650-22E, also referred to as Solvent Tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina.

  17. Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM | Department of Energy the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM In December 2007, the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE Program

  18. RCRA information on hazardous wastes for publicly owned treatment works. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The guidance manual provides guidance to municipal personnel in understanding hazardous waste requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the implications of these RCRA requirements for the wastewater treatment plant operated by your municipality, for your local pretreatment program, and for local industries served by the treatment plant. The primary purpose of the manual is the RCRA notification requirement specified in the General Pretreatment Regulations. The manual focuses on Subtitle C requirements. (Subtitle C is directly applicable to industries since this program regulates generators, transporters, and disposers of hazardous waste). The manual also provides a general understanding of how federal RCRA requirements for hazardous waste affect industrial users. The manual also will be helpful in complying with any applicable federal requirements incumbent upon your POTW under Subtitle C of RCRA. The appendices contain lists of hazardous wastes regulated by federal requirements; selected EPA-approved forms for hazardous waste facilities to use; RCRA information brochure which briefly outlines the Act's impact on industries that generate or transport hazardous wastes; and EPA pamphlets summarizing information for generators of small quantities of hazardous waste.

  19. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COVEY, L.I.

    2000-11-28

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) located on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for WESF. DOE Orders require an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

  20. Readiness Assessment Plan, Hanford 200 areas treated effluent disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, F.J.

    1995-02-06

    This Readiness Assessment Plan documents Liquid Effluent Facilities review process used to establish the scope of review, documentation requirements, performance assessment, and plant readiness to begin operation of the Treated Effluent Disposal system in accordance with DOE-RLID-5480.31, Startup and Restart of Facilities Operational Readiness Review and Readiness Assessments.

  1. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    January 2013 | Department of Energy Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent assessment of nuclear safety culture at the

  2. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Safety and Health, and Emergency Management Assessment ... for resolving facility problems in a timely manner. ... support, oversight planning, and periodic evaluation ...

  3. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reactor Facility Operations at Sandia National Laboratories The U.S. Department of Energy independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) conducted a review of nuclear reactor ...

  4. Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    with buildings assigned to replication units based on the sample stratification cells. It is conceivable that buildings associated with the same facility could be...

  5. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations at Sandia National Laboratories - March 2016 | Department of Energy Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations at Sandia National Laboratories - March 2016 Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations at Sandia National Laboratories - March 2016 March 2016 Targeted Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations at Sandia National Laboratories The U.S. Department of Energy independent Office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) conducted a review of nuclear

  6. 233-S plutonium concentration facility hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-12-19

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  7. 340 Facility emergency preparedness hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAMPBELL, L.R.

    1998-11-25

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 340 Facility on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated.

  8. Hazards Assessment Document of the New Waste Transfer Facility (NWTF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    This Hazards Assessment Document for the New Waste Transfer Facility (NWTF) has been prepared in accordance with the Interim Hazards Classification Guide for Non-Reactor Facilities at Savannah River Site. The conclusion of this assessment is that the facility is a High Hazard Nuclear Facility. The NWTF consists of all facilities installed by Project S-3122. The NWTF contains three segments. Segment 1 consists of the cells containing the diversion box and pump pits, with a Facility Segment Use Category (FSUC) determined to be High Hazard. Segment 2 is the building that encloses the cells. The FSUC of Segment 2 has been determined to be Low Hazard. Segment 3 consists of all parts of the facility external to the main building; this segment contains the ventilation system and HEPA filters and includes the diesel fuel tank. The FSUC of Segment 3 is Low Hazard.

  9. Quantitative fire risk assessment for a proposed tritium technology facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    A new Tritium Technology Facility has been proposed for the Chalk River Laboratories to support fusion research and the commercial use of tritium. One of the major safety and licensing issues for the new facility raised by the internal Safety Review Committee is the potential hazard fire poses to it. Fire could cause a large release from tritium from the facility's metal tritide storage beds, resulting in conversion of elemental tritium (HT) into oxide tritium (HTO). The radiological hazard of HTO is {approximately}10,000 times higher than that of HT. Because of the potential significance of fire in the tritium facility, a quantitative fire risk assessment has been conducted for the proposed new facility. The frequency of a large tritium release due to a fire in the Tritium Technology Facility was assessed as being on the order of 10{sup {minus}5} per year, which satisfies the safety goal requirement of the facility.

  10. Assessment of Energy Use in Multibuilding Facilities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    between the Facility Form and the District Heating and Cooling Form. Even if the language of the form can make the survey definitions clear, it may be unrealistic to...

  11. CRAD, Verification and Validation of Facilities Procedures Assessment Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose of this assessment is verify and validate the process for the development of operations procedures and that procedures are in place which provide direction to personnel to ensure that the facility is operated within its design bases.

  12. Independent Oversight Assessment, Salt Waste Processing Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Headquarters - November 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory - April 2012 An Independent Evaluation of Safety Culture at the U.S....

  13. Hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calley, M.B.; Jones, J.L. Jr.

    1994-09-19

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, which is operated by EG&G Idaho, Inc., for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The hazards assessment was performed to ensure that this facility complies with DOE and company requirements pertaining to emergency planning and preparedness for operational emergencies. DOE Order 5500.3A requires that a facility-specific hazards assessment be performed to provide the technical basis for facility emergency planning efforts. This hazards assessment was conducted in accordance with DOE Headquarters and DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) guidance to comply with DOE Order 5500.3A. The hazards assessment identifies and analyzes hazards that are significant enough to warrant consideration in a facility`s operational emergency management program. This hazards assessment describes the WERF, the area surrounding WERF, associated buildings and structures at WERF, and the processes performed at WERF. All radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials stored, used, or produced at WERF were identified and screened. Even though the screening process indicated that the hazardous materials could be screened from further analysis because the inventory of radiological and nonradiological hazardous materials were below the screening thresholds specified by DOE and DOE-ID guidance for DOE Order 5500.3A, the nonradiological hazardous materials were analyzed further because it was felt that the nonradiological hazardous material screening thresholds were too high.

  14. Application of NEPA to CERCLA and RCRA Cleanup Actions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The document clarifies DOE policies to streamline the environmental review of actions to be taken under CERCLA and RCRA.

  15. Energy Consumption Series: Assessment of energy use in multibuilding facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This study originally had two primary objectives: (1) to improve EIA`s estimates of district heat consumption for commercial buildings in the CBECS sample that lacked individual metering and (2) to provide a basis for estimating primary fuel consumption by central plants serving commercial buildings. These objectives were expanded to include additional questions relating to these central plants. Background information is provided on the CBECS and on district heating and cooling, which is the most important type of energy-related service provided by multibuilding facilities with central physical plants. Chapters 2 and 3 present data results on multibuilding facilities from the 1989 CBECS and the pilot Facility Survey. Chapter 2 presents the characteristics of multibuilding facilities and the individual buildings located on these facilities. Chapter 3 provides estimates of energy inputs and outputs of multibuilding facilities with central physical plants. Chapter 4 assesses the quality of the pilot Facility Survey and includes recommendations for future work in this area. The appendices provide more detailed information on the Facility Survey itself, in particular the limitations on the use of these results. Appendix B, ``Data Quality``, provides detailed information relating to the limitations of the data and the conclusions presented in this report. As a pilot study, the 1989 Facility Survey has some serious flaws and limitations which are recognized in this report.

  16. Spring 2009 Semiannual (III.H. and I.U.) Report for the HWMA/RCRA Post-Closure Permit for the INTEC Waste Calcining Facility at the INL Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehmer, Ann M.

    2009-05-31

    The Waste Calcining Facility is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. In 1999, the Waste Calcining Facility was closed under and approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure plan. Vessels and spaces were grouted and then covered with a concrete cap. This permit sets forth procedural requirements for groundwater characterization and monitoring, maintenance, and inspections of the Waste Calcining Facility to ensure continued protection of human health and the environment.

  17. FY 2006 ANNUAL REVIEW-SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crapse, K; Benjamin Culbertson, B

    2007-03-15

    The Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) consists of two disposal units, Vaults 1 and 4, described in the Performance Assessment (PA) (WSRC 1992). The FY06 PA Annual Review concludes that both vaults contain much lower levels of radionuclides (curies) than that allowed by the PA. The PA controls established to govern waste operations and monitor disposal facility performance are determined to be adequate.

  18. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and

  19. Comparison of RCRA SWMU corrective action and CERCLA remedial action. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupe, S.C.

    1991-09-30

    With the passage of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and the addition of expanded authorities to require corrective action for release of hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities, the Solid Waste Disposal Act (hereafter referred to as the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act or RCRA) will dramatically influence the Superfund program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Not only will the RCRA corrective action program help prevent current RCRA sites from becoming Superfund sites, but it also offers EPA and the states an important alternative to address superfund sites that already exist. EPA recognized this and, hoping to conserve Superfund resources, developed a policy to defer listing of sites from the National Priority List if those sites can be addressed under RCRA's corrective action authorities. Private industry and federal agencies with problem sites that could qualify under either program need to compare the advantages and disadvantages of each program. EPA's deferral policy continues to evolve and appears to be ripe for expansion.

  20. Sandia Lightning Simulation Facility Building 888. Hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banda, Z.; Barnett, B.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Sandia Lightning Simulation Facility, Building 888. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 65 meters.

  1. Sandia Administrative Micrographics Facility, Building 802: Hazards assessment document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swihart, A.

    1994-12-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Sandia Administrative Micrographics Facility, Building 802. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 33 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 75 meters.

  2. International physical protection self-assessment tool for chemical facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewell, Craig R.; Burdick, Brent A.; Stiles, Linda L.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

    2010-09-01

    This report is the final report for Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Project No.130746, International Physical Protection Self-Assessment Tool for Chemical Facilities. The goal of the project was to develop an exportable, low-cost, computer-based risk assessment tool for small to medium size chemical facilities. The tool would assist facilities in improving their physical protection posture, while protecting their proprietary information. In FY2009, the project team proposed a comprehensive evaluation of safety and security regulations in the target geographical area, Southeast Asia. This approach was later modified and the team worked instead on developing a methodology for identifying potential targets at chemical facilities. Milestones proposed for FY2010 included characterizing the international/regional regulatory framework, finalizing the target identification and consequence analysis methodology, and developing, reviewing, and piloting the software tool. The project team accomplished the initial goal of developing potential target categories for chemical facilities; however, the additional milestones proposed for FY2010 were not pursued and the LDRD funding therefore was redirected.

  3. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (Project W-296) Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    This Safety Assessment is based on information derived from the Conceptual Design Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (DOE/RL 1994) and ancillary documentation developed during the conceptual design phase of Project W-296. The Safety Assessment has been prepared to support the Solid Waste Burial Ground Interim Safety Basis document. The purpose of the Safety Assessment is to provide an evaluation of the design to determine if the process, as proposed, will comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) Limits for radioactive and hazardous material exposures and be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint. The evaluation considered affects on the worker, onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  4. Draft RCRA Permit Workshop Info for HAB Presenters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RCRA Permit Workshop Info for HAB Presenters RAP meeting - Wednesday, March 7, 2012 - Richland Public Library Discussion of PerspectivesIssues of Concerns Pertinent to the Permit:...

  5. EPA - RCRA Orientation Manual 2011: Resource Conservation and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    waste management programs under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Author Environmental Protection Agency Published Environmental Protection Agency, 2012 DOI Not...

  6. Performance assessment for the class L-II disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This draft radiological performance assessment (PA) for the proposed Class L-II Disposal Facility (CIIDF) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) has been prepared to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. This PA considers the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) over the operating life of the facility and the long-term performance of the facility in providing protection to public health and the environment. The performance objectives contained in the order require that the facility be managed to accomplish the following: (1) Protect public health and safety in accordance with standards specified in environmental health orders and other DOE orders. (2) Ensure that external exposure to the waste and concentrations of radioactive material that may be released into surface water, groundwater, soil, plants, and animals results in an effective dose equivalent (EDE) that does not exceed 25 mrem/year to a member of the public. Releases to the atmosphere shall meet the requirements of 40 CFR Pt. 61. Reasonable effort should be made to maintain releases of radioactivity in effluents to the general environment as low as reasonably achievable. (1) Ensure that the committed EDEs received by individual who inadvertently may intrude into the facility after the loss of active institutional control (100 years) will not exceed 100 mrem/year for continuous exposure of 500 mrem for a single acute exposure. (4) Protect groundwater resources, consistent with federal, state, and local requirements.

  7. Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

  8. 1999 ESH&Q Liability Assessment Report of Envirocare of Utah, Inc. Clive, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trump, D. E.; Vilord, C. E.

    1999-07-01

    This report contains the results of an environment, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q) assessment of the treatment technologies and treatment-related operations that was conducted of Envirocare of Utah, Inc. (EOU). EOU is a lowlevel radioactive and mixed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)- regulated haz.ardous low-level radioactive waste (mixed low-level waste) treatment/disposal facility located near Clive, Utah. An ESH&Q assessment of the EOU Clive, Utah facility treatment technologies and related treatment operations was conducted in mid-April 1999. The assessment was required as part of the technical evaluation of proposals received by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO) for modification of a mixed low-level radioactive waste disposal subcontract (No.K79-180572). The EOU Clive, Utah facility is proposed as a potential treatment/disposal facility for mixed low-level radioactive waste regulated under the RCRA and the Atomic Energy Act

  9. 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116

  10. Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    URS Consultants, Inc.

    1992-06-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

  11. Guidance document publications list - Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This document provides a listing of Guidance Documents from the RCRA/CERCLA Division for August 1995. Documents are listed under the following categories: RCRA Guidance Manuals; RCRA Information Briefs; CERCLA Guidance Manuals; CERCLA Regulatory Bulletins; RCRA/CERCLA Guidance Manuals; TSCA Guidance Manuals; TSCA Information Briefs; and, Cross Cut Manuals.

  12. Plantwide Energy Assessment of a Sugarcane Farming and Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakeway, L.A.; Turn, S.Q.; Keffer, V.I.; Kinoshita, C.M.

    2006-02-27

    A plantwide energy assessment was performed at Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., an integrated sugarcane farming and processing facility on the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. There were four main tasks performed for the plantwide energy assessment: 1) pump energy assessment in both field and factory operations, 2) steam generation assessment in the power production operations, 3) steam distribution assessment in the sugar manufacturing operation, and 4) electric power distribution assessment of the company system grid. The energy savings identified in each of these tasks were summarized in terms of fuel savings, electricity savings, or opportunity revenue that potentially exists mostly from increased electric power sales to the local electric utility. The results of this investigation revealed eight energy saving projects that can be implemented at HC&S. These eight projects were determined to have potential for $1.5 million in annual fuel savings or 22,337 MWh equivalent annual electricity savings. Most of the savings were derived from pump efficiency improvements and steam efficiency improvements both in generation and distribution. If all the energy saving projects were implemented and the energy savings were realized as less fuel consumed, there would be corresponding reductions in regulated air pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions from supplemental coal fuel. As HC&S is already a significant user of renewable biomass fuel for its operations, the projected reductions in air pollutants and emissions will not be as great compared to using only coal fuel for example. A classification of implementation priority into operations was performed for the identified energy saving projects based on payback period and ease of implementation.

  13. Save Energy Now Energy Assessments What Are the Benefits for Small and Medium Facilities?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 19, 2009 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast Agenda * Overview of Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program - Bill Prymak, US Department of Energy * Facility Assessment Process - Don Kasten, Rutgers University * Demonstration of IAC Website - Don Kasten/Michael B. Muller, Rutgers University * Q&A 3 DOE Industrial Technologies Goal: Drive a 25% reduction in

  14. RCRA Notification of Regulated Waste Activity (EPA Form 8700...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notification of Regulated Waste Activity (EPA Form 8700-12) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Notification of Regulated Waste Activity...

  15. RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application: Instructions and Form (EPA Form 8700-23) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Hazardous Waste...

  16. Macro Security Methodology for Conducting Facility Security and Sustainability Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdes, Greg A.; Freier, Keith D.; Wright, Kyle A.

    2007-07-09

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has developed a macro security strategy that not only addresses traditional physical protection systems, but also focuses on sustainability as part of the security assessment and management process. This approach is designed to meet the needs of virtually any industry or environment requiring critical asset protection. PNNL has successfully demonstrated the utility of this macro security strategy through its support to the NNSA Office of Global Threat Reduction implementing security upgrades at international facilities possessing high activity radioactive sources that could be used in the assembly of a radiological dispersal device, commonly referred to as a “dirty bomb”. Traditional vulnerability assessments provide a snap shot in time of the effectiveness of a physical protection system without significant consideration to the sustainability of the component elements that make up the system. This paper describes the approach and tools used to integrate technology, plans and procedures, training, and sustainability into a simple, quick, and easy-to-use security assessment and management tool.

  17. Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

    2003-02-26

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude.

  18. A probabilistic risk assessment of the LLNL Plutonium facility`s evaluation basis fire operational accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brumburgh, G.

    1994-08-31

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility conducts numerous involving plutonium to include device fabrication, development of fabrication techniques, metallurgy research, and laser isotope separation. A Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the building 332 Plutonium Facility was completed rational safety and acceptable risk to employees, the public, government property, and the environment. This paper outlines the PRA analysis of the Evaluation Basis Fire (EDF) operational accident. The EBF postulates the worst-case programmatic impact event for the Plutonium Facility.

  19. Assessment of Facilities, Materials, and Wastes Proposed for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Environmental Management (EM-1) invited the DOE ... National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to propose facilities and legacy waste for transfer to Environmental ...

  20. Draft Environmental Assessment for the High Explosive Science and Engineering Facility Pantex Plant

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DRAFT DOE/EA-1993 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE HIGH EXPLOSIVE SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING FACILITY PANTEX PLANT * AMARILLO, TEXAS * 2015 Draft Environmental Assessment for the High Explosive Science and Engineering Facility Pantex Plant August 2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  1. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Ann E; Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; Wells, Jack C; White, Julia C

    2011-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.5 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2010 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Scientific achievements by OLCF users range from collaboration with university experimentalists to produce a working supercapacitor that uses atom-thick sheets of carbon materials to finely determining the resolution requirements for simulations of coal gasifiers and their components, thus laying the foundation for development of commercial-scale gasifiers. OLCF users are pushing the boundaries with software applications sustaining more than one petaflop of performance in the quest to illuminate the fundamental nature of electronic devices. Other teams of researchers are working to resolve predictive capabilities of climate models, to refine and validate genome sequencing, and to explore the most fundamental materials in nature - quarks and gluons - and their unique properties. Details of these scientific endeavors - not possible without access to leadership-class computing resources - are detailed in Section 4 of this report and in the INCITE in Review. Effective operations of the OLCF play a key role in the scientific missions and accomplishments of its users. This Operational Assessment Report (OAR) will delineate the policies, procedures, and innovations implemented by the OLCF to continue delivering a petaflop-scale resource for cutting-edge research. The 2010 operational assessment of the OLCF yielded recommendations that have been addressed (Reference Section 1) and where

  2. Compilation of RCRA closure plan conditions applicable to boilers and industrial furnaces at cement plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, A.N.

    1998-12-31

    A prudent approach to closure plan development will assist preparers of closure plans to ensure that a cement kiln BIF unit and associated Resources conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units are effectively closed in a manner that minimizes potential threats to human health and the environment, as well as facilitating closure in an economical and timely manner. Cement kilns burning hazardous waste-derived-fuel (HWDF) must comply with the general facility standards of Subpart G Closure and Post-Closure requirements of 40 CFR parts 264 or 265 in addition to the RCRA Part b permitting requirements of 40 CFR parts 270.13 and 270.22 (e) and (f). As a result, approved closure plans for BIF facilities (or individual BIF units) will contain general and site-specific permit conditions that will mandate numerous closure activities be conducted to successfully implement the partial or final closure of a permitted or interim status BIF unit or facility. Currently, a scarce amount of published information is available to the cement industry in the form of agency guidance documents that would assist facilities with BIF unit closures. A review of seven approved or implemented closure plans revealed significant differences between plans approved recently versus a few years ago as well as observed differences in acceptable closure criteria between EPA regions and various states agencies. The intent of this paper is to first familiarize readers with general closure plan requirements, followed by a detailed discussion of closure requirements that are pertinent to BIF unit facilities. Comparisons are presented to provide an overview of typical components of BIF unit closure plans.

  3. Development of guidance for variances from the RCRA Land Disposal Restrictions for US DOE mixed-waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheuer, N.; Spikula, R. ); Harms, T. . Environmental Guidance Div.); Triplett, M.B. )

    1990-02-01

    In response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) anticipated need for variances from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDRs), a guidance manual was prepared. The guidance manual is for use by DOE facilities and operations offices in obtaining variances from the RCRA LDR treatment standards. The manual was prepared as a part of an ongoing effort by DOE-EH to provide guidance for the operations offices and facilities to comply with the RCRA LDRs. The manual addresses treatability variances and equivalent treatment variances. A treatability variance is an alternative treatment standard granted by EPA for a restricted waste. Such a variance is not an exemption from the requirements of the LDRs, but rather is an alternative treatment standard that must be met before land disposal. An equivalent treatment variance is granted by EPA that allows treatment of a restricted waste by a process that differs from that specified in the standards, but achieves a level of performance equivalent to the technology specified in the standard. 4 refs.

  4. Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support the Lab's security mission

  5. Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secure and Sustainable Energy Future Mission/Facilities Facilities Tara Camacho-Lopez 2016-04-06T18:06:13+00:00 National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) facility_nsttf_slide NSTTF's primary goal is to provide experimental engineering data for the design, construction, and operation of unique components and systems in proposed solar thermal electrical plants, which have three generic system architectures: line-focus (trough and continuous linear Fresnel reflector systems), point-focus central

  6. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the CPP-602 Laboratory Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho Cleanup Project

    2009-09-30

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure (HWMA/RCRA) Plan for the CPP-602 laboratory lines was developed to meet the tank system closure requirements of the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.008 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 264, Subpart G. CPP-602 is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. The lines in CPP-602 were part of a liquid hazardous waste collection system included in the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Liquid Waste Management System Permit. The laboratory lines discharged to the Deep Tanks System in CPP-601 that is currently being closed under a separate closure plan. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and the methods for achieving those standards. The closure approach for the CPP-602 laboratory lines is to remove the lines, components, and contaminants to the extent practicable. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Site CPP-117 includes the CPP-602 waste trench and the area beneath the basement floor where waste lines are direct-buried. Upon completion of rinsing or mopping to remove contamination to the extent practicable from the waste trench and rinsing the intact buried lines (i.e., stainless steel sections), these areas will be managed as part of CERCLA Site CPP-117 and will not be subject to further HWMA/RCRA closure activities. The CPP-602 building is being decontaminated and decommissioned under CERCLA as a non-time critical removal action in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement/Consent Order. As such, all waste generated by this CERCLA action, including closure-generated waste, will be managed in coordination with that CERCLA action in substantive compliance with HWMA/RCRA regulations. All waste will be subject to a hazardous waste determination for the purpose of supporting appropriate management and will be managed in accordance

  7. The WIPP RCRA Part B permit application for TRU mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.; Snider, C.A. [USDOE Carlsbad Area Office, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In August 1993, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) issued a draft permit for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to begin experiments with transuranic (TRU) mixed waste. Subsequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to cancel the on-site test program, opting instead for laboratory testing. The Secretary of the NMED withdrew the draft permit in 1994, ordering the State`s Hazardous and Radioactive Waste Bureau to work with the DOE on submittal of a revised permit application. Revision 5 of the WIPP`s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit Application was submitted to the NMED in May 1995, focusing on disposal of 175,600 m{sup 3} of TRU mixed waste over a 25 year span plus ten years for closure. A key portion of the application, the Waste Analysis Plan, shifted from requirements to characterize a relatively small volume of TRU mixed waste for on-site experiments, to describing a complete program that would apply to all DOE TRU waste generating facilities and meet the appropriate RCRA regulations. Waste characterization will be conducted on a waste stream basis, fitting into three broad categories: (1) homogeneous solids, (2) soil/gravel, and (3) debris wastes. Techniques used include radiography, visually examining waste from opened containers, radioassay, headspace gas sampling, physical sampling and analysis of homogeneous wastes, and review of documented acceptable knowledge. Acceptable knowledge of the original organics and metals used, and the operations that generated these waste streams is sufficient in most cases to determine if the waste has toxicity characteristics, hazardous constituents, polychlorinated biphenyls (PBCs), or RCRA regulated metals.

  8. Readiness assessment plan for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility (Trench 31)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irons, L.G.

    1994-11-22

    This document provides the Readiness Assessment Plan (RAP) for the Project W-025 (Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility) Readiness Assessment (RA). The RAP documents prerequisites to be met by the operating organization prior to the RA. The RAP is to be implemented by the RA Team identified in the RAP. The RA Team is to verify the facility`s compliance with criteria identified in the RAP. The criteria are based upon the {open_quotes}Core Requirements{close_quotes} listed in DOE Order 5480.31, {open_quotes}Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities{close_quotes}.

  9. HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

    2007-01-15

    As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

  10. Assessment of Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Facility and Capability Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Werner

    2014-07-01

    The development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system rests heavily upon being able to fabricate and demonstrate the performance of a high temperature nuclear fuel as well as demonstrating an integrated system prior to launch. A number of studies have been performed in the past which identified the facilities needed and the capabilities available to meet the needs and requirements identified at that time. Since that time, many facilities and capabilities within the Department of Energy have been removed or decommissioned. This paper provides a brief overview of the anticipated facility needs and identifies some promising concepts to be considered which could support the development of a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Detailed trade studies will need to be performed to support the decision making process.

  11. Preliminary safety assessment for an IFE target fabrication facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Besenbruch, G E; Goodin, D T

    2000-10-13

    We estimate possible ranges of tritium inventories for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target fabrication facility producing various types of targets and using various production technologies. Target fill is the key subtask in determining the overall tritium inventory for the plant. By segmenting the inventory into multiple, parallel production lines--each with its own fill canister--and including an expansion tank to limit releases, we are able to ensure that a target fabrication facility would meet the accident dose goals of 10 mSv (1 rem) set forth in the Department of Energy's Fusion Safety Standards. For indirect-drive targets, we calculate release fractions for elements from lithium to bismuth and show that nearly all elements meet the dose goal. Our work suggests directions for future R&D that will help reduce total tritium inventories and increase the flexibility of target fabrication facilities.

  12. WTP Pretreatment Facility Potential Design Deficiencies--Sliding Bed and Sliding Bed Erosion Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E. K.

    2015-05-06

    This assessment is based on readily available literature and discusses both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries with respect to sliding beds and erosion due to sliding beds. This report does not quantify the size of the sliding beds or erosion rates due to sliding beds, but only assesses if they could be present. This assessment addresses process pipelines in the Pretreatment (PT) facility and the high level waste (HLW) transfer lines leaving the PT facility to the HLW vitrification facility concentrate receipt vessel.

  13. Geotechnical Seismic Assessment Report for Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHood, M.

    2000-10-04

    High level waste facilities at the Savannah River Site include several major structures that must meet seismic requirements, including the Defense Waste Processing Facility. Numerous geotechnical and geological investigations have been performed to characterize the in-situ static and dynamic properties of the soil sediments. These investigations have led to conclusions concerning the stability of foundation soils in terms of liquefaction potential and structure settlement. This report reviews past work that addresses seismic soil stability and presents the results of more recent analyses incorporating updated seismic criteria.

  14. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction and Summary of Results; Facility Background; Facility Emissions; Atmospheric Dispersion and Deposition Modeling of Emissions; Human Health Risk Assessment; Screening Ecological Risk Assessment; Accident Analysis; Additional Analysis in Response to Peer Review Recommendations; References.

  15. TRANSPORTATION CASK RECEIPT AND RETURN FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Arakali

    2005-02-24

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Transportation Cask Receipt and Return Facility (TCRRF) of the repository including the personnel at the security gate and cask staging areas. This calculation is required to support the preclosure safety analysis (PCSA) to ensure that the predicted doses are within the regulatory limits prescribed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Cask Receipt and Return Facility receives NRC licensed transportation casks loaded with spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The TCRRF operation starts with the receipt, inspection, and survey of the casks at the security gate and the staging areas, and proceeds to the process facilities. The transportation casks arrive at the site via rail cars or trucks under the guidance of the national transportation system. This calculation was developed by the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization and is intended solely for the use of Design and Engineering in work regarding facility design. Environmental and Nuclear Engineering personnel should be consulted before using this calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or for use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering organization.

  16. Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management Area S-SX at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, V.G.; Chou, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL), in accordance with the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area (WMA) S-SX has impacted groundwater quality. The WMA is located in the southern portion of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and consists of the 241-S and 241-SX tank farms and ancillary waste systems. The unit is regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (40 CFR 265, Subpart F) and was placed in assessment groundwater monitoring (40 CFR 265.93 [d]) in August 1996 because of elevated specific conductance and technetium-99, a non-RCRA co-contaminant, in downgradient monitoring wells. Major findings of the assessment are summarized below: (1) Distribution patterns for radionuclides and RCRA/dangerous waste constituents indicate WMA S-SX has contributed to groundwater contamination observed in downgradient monitoring wells. (2) Drinking water standards for nitrate and technetium-99 are currently exceeded in one RCRA-compliant well (299-W22-46) located at the southeastern comer of the SX tank farm. (3) Technetium-99, nitrate, and chromium concentrations in downgradient well 299-W22-46 (the well with the highest current concentrations) appear to be declining after reaching maximum concentrations in May 1997. (4) Cesium-137 and strontium-90, major constituents of concern in single-shell tank waste, were not detected in any of the RCRA-compliant wells in the WMA network, including the well with the highest current technetium-99 concentrations (299-W22-46). (5) Low but detectable strontium-90 and cesium-137 were found in one old well (2-W23-7), located inside and between the S and SX tank farms.

  17. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Overview; Facility Background; Risk Assessment History at WTI; Peer Review Comments and Key Assumptions; and References.

  18. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  19. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations at Sandia National Laboratories Â… March 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of Nuclear Reactor Facility Operations at Sandia National Laboratories March 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  20. Performing Energy Security Assessments: A How-To Guide for Federal Facility Managers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes the best practices and recommended process for federal facility managers to prepare for the following sections of a facility’s energy security plan: vulnerability assessments, energy preparedness and operations plans, and remedial action plans.

  1. Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities The the WTGa1 turbine (aka DOE/SNL #1) retuns to power as part of a final series of commissioning tests. Permalink Gallery First Power for SWiFT Turbine Achieved during Recommissioning Facilities, News, Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Wind Energy, Wind News First Power for SWiFT Turbine Achieved during Recommissioning The Department of Energy's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility reached an exciting milestone with the return to power production of the WTGa1 turbine (aka DOE/SNL #1)

  2. Performance assessment for a hypothetical low-level waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.S.; Rohe, M.J.; Ritter, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Disposing of low-level waste (LLW) is a concern for many states throughout the United States. A common disposal method is below-grade concrete vaults. Performance assessment analyses make predictions of contaminant release, transport, ingestion, inhalation, or other routes of exposure, and the resulting doses for various disposal methods such as the below-grade concrete vaults. Numerous assumptions are required to simplify the processes associated with the disposal facility to make predictions feasible. In general, these assumptions are made conservatively so as to underestimate the performance of the facility. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used in conducting a performance assessment for a hypothetical waste facility located in the northeastern United States using real data as much as possible. This report consists of the following: (a) a description of the disposal facility and site, (b) methods used to analyze performance of the facility, (c) the results of the analysis, and (d) the conclusions of this study.

  3. TSD-DOSE: A radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfingston, M.; Arnish, J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.

    1998-10-14

    Past practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) field facilities resulted in the presence of trace amounts of radioactive materials in some hazardous chemical wastes shipped from these facilities. In May 1991, the DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping all hazardous waste until procedures could be established to ensure that only nonradioactive hazardous waste would be shipped from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. To aid in assessing the potential impacts of shipments of mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes, a radiological assessment computer model (or code) was developed on the basis of detailed assessments of potential radiological exposures and doses for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. The model, called TSD-DOSE, is designed to incorporate waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a TSD facility. The code is intended to provide both DOE and commercial TSD facilities with a rapid and cost-effective method for assessing potential human radiation exposures from the processing of chemical wastes contaminated with trace amounts of radionuclides.

  4. Qualitative risk assessment of Sandia`s rocket preparation and launch facility at Barking Sands, Kauai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper demonstrates the application of a qualitative methodology for performing risk assessments using the consequence and probability binning criteria of DOE Order 5481.1B. The particular application that is the subject of this paper is a facility risk assessment conducted for Sandia National Laboratories` Kauai Test Facility (KTF). The KTF is a rocket preparation and launch facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy and is located on the US Navy`s Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands on the western side of the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The KTF consists of an administrative compound and main launch facility located on the north end of the PMRF, as well as the small Kokole Point launch facility located on the south end of the PMRF. It is classified as a moderate hazard facility in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B. As such, its authorization basis for operations necessitates a safety/risk assessment. This paper briefly addresses the hazards associated with KTF operations and the accidents selected for evaluation, introduces the principal elements of the accident assessment methodology, presents analysis details for two of the selected accidents, and provides a summary of results for all of the accidents evaluated.

  5. The marriage of RCRA and CERCLA at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, D.C.; Brooks, L.M.

    1998-11-01

    A key goal of the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) signed in July of 1996 was to provide a seamless marriage of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (and other media specific programs) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the implementing agencies of each. This paper examines the two years since the signing of RFCA and identifies the successes, failures, and stresses of the marriage. RFCA has provided an excellent vehicle for regulatory and substantive progress at the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats facility. The key for a fully successful marriage is to build on the accomplishments to date and to continually improve the internal and external systems and relationships. To date, the parties can be proud of both the substantial accomplishment of substantive environmental work and the regulatory systems that have enabled the work.

  6. Characterizing cemented TRU waste for RCRA hazardous constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeamans, D.R.; Betts, S.E.; Bodenstein, S.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has characterized drums of solidified transuranic (TRU) waste from four major waste streams. The data will help the State of New Mexico determine whether or not to issue a no-migration variance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) so that WIPP can receive and dispose of waste. The need to characterize TRU waste stored at LANL is driven by two additional factors: (1) the LANL RCRA Waste Analysis Plan for EPA compliant safe storage of hazardous waste; (2) the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) The LANL characterization program includes headspace gas analysis, radioassay and radiography for all drums and solids sampling on a random selection of drums from each waste stream. Data are presented showing that the only identified non-metal RCRA hazardous component of the waste is methanol.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories Hazardous Waste (RCRA) Information Repository

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Index Hazardous Waste (RCRA) Information Repository Index Reading List Subject / Description Zimmerman ID There are no items on your reading list Print Instructions for Zimmerman Library Zimmerman Library is located near Roma Avenue and Yale Boulevard on the University of New Mexico main campus in Albuquerque. We strongly recommend making an appointment for document review, but you are not required to do so. To make an appointment, please contact Monica Dorame in the Government Information

  8. RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) final authorization guidance manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-10

    The document provides guidance regarding final authorization of State Hazardous Waste programs for the pre-HSWA RCRA program. The manual establishes a process and schedule for State Authorization applications, and provides detailed guidance on what State programs must contain in order to qualify for final authorization. The primary audience is U.S. EPA Headquarters and Regional offices and also State agencies, but public requests have also been received so they are included in that broad audience.

  9. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, CY 2011 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Ann E; Barker, Ashley D; Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Hack, James J; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; Wells, Jack C; White, Julia C; Hudson, Douglas L

    2012-02-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) continues to deliver the most powerful resources in the U.S. for open science. At 2.33 petaflops peak performance, the Cray XT Jaguar delivered more than 1.4 billion core hours in calendar year (CY) 2011 to researchers around the world for computational simulations relevant to national and energy security; advancing the frontiers of knowledge in physical sciences and areas of biological, medical, environmental, and computer sciences; and providing world-class research facilities for the nation's science enterprise. Users reported more than 670 publications this year arising from their use of OLCF resources. Of these we report the 300 in this review that are consistent with guidance provided. Scientific achievements by OLCF users cut across all range scales from atomic to molecular to large-scale structures. At the atomic scale, researchers discovered that the anomalously long half-life of Carbon-14 can be explained by calculating, for the first time, the very complex three-body interactions between all the neutrons and protons in the nucleus. At the molecular scale, researchers combined experimental results from LBL's light source and simulations on Jaguar to discover how DNA replication continues past a damaged site so a mutation can be repaired later. Other researchers combined experimental results from ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source and simulations on Jaguar to reveal the molecular structure of ligno-cellulosic material used in bioethanol production. This year, Jaguar has been used to do billion-cell CFD calculations to develop shock wave compression turbo machinery as a means to meet DOE goals for reducing carbon sequestration costs. General Electric used Jaguar to calculate the unsteady flow through turbo machinery to learn what efficiencies the traditional steady flow assumption is hiding from designers. Even a 1% improvement in turbine design can save the nation billions of gallons of

  10. A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Day, Robin; Strickland, M. Dale

    2012-11-01

    Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post

  11. Revised RCRA closure plan for the Interim Drum Yard (S-030) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.M.

    1994-09-01

    The Interim Drum Yard (IDY) facility is a containerized waste storage area located in the Y-12 exclusion area. It was used to store waste materials which are regulated by RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act); uranyl nitrate solutions were also stored there. The closure plan outlines the actions required to achieve closure of IDY and is being submitted in accordance with TN Rule 1200-1-11.05(7) and 40 CFR 265.110.

  12. PART FOUR INTEGRATION OF EPA AND ECOLOGY RESPONSIBILITIES ARTICLE XXIII. RCRA/CERCLA INTERFACE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49- PART FOUR INTEGRATION OF EPA AND ECOLOGY RESPONSIBILITIES ARTICLE XXIII. RCRA/CERCLA INTERFACE 86. Part Two of this Agreement requires DOE to carry out RCRA TSD work under the direction and authority of Ecology. Part Three of this Agreement requires DOE to carry out investigations and cleanup of past- practice units through the CERCLA process under the authority of EPA, or through the RCRA Corrective Action process under the authority of Ecology. This Part Four establishes the framework for

  13. Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J.W.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

  14. High Performance Computing Facility Operational Assessment, FY 2010 Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bland, Arthur S Buddy; Hack, James J; Baker, Ann E; Barker, Ashley D; Boudwin, Kathlyn J.; Kendall, Ricky A; Messer, Bronson; Rogers, James H; Shipman, Galen M; White, Julia C

    2010-08-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Cray XT5 supercomputer, Jaguar, kicked off the era of petascale scientific computing in 2008 with applications that sustained more than a thousand trillion floating point calculations per second - or 1 petaflop. Jaguar continues to grow even more powerful as it helps researchers broaden the boundaries of knowledge in virtually every domain of computational science, including weather and climate, nuclear energy, geosciences, combustion, bioenergy, fusion, and materials science. Their insights promise to broaden our knowledge in areas that are vitally important to the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation as a whole, particularly energy assurance and climate change. The science of the 21st century, however, will demand further revolutions in computing, supercomputers capable of a million trillion calculations a second - 1 exaflop - and beyond. These systems will allow investigators to continue attacking global challenges through modeling and simulation and to unravel longstanding scientific questions. Creating such systems will also require new approaches to daunting challenges. High-performance systems of the future will need to be codesigned for scientific and engineering applications with best-in-class communications networks and data-management infrastructures and teams of skilled researchers able to take full advantage of these new resources. The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) provides the nation's most powerful open resource for capability computing, with a sustainable path that will maintain and extend national leadership for DOE's Office of Science (SC). The OLCF has engaged a world-class team to support petascale science and to take a dramatic step forward, fielding new capabilities for high-end science. This report highlights the successful delivery and operation of a petascale system and shows how the OLCF fosters application development teams, developing cutting-edge tools and resources for next

  15. Vulnerability Assessments and Resilience Planning at Federal Facilities. Preliminary Synthesis of Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, R. H.; Delgado, A.; Malone, E L.

    2015-08-15

    U.S. government agencies are now directed to assess the vulnerability of their operations and facilities to climate change and to develop adaptation plans to increase their resilience. Specific guidance on methods is still evolving based on the many different available frameworks. Agencies have been experimenting with these frameworks and approaches. This technical paper synthesizes lessons and insights from a series of research case studies conducted by the investigators at facilities of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. The purpose of the paper is to solicit comments and feedback from interested program managers and analysts before final conclusions are published. The paper describes the characteristics of a systematic process for prioritizing needs for adaptation planning at individual facilities and examines requirements and methods needed. It then suggests a framework of steps for vulnerability assessments at Federal facilities and elaborates on three sets of methods required for assessments, regardless of the detailed framework used. In a concluding section, the paper suggests a roadmap to further develop methods to support agencies in preparing for climate change. The case studies point to several preliminary conclusions; (1) Vulnerability assessments are needed to translate potential changes in climate exposure to estimates of impacts and evaluation of their significance for operations and mission attainment, in other words into information that is related to and useful in ongoing planning, management, and decision-making processes; (2) To increase the relevance and utility of vulnerability assessments to site personnel, the assessment process needs to emphasize the characteristics of the site infrastructure, not just climate change; (3) A multi-tiered framework that includes screening, vulnerability assessments at the most vulnerable installations, and adaptation design will efficiently target high-risk sites and infrastructure

  16. Groundwater quality assessment report for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facility, is a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and other waste types. Wastes were disposed of in unlined trenches and auger holes from 1969 until May 1986, when it was determined that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated wastes were being disposed of there. DOE closed SWSA 6 until changes in operating procedures prevented the disposal of RCRA wastes at SWSA 6. The site, which reopened for waste disposal activities in July 1986, is the only currently operated disposal area for low-level radioactive waste at ORNL. This report provides the results of the 1998 RCRA groundwater assessment monitoring. The monitoring was performed in accordance with the proposed routine monitoring plan recommended in the 1996 EMP. Section 2 provides pertinent background on SWSA 6. Section 3 presents the 1998 monitoring results and discusses the results in terms of any significant changes from previous monitoring efforts. Section 4 provides recommendations for changes in monitoring based on the 1998 results. References are provided in Section 5. Appendix A provides the 1998 RCRA Sampling Data and Appendix B provides a summary of 1998 Quality Assurance results.

  17. Final Pantex Report - 2006 [Phase 1 plan for assessment of Former Workers at the Pantex Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, Ronna

    2013-07-18

    The purpose of this project was to develop a Phase 1 plan for assessment of Former Workers at the Pantex Facility in Amarillo, TX and to determine the suitability to start a medical surveillance program among former workers for this site.

  18. Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, S.W.

    1997-08-29

    The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

  19. Renewable Energy Assessment of Bureau of Reclamation Land and Facilities Using Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimiller, D.; Haase, S.; Melius, J.

    2013-05-01

    This report summarizes results of geographic information system screening for solar and wind potential at select Bureau of Reclamation lands in the western United States. The study included both utility-scale and facility-scale potential. This study supplements information in the report titled Renewable Energy Assessment for the Bureau of Reclamation: Final Report.

  20. RCRA Summary Document for the David Witherspoon 1630 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, J.

    2008-06-10

    The 48-acre David Witherspoon, Inc. (DWI) 1630 Site operated as an unregulated industrial landfill and scrap yard. The Tennessee Division of Superfund (TDSF) closed the landfill in 1974. During the period of operation, the site received solid and liquid wastes from salvage and industrial operations. The site consists of five separate tracts of land including a small portion located across the Norfolk Southern Railroad track. The landfill occupies approximately 5 acres of the site, and roughly 20 acres of the 48 acres contains surface and buried debris associated with the DWI dismantling business operation. Beginning in 1968, the state of Tennessee licensed DWI to receive scrap metal at the DWI 1630 Site, contaminated with natural uranium and enriched uranium (235U) not exceeding 0.1 percent by weight (TDSF 1990). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has agreed to undertake remedial actions at the DWI 1630 Site as specified under a Consent Order with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) (Consent Order No. 90-3443, April 4, 1991), and as further delineated by a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between DOE and the State of Tennessee (MOU Regarding Implementation of Consent Orders, October 6, 1994). The soil and debris removal at the DWI 1630 Site is being performed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. Remediation consists of removing contaminated soil and debris from the DWI 1630 site except for the landfill area and repairing the landfill cap. The DWI 1630 remediation waste that is being disposed at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) as defined as waste lot (WL) 146.1 and consists primarily of soils and soil like material, incidental debris and secondary waste generated from the excavation of debris and soil from the DWI 1630 site. The WL 146.1 includes soil, soil like material (e.g., shredded or chipped vegetation, ash), discrete debris items (e.g., equipment, drums, large scrap metal

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application for tank storage units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    In compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this report discusses information relating to permit applications for three tank storage units at Y-12. The storage units are: Building 9811-1 RCRA Tank Storage Unit (OD-7); Waste Oil/Solvent Storage Unit (OD-9); and Liquid Organic Solvent Storage Unit (OD-10). Numerous sections discuss the following: Facility description; waste characteristics; process information; groundwater monitoring; procedures to prevent hazards; contingency plan; personnel training; closure plan, post closure plan, and financial requirements; record keeping; other federal laws; organic air emissions; solid waste management units; and certification. Sixteen appendices contain such items as maps, waste analyses and forms, inspection logs, equipment identification, etc.

  2. ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT ON VITRIFICATION FACILITY OF LOW-AND INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN KOREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Kun Jai; Ji, Pyung Kook; Park, Jong Kil; Ha, Jong Hyun; Song, Myung Jae

    2003-02-27

    The usefulness of vitrification technology for low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes was demonstrated with high volume reduction capability and good mechanical and chemical stability of final waste forms, and commercial vitrification facility is expected to be constructed at Ulchin site of Korean Nuclear Power Plant Ulchin Unit 5 and 6. Hence, overall economic assessment was necessary to find out the economic advantage of the vitrification facility and to predict the construction and operation costs of the facility on the preliminary bases. Additionally, the generation characteristics of radioactive wastes were investigated. The results of the cost analysis showed that the disposal cost of radioactive wastes treated by vitrification facility reduced to 85 percent compared with that by current waste treatment system. And the present worth analysis was performed through the cost-benefit analysis method for the commercial vitrification facility. The results showed that the vitrification facility combining cold crucible melter (CCM) for treatment of combustible DAW, spent resin, and borated liquid waste concentrate and plasma torch melter (PTM) for non-combustible DAW and spent filter is more economical than current waste treatment system when the escalation rate of disposal cost of more than 10 percent per year was applied.

  3. Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    2000-04-11

    This report is the first revision to ``Radiological Performance Assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility, Revision 0'', which was issued in April 1994 and received conditional DOE approval in September 1994. The title of this report has been changed to conform to the current name of the facility. The revision incorporates improved groundwater modeling methodology, which includes a large data base of site specific geotechnical data, and special Analyses on disposal of cement-based wasteforms and naval wastes, issued after publication of Revision 0.

  4. Near-Field Hydrology Data Package for the Integrated Disposal Facility 2005 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Philip D.; Saripalli, Prasad; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2004-06-25

    CH2MHill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) is designing and assessing the performance of an Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) to receive immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), Low-Level and Mixed Low-Level Wastes (LLW/MLLW), and the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) melters used to vitrify the ILAW. The IDF Performance Assessment (PA) assesses the performance of the disposal facility to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface water resources, and inadvertent intruders. The PA requires prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities, which is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the pore water of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CHG in its performance assessment activities. One of PNNL’s tasks is to provide estimates of the physical, hydraulic, and transport properties of the materials comprising the disposal facilities and the disturbed region around them. These materials are referred to as the near-field materials. Their properties are expressed as parameters of constitutive models used in simulations of subsurface flow and transport. In addition to the best-estimate parameter values, information on uncertainty in the parameter values and estimates of the changes in parameter values over time are required to complete the PA. These parameter estimates and information were previously presented in a report prepared for the 2001 ILAW PA. This report updates the parameter estimates for the 2005 IDF PA using additional information and data collected since publication of the earlier report.

  5. Construction and operation of replacement hazardous waste handling facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0423, for the construction and operation of a replacement hazardous waste handling facility (HWHF) and decontamination of the existing HWHF at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Berkeley, California. The proposed facility would replace several older buildings and cargo containers currently being used for waste handling activities and consolidate the LBL`s existing waste handling activities in one location. The nature of the waste handling activities and the waste volume and characteristics would not change as a result of construction of the new facility. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 USC. 4321 et seq. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required.

  6. Environmental Assessment for decommissioning the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Weeks Island Facility, Iberia Parish, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Weeks Island site is one of five underground salt dome crude oils storage facilities operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). It is located in Iberia Parish, Louisiana. The purpose of the proposed action is to decommission the Weeks Island crude oil storage after the oil inventory has been transferred to other SPR facilities. Water intrusion into the salt dome storage chambers and the development of two sinkholes located near the aboveground facilities has created uncertain geophysical conditions. This Environmental Assessment describes the proposed decommissioning operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. Based on this analyses, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and has issued the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  7. An Integrated Assessment of Location-Dependent Scaling for Microalgae Biofuel Production Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andre M.; Abodeely, Jared; Skaggs, Richard; Moeglein, William AM; Newby, Deborah T.; Venteris, Erik R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2014-07-01

    Successful development of a large-scale microalgae-based biofuels industry requires comprehensive analysis and understanding of the feedstock supply chain—from facility siting/design through processing/upgrading of the feedstock to a fuel product. The evolution from pilot-scale production facilities to energy-scale operations presents many multi-disciplinary challenges, including a sustainable supply of water and nutrients, operational and infrastructure logistics, and economic competitiveness with petroleum-based fuels. These challenges are addressed in part by applying the Integrated Assessment Framework (IAF)—an integrated multi-scale modeling, analysis, and data management suite—to address key issues in developing and operating an open-pond facility by analyzing how variability and uncertainty in space and time affect algal feedstock production rates, and determining the site-specific “optimum” facility scale to minimize capital and operational expenses. This approach explicitly and systematically assesses the interdependence of biofuel production potential, associated resource requirements, and production system design trade-offs. The IAF was applied to a set of sites previously identified as having the potential to cumulatively produce 5 billion-gallons/year in the southeastern U.S. and results indicate costs can be reduced by selecting the most effective processing technology pathway and scaling downstream processing capabilities to fit site-specific growing conditions, available resources, and algal strains.

  8. Floodplain Assessment for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Installation of a Renewable Energy Anaerobic Digester Facility at the University of California, Davis in Yolo County, California January 11, 2013 1.0 Introduction This floodplain assessment has been prepared in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1022, "Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements" which were promulgated to implement the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) responsibilities under Executive Order 11988,

  9. Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for US Army Garrison, Japan - Honshu Installations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kora, Angela R.; Brown, Daryl R.; Dixon, Douglas R.

    2010-03-09

    This report documents an assessment was performed by a team of engineers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract to the Installation Management Command (IMCOM) Pacific Region Office (PARO). The effort used the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) model to determine how energy is consumed at five U.S. Army Garrison-Japan (USAG-J) installations in the Honshu area, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

  10. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Assessment of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High-Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Safety Basis Change Package Â… May 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant High-Level Waste Facility Radioactive Liquid Waste Disposal System Safety Basis Change Package May 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms

  11. Facility Floorplan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility floorplan Facility Floorplan

  12. Performance Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup; Arthur S. Rood

    2012-05-01

    This performance assessment for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory documents the projected radiological dose impacts associated with the disposal of low-level radioactive waste at the facility. This assessment evaluates compliance with the applicable radiological criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for protection of the public and the environment. The calculations involve modeling transport of radionuclides from buried waste to surface soil and subsurface media, and eventually to members of the public via air, groundwater, and food chain pathways. Projections of doses are calculated for both offsite receptors and individuals who inadvertently intrude into the waste after site closure. The results of the calculations are used to evaluate the future performance of the low-level radioactive waste disposal facility and to provide input for establishment of waste acceptance criteria. In addition, one-factor-at-a-time, Monte Carlo, and rank correlation analyses are included for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The comparison of the performance assessment results to the applicable performance objectives provides reasonable expectation that the performance objectives will be met

  13. A comparison of the RCRA Corrective Action and CERCLA Remedial Action Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traceski, Thomas T.

    1994-02-01

    This document provides a comprehensive side-by-side comparison of the RCRA corrective action and the CERCLA remedial action processes. On the even-numbered pages a discussion of the RCRA corrective action process is presented and on the odd-numbered pages a comparative discussion of the CERCLA remedial action process can be found. Because the two programs have a difference structure, there is not always a direct correlation between the two throughout the document. This document serves as an informative reference for Departmental and contractor personnel responsible for oversight or implementation of RCRA corrective action and CERCLA remedial action activities at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  14. E AREA LOW LEVEL WASTE FACILITY DOE 435.1 PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhite, E

    2008-03-31

    This Performance Assessment for the Savannah River Site E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility was prepared to meet requirements of Chapter IV of the Department of Energy Order 435.1-1. The Order specifies that a Performance Assessment should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The Order also requires assessments of impacts to water resources and to hypothetical inadvertent intruders for purposes of establishing limits on radionuclides that may be disposed near-surface. According to the Order, calculations of potential doses and releases from the facility should address a 1,000-year period after facility closure. The point of compliance for the performance measures relevant to the all pathways and air pathway performance objective, as well as to the impact on water resources assessment requirement, must correspond to the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste following the assumed end of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure. During the operational and institutional control periods, the point of compliance for the all pathways and air pathway performance measures is the SRS boundary. However, for the water resources impact assessment, the point of compliance remains the point of highest projected dose or concentration beyond a 100-m buffer zone surrounding the disposed waste during the operational and institutional control periods. For performance measures relevant to radon and inadvertent intruders, the points of compliance are the disposal facility surface for all time periods and the disposal facility after the assumed loss of active institutional controls 100 years after facility closure, respectively. The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility is located in the central region of the SRS known as the General Separations Area. It is an elbow-shaped, cleared area, which curves to the northwest

  15. Gamma Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) on the proposed construction and operation of a new Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This facility is needed to: enhance capabilities to assure technical excellence in nuclear weapon radiation environments testing, component development, and certification; comply with all applicable ES and H safeguards, standards, policies, and regulations; reduce personnel radiological exposure to comply with ALARA limits in accordance with DOE orders and standards; consolidate major gamma ray sources into a central, secured area; and reduce operational risks associated with operation of the GIF and LICA in their present locations. This proposed action provides for the design, construction, and operation of a new GIF located within TA V and the removal of the existing GIF and Low Intensity Cobalt Array (LICA). The proposed action includes potential demolition of the gamma shield walls and removal of equipment in the existing GIF and LICA. The shielding pool used by the existing GIF will remain as part of the ACRR facility. Transportation of the existing {sup 60}Co sources from the existing LICA and GIF to the new facility is also included in the proposed action. Relocation of the gamma sources to the new GIF will be accomplished by similar techniques to those used to install the sources originally.

  16. RCRA Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form 8700-22) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form 8700-22) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: RCRA Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest (EPA Form...

  17. Radiological performance assessment for the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.; Fowler, J.R.

    1992-12-18

    This radiological performance assessment (RPA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was prepared in accordance with the requirements of Chapter III of the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. The Order specifies that an RPA should provide reasonable assurance that a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility will comply with the performance objectives of the Order. The performance objectives require that: (1) exposures of the general public to radioactivity in the waste or released from the waste will not result in an effective dose equivalent of 25 mrem per year; (2) releases to the atmosphere will meet the requirements of 40 CFR 61; (3) inadvertent intruders will not be committed to an excess of an effective dose equivalent of 100 mrem per year from chronic exposure, or 500 mrem from a single acute exposure; and (4) groundwater resources will be protected in accordance with Federal, State and local requirements.

  18. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility Construction Quality Â… January 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility Construction Quality January 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  19. Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799, 799A, and 770C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mecham; Don Konoyer

    2009-11-01

    The Materials & Fuel Complex (MFC) facilities 799 Sodium Processing Facility (a single building consisting of two areas: the Sodium Process Area (SPA) and the Carbonate Process Area (CPA), 799A Caustic Storage Area, and 770C Nuclear Calibration Laboratory have been declared excess to future Department of Energy mission requirements. Transfer of these facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management, and an associated schedule for doing so, have been agreed upon by the two offices. The prerequisites for this transfer to occur are the removal of nonexcess materials and chemical inventory, deinventory of the calibration source in MFC-770C, and the rerouting and/or isolation of utility and service systems. This report provides a description of the current physical condition and any hazards (material, chemical, nuclear or occupational) that may be associated with past operations of these facilities. This information will document conditions at time of transfer of the facilities from Nuclear Energy to Environmental Management and serve as the basis for disposition planning. The process used in obtaining this information included document searches, interviews and facility walk-downs. A copy of the facility walk-down checklist is included in this report as Appendix A. MFC-799/799A/770C are all structurally sound and associated hazardous or potentially hazardous conditions are well defined and well understood. All installed equipment items (tanks, filters, etc.) used to process hazardous materials remain in place and appear to have maintained their integrity. There is no evidence of leakage and all openings are properly sealed or closed off and connections are sound. The pits appear clean with no evidence of cracking or deterioration that could lead to migration of contamination. Based upon the available information/documentation reviewed and the overall conditions observed during the facilities walk-down, it is concluded that these facilities may be disposed of

  20. Closure of hazardous and mixed radioactive waste management units at DOE facilities. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This is document addresses the Federal regulations governing the closure of hazardous and mixed waste units subject to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. It provides a brief overview of the RCRA permitting program and the extensive RCRA facility design and operating standards. It provides detailed guidance on the procedural requirements for closure and post-closure care of hazardous and mixed waste management units, including guidance on the preparation of closure and post-closure plans that must be submitted with facility permit applications. This document also provides guidance on technical activities that must be conducted both during and after closure of each of the following hazardous waste management units regulated under RCRA.

  1. Performance Assessment Program for the Savannah River Site Liquid Waste Facilities - 13610

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberger, Kent H.

    2013-07-01

    The Liquid Waste facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) are operated by Liquid Waste Operations contractor Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR). A separate Performance Assessment (PA) is prepared to support disposal operations at the Saltstone Disposal Facility and closure evaluations for the two liquid waste tank farm facilities at SRS, F-Tank Farm and H-Tank Farm. A PA provides the technical basis and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements identified in operations and closure regulatory guidance. The Saltstone Disposal Facility is subject to a State of South Carolina industrial solid waste landfill permit and the tank farms are subject to a state industrial waste water permit. The three Liquid Waste facilities are also subject to a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Due to the regulatory structure, a PA is a key technical document reviewed by the DOE, the State of South Carolina and the EPA. As the waste material disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility and the residual material in the closed tank farms is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is also a reviewing agency for the PAs. Pursuant to the Act, the NRC also has a continuing role to monitor disposal actions to assess compliance with stated performance objectives. The Liquid Waste PA program at SRS represents a continual process over the life of the disposal and closure operations. When the need for a PA or PA revision is identified, the first step is to develop a conceptual model to best represent the facility conditions. The conceptual model will include physical dimensions of the closed system, both the engineered and natural system, and modeling

  2. ANNUAL SUMMARY OF THE INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2005-02-09

    As required by the US. Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1999a) and as implemented by the ''Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment'' (Mann 2004), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a performance assessment is not issued. A draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA was sent to the DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ) in April 2001 for review and approval. The DOE approved (DOE 2001) the draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA and issued a new version of the Hanford Site waste disposal authorization statement (DAS). Based on comments raised during the review, the draft version was revised and the 2001 ILAW PA was formally issued (Mann et al. 2001). The DOE (DOE 2003a) has reviewed the final 2001 ILAW PA and concluded that no changes to the DAS were necessary. Also as required by the DOE order, annual summaries have been generated and approved. The previous annual summary (Mann 2003b) noted the change of mission from ILAW disposal to the disposal of a range of solid waste types, including ILAW. DOE approved the annual summary (DOE 2003c), noting the expanded mission. Considering the results of data collection and analysis, the conclusions of the 2001 ILAW PA remain valid as they pertain to ILAW disposal. The new data also suggest that impacts from the disposal of the other solid waste will be lower than initially estimated in the ''Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment'' (Mann 2003a). A performance assessment for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) will be issued in the summer of 2005.

  3. Data Quality Assessment and Control for the ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R

    2012-06-26

    The mission of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is to provide observations of the earth climate system to the climate research community for the purpose of improving the understanding and representation, in climate and earth system models, of clouds and aerosols as well as their coupling with the Earth's surface. In order for ARM measurements to be useful toward this goal, it is important that the measurements are of a known and reasonable quality. The ARM data quality program includes several components designed to identify quality issues in near-real-time, track problems to solutions, assess more subtle long-term issues, and communicate problems to the user community.

  4. Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Draft Paducah Environmental Assessment for Potential Land and Facilities Transfers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is evaluating the potential conveyance (lease, easement, and/or title transfer) of real property that may be determined to be excessed, underutilized or unneeded at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). After appropriate agency reviews, DOE could transfer PGDP real property to one or more entities for a range of economic development and/or recreational uses. DOE’s potential action is designed to reduce the footprint of the site and the cost for maintenance of the site, providing opportunities for beneficial reuse. DOE prepared this Draft Environmental Assessment (EA) to analyze the potential environmental consequences associated with potential land and facilities transfers.

  5. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Facilities Maintenance Team (FMT) paint shop.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klossner, Kristin Ann

    2003-05-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for Sandia National Laboratories/California Facilities Maintenance Team Paint Shop Operations in August and September 2002. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist Paint Shop personnel in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed and recommends options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Pollution Prevention staff will continue to work with the Paint Shop to implement the recommendations.

  6. NPH Risk Assessment and Mitigation of a SRS Facility for the Safe Storage of Tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.R.; Griffin, M.J.; Bjorkman, G.S.

    1995-10-18

    Because of the reduction in the nation`s stockpile of weapon systems a large amount of tritium is being returned to the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC. Due to the increased quantity of tritium returning to SRS, the SRS Tritium Facility was tasked to determine the most cost effective means to safely store the tritium gas in a short period of time. This paper presents results of the risk assessment developed to evaluate the safe storage of tritium at SRS, and highlights the structural design of the HIVES used as the cost-effective short term NPH mitigation solution.

  7. Environmental Assessment for the Leasing of Facilities and Equipment to USEC Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-10-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for the lease of facilities and equipment to USEC Inc. (USEC), which would be used in its Gas Centrifuge Research and Development (R&D) Project at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) [hereinafter referred to as the USEC EA]. The USEC EA analyzes the potential environmental impacts of DOE leasing facility K-101 and portions of K-1600, K-1220 and K-1037 at the ETTP to USEC for a minimum 3-year period, with additional option periods consistent with the Oak Ridge Accelerated Clean-up Plan (ACP) Agreement. In July 2002, USEC notified DOE that it intends to use certain leased equipment at an off-site facility at the Centrifuge Technology Center (CTC) on the Boeing Property. The purpose of the USEC Gas Centrifuge R&D Project is to develop an economically attractive gas centrifuge machine and process using DOE's centrifuge technology.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility: Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-0466) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 for the proposed completion of construction and subsequent operation of a central Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management Facility (RMWMF), in the southeastern portion of Technical Area III at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque (SNLA). The RMWMF is designed to receive, store, characterize, conduct limited bench-scale treatment of, repackage, and certify low-level waste (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) (as necessary) for shipment to an offsite disposal or treatment facility. The RMWMF was partially constructed in 1989. Due to changing regulatory requirements, planned facility upgrades would be undertaken as part of the proposed action. These upgrades would include paving of road surfaces and work areas, installation of pumping equipment and lines for surface impoundment, and design and construction of air locks and truck decontamination and water treatment systems. The proposed action also includes an adjacent corrosive and reactive metals storage area, and associated roads and paving. LLW and MW generated at SNLA would be transported from the technical areas to the RMWMF in containers approved by the Department of Transportation. The RMWMF would not handle nonradioactive hazardous waste. Based on the analysis in the EA, the proposed completion of construction and operation of the RMWMF does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement for the proposed action is not required.

  9. The environmental impact assessment process for nuclear facilities: An examination of the Indian experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramana, M.V.; Rao, Divya Badami

    2010-07-15

    India plans to construct numerous nuclear plants and uranium mines across the country, which could have significant environmental, health, and social impacts. The national Environmental Impact Assessment process is supposed to regulate these impacts. This paper examines how effective this process has been, and the extent to which public inputs have been taken into account. In addition to generic problems associated with the EIA process for all kinds of projects in India, there are concerns that are specific to nuclear facilities. One is that some nuclear facilities are exempt from the environmental clearance process. The second is that data regarding radiation baseline levels and future releases, which is the principle environmental concern with respect to nuclear facilities, is controlled entirely by the nuclear establishment. The third is that members of the nuclear establishment take part in almost every level of the environmental clearance procedure. For these reasons and others, the EIA process with regard to nuclear projects in India is of dubious quality. We make a number of recommendations that could address these lacunae, and more generally the imbalance of power between the nuclear establishment on the one hand, and civil society and the regulatory agencies on the other.

  10. Requirements for satellite accumulation areas. RCRA Information Brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J.

    1993-07-01

    In 1980, EPA promulgated hazardous waste management regulations under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which included standard for generators of hazardous waste. With respect to storage of hazardous waste on-site by generators, these regulations originally made no distinction between the initial accumulation of hazardous waste at various points of generation (i.e., ``satellite`` accumulation) and storage at locations where hazardous waste is consolidated for on-site management or transportation off-site. EPA amended the hazardous waste generator regulations on December 20, 1984, to allow generators to store hazardous waste in satellite areas as long as certain conditions were met. State programs, however, do not have to allow for the accumulation of hazardous waste in satellite areas or may have more stringent requirements for these waste accumulation areas. A satellite accumulation area is a storage location at or near any point of generation where hazardous wastes initially accumulate, which is under the control of the operator of the process generating the waste. Wastes stored in these areas are subject to regulatory requirements that are less stringent than requirements applicable to hazardous wastes stored in permitted, interim status, or 90-day storage areas meeting the applicable provisions of 40 CFR 264, 265, or 262.34(a), respectively.

  11. Analysis of material recovery facilities for use in life-cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pressley, Phillip N.; Levis, James W.; Damgaard, Anders; Barlaz, Morton A.; DeCarolis, Joseph F.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Life-cycle assessment of solid waste management relies on accurate process models. • Material recovery facility (MRF) processes were modeled with new primary data. • Single stream, dual stream, pre-sorted, and mixed waste MRFs were considered. • MRF electricity consumption ranges from 4.7 to 7.8 kW h per Mg input. • Total cost ranges from $19.8 to $24.9 per Mg input. - Abstract: Insights derived from life-cycle assessment of solid waste management strategies depend critically on assumptions, data, and modeling at the unit process level. Based on new primary data, a process model was developed to estimate the cost and energy use associated with material recovery facilities (MRFs), which are responsible for sorting recyclables into saleable streams and as such represent a key piece of recycling infrastructure. The model includes four modules, each with a different process flow, for separation of single-stream, dual-stream, pre-sorted recyclables, and mixed-waste. Each MRF type has a distinct combination of equipment and default input waste composition. Model results for total amortized costs from each MRF type ranged from $19.8 to $24.9 per Mg (1 Mg = 1 metric ton) of waste input. Electricity use ranged from 4.7 to 7.8 kW h per Mg of waste input. In a single-stream MRF, equipment required for glass separation consumes 28% of total facility electricity consumption, while all other pieces of material recovery equipment consume less than 10% of total electricity. The dual-stream and mixed-waste MRFs have similar electricity consumption to a single-stream MRF. Glass separation contributes a much larger fraction of electricity consumption in a pre-sorted MRF, due to lower overall facility electricity consumption. Parametric analysis revealed that reducing separation efficiency for each piece of equipment by 25% altered total facility electricity consumption by less than 4% in each case. When model results were compared with actual data for an

  12. Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

    2004-09-30

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and

  13. Federal-facilities Hazardous-Waste Compliance Manual. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-09

    In the continuing effort to achieve a higher level of compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Federal facilities, the Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Office (FFHWCO) has developed the Federal Facilities Hazardous Waste Compliance Manual. The manual includes an overview of the Federal-facilities hazardous-waste compliance program, relevant statutory authorities, model provisions for Federal facility agreements, enforcement and other applicable guidance, Federal facilities docket and NPL listings, data-management information, selected DOD and DOE program guidance, and organization charts and contacts. This compendium is intended to be used as a reference by Regional RCRA and CERCLA enforcement personnel and Regional Counsels, particularly as an orientation guide for new Federal facilities staff.

  14. Joint Assessment of Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Research Center (REWDC) Program Capabilities and Facilities In Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissani, M; Fischer, R; Kidd, S; Merrigan, J

    2006-04-03

    The primary goal of this visit was to perform a joint assessment of the Renewable Energy and Water Desalination Center's (REWDC) program in radioactive waste management. The visit represented the fourth technical and scientific interaction with Libya under the DOE/NNSA Sister Laboratory Arrangement. Specific topics addressed during the visit focused on Action Sheet P-05-5, ''Radioactive Waste Management''. The Team, comprised of Mo Bissani (Team Lead), Robert Fischer, Scott Kidd, and Jim Merrigan, consulted with REWDC management and staff. The team collected information, discussed particulars of the technical collaboration and toured the Tajura facility. The tour included the waste treatment facility, waste storage/disposal facility, research reactor facility, hot cells and analytical labs. The assessment team conducted the first phase of Task A for Action Sheet 5, which involved a joint assessment of the Radioactive Waste Management Program. The assessment included review of the facilities dedicated to the management of radioactive waste at the Tourja site, the waste management practices, proposed projects for the facility and potential impacts on waste generation and management.

  15. Enterprise Assessments Operational Awareness Record for the Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility (OAR EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA Operational Awareness Record Report Number: EA-HANFORD-2015-09-09 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Assessment of Construction at the Hanford Site K-West Annex Facility Dates of Activity: 09/15/15 Onsite 11/30/15 Records Review Report Preparer: Joseph J. Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this activity was to perform a quarterly assessment of the construction activities at the Hanford K-West Annex Facility. The office of Enterprise Assessments (EA) performed the following

  16. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  17. The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, L.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

  18. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  19. Safety Assessment for the Kozloduy National Disposal Facility in Bulgaria - 13507

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biurrun, E.; Haverkamp, B.; Lazaro, A.; Miralles, A.; Stefanova, I.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the early decommissioning of four Water-Water Energy Reactors (WWER) 440-V230 reactors at the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) near the city of Kozloduy in Bulgaria, large amounts of low and intermediate radioactive waste will arise much earlier than initially scheduled. In or-der to manage the radioactive waste from the early decommissioning, Bulgaria has intensified its efforts to provide a near surface disposal facility at Radiana with the required capacity. To this end, a project was launched and assigned in international competition to a German-Spanish consortium to provide the complete technical planning including the preparation of the Intermediate Safety Assessment Report. Preliminary results of operational and long-term safety show compliance with the Bulgarian regulatory requirements. The long-term calculations carried out for the Radiana site are also a good example of how analysis of safety assessment results can be used for iterative improvements of the assessment by pointing out uncertainties and areas of future investigations to reduce such uncertainties in regard to the potential radiological impact. The computer model used to estimate the long-term evolution of the future repository at Radiana predicted a maximum total annual dose for members of the critical group, which is carried to approximately 80 % by C-14 for a specific ingestion pathway. Based on this result and the outcome of the sensitivity analysis, existing uncertainties were evaluated and areas for reasonable future investigations to reduce these uncertainties were identified. (authors)

  20. Environmental impact assessment for a radioactive waste facility: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devgun, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    A 77-ha site, known as the Niagara Falls Storage Site and located in northwestern New York State, holds about 190, 000 m{sup 3} of soils, wastes, and residues contaminated with radium and uranium. The facility is owned by the US Department of Energy. The storage of residues resulting from the processing of uranium ores started in 1944, and by 1950 residues from a number of plants were received at the site. The residues, with a volume of about 18,000 m{sup 3}, account for the bulk of the radioactivity, which is primarily due to Ra-226; because of the extraction of uranium from the ore, the amount of uranium remaining in the residues is quite small. An analysis of the environmental impact assessment and environmental compliance actions taken to date at this site and their effectiveness are discussed. This case study provides an illustrative example of the complexity of technical and nontechnical issues for a large radiative waste facility. 11 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Environmental assessment report: Nuclear Test Technology Complex. [Construction and operation of proposed facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonnessen, K.; Tewes, H.A.

    1982-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) is planning to construct and operate a structure, designated the Nuclear Test Technology Complex (NTTC), on a site located west of and adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NTTC is designed to house 350 nuclear test program personnel, and will accommodate the needs of the entire staff of the continuing Nuclear Test Program (NTP). The project has three phases: land acquisition, facility construction and facility operation. The purpose of this environmental assessment report is to describe the activities associated with the three phases of the NTTC project and to evaluate potential environmental disruptions. The project site is located in a rural area of southeastern Alameda County, California, where the primary land use is agriculture; however, the County has zoned the area for industrial development. The environmental impacts of the project include surface disturbance, high noise levels, possible increases in site erosion, and decreased air quality. These impacts will occur primarily during the construction phase of the NTTC project and can be mitigated in part by measures proposed in this report.

  2. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the SNL/California waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braye, S.; Phillips, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    SNL/California`s waste management facilities, Bldgs. 961 and 962-2, generate a secondary stream of hazardous and radioactive waste. This waste stream is generated mainly during the processing and handling of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes (primary waste stream), which are generated by the laboratories, and when cleaning up spills. The secondary waste stream begins with the removal of a generator`s hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste from specified collection areas. The waste stream ends when the containers of processed waste are loaded for shipment off-site. The total amount of secondary hazardous waste generated in the waste management facilities from January 1993 to July 1994 was 1,160.6 kg. The total amount of secondary radioactive waste generated during the same period was 1,528.8 kg (with an activity of 0.070 mCi). Mixed waste usually is not generated in the secondary waste stream. This pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was conducted using the graded approach methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) PPOA task group. The original method was modified to accommodate the needs of Sandia`s site-specific processes. The options generated for potential hazardous waste minimization, cost savings, and environmental health and safety were the result of a waste minimization team effort. The results of the team efforts are summarized.

  3. X-ray transport and radiation response assessment (XTRRA) experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fournier, K. B.; Brown, Jr., C. G.; Yeoman, M. F.; Fisher, J. H.; Seiler, S. W.; Hinshelwood, D.; Compton, S.; Holdener, F. R.; Kemp, G. E.; Newlander, C. D.; et al

    2016-08-10

    Our team has developed an experimental platform to evaluate the x-ray-generated stress and impulse in materials. Experimental activities include x-ray source development, design of the sample mounting hardware and sensors interfaced to the NIF’s diagnostics insertion system, and system integration into the facility. This paper focuses on the X-ray Transport and Radiation Response Assessment (XTRRA) test cassettes built for these experiments. The test cassette is designed to position six samples at three predetermined distances from the source, each known to within ±1% accuracy. Built in calorimeters give in situ measurements of the x-ray environment along the sample lines of sight.more » We discuss the measured accuracy of sample responses, as well as planned modifications to the XTRRA cassette.« less

  4. Recharge Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Szecsody, Jim E.

    2004-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assisted CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., (CHG) by providing estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The IDF will be located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site and will receive several types of waste including immobilized low-activity waste. The recharge estimates for each scenario were derived from lysimeter and tracer data collected by the IDF PA Project and from modeling studies conducted for the project. Recharge estimates were provided for three specific site features (the surface barrier; possible barrier side slopes; and the surrounding soil) and four specific time periods (pre-Hanford; Hanford operations; surface barrier design life; post-barrier design life). CHG plans to conduct a performance assessment of the latest IDF design and call it the IDF 2005 PA; this recharge data package supports the upcoming IDF 2005 PA.

  5. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 3. Characterization of the nature and magnitude of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume III of the report describes the methods used to estimate both stack and fugitive emission rates from the facility.

  6. Boil-off experiments with the EIR-NEPTUN Facility: Analysis and code assessment overview report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksan, S.N.; Stierli, F.; Analytis, G.T.

    1992-03-01

    The NEPTUN data discussed in this report are from core uncovery (boil-off) experiments designed to investigate the mixture level decrease and the heat up of the fuel rod simulators above the mixture level for conditions simulating core boil-off for a nuclear reactor under small break loss-of-coolant accident conditions. The first series of experiments performed in the NEPTUN test facility consisted of ten boil-off (uncovery) and one adiabatic heat-up tests. In these tests three parameters were varied: rod power, system pressure and initial coolant subcooling. The NEPTUN experiments showed that the external surface thermocouples do not cause a significant cooling influence in the rods to which they are attached under boil-off conditions. The reflooding tests performed later on indicated that the external surface thermocouples have some effect during reflooding for NEPTUN electrically heated rod bundle. Peak cladding temperatures are reduced by about 30--40C and quench times occur 20--70 seconds earlier than rods with embedded thermocouples. Additionally, the external surface-thermocouples give readings up to 20 K lower than those obtained with internal surface thermocouples (in the absence of external thermocouples) in the peak cladding temperature zone. Some of the boil-off data obtained from the NEPTUN test facility are used for the assessment of the thermal-hydraulic transient computer codes. These calculations were performed extensively using the frozen version of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 (version 22). A limited number of assessment calculations were done with RELAP5/MOD2 (version 36.02). In this report the main results and conclusions of these calculations are presented with the identification of problem areas in relation to models relevant to boil-off phenomena. On the basis of further analysis and calculations done, changing some of the models such as the bubbly/slug flow interfacial friction correlation which eliminate some of the problems are recommended.

  7. Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, James R.

    2005-12-07

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

  8. Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment Charley Yu*, Argonne National Laboratory ; Emmanuel Gnanapragasam, Argonne National Laboratory; Carlos Corredor, U.S. Department of Energy; W. Alexander Williams, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energy’s new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person

  9. Monitored retrievable storage submission to Congress: Volume 2, Environmental assessment for a monitored retrievable storage facility. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1986-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) supports the DOE proposal to Congress to construct and operate a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of spent fuel at a site on the Clinch River in the Roane County portion of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The first part of this document is an assessment of the value of, need for, and feasibility of an MRS facility as an integral component of the waste management system. The second part is an assessment and comparison of the potential environmental impacts projected for each of six site-design combinations. The MRS facility would be centrally located with respect to existing reactors, and would receive and canister spent fuel in preparation for shipment to and disposal in a geologic repository. 207 refs., 57 figs., 132 tabs.

  10. Approaches to consider covers and liners in a low-level waste disposal facility performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger; Phifer, Mark; Suttora, Linda

    2015-03-17

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several USDOE sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the USEPA in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. One task completed by the working group addressed approaches for considering the performance of covers and liners/leachate collection systems in the context of a performance assessment (PA). A document has been prepared which provides recommendations for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information is then synthesized into recommendations for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system.

  11. Procedural guidance for reviewing exposure information under RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) section 3019. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grogan, T.; Kayser, R.

    1986-09-26

    This guidance manual describes the procedures for permit writers in evaluating exposure information submitted under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Section 3019. The integration of the review with existing RCRA permitting activities is also discussed. The document outlines procedures to follow in referring sites to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) for health evaluations.

  12. Permit applicants' guidance manual for exposure information requirements under RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) Section 3019. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-07-03

    The purpose of this document is to provide owners and operators of hazardous-waste landfills and surface impoundments that are subject to permitting under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) with guidance for submitting information on the potential for public exposure to hazardous wastes, as required by Section 3019 of RCRA.

  13. Proliferation resistance assessments during the design phase of a recycling facility as a means of reducing proliferation risks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindell, M.A.; Grape, S.; Haekansson, A.; Jacobsson Svaerd, S.

    2013-07-01

    The sustainability criterion for Gen IV nuclear energy systems inherently presumes the availability of efficient fuel recycling capabilities. One area for research on advanced fuel recycling concerns safeguards aspects of this type of facilities. Since a recycling facility may be considered as sensitive from a non-proliferation perspective, it is important to address these issues early in the design process, according to the principle of Safeguards By Design. Presented in this paper is a mode of procedure, where assessments of the proliferation resistance (PR) of a recycling facility for fast reactor fuel have been performed so as to identify the weakest barriers to proliferation of nuclear material. Two supplementing established methodologies have been applied; TOPS (Technological Opportunities to increase Proliferation resistance of nuclear power Systems) and PR-PP (Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection evaluation methodology). The chosen fuel recycling facility belongs to a small Gen IV lead-cooled fast reactor system that is under study in Sweden. A schematic design of the recycling facility, where actinides are separated using solvent extraction, has been examined. The PR assessment methodologies make it possible to pinpoint areas in which the facility can be improved in order to reduce the risk of diversion. The initial facility design may then be slightly modified and/or safeguards measures may be introduced to reduce the total identified proliferation risk. After each modification of design and/or safeguards implementation, a new PR assessment of the revised system can then be carried out. This way, each modification can be evaluated and new ways to further enhance the proliferation resistance can be identified. This type of iterative procedure may support Safeguards By Design in the planning of new recycling plants and other nuclear facilities. (authors)

  14. HAB Advice and Issue Tracking Process for Draft RCRA Site-Wide Permit Comment Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Issue Tracking Process for Draft RCRA Site-Wide Permit Comment Period Last updated 5/8/12 Introduction: The following document is a living document intended to be updated regularly to include new information and track issues related to the Draft Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit, also referred to as the RCRA Permit. Advice Process: 1. Assemble Issue Manager Team: Liz Mattson, Pam Larsen, Gerry Pollet, Jean Vanni, Steve Hudson 2. Prepare for years for the release of the Permit, work with Ecology

  15. Development of an ASTM standard guide on performing vulnerability assessments for nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkey, D.D.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes an effort undertaken by subcommittee C26.12 (Safeguards) of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) to develop a standard guide for performing vulnerability assessments (VAs). VAs are performed to determine the effectiveness of safeguards and security systems for both domestic and international nuclear facilities. These assessments address a range of threats, including theft of nuclear material and sabotage, and use an array of methods. The approach to performing and documenting VAs is varied and is largely dependent upon the tools used to perform them. This diversity can lead to tools being misused, making validation of VAs more difficult. The development of a standard guide for performing VAs would, if generally accepted, alleviate these concerns. ASTM provides a forum for developing guides that includes a high level of peer review to assure that the result is acceptable to all potential users. Additionally, the ASTM is widely recognized for setting standards, and endorsement by the Society may increase the likelihood of acceptance by the nuclear community. The goal of this work is to develop a guide that is independent of the tools being used to perform the VA and applicable to the spectrum of threats described above.

  16. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment (SERA). Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) is an analysis of the potential significance of risks to ecological receptors (e.g., plants, fish, wildlife) from exposure to facility emissions. The SERA was performed using conservative assumptions and approaches to determine if a further, more refined analysis is warranted. Volume VI describes in detail the methods used in the SERA and reports the results of the SERA in terms of site-specific risks to ecological receptors.

  17. Preliminary Closure Plan for the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-08-31

    This document describes the preliminary plans for closure of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) disposal facility to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington. The facility will provide near-surface disposal of up to 204,000 cubic meters of ILAW in engineered trenches with modified RCRA Subtitle C closure barriers.

  18. Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.

    1982-09-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

  19. Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.B.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

  20. Environmental assessment for the construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Waste Segregation Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE) to assess the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction, operation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Waste Segregation Facility (WSF) for the sorting, shredding, and compaction of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) located near Aiken, South Carolina. The LLW to be processed consists of two waste streams: legacy waste which is currently stored in E-Area Vaults of SRS and new waste generated from continuing operations. The proposed action is to construct, operate, and D&D a facility to process low-activity job-control and equipment waste for volume reduction. The LLW would be processed to make more efficient use of low-level waste disposal capacity (E-Area Vaults) or to meet the waste acceptance criteria for treatment at the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at SRS.

  1. Radiological Assessment for the Vance Road Facility Source Vault, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratories had been used for a broad range of nuclear medicine research involving numerous radionuclides. These radionuclides were stored in the a source vault located on the first floor of the facility. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault after it had been remediated and in preparation for converting the area to office space.

  2. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 2. Introduction. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This volume provides a description of the facility, and its location and setting in the three-state area of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia; an overview of previous risk assessments conducted by U.S. EPA for this site, including the preliminary assessment of inhalation exposure and the screening-level risk analyses of indirect exposure; and a summary of comments provided by the Peer Review Panel on the Project Plan.

  3. RCRA corrective action for underground storage tanks -- Subtitle C for Subtitle I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to DOE and DOE contractor personnel responsible for planning and implementation of corrective measures addressing cleanup of releases of hazardous materials or regulated substances from underground storage tanks regulated under RCRA Subtitle C or Subtitle I.

  4. Annual Report RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspections for Corrective Action Unit 112: Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley F. Emer

    1999-01-01

    This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture data obtained at the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) unit, located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada during the October 1997 - October 1998 period. Inspections of the Area 23 Hazardous Waste Trenches RCRA unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the covers, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. Physical inspections of the closure were completed quarterly and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. An annual subsidence survey of the elevation markers was conducted in July 1998. There has been no subsidence at any of the markers since monitoring began six years ago. The objective of the neutron logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along 30 neutron access tubes and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement at a point located directly beneath each trench. All monitored access tubes are within the compliance criteria of less than 5 percent residual volumetric moisture content at the compliance point directly beneath each respective trench. Soil conditions remain dry and stable underneath the trenches.

  5. Use of the UNCLE Facility to Assess Integrated Online Monitoring Systems for Detection of Diversions at Uranium Conversion Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewji, Shaheen A; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Lee, Denise L; Rauch, Eric; Hertel, Nolan

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the approach to safeguarding nuclear material in the front end of the fuel cycle was implemented only at the stage when UF6 was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. Recent International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) circulars and policy papers have sought to implement safeguards when any purified aqueous uranium solution or uranium oxides suitable for isotopic enrichment or fuel fabrication exist. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) operating at 6000 MTU/year. Monitoring instruments, including the 3He passive neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter, have been tested at UNCLE and field tested at Springfields. The field trials demonstrated the need to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of operations and safeguards monitoring at additional plants. Currently, UNCLE is testing neutron-based monitoring for detection of noncompliant activities; however, gamma-ray source term monitoring is currently being explored complementary to the neutron detector in order to detect undeclared activities in a more timely manner. The preliminary results of gamma-ray source term modeling and monitoring at UNCLE are being analyzed as part of a comprehensive source term and detector benchmarking effort. Based on neutron source term detection capabilities, alternative gamma-based detection and monitoring methods will be proposed to more effectively monitor NUCP operations in verifying or detecting deviations from declared conversion activities.

  6. Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

    1995-02-01

    The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

  7. Draft environmental assessment -- Closure of the Waste Calcining Facility (CPP-633), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, J.B.; Irving, J.S.; Staley, C.S.; Stanley, N.

    1996-04-01

    The DOE-Idaho Operations Office has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) to analyze the environmental impacts of closing the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of the action is to reduce the risk of radioactive exposure and release of radioactive and hazardous constituents and eliminate the need for extensive long-term surveillance and maintenance. DOE has determined that the closure is needed to reduce these risks to human health and the environment and to comply with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements. The WCF closure project is described in the DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (Programmatic EIS). DOE determined in the Programmatic EIS Record of Decision (ROD) that certain actions would be implemented and other actions deferred. The EA examined the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and evaluated reasonable alternatives, including the no action alternative in accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations. Based on the analysis in the EA, the action will not have a significant effect on the human environment.

  8. Description of the OSU APEX test facility to assess AP600 passive safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochreiter, L.E.; Lau, L.K.; Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Groome, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to describe the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) test facility, which is a new integral system test facility located at Oregon State University (OSU) specifically scaled, designed, and built to simulate all of the important geometrical details of the Westinghouse AP600. The APEX facility has been designed and constructed to develop a database that can be used to validate the thermal hydraulic safety analysis codes that will be used in the AP600 design certification process. The test facility has been specifically designed and scaled to model small break loss-of-coolant and long-term cooling transients, which utilize the AP600 passive safety systems.

  9. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  10. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Edwards, Daniel L.

    2003-12-05

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the assessment performed in 2003.

  11. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis: Selection and assessment of potential release scenarios. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. The Accident Analysis is an evaluation of the likelihood of occurrence and resulting consequences from several general classes of accidents that could potentially occur during operation of the facility. The Accident Analysis also evaluates the effectiveness of existing mitigation measures in reducing off-site impacts. Volume VII describes in detail the methods used to conduct the Accident Analysis and reports the results of evaluations of likelihood and consequence for the selected accident scenarios.

  12. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.

    1993-09-01

    In 1943 the Hanford Site was chosen as a location for the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. The 100-N Area at Hanford was used from 1963 to 1987 for a dual-purpose, plutonium production and steam generation reactor and related operational support facilities (Diediker and Hall 1987). In November 1989, the reactor was put into dry layup status. During operations, chemical and radioactive wastes were released into the area soil, air, and groundwater. The 1325-N LWDF was constructed in 1983 to replace the 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility (1301-N LWDF). The two facilities operated simultaneously from 1983 to 1985. The 1301-N LWDF was retired from use in 1985 and the 1325-N LWDF continued operation until April 1991, when active discharges to the facility ceased. Effluent discharge to the piping system has been controlled by administrative means. This report discusses ground water contamination resulting from the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal facility.

  13. Environmental assessment of oil degasification at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve facilities in Texas and Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to treat gassy oil at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage sites to lower the gas content of the stored crude oil and help ensure safe transfer of the oil during drawdown. The crude oil is stored underground in caverns created in salt domes. The degree of gassiness of the oil varies substantially among sites and among caverns within a site. This environmental assessment describes the proposed degasification operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. The need for degasification has arisen because over time, gases, principally methane and nitrogen, have migrated into and become dissolved in the stored crude oil. This influx of gas has raised the crude oil vapor pressure above limits required by safety and emission guidelines. When oil is drawn from the caverns, excess gases may come out of solution. Based on preliminary data from an ongoing sampling program, between 200 and 350 million of the 587 million barrels of crude oil stored at these four sites would require processing to remove excess gas. Degasification, a commonly used petroleum industry process, would be done at four crude oil storage facilities: Bryan Mound and Big Hill in Texas, and West Hackberry and Bayou Choctaw in Louisiana. DOE would use a turnkey services contract for engineering, procurement, fabrication, installation, operation and maintenance of two degasification plants. These would be installed initially at Bryan Mound and West Hackberry. Degasification would be complete in less than three years of continuous operations. This report summarizes the environmental impacts of this gasification process.

  14. Enhancing RESRAD-OFFSITE for Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Abstract: The RESRAD-OFFSITE code was developed to evaluate the radiological dose and excess cancer risk to an individual who is exposed while located within or outside the area of initial (primary) contamination. The primary contamination, which is the source of all releases modeled by the code, is assumed to be a layer of soil. The code considers the release of contamination from the source to the atmosphere, to surface runoff, and to groundwater. The radionuclide leaching was modeled as a first order (without transport) release using radionuclide distribution coefficient and infiltration rate calculated from water balance (precipitation, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, etc.). Recently, a new source term model was added the RESRAD-OFFSITE code so that it can be applied to the evaluation of Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment. This new improved source term model include (1) first order with transport, (2) equilibrium desorption (rinse) release, and (3) uniform release (constant dissolution). With these new source release options, it is possible to simulate both uncontainerized (soil) contamination and containerized (waste drums) contamination. A delay time in the source release was also added to the code. This allows modeling the LLW container degradation as a function of time. The RESRAD-OFFSITE code also allows linking to other codes using improved flux and concentration input options. Additional source release model such as diffusion release may be added later. In addition, radionuclide database with 1252 radionuclides (ICRP 107) and the corresponding dose coefficients (DCFPAK 3.02) and the Department of Energy’s new gender- and age-averaged Reference Person dose coefficients (DOE-STD-1196-2011) which is based on the US census data will be added to the next version of RESRAD-OFFSITE code

  15. 324 Facility special-case waste assessment in support of 324 closure (TPA milestone M-89-05)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobart, R.L.

    1998-06-25

    Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-89-05, requires US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office to complete a 324 Facility Special-Case Waste Assessment in Support of 324 Closure. This document, HNF-1270, has been prepared with the intent of meeting this regulatory commitment. Alternatives for the special-case wastes located in the 324 Building were defined and analyzed. Based on the criteria of safety, environmental, complexity of interfaces, risk, cost, schedule, and long-term operability and maintainability, the best alternative was chosen. Waste packaging and transportation options are also included in the recommendations. The waste disposition recommendations for the B-Cell dispersibles/tank heels and High-Level Vault packaged residuals are to direct them to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) Number 2 storage tunnel.

  16. Steam plant ash disposal facility and industrial landfill at the Y-12 Plant, Anderson County, Tennessee. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to install a wet ash handling system to dewater bottom ash from the coal-fired steam plant at its Y-12 Plant and to construct a new landfill for disposal of industrial wastes, including the dewatered bottom ash. The DOE operates three major facilities on its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Operation of these facilities results in the production of a variety of nonhazardous, nonradioactive solid wastes (approximately 300 m{sup 3} per day, compacted) including sanitary wastes, common industrial wastes and construction debris. At the current rate of use, this existing landfill will be filled within approximately 18 months, and more space is urgently needed. In an effort to alleviate this problem, DOE and WMD management propose to create additional landfill facilities at a nearby site. The potential environmental impacts associated with this proposed action are the subject of this environmental assessment (EA).

  17. Evaluation of a performance assessment methodology for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities: Validation needs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozak, M.W.; Olague, N.E.

    1995-02-01

    In this report, concepts on how validation fits into the scheme of developing confidence in performance assessments are introduced. A general framework for validation and confidence building in regulatory decision making is provided. It is found that traditional validation studies have a very limited role in developing site-specific confidence in performance assessments. Indeed, validation studies are shown to have a role only in the context that their results can narrow the scope of initial investigations that should be considered in a performance assessment. In addition, validation needs for performance assessment of low-level waste disposal facilities are discussed, and potential approaches to address those needs are suggested. These areas of topical research are ranked in order of importance based on relevance to a performance assessment and likelihood of success.

  18. Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Facility Agreement for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant State Kentucky Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Ensure that the environmental impacts of activities at the Site are investigated and appropriate response actions are taken. Parties U.S. DOE; Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet; U.S. EPA Date 2/01/1998 SCOPE * Ensure all releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants are addressed to

  19. Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment - Enhancing a Facility-Level Model for Proliferation Resistance Assessment of a Nuclear Enegry System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Brothers, Alan J.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Olson, Jarrod; Thompson, Sandra E.

    2009-10-26

    The Utility of Social Modeling for Proliferation Assessment project (PL09-UtilSocial) investigates the use of social and cultural information to improve nuclear proliferation assessments, including nonproliferation assessments, Proliferation Resistance (PR) assessments, safeguards assessments, and other related studies. These assessments often use and create technical information about a host State and its posture towards proliferation, the vulnerability of a nuclear energy system (NES) to an undesired event, and the effectiveness of safeguards. This objective of this project is to find and integrate social and technical information by explicitly considering the role of cultural, social, and behavioral factors relevant to proliferation; and to describe and demonstrate if and how social science modeling has utility in proliferation assessment. This report describes a modeling approach and how it might be used to support a location-specific assessment of the PR assessment of a particular NES. The report demonstrates the use of social modeling to enhance an existing assessment process that relies on primarily technical factors. This effort builds on a literature review and preliminary assessment performed as the first stage of the project and compiled in PNNL-18438. [ T his report describes an effort to answer questions about whether it is possible to incorporate social modeling into a PR assessment in such a way that we can determine the effects of social factors on a primarily technical assessment. This report provides: 1. background information about relevant social factors literature; 2. background information about a particular PR assessment approach relevant to this particular demonstration; 3. a discussion of social modeling undertaken to find and characterize social factors that are relevant to the PR assessment of a nuclear facility in a specific location; 4. description of an enhancement concept that integrates social factors into an existing, technically

  20. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Edwards; KD Shields; MJ Sula; MY Ballinger

    1999-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP--US Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H). In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the US Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Pacific Northwest) on the Hanford Site. Two of the facilities evaluated, 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory, and 331 Building Life Sciences Laboratory met state and federal criteria for continuous sampling of airborne radionuclide emissions. One other building, the 3720 Environmental Sciences Laboratory, was recognized as being in transition with the potential for meeting the continuous sampling criteria.

  1. RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

  2. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is

  3. An assessment of alternatives and technologies for replacing ozone- depleting substances at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C.W.; Miller, K.B.; Friedman, J.R.; Rapoport, R.D.; Conover, D.R.; Hendrickson, P.L. ); Koss, T.C. . Office of Environmental Guidance)

    1992-10-01

    Title VI of the Clean Air Act, as amended, mandates a production phase-out for ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). These requirements will have a significant impact on US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Currently, DOE uses ODSs in three major activities: fire suppression (halon), refrigeration and cooling (chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs]), and cleaning that requires solvents (CFCs, methyl chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). This report provides basic information on methods and strategies to phase out use of ODSs at DOE facilities.

  4. RCRA ground-water monitoring: Draft technical guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The manual was prepared to provide guidance for implementing the ground-water monitoring regulations for regulated units contained in 40 CFR Part 264 Subpart F and the permitting standards of 40 CFR Part 270. The manual also provides guidance to owners and operators of treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) that are required to comply with the requirements of 40 CFR Part 264 Subparts J (Tank Systems), K (Surface Impoundments), L (Waste Piles), N (Landfills), and X (Miscellaneous Units). This document updates technical information contained in other sources of U.S. EPA guidance, such as chapter eleven of SW-846 (Revision O, September 1986) and the Technical Enforcement Guidance Document (TEGD).

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BERAC) published findings and recommendations from their assessment of the effectiveness of ARM Climate Research Facility as a national scientific user facility. Based on...

  6. Assessment of Geochemical Environment for the Proposed INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Craig Cooper

    2011-11-01

    Conservative sorption parameters have been estimated for the proposed Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility. This analysis considers the influence of soils, concrete, and steel components on water chemistry and the influence of water chemistry on the relative partitioning of radionuclides over the life of the facility. A set of estimated conservative distribution coefficients for the primary media encountered by transported radionuclides has been recommended. These media include the vault system, concrete-sand-gravel mix, alluvium, and sedimentary interbeds. This analysis was prepared to support the performance assessment required by U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management.' The estimated distribution coefficients are provided to support release and transport calculations of radionuclides from the waste form through the vadose zone. A range of sorption parameters are provided for each key transport media, with recommended values being conservative. The range of uncertainty has been bounded through an assessment of most-likely-minimum and most-likely-maximum distribution coefficient values. The range allows for adequate assessment of mean facility performance while providing the basis for uncertainty analysis.

  7. Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

  8. Development and implementation of a site radiation protection program for a radioactive waste vitrification and RCRA clean closure project at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, M.S.; Howard, I.S.; Veronee, W.A. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to implement radiological protection program at the M-Area Vendo Treatment Facility (VTF) at the Savannah River Site. The project is unique in that it incorporates a turnkey approach to operation and control of a single waste treatment facility at a DOE site. The Vendor Treatment Facility is a temporary installation in the M-Area of the Savannah River Site consisting of buildings 341-M and 341-8M and tanks 100-7, 100-8, and 100-10. The objective of the VTF is to convert approximately 660,000 gallons of uranium and nickel-contaminated sludge to a stable glass wasteform. The scope of the VTF project also includes RCRA clean closure of the tanks following removal of the sludge. Facility-specific radiological controls for the VTF were necessary to minimize safety and health risks to occupational workers, as well as members of the general public. The Radiation Protection Program (RPP) established radiological requirements for all VTF operations and support activities. The RPP was designed and implemented to support Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s (WSRC) implementation of a radiological protection program as specified in WSRC Manual 5Q; the U.S. DOE Radiological Control Manual, DOE/EH-0256T; Occupational Radiation Protection, 10 CFR 835; and contractual commitments.

  9. Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkoulidis, G.; Papageorgiou, A.; Karagiannidis, A.; Kalogirou, S.

    2010-07-15

    The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased

  10. Operation of N Reactor and Fuels Fabrication Facilities, Hanford Reservation, Richland, Benton County, Washington: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    Environmental data, calculations and analyses show no significant adverse radiological or nonradiological impacts from current or projected future operations resulting from N Reactor, Fuels Fabrication and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities. Nonoccupational radiation exposures resulting from 1978 N Reactor operations are summarized and compared to allowable exposure limits.

  11. Environmental assessment for the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory proposes to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF) to treat explosive waste at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site, Site 300. It is also proposed to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life in accordance with the regulations. The facility would replace the existing Building 829 Open Burn Facility (B829) and would treat explosive waste generated at the LLNL Livermore Site and at Site 300 either by open burning or open detonation, depending on the type of waste. The alternatives addressed in the 1992 sitewide EIS/EIR are reexamined in this EA. These alternatives included: (1) the no-action alternative which would continue open burning operations at B829; (2) continuation of only open burning at a new facility (no open detonation); (3) termination of open burning operations with shipment of explosive waste offsite; and (4) the application of alternative treatment technologies. This EA examines the impact of construction, operation, and closure of the EWTF. Construction of the EWTF would result in the clearing of a small amount of previously disturbed ground. No adverse impact is expected to any state or federal special status plant or animal species (special status species are classified as threatened, endangered, or candidate species by either state or federal legislation). Operation of the EWTF is expected to result in a reduced threat to involved workers and the public because the proposed facility would relocate existing open burning operations to a more remote area and would incorporate design features to reduce the amount of potentially harmful emissions. No adverse impacts were identified for activities necessary to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life.

  12. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  13. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 1. Executive summary. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume I is a description of the components and methodologies used in the risk assessment and provides a summary of the major results from the three components of the assessment.

  14. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Startup Test Plans Â… June 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility Construction Quality January 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  15. Enterprise Assessments Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of the Management of Safety Systems at U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities Â… April 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of the Management of Safety Systems at U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities April 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  16. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Delegation of Safety Basis Approval Authority for Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 Nuclear Facilities Â… April 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Delegation of Safety Basis Approval Authority for Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 Nuclear Facilities April 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  17. Enterprise Assessments Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Fire Protection Systems Follow-up Review at the Savannah River Site Â… January 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Quality and Fire Protection Systems Follow-up Review at the Savannah River Site January 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive

  18. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety Basis at the Savannah River Site F-Area Central Laboratory Facility Â… January 2016

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Safety Basis at the Savannah River Site F-Area Central Laboratory Facility January 2016 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms ...................................................................................................................................................... ii Executive Summary

  19. Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, R.H.; Oji, L.N.

    1997-11-14

    Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

  20. Independent Review of Siesmic Performance Assessments for the Plutonium Facility PF-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, Andrew; Goen, Lawrence Kenneth; Kennedy, Robert; McDonald, Brian; Morgan, Troy; Wyllie, Loring

    2015-11-25

    The Plutonium Facility, designated PF-4, is located in Technical Area 55 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The facility is a one-story rectangular structure above a complete basement; the building was constructed of cast-in-place reinforced concrete, with small interior frames of structural steel. The plan dimensions of the building are 265’×284’. The overall height of the building varies between 39’-0” at the north and south ends, and 40’-6” at the center ridge. The programmatic work performed in the building is vital to our national security and its functions and storage purposes are not replicated elsewhere in the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Hockert, John; Gitau, Ernest TN; Zentner, Michael D.

    2013-01-26

    FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

  2. Trial Application of the Facility Safeguardability Assessment Process to the NuScale SMR Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, Garill A.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Hockert, John; Zentner, Michael D.

    2012-11-09

    FSA is a screening process intended to focus a facility designer’s attention on the aspects of their facility or process design that would most benefit from application of SBD principles and practices. The process is meant to identify the most relevant guidance within the SBD tools for enhancing the safeguardability of the design. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, NNSA sponsored PNNL to evaluate the practical application of FSA by applying it to the NuScale small modular nuclear power plant. This report documents the application of the FSA process, presenting conclusions regarding its efficiency and robustness. It describes the NuScale safeguards design concept and presents functional "infrastructure" guidelines that were developed using the FSA process.

  3. Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.; Hunt, P.D.

    1994-04-15

    The E-Area Vaults (EAVs) located on a 200 acre site immediately north of the current LLW burial site at Savannah River Site will provide a new disposal and storage site for solid, low-level, non-hazardous radioactive waste. The EAV Disposal Facility will contain several large concrete vaults divided into cells. Three types of structures will house four designated waste types. The Intermediate Level Non-Tritium Vaults will receive waste radiating greater than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container. The Intermediate Level Tritium Vaults will receive waste with at least 10 Ci of tritium per package. These two vaults share a similar design, are adjacent, share waste handling equipment, and will be closed as one facility. The second type of structure is the Low Activity Waste Vaults which will receive waste radiating less than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container and containing less than 10 Ci of tritium per package. The third facility, the Long Lived Waste Storage Building, provides covered, long term storage for waste containing long lived isotopes. Two additional types of disposal are proposed: (1) trench disposal of suspect soil, (2) naval reactor component disposal. To evaluate the long-term performance of the EAVs, site-specific conceptual models were developed to consider: (1) exposure pathways and scenarios of potential importance; (2) potential releases from the facility to the environment; (3) effects of degradation of engineered features; (4) transport in the environment; (5) potential doses received from radionuclides of interest in each vault type.

  4. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria

  5. Assessment of Potential Flood Events and Impacts at INL's Proposed Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter

    2010-09-01

    Rates, depths, erosion potential, increased subsurface transport rates, and annual exceedance probability for potential flooding scenarios have been evaluated for the on-site alternatives of Idaho National Laboratory’s proposed remote handled low-level waste disposal facility. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of flood impacts are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE-O 435.1), its natural phenomena hazards assessment criteria (DOE-STD-1023-95), and the Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1) guidance in addition to being required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) environmental assessment (EA). Potential sources of water evaluated include those arising from (1) local precipitation events, (2) precipitation events occurring off of the INL (off-site precipitation), and (3) increased flows in the Big Lost River in the event of a Mackay Dam failure. On-site precipitation events include potential snow-melt and rainfall. Extreme rainfall events were evaluated for the potential to create local erosion, particularly of the barrier placed over the disposal facility. Off-site precipitation carried onto the INL by the Big Lost River channel was evaluated for overland migration of water away from the river channel. Off-site precipitation sources evaluated were those occurring in the drainage basin above Mackay Reservoir. In the worst-case scenarios, precipitation occurring above Mackay Dam could exceed the dam’s capacity, leading to overtopping, and eventually complete dam failure. Mackay Dam could also fail during a seismic event or as a result of mechanical piping. Some of the water released during dam failure, and contributing precipitation, has the potential of being carried onto the INL in the Big Lost River channel. Resulting overland flows from these flood sources were evaluated for their

  6. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerard, Morgan Evan

    2011-12-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the MicroFab and SiFab facilities at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico in Fiscal Year 2011. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to provide recommendations to assist organizations in reducing the generation of waste and improving the efficiency of their processes and procedures. This report contains a summary of the information collected, the analyses performed, and recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Management System (EMS) and Pollution Prevention (P2) staff will continue to work with the organizations to implement the recommendations.

  7. Recommended Method To Account For Daughter Ingrowth For The Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Smith, Frank G. III

    2013-06-21

    A 3-D STOMP model has been developed for the Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility (OSWDF) at Site D as outlined in Appendix K of FBP 2013. This model projects the flow and transport of the following radionuclides to various points of assessments: Tc-99, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Am-241, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Th-228, and Th-230. The model includes the radioactive decay of these parents, but does not include the associated daughter ingrowth because the STOMP model does not have the capability to model daughter ingrowth. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides herein a recommended method to account for daughter ingrowth in association with the Portsmouth OSWDF Performance Assessment (PA) modeling.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Big Hill facility storage of commercial crude oil project, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The Big Hill SPR facility located in Jefferson County, Texas has been a permitted operating crude oil storage site since 1986 with benign environmental impacts. However, Congress has not authorized crude oil purchases for the SPR since 1990, and six storage caverns at Big Hill are underutilized with 70 million barrels of available storage capacity. On February 17, 1999, the Secretary of Energy offered the 70 million barrels of available storage at Big Hill for commercial use. Interested commercial users would enter into storage contracts with DOE, and DOE would receive crude oil in lieu of dollars as rental fees. The site could potentially began to receive commercial oil in May 1999. This Environmental Assessment identified environmental changes that potentially would affect water usage, power usage, and air emissions. However, as the assessment indicates, changes would not occur to a major degree affecting the environment and no long-term short-term, cumulative or irreversible impacts have been identified.

  9. Environmental Assessment for the proposed modification and continued operation of the DIII-D facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The EA evaluates the proposed action of modifying the DIII-D fusion facility and conducting related research activities at the GA San Diego site over 1995-1999 under DOE contract number DE-ACO3-89ER51114. The proposed action is need to advance magnetic fusion research for future generation fusion devices such as ITER and TPX. It was determined that the proposed action is not a major action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment according to NEPA; therefore a finding of no significant impact is made and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  10. Performance Assessment of the Portsmouth On-Site Waste Disposal Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 2015 Annual Performance and Risk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Technical Exchange Meeting held in Richland, Washington on December 15-16, 2015.

  11. Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities radionuclide inventory assessment CY 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    Assessments for evaluating compliance with airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subparts H and I) were performed for 33 buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory on the Hanford Site, and for five buildings owned and operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1992 and 1993. Results of the assessments are summarized in Table S.1 for DOE-PNL buildings and in Table S.2 for Battelle-owned buildings. Based on the radionuclide inventory assessments, four DOE-PNL buildings (one with two emission points) require continuous sampling for radionuclides per 40 CFR 61. None of the Battelle-owned buildings require continuous emission sampling.

  12. Methodology for assessing alternative water-acquisition-and-use strategies for energy facilities in the American West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, J.J.; Adams, E.E.; Harleman, D.R.F.; Marks, D.H.

    1981-12-01

    A method for assessing alternative strategies for acquiring and using water at western energy plants was developed. The method was tested in a case study of cooling-water use for a hypothetical steam-electric power plant on the Crazy Woman Creek, an unregulated stream in Wyoming. The results from the case study suggest a careful analysis of reservoir design and water-right purchase strategies can reduce the cost of acquiring and using water at an energy facility. The method uses simulation models to assess the capital and operating costs and expected monthly water-consumption rates for different cooling-system designs. The method also uses reservoir operating algorithms to select, for a fixed cooling-system design, the optimal tradeoff between building a make-up water reservoir and purchasing water rights. These tradeoffs can be used to derive the firm's true demand curve for different sources of water. The analysis also reveals the implicit cost of selecting strategies that minimize conflicts with other water users. Results indicate that: (1) cooling ponds are as good as or preferred to wet towers because their costs already include provisions for storing water for use during the normally dry summer months and during occasional drought years; (2) the energy firm's demand for overall water consumption in the cooling system was found to be inversely proportional to both the cost of installing make-up water reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility; and (3) the firm's willingness to pay for existing rights is proportional to both the cost of installing reservoirs, and the size of the energy facility.

  13. Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility. Appendices A through M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    1994-04-15

    These document contains appendices A-M for the performance assessment. They are A: details of models and assumptions, B: computer codes, C: data tabulation, D: geochemical interactions, E: hydrogeology of the Savannah River Site, F: software QA plans, G: completeness review guide, H: performance assessment peer review panel recommendations, I: suspect soil performance analysis, J: sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, K: vault degradation study, L: description of naval reactor waste disposal, M: porflow input file. (GHH)

  14. Revised Draft RCRA Permit Public Workshop AGENDA (revised April 16, 2012)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 16, 2012) May 3, 2012 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. LOCATION: WA Department of Ecology Offices WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES Enable participants to identify: ď‚· Why there is a Dangerous Waste Permit for the Hanford site. ď‚· HAB concerns and values related to the draft permit and possible advice points. Attendees: HAB members and members of the public Please read: Frequently Asked Questions about the RCRA permit found on Ecology's website 9:00-9:15 a.m. Welcome, Agenda, Housekeeping Welcome: Facilitator

  15. Revised Draft RCRA Permit Public Workshop AGENDA (revised March 6, 2012)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 6, 2012) May 3, 2012 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. LOCATION: WA Department of Ecology Offices WORKSHOP OBJECTIVES Enable participants to identify: * Why there is a Dangerous Waste Permit for the Hanford site. * HAB concerns and values related to the draft permit and possible advice points. Attendees: HAB members and members of the public Please read: Frequently Asked Questions about the RCRA permit found on Ecology's website 9:00-9:30 am Welcome, Agenda, Housekeeping Welcome: Susan Leckband Agenda

  16. Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-01-01

    A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

  17. Program management assessment of Federal Facility Compliance Agreement regarding CAA-40 C.F.R. Part 61, Subpart H at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    An assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s management system related to facility compliance with an element of the Clean Air Act was performed under contract by a team from Northern Arizona University. More specifically, a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was established in 1996 to bring the Laboratory into compliance with emissions standards of radionuclides, commonly referred to as Rad/NESHAP. In the fall of 1996, the four-person team of experienced environmental managers evaluated the adequacy of relevant management systems to implement the FFCA provisions. The assessment process utilized multiple procedures including document review, personnel interviews and re-interviews, and facility observations. The management system assessment was completed with a meeting among team members, Laboratory officials and others on November 1, 1996 and preparation of an assessment report.

  18. Technical assessment of workplace air sampling requirements at tank farm facilities. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, P.A.

    1994-09-21

    WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE N 5480.6 ``US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual`` as it applies to programs at Hanford which are now overseen by WHC. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ``Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual`` and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of Tank Farms` workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

  19. PU/SS EUTECTIC ASSESSMENT IN 9975 PACKAGINGS IN A STORAGE FACILITY DURING EXTENDED FIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N.

    2012-03-26

    In a radioactive material (RAM) packaging, the formation of eutectic at the Pu/SS (plutonium/stainless steel) interface is a serious concern and must be avoided to prevent of leakage of fissile material to the environment. The eutectic temperature for the Pu/SS is rather low (410 C) and could seriously impact the structural integrity of the containment vessel under accident conditions involving fire. The 9975 packaging is used for long term storage of Pu bearing materials in the DOE complex where the Pu comes in contact with the stainless steel containment vessel. Due to the serious consequences of the containment breach at the eutectic site, the Pu/SS interface temperature is kept well below the eutectic formation temperature of 410 C. This paper discusses the thermal models and the results for the extended fire conditions (1500 F for 86 minutes) that exist in a long term storage facility and concludes that the 9975 packaging Pu/SS interface temperature is well below the eutectic temperature.

  20. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Paducah Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility Fire Protection Program – September 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Targeted Review of the Fire Protection Program at the Paducah Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility

  1. Characterization of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Environmental Assessment (EA) glass Standard Reference Material. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Beam, D.C.; Crawford, C.L.; Pickett, M.A.

    1993-06-01

    Liquid high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be immobilized by vitrification in borosilicate glass. The glass will be produced and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Other waste form producers, such as West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP), will also immobilize high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The canistered waste will be stored temporarily at each facility for eventual permanent disposal in a geologic repository. The Department of Energy has defined a set of requirements for the canistered waste forms, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The current Waste Acceptance Primary Specification (WAPS) 1.3, the product consistency specification, requires the waste form producers to demonstrate control of the consistency of the final waste form using a crushed glass durability test, the Product Consistency Test (PCI). In order to be acceptable, a waste glass must be more durable during PCT analysis than the waste glass identified in the DWPF Environmental Assessment (EA). In order to supply all the waste form producers with the same standard benchmark glass, 1000 pounds of the EA glass was fabricated. The chemical analyses and characterization of the benchmark EA glass are reported. This material is now available to act as a durability and/or redox Standard Reference Material (SRM) for all waste form producers.

  2. RELAP5/MOD3.2 Assessment Using CHF Data from the KS-1 and V-200 Experiment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayless, Paul David

    2001-07-01

    The RELAP/MOD3.2 computer code has been assessed using rod bundle critical heat flux data from the KS-1 and V-200 facilities. This work was performed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s International Nuclear Safety Program, and is part of the effort addressing the capability of the RELAP5/MOD3.2 code to model transients in Soviet-designed reactors. Designated VVER Standard Problem 7, these tests addressed one of the important phenomena related to VVER behavior that the code needs to simulate well, core heat transfer. The code was judged to be in minimal agreement with the experiment data, consistently overpredicting the measured critical heat flux. It is recommended that a model development effort be undertaken to develop a critical heat flux model for RELAP5 that better represents the behavior in VVER rod bundles.

  3. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  4. Federal Facility Agreement for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Related Health Research Agreement Name Federal Facility Agreement for the Laboratory for Energy- Related Health Research State California Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA/RCRA Scope Summary Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing and monitoring appropriate response actions at LEHR Parties DOE; USEPA; California Department of Toxic Substances Control; Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board; California

  5. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 6. Screening ecological risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The Screening Ecological Risk Assessment (SERA) includes an evaluation of available biotic information from the site vicinity to provide a preliminary description of potential ecological receptors (e.g., rare, threatened and endangered species; migratory birds; and important game species), and important ecological habitats (e.g., wetland areas). A conceptual site model is developed that describe show stressors associated with the WTI facility might affect the ecological components in the surrounding environment through the development and evaluation of specific ecological endpoints. Finally, an estimate of the potential for current and/or future adverse impacts to the biotic component of the environment is provided, based on the integration of potential exposures of ecological receptors to WTI emissions and toxicological threshold values.

  6. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  7. Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (DOE, 1997)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guidance results from the work of a Task Team formed by DOE's Environmental Management's NEPA Compliance Officer to study streamlining the NEPA process for RCRA corrective actions, in response to a recommendation in the National Academy of Sciences Report on "Improving the Environment: An Evaluation of DOE'S Environmental Management Program."

  8. Radiological Assessment Survey of the Vance road Facility Source Vault Building Materials, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratory was the site of extensive nuclear medical research and involved the used of numerous radionuclides. These nuclides were stored in a source vault stored on the first floor of the facility. Nuclear medical research is no longer conducted in this facility, and the source vault was remediated in preparation for converting the area to office space and general use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault and its associated miscellaneous building materials and laboratory equipment in preparation for the conversion to general use space.

  9. POST CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 92: AREA 6 DECON PAD FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE NEVADA, FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 2004 - DECEMBER 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-03-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of inspections for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 92, Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 92 was closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Operational Permit (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 1995) and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 on May 11, 1999. CAU 92 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad oil/Water Separator; and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA). Both CASs have use restrictions; however, only CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), requires post-closure inspections. CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, is located inside the fence at the Building 6-605 compound. This report covers the annual period January 2004 through December 2004.

  10. A Strategy to Assess Performance of Selected Low-Activity Waste Forms in an Integrated Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrail, B PETER.; Bacon, Diana H.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2003-08-22

    An overall strategy for evaluating the long-term performance of three waste forms being considered for supplemental treatment of low-activity waste at Hanford is discussed. The same computational framework used to conduct the 2001 ILAW performance assessment will be used for all three waste forms. Cast stone will be modeled with a diffusion-advection transport model and bulk vitrified glass and steam reformed LAW will be modeled with a reactive chemical transport simulator. The recommended laboratory testing to support the supplemental LAW form selection includes single-pass flow-through (SPFT), product consistency (PCT), and vapor hydration tests for glass, SPFT and PCT tests for steam reformed LAW forms, and ANS 16.1 tests for cast stone. These and potentially other laboratory tests for the selected waste form(s) would also be the basis for more detailed studies needed to support a comprehensive long-term performance assessment should one or more of these waste forms be selected for disposal in an integrated disposal facility.

  11. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  12. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2006-06-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  13. Laboratory Testing of Bulk Vitrified Low-Activity Waste Forms to Support the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Reed, Lunde R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2005-03-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the results from laboratory testing of the bulk vitri-fied (BV) waste form that was conducted in support of the 2005 integrated disposal facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA). Laboratory testing provides a majority of the key input data re-quired to assess the long-term performance of the BV waste package with the STORM code. Test data from three principal methods, as described by McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a), are dis-cussed in this testing report including the single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) and product con-sistency test (PCT). Each of these test methods focuses on different aspects of the glass corrosion process. See McGrail et al. (2000a; 2003a) for additional details regarding these test methods and their use in evaluating long-term glass performance. In addition to evaluating the long-term glass performance, this report discusses the results and methods used to provided a recommended best estimate of the soluble fraction of 99Tc that can be leached from the engineer-ing-scale BV waste package. These laboratory tests are part of a continuum of testing that is aimed at improving the performance of the BV waste package.

  14. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment (HHRA): Evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) portion of the WTI Risk Assessment involves the integration of information about the facility with site-specific data for the surrounding region and population to characterize the potential human health risks due to emissions from the facility. The estimation of human health risks is comprised of the following general steps: (1) identification of substances of potential concern; (2) estimation of the nature and magnitude of chemical releases from the WTI facility; (3) prediction of the atmospheric transport of the emitted contaminants; (4) determination of the types of adverse effects associated with exposure to the substances of potential concern (referred to as hazard identification), and the relationship between the level of exposure and the severity of any health effect (referred to as dose-response assessment); (5) estimation of the magnitude of exposure (referred to as exposure assessment); and (6) characterization of the health risks associated with exposure (referred to as risk characterization).

  15. Addressing Facility Needs for Concrete Assessment Using Ultrasonic Testing: Mid-year Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Payan, Cedric; Roberts, Peter M.

    2012-03-28

    The UFD Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel (June 30, 2011) emphasizes the need for the development of monitoring techniques and technologies for dry storage cask materials. A high priority is given to the development of 'systems for early detection of confinement boundary degradation.' This requires both new techniques for monitoring and inspection, as well as new measurable parameters to quantify mechanical degradation. The use of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) has been shown to provide sensitive parameters correlating to mechanical degradation in a wide variety of materials. Herein we report upon recent research performed to address the high priority of concrete degradation using a selection of these techniques and compare to a ASTM standard ultrasonic technique. Also reported are the near term plans to continue this research in the remaining FY and into the coming years. This research was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the Acoustics Lab of the Geophysics group in the Earth and Environmental Sciences division, and in collaboration with the Laboratory for Nondestructive Evaluation at the University of the Mediterranean (Aix en Provence, France) and the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of using an NDE technique based on non-linear ultrasound for determining the depth and degree of microcracking in the near surface of concrete and to assess the degree of sensitivity of such technique. This objective is reached by the means of combining linear and nonlinear measurements, associated with numerical simulation. We first study the global effect of thermal damage on concrete's linear and nonlinear properties by resonance inspection techniques. We show that standard pulse wave speed techniques are not relevant to extract mechanical properties of concrete. The high sensitivity of measured nonlinearity is shown and serves as a

  16. Final Assessment: U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park and Adjacent Facilities Energy-Efficiency and Micro-Grid Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, Joseph M.; Boyd, Paul A.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Parker, Graham B.

    2015-12-31

    The purpose of this assessment was to undertake an assessment and analysis of cost-effective options for energy-efficiency improvements and the deployment of a micro-grid to increase the energy resilience at the U.S. Virgin Islands Industrial Development Park (IDP) and adjacent facilities in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. The Economic Development Authority sought assistance from the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake this assessment undertaken by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The assessment included 18 buildings plus the perimeter security lighting at the Virgin Islands Bureau of Correctional Facility, four buildings plus exterior lighting at the IDP, and five buildings (one of which is to be constructed) at the Virgin Islands Police Department for a total of 27 buildings with a total of nearly 323,000 square feet.

  17. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  18. Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about sampling design, required analyses, and sample collection and handling procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System.

  19. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incinerator facility (east Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition modeling of emissions. Draft report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The report constitutes a comprehensive site-specific risk assessment for the WTI incineration facility located in East Liverpool, OH. Volume IV describes the air dispersion model used to estimate air concentrations and particle deposition, as well as the results of the modeling exercise.

  20. Performance assessment techniques for groundwater recovery and treatment systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, G.L.

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater recovery and treatment (pump and treat systems) continue to be the most commonly selected remedial technology for groundwater restoration and protection programs at hazardous waste sites and RCRA facilities nationwide. Implementing a typical groundwater recovery and treatment system includes the initial assessment of groundwater quality, characterizing aquifer hydrodynamics, recovery system design, system installation, testing, permitting, and operation and maintenance. This paper focuses on methods used to assess the long-term efficiency of a pump and treat system. Regulatory agencies and industry alike are sensitive to the need for accurate assessment of the performance and success of groundwater recovery systems for contaminant plume abatement and aquifer restoration. Several assessment methods are available to measure the long-term performance of a groundwater recovery system. This paper presents six assessment techniques: degree of compliance with regulatory agency agreement (Consent Order of Record of Decision), hydraulic demonstration of system performance, contaminant mass recovery calculation, system design and performance comparison, statistical evaluation of groundwater quality and preferably, integration of the assessment methods. Applying specific recovery system assessment methods depends upon the type, amount, and quality of data available. Use of an integrated approach is encouraged to evaluate the success of a groundwater recovery and treatment system. The methods presented in this paper are for engineers and corporate management to use when discussing the effectiveness of groundwater remediation systems with their environmental consultant. In addition, an independent (third party) system evaluation is recommended to be sure that a recovery system operates efficiently and with minimum expense.

  1. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: RCRA Borehole 299-E33-338 Located Near the B-BX-BY Waste Management Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gee, Glendon W.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Brown, Christopher F.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Royack, Lisa J.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Table 4.8. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in June 2003. The overall goals of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., are: 1) to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities, 2) to identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures, and 3) to aid via collection of geotechnical information and data, future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas. For a more complete discussion of the goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, see the overall work plan, Phase 1 RCRA Facility Investigation/Corrective Measures Study Work Plan for the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (DOE 1999). Specific details on the rationale for activities performed at the B-BX-BY tank farm waste management area are found in CH2M HILL (2000).

  2. Summary of Conceptual Models and Data Needs to Support the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Jeff Sondrup; Annette L. Schafter; Arthur S. Rood

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the technical approach and data required to support development of the performance assessment, and composite analysis are presented for the remote handled low-level waste disposal facility on-site alternative being considered at Idaho National Laboratory. Previous analyses and available data that meet requirements are identified and discussed. Outstanding data and analysis needs are also identified and summarized. The on-site disposal facility is being evaluated in anticipation of the closure of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INL. An assessment of facility performance and of the composite performance are required to meet the Department of Energy’s Low-Level Waste requirements (DOE Order 435.1, 2001) which stipulate that operation and closure of the disposal facility will be managed in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. The corresponding established procedures to ensure these protections are contained in DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual (DOE M 435.1-1 2001). Requirements include assessment of (1) all-exposure pathways, (2) air pathway, (3) radon, and (4) groundwater pathway doses. Doses are computed from radionuclide concentrations in the environment. The performance assessment and composite analysis are being prepared to assess compliance with performance objectives and to establish limits on concentrations and inventories of radionuclides at the facility and to support specification of design, construction, operation and closure requirements. Technical objectives of the PA and CA are primarily accomplished through the development of an establish inventory, and through the use of predictive environmental transport models implementing an overarching conceptual framework. This document reviews the conceptual model, inherent assumptions, and data required to implement the conceptual model in a numerical framework. Available site-specific data and data sources

  3. RCRA and Operational Monitoring (ROM). Multi-Year Program Plan and Fiscal Year 95 Work Plan WBS 1.5.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-17

    This document contains information concerning the RCRA and Operational Monitoring Program at Hanford Reservation. Information presented includes: Schedules for ground water monitoring activities, program cost baseline, program technical baseline, and a program milestone list.

  4. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). The modifications are proposed to: (1) revise the current text for two of the Permit Conditions included in Permit Section II - General Facility Conditions, and (2) update the PCP with revised versions of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) technical field procedures included in several of the Permit Attachments. The updated field procedures and editorial revisions are Class 1 permit modifications, as specified in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section}270.42; Appendix I - Classification of Permit Modifications. These modifications are summarized below.

  5. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Transuranic Waste Facility 90% Draft Documented Safety Analysis and Technical Safety Requirements Submittals Â… EA-LANL-2015-07-07

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plutonium Facility Restart of Fissile Material Operations - January 2016 | Department of Energy Plutonium Facility Restart of Fissile Material Operations - January 2016 Enterprise Assessments Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility Restart of Fissile Material Operations - January 2016 January 2016 Review of the Plutonium Facility Restart of Fissile Material Operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safety and

  6. US Department of Energy`s Federal Facility Compliance Act Chief Financial Officer`s Report to Congress for fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992 (FFCAct) (Public Law 102-386) was enacted into law on October 6, 1992. In addition to amending the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the FFCAct requires the US Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare an annual report from the Chief Financial Officer to the Congress on compliance activities undertaken by the DOE with regard to mixed waste streams and provide an accounting of the fines and penalties imposed upon the DOE for violations involving mixed waste. This document has been prepared to report the necessary information. Mixed waste is defined by the FFCAct to include those wastes containing both hazardous waste as defined in the RCRA and source, special nuclear, or byproduct material subject to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended (42 U.S.C. Section 2001 et seq.). Section 2 of this report briefly summarizes DOE Headquarters` activities conducted during Fiscal Year 1993 (FY 1993) to comply with the requirements of the FFCAct. Section 3 of this report provides an overview of the site-specific RCRA compliance activities, relating to mixed waste streams, conducted in FY 1993 for those sites that currently generated or store mixed waste that are subject to regulation under RCRA. Section 4 provides information on notifications of alleged RCRA violations involving mixed waste imposed upon the DOE during FY 1993 and an accounting of any fines and penalties associated with these violations. Appendix A provides site-specific summaries of RCRA compliance activities, relating to mixed waste streams, conducted in FY 1993 for those sites that currently generate or store mixed waste that are subject to regulation under RCRA.

  7. Preliminary Performance Assessment for the Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site in Southeast Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Singleton, Kristin M.; Eberlein, Susan J.

    2015-01-07

    A performance assessment (PA) of Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area C (WMA C) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington is being conducted to satisfy the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), as well as other Federal requirements and State-approved closure plans and permits. The WMP C PA assesses the fate, transport, and impacts of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals within residual wastes left in tanks and ancillary equipment and facilities in their assumed closed configuration and the subsequent risks to humans into the far future. The part of the PA focused on radiological impacts is being developed to meet the requirements for a closure authorization under DOE Order 435.1 that includes a waste incidental to reprocessing determination for residual wastes remaining in tanks, ancillary equipment, and facilities. An additional part of the PA will evaluate human health and environmental impacts from hazardous chemical inventories in residual wastes remaining in WMA C tanks, ancillary equipment, and facilities needed to meet the requirements for permitted closure under RCRA.

  8. FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

    2011-01-01

    The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008

  9. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, R. C.; Lewis, K. K.

    1991-09-01

    This report presents data and information related to remedial investigation studies for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Information is included on a soil gas survey, surface radiological investigations of waste areas, and well installation for ground water monitoring. (CBS)

  10. RCRA facility investigation/corrective measures study work plan for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The 200-UP-2 Operable Unit is one of two source operable units at the U Plant Aggregate Area at the Hanford Site. Source operable units include waste management units and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of radioactive and/or hazardous substance contamination. This work plan, while maintaining the title RFI/CMS, presents the background and direction for conducting a limited field investigation in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit, which is the first part of the process leading to final remedy selection. This report discusses the background, prior recommendations, goals, organization, and quality assurance for the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. The discussion begins with a summary of the regulatory framework and the role of the work plan. The specific recommendations leading into the work plan are then addressed. Next, the goals and organization of the report are discussed. Finally, the quality assurance and supporting documentation are presented.

  11. Assessment of the Integrated Facility Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory & Y-12 for Transfer of Facilities & Materials to EM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Force Space Command Installations SAND 2016-2600 | Department of Energy Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations SAND 2016-2600 Assessment of Small Modular Reactor Suitability for Use On or Near Air Force Space Command Installations SAND 2016-2600 This report assesses the suitability of using US-developed light water SMR technology to provide energy for Schriever Air Force Base, CO and Clear Air Force Station, AK, as well as broader SMR

  12. Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facilities Production Facilities Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for the irradiation of experiments with high-intensity gamma ray sources. The main features

  13. Estimation of natural ground water recharge for the performance assessment of a low-level waste disposal facility at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, M.L.; Fayer, M.J.; Kincaid, C.T.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) initiated the Recharge Task, under the PNL Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project, to assist Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in designing and assessing the performance of a low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Recharge Task was established to address the issue of ground water recharge in and around the LLW facility and throughout the Hanford Site as it affects the unconfined aquifer under the facility. The objectives of this report are to summarize the current knowledge of natural ground water recharge at the Hanford Site and to outline the work that must be completed in order to provide defensible estimates of recharge for use in the performance assessment of this LLW disposal facility. Recharge studies at the Hanford Site indicate that recharge rates are highly variable, ranging from nearly zero to greater than 100 mm/yr depending on precipitation, vegetative cover, and soil types. Coarse-textured soils without plants yielded the greatest recharge. Finer-textured soils, with or without plants, yielded the least. Lysimeters provided accurate, short-term measurements of recharge as well as water-balance data for the soil-atmosphere interface and root zone. Tracers provided estimates of longer-term average recharge rates in undisturbed settings. Numerical models demonstrated the sensitivity of recharge rates to different processes and forecast recharge rates for different conditions. All of these tools (lysimetry, tracers, and numerical models) are considered vital to the development of defensible estimates of natural ground water recharge rates for the performance assessment of a LLW disposal facility at the Hanford Site.

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  15. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities State-Of-The-Art Supporting all elements of IMS projects Facilities Labs and Test Sites Integrated Military Systems maintains a number of state-of-the-art testing and fabrication facilities. Supporting all elements of IMS projects including design, prototyping, fabrication, development, testing, and assessments, these facilities enable customers to quickly realize their projects and get the information they need in a fast and effective way. Use the "left" and

  17. CRAD, Assessment Criteria and Guidelines for Determining the Adequacy of Software Used in the Safety Analysis and Design of Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These guidelines and criteria provide a consistent overall framework for assessment of the processes that are currently in place to ensure that the software being used in the safety analysis and design of the SSCs in defense nuclear facilities is adequate. These reviews will be conducted only on software that is currently in use, not on software that was previously used as part of a safety analysis and design process.

  18. DOE/EA-1927, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Final Environmental Assessment for Potential Land and Facilities Transfers, McCracken County, Kentucky

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Final Environmental Assessment for Potential Land and Facilities Transfers, McCracken County, Kentucky U.S. Department of Energy Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office December 2015 DOE/EA-1927 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 CFR Code of Federal Regulations dBA A-weighted decibel DOE U.S. Department of Energy DUF 6 depleted uranium hexafluoride EA

  19. Wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleteduranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11990 (''Protection of Wetlands'') and DOE regulations for implementing this Executive Order as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements]), to evaluate potential impacts to wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. Approximately 0.02 acre (0.009 ha) of a 0.08-acre (0.03-ha) palustrine emergent wetland would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material during facility construction at Location A. Portions of this wetland that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered

  20. Corrective action management unit application for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) is to accept both CERCLA (EPA-regulated) and RCRA (Ecology-regulated) remediation waste. The ERDF is considered part of the overall remediation strategy on the Hanford Site, and as such, determination of ERDF viability has followed both RCRA and CERCLA decision making processes. Typically, determination of the viability of a unit, such as the ERDF, would occur as part of record of decision (ROD) or permit modification for each remediation site before construction of the ERDF. However, because construction of the ERDF may take a significant amount of time, it is necessary to begin design and construction of the ERDF before final RODs/permit modifications for the remediation sites. This will allow movement of waste to occur quickly once the final remediation strategy for the RCRA and CERCLA past-practice units is determined. Construction of the ERDF is a unique situation relative to Hanford Facility cleanup, requiring a Hanford Facility specific process be developed for implementing the ERDF that would satisfy both RCRA and CERCLA requirements. While the ERDF will play a significant role in the remediation process, initiation of the ERDF does not preclude the evaluation of remedial alternatives at each remediation site. To facilitate this, the January 1994 amendment to the Tri-Party Agreement recognizes the necessity for the ERDF, and the Tri-Party Agreement states: ``Ecology, EPA, and DOE agree to proceed with the steps necessary to design, approve, construct, and operate such a ... facility.`` The Tri-Party Agreement requires the DOE-RL to prepare a comprehensive ``package`` for the EPA and Ecology to consider in evaluating the ERDF. The package is to address the criteria listed in 40 CFR 264.552(c) for corrective action management unit (CAMU) designation and a CERCLA ROD. This CAMU application is submitted as part of the Tri-Party Agreement-required information package.

  1. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  2. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Design.

  3. ARM - SGP Extended Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration...

  4. ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermediate Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration...

  5. ARM - SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration...

  6. Annual summary of Immobilized Low-Activity Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment for 2003 Incorporating the Integrated Disposal Facility Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2003-09-01

    To Erik Olds 09/30/03 - An annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a full performance assessment is not issued.

  7. CRAD, Criteria and Guidelines For the Assessment of Safety System Software and Firmware at Defense Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose and scope of this CRAD is to provide a set of consistent assessment criteria and guidelines for the assessment of safety system software and firmware that performs an SC or SS function, as described in the Background section. The scope of the assessment, henceforth, is called "I&C software."

  8. Savannah River Site RCRA/CERCLA/NEPA integrated investigation case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.R.; Thomas, R.; Wilson, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a US Department of Energy facility placed on the Superfund National Priority List in 1989. Numerous past disposal facilities and contaminated areas are undergoing the integrated regulatory remediation process detailed in the draft SRS Federal Facility Agreement. This paper will discuss the integration of these requirements by highlighting the investigation of the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits, a typical waste unit at SRS.

  9. Savannah River Site RCRA/CERCLA/NEPA integrated investigation case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.R.; Thomas, R.; Wilson, M.P.

    1992-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a US Department of Energy facility placed on the Superfund National Priority List in 1989. Numerous past disposal facilities and contaminated areas are undergoing the integrated regulatory remediation process detailed in the draft SRS Federal Facility Agreement. This paper will discuss the integration of these requirements by highlighting the investigation of the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits, a typical waste unit at SRS.

  10. National Ignition Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Ignition Facility Subscribe to RSS - National Ignition Facility National Ignition Facility Image: National Ignition Facility Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy Read more about Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record Read more about National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY Read more about

  11. ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance), 4/30/13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's management of hazardous and mixed wastes in satellite accumulation areas.  The Facility Representative...

  12. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety System Management of the Secondary Confinement System and Power Distribution Safety System at the Y-12 National Security Complex Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility Â… December 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeted Review of the Safety System Management of the Secondary Confinement System and Safety Significant Power Distribution System at the Y-12 National Security Complex Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility December 2015 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms

  13. RCRA Part B permit modifications for cost savings and increased flexibility at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jierree, C.; Ticknor, K.

    1996-10-01

    With shrinking budgets and downsizing, a need for streamlined compliance initiatives became evident at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Therefore, Rocky Mountain Remediation Services (RMRS) at the RFETS successfully and quickly modified the RFETS RCRA Part B Permit to obtain significant cost savings and increased flexibility. This `was accomplished by requesting operations personnel to suggest changes to the Part B Permit which did not diminish overall compliance and which would be most. cost beneficial. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsequently obtained approval of those changes from the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE).

  14. A method for the assessment of site-specific economic impacts of commercial and industrial biomass energy facilities. A handbook and computer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    A handbook on ``A Method for the Assessment of Site-specific Econoomic Impacts of Industrial and Commercial Biomass Energy Facilities`` has been prepared by Resource Systems Group Inc. under contract to the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP). The handbook includes a user-friendly Lotus 123 spreadsheet which calculates the economic impacts of biomass energy facilities. The analysis uses a hybrid approach, combining direct site-specific data provided by the user, with indirect impact multipliers from the US Forest Service IMPLAN input/output model for each state. Direct economic impacts are determined primarily from site-specific data and indirect impacts are determined from the IMPLAN multipliers. The economic impacts are given in terms of income, employment, and state and federal taxes generated directly by the specific facility and by the indirect economic activity associated with each project. A worksheet is provided which guides the user in identifying and entering the appropriate financial data on the plant to be evaluated. The WLAN multipliers for each state are included in a database within the program. The multipliers are applied automatically after the user has entered the site-specific data and the state in which the facility is located. Output from the analysis includes a summary of direct and indirect income, employment and taxes. Case studies of large and small wood energy facilities and an ethanol plant are provided as examples to demonstrate the method. Although the handbook and program are intended for use by those with no previous experience in economic impact analysis, suggestions are given for the more experienced user who may wish to modify the analysis techniques.

  15. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-02-27

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

  16. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  17. Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, S.K.

    2002-01-31

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

  18. Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Huntington Resource Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Huntington Resource Recovery Facility...

  19. Wheelabrator Sherman Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sherman Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheelabrator Sherman Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility Wheelabrator Sherman Energy Facility Sector...

  20. Summary environmental site assessment report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oxnard Facility, Oxnard, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the investigations conducted by Rust Geotech at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oxnard facility, 1235 East Wooley Road, Oxnard, California. These investigations were designed to locate, identify, and characterize any regulated contaminated media on the site. The effort included site visits; research of ownership, historical uses of the Oxnard facility and adjacent properties, incidences of and investigations for contaminants on adjacent properties, and the physical setting of the site; sampling and analysis; and reporting. These investigations identified two friable asbestos gaskets on the site, which were removed, and nonfriable asbestos, which will be managed through the implementation of an asbestos management plan. The California primary drinking water standards were exceeded for aluminum on two groundwater samples and for lead in one sample collected from the shallow aquifer underlying the site; remediation of the groundwater in this aquifer is not warranted because it is not used. Treated water is available from a municipal water system. Three sludge samples indicated elevated heavy metals concentrations; the sludge must be handled as a hazardous waste if disposed. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected at concentrations below remediation criteria in facility soils at two locations. In accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State of California guidance, remediation of the PCBs is not required. No other hazardous substances were detected in concentrations exceeding regulatory limits.

  1. Remedial investigation work plan for Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, SY-200 Yard, Spoil Area 1) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The enactment of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976 and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to RCRA in 1984 created management requirements for hazardous waste facilities. The facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) were in the process of meeting the RCRA requirements when ORR was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) National Priorities List (NPL) on November 21, 1989. Under RCRA, the actions typically follow the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA)/RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS)/Corrective Measures implementation process. Under CERCLA the actions follow the PA/SI/Remedial Investigation (RI)/Feasibility Study (FS)/Remedial Design/Remedial Action process. The development of this document will incorporate requirements under both RCRA and CERCLA into an RI work plan for the characterization of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Operable Unit (OU) 2.

  2. Environmental assessment operation of the HB-Line facility and frame waste recovery process for production of Pu-238 oxide at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0948, addressing future operations of the HB-Line facility and the Frame Waste Recovery process at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, DOE has concluded that, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact.

  3. Byron Extended Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Byron Extended Facility Map

  4. Ashton Extended Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ashton Extended Facility Map

  5. A review and critique of the socioeconomic impact assessment for the Kahe Point Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, R; Gopalakrishnan, C; Samples, K

    1988-01-01

    This report addresses the adequacy of Ocean Thermal Corporation's socioeconomic impact assessment of its 40-MWe closed-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plant proposed for Kahe Point, Oahu, Hawaii. The socioeconomic impacts identified as relevant to the plant were assessed in detail, including potential economic-demographic, public-service and fiscal, ocean-use, aesthetic, cultural, and energy impacts. The economic-demographic impact assessment does not estimate the full extent of population and income changes or second-order effects associated with the plant. There is no subjective assessment of perceptions on the part of local communities concerning probable changes in land values, housing, and population. Anticipated public-service and fiscal impacts are found to be relatively unimportant; however, the measurement of the impact of the plant on tax revenues needs improvement. The assessment does not sufficiently consider the objective and subjective assessment of ocean-use, aesthetic, and cultural impacts, which are of major significance to the local communities. The quantification of physical impacts, perceptions of impacts, and potential mitigation measures is inadequate. The energy impacts need to be updated to reflect the recent declines in oil prices and price projections. An assessment of low-probability, high-risk occurrences may be necessary. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Facilities User Facilities User facility agreements allow Los Alamos partners and other entities to conduct research at our unique facilities. In 2011, LANL hosted more than 1,200 users at CINT, LANSCE, and NHMFL. Users came from across the DOE complex, from international academia, and from industrial companies from 45 states across the U.S. Unique world-class user facilities foster rich research opportunities Through its technology transfer efforts, LANL can implement user facility

  7. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2011-05-13

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants ([NESHAP]; U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated off-site doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2010.

  8. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Barfuss, Brad C.; Gervais, Todd L.

    2008-01-01

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP – U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection – Air Emissions. In these NESHAP assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at buildings that are part of the consolidated laboratory campus of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This report describes the inventory-based methods and provides the results for the NESHAP assessment performed in 2007.

  9. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-31

    DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

  10. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, S.M.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1994-03-01

    This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  11. Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ERDF ETR Report Date: June 2007 ETR-6 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility(ERDF) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The ERDF is a large- scale disposal facility authorized to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. It contains double-lined cells with a RCRA Subtitle C- type liner and leachate collection system. By 2007, 6.8 million tons of

  12. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 7. Accident analysis; selection and assessment of potential release scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    In this part of the assessment, several accident scenarios are identified that could result in significant releases of chemicals into the environment. These scenarios include ruptures of storage tanks, large magnitude on-site spills, mixing of incompatible wastes, and off-site releases caused by tranpsortation accidents. In evaluating these scenarios, both probability and consequence are assessed, so that likelihood of occurrence is coupled with magnitude of effect in characterizing short term risks.

  13. Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasser, K.

    1994-06-01

    In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

  14. Assessment of radiological releases from the NuMI facility during MINOS and NOvA operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Mike; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    This report makes projections of the radiological releases from the NuMI facility during operations for the MINOS and NO ?A experiments. It includes an estimate of the radionuclide levels released into the atmosphere and the estimated tritium and sodium-22 concentrations in the NuMI sump water and Fermilab pond system. The analysis was performed for NuMI operations with a beam power on target increased from the present 400 kW design up to a possible 1500 kW with future upgrades. The total number of protons on target was assumed to be 18 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of MINOS and 78 x 10{sup 20} after the completion of NO ?A.

  15. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time

  16. Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation: Facility Utilizes Energy Assessments to Identify $930,000 in Potential Annual Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    Kennecott Utah Copper Corporation (KUCC) used targeted energy assessments in the smelter and refinery at its Bingham Canyon Mine, near Salt Lake City, Utah. The assessment focused mainly on the energy-intensive processes of copper smelting and refining. By implementing the projects identified, KUCC could realize annual cost savings of $930,000 and annual energy savings of 452,000 MMBtu. The projects would also reduce maintenance, repair costs, waste, and environmental emissions. One project would use methane gas from an adjacent municipal dump to replace natural gas currently used to heat the refinery electrolyte.

  17. DOE/EA-1605: Environmental Assessment for Biomass Cogeneration and Heating Facilities at the Savannah River Site (August 2008)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment July 2007 Office of Legacy Management DOE/EA 1535 - Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EA-1535 Uranium Leasing Program Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment July 2007 U.S. Department of

  18. National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

  19. Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Nuclear Materials Contained in High-Activity Waste Arising from the Operations at the 'SHELTER' Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherkas, Dmytro

    2011-10-01

    . The platform with the source is placed under the measurement chamber. The platform with the source material is moved under the measurement chamber. The design allows one to move the platform with the source in and out, thus moving the drum. The CDAS system and radioactive waste containers have been built. For each drum filled with waste two individual measurements (passive/active) will be made. This paper briefly describes the work carried out to assess qualitatively and quantitatively the nuclear materials contained in high-level waste at the SHELTER facility. These efforts substantially increased nuclear safety and security at the facility.

  20. User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Facilities User Facilities A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open, and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships and collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. Unique world-class user facilities foster rich research opportunities Through its technology transfer efforts, Los Alamos National Laboratory can implement user facility agreements that allow its partners and other entities to conduct research at many of its unique facilities. While our largest user

  1. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-03-01

    This standard, DOE-STD-1063, Facility Representatives, defines the duties, responsibilities and qualifications for Department of Energy (DOE) Facility Representatives, based on facility hazard classification; risks to workers, the public, and the environment; and the operational activity level. This standard provides the guidance necessary to ensure that DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities have sufficient staffing of technically qualified facility representatives (FRs) to provide day-to-day oversight of contractor operations.

  2. Assessment of the measurement control program for solution assay instruments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, A.S.

    1985-05-01

    This report documents and reviews the measurement control program (MCP) over a 27-month period for four solution assay instruments (SAIs) Facility. SAI measurement data collected during the period January 1982 through March 1984 were analyzed. The sources of these data included computer listings of measurements emanating from operator entries on computer terminals, logbook entries of measurements transcribed by operators, and computer listings of measurements recorded internally in the instruments. Data were also obtained from control charts that are available as part of the MCP. As a result of our analyses we observed agreement between propagated and historical variances and concluded instruments were functioning properly from a precision aspect. We noticed small, persistent biases indicating slight instrument inaccuracies. We suggest that statistical tests for bias be incorporated in the MCP on a monthly basis and if the instrument bias is significantly greater than zero, the instrument should undergo maintenance. We propose the weekly precision test be replaced by a daily test to provide more timely detection of possible problems. We observed that one instrument showed a trend of increasing bias during the past six months and recommend a randomness test be incorporated to detect trends in a more timely fashion. We detected operator transcription errors during data transmissions and advise direct instrument transmission to the MCP to eliminate these errors. A transmission error rate based on those errors that affected decisions in the MCP was estimated as 1%. 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Environmental, Health and Safety Assessment: ATS 7H Program (Phase 3R) Test Activities at the GE Power Systems Gas Turbine Manufacturing Facility, Greenville, SC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-17

    International Technology Corporation (IT) was contracted by General Electric Company (GE) to assist in the preparation of an Environmental, Health and Safety (HI&3) assessment of the implementation of Phase 3R of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) 7H program at the GE Gas Turbines facility located in Greenville, South Carolina. The assessment was prepared in accordance with GE's contractual agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (GE/DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC3 1176) and supports compliance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970. This report provides a summary of the EH&S review and includes the following: General description of current site operations and EH&S status, Description of proposed ATS 7H-related activities and discussion of the resulting environmental, health, safety and other impacts to the site and surrounding area. Listing of permits and/or licenses required to comply with federal, state and local regulations for proposed 7H-related activities. Assessment of adequacy of current and required permits, licenses, programs and/or plans.

  4. Baseline Risk Assessment Supporting Closure at Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, Kristin M.

    2015-01-07

    The Office of River Protection under the U.S. Department of Energy is pursuing closure of the Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) C under the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO). A baseline risk assessment (BRA) of current conditions is based on available characterization data and information collected at WMA C. The baseline risk assessment is being developed as a part of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI)/Corrective Measures Study (CMS) at WMA C that is mandatory under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and RCRA corrective action. The RFI/CMS is needed to identify and evaluate the hazardous chemical and radiological contamination in the vadose zone from past releases of waste from WMA C. WMA C will be under Federal ownership and control for the foreseeable future, and managed as an industrial area with restricted access and various institutional controls. The exposure scenarios evaluated under these conditions include Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA) Method C, industrial worker, maintenance and surveillance worker, construction worker, and trespasser scenarios. The BRA evaluates several unrestricted land use scenarios (residential all-pathway, MTCA Method B, and Tribal) to provide additional information for risk management. Analytical results from 13 shallow zone (0 to 15 ft. below ground surface) sampling locations were collected to evaluate human health impacts at WMA C. In addition, soil analytical data were screened against background concentrations and ecological soil screening levels to determine if soil concentrations have the potential to adversely affect ecological receptors. Analytical data from 12 groundwater monitoring wells were evaluated between 2004 and 2013. A screening of groundwater monitoring data against background concentrations and Federal maximum concentration levels was used to determine vadose zone

  5. Independent Oversight Assessment, Los Alamos National Laboratory- August 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facility Centered Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science and Technology Operations - Facility Operations Director Managed Facilities

  6. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States overall electrical generation capacity is expected to increase by 10-25 gigawatts (GW) per year to meet increases in demand. Wind energy is a key component of state and federal renewable energy standards, and central to the Department of Energy’s 20% by 2030 wind production goals. Increased wind energy development may present increased resource conflict with avian wildlife, and environmental permitting has been identified as a potential obstacle to expansion in the sector. ICF developed an analytical framework to help applicants and agencies examine potential impacts in support of facility siting and permitting. A key objective of our work was to develop a framework that is scalable from the local to the national level, and one that is generalizable across the different scales at which biological communities operate – from local influences to meta-populations. The intent was to allow natural resource managers to estimate the cumulative impacts of turbine strikes and habitat changes on long-term population performance in the context of a species demography, genetic potential, and life history. We developed three types of models based on our literature review and participation in the scientific review processes. First, the conceptual model was developed as a general description of the analytical framework. Second, we developed the analytical framework based on the relationships between concepts, and the functions presented in the scientific literature. Third, we constructed an application of the model by parameterizing the framework using data from and relevant to the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA), and an existing golden eagle population model. We developed managed source code, database create statements, and written documentation to allow for the reproduction of each phase of the analysis. ICF identified a potential template adaptive management system in the form of the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Adaptive Harvest

  7. ORISE: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE Facilities Unique laboratories and training centers among the assets managed on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is home to a number of on- and off-site facilities that support the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) science education and research mission. From on-site medical laboratories to radiation emergency medicine training facilities, ORISE facilities are helping to address national needs in the following areas:

  8. Science Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Science Facilities The focal point for basic and applied R&D programs with a primary focus on energy but also encompassing medical, biotechnology, high-energy physics, and advanced scientific computing programs. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies» Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT)» Electron Microscopy Lab» Ion Beam Materials Lab» Isotope Production Facility» Los Alamos Neutron Science Center» Lujan Center» Matter-Radiation Interactions in

  9. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-24

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  10. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-11-16

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

  11. Microsoft Word - Attachment Sixth Supplement to RCRA CP 2015-11-18_rrc_rfk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departm ent of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 NOV 2 5 2015 Ms. Kathryn Roberts, Director Resource Protection Division New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East. Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 New Mexico Environment Department Harold Runnels Building 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5496 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Subject: Sixth Supplement to the Report of Implementation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Facility Resource Conservation

  12. 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-01

    Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 3718-F Alkali Metal Treatment and Storage Facility, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. The closure plan consists of a Part A Dangerous waste Permit Application and a RCRA Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Revision (Revision 1) submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The closure plan consists of 9 chapters and 5 appendices. The chapters cover: introduction; facility description; process information; waste characteristics; groundwater; closure strategy and performance standards; closure activities; postclosure; and references.

  13. Expedited site characterization for remedial investigations at federal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, J.C.

    1994-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s Expedited Side Characterization (ESC) methodology gives federal agencies a process for producing high-quality CERCLA and RCRA site characterizations and remedial investigations in a cost- and time-efficient manner. The ESC process has been successfully tested and applied at numerous federal facilities. Examples include expanded site investigations for the Department of Interior`s Bureau of Land Management and remedial investigations for the Commodity Credit Corporation/US Dept. of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). In particular, the CCC/USDA has been the major sponsor in the development of the ESC process at Argonne. The technical successes and the cost and time savings of the ESC process for these programs have been detailed in previous papers. The Argonne ESC is currently being implemented at a Department of Energy facility (Pantex) and is schedules for implementation in the Department of Defense base closure program in order to meet accelerated schedules for remedial actions by these agencies.

  14. Preliminary assessment report for Bee Caves Armory (former Nike BG-80 Fire Control Facility), Installation 48055, Austin, Texas. Installation Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, C.

    1993-08-01

    This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (ARNG) property in Austin, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing, preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining, site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Bee Caves Armory property, the requirements of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program. Of concern is the potential for hazardous waste to be present on the property as a result of the former Nike Missile Base operations or in the form of original construction materials. Environmentally sensitive operations associated with the property from that period include (1) underground fuel storage, (2) hazardous materials storage/use, (3) disposal of hazardous waste and (4) release of hazardous waste water.

  15. 3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-05-12

    Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

  16. Enterprise Assessments Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of the Management of Safety Systems at U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities – April 2016

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lessons Learned from Targeted Reviews of the Management of Safety Systems at U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

  17. Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facility Facility Wheelabrator Millbury Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Worcester County, Massachusetts Coordinates 42.4096528, -71.8571331...

  18. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Construction and Operations of a Biosafety Level 3 Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-02-26

    The ''National Environmental Policy Act of 1969'' (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' [CFR] 1500-1508) and DOE's own NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision-makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an Environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. This EA has been prepared to assess environmental consequences resulting from the construction and operation of a Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) laboratory facility within the boundaries of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL is one of the national security laboratories under the authority of the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security of the NNSA who serves as the Administrator for Nuclear Security and Head of the NNSA (50 USC Chapter 41, Section 2402(b)). The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and describe any reasonable alternatives that satisfy the purpose and need for NNSA action; (3) describe baseline environmental conditions at LANL; (4) analyze the potential indirect, direct, and cumulative effects to the existing environment from implementation of the Proposed Action and other reasonable alternatives; and (5) compare the effects of the Proposed Action with the No Action Alternative and other reasonable alternatives. For the purposes of compliance with NEPA, reasonable alternatives are identified as being those that meet NNSA's purpose and need for action by virtue of timeliness, appropriate technology, and applicability to LANL. The EA process

  19. Beamlines & Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Group: Beamlines The X-ray Micrscopy and Imaging Group operates several beamlines and facilities. The bending magnet beamline (2-BM) entertaines 2 general user programs in...

  20. Beryllium Facilities & Areas - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities & Areas About Us Hanford Cultural Resources Beryllium Program Beryllium Program Points of Contact Beryllium Facilities & Areas Beryllium Program Information Hanford CBDPP Committee Beryllium FAQs Beryllium Related Links Hanford Beryllium Awareness Group (BAG) Program Performance Assessments Beryllium Program Feedback Beryllium Health Advocates Primary Contractors/Employers Medical Testing and Surveillance Facilities General Resources Beryllium Facilities & Areas Email

  1. Technical Approach for Determining Key Parameters Needed for Modeling the Performance of Cast Stone for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-03-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) and its contractors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are conducting a development program to develop / refine the cementitious waste form for the wastes treated at the ETF and to provide the data needed to support the IDF PA. This technical approach document is intended to provide guidance to the cementitious waste form development program with respect to the waste form characterization and testing information needed to support the IDF PA. At the time of the preparation of this technical approach document, the IDF PA effort is just getting started and the approach to analyze the performance of the cementitious waste form has not been determined. Therefore, this document looks at a number of different approaches for evaluating the waste form performance and describes the testing needed to provide data for each approach. Though the approach addresses a cementitious secondary aqueous waste form, it is applicable to other waste forms such as Cast Stone for supplemental immobilization of Hanford LAW. The performance of Cast Stone as a physical and chemical barrier to the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) from solidification of Hanford liquid low activity waste (LAW) and secondary wastes processed through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is of critical importance to the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) total system performance assessment (TSPA). The effectiveness of cementitious waste forms as a barrier to COC release is expected to evolve with time. PA modeling must therefore anticipate and address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Most organizations responsible for disposal facility operation and their regulators support an iterative hierarchical safety/performance assessment approach with a general philosophy that modeling provides

  2. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, March--May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M.; Hoffman, F.O.

    1994-06-01

    The project described in this report was the result of a Memorandum of Cooperation between the US and the former-USSR following the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4. A joint program was established to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. The task of Working Group 7 was ``to develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (Biospheric Model Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (Validation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains. In the future, this project will be considered separately from the Chernobyl Studies Project and the essential activities of former Task 7.1D will be folded within the broader umbrella of the BIOMOVS and VAMP projects. The Working Group Leader of Task 7.1D will continue to provide oversight for this project.

  3. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-06

    REPLACED BY DOE-STD-1063 | SUPERSEDING DOE-STD-1063-2000 (MARCH 2000) The purpose of the DOE Facility Representative Program is to ensure that competent DOE staff personnel are assigned to oversee the day-to-day contractor operations at DOE’s hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities.

  4. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22

    This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

  5. Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Savannah River Site Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness Assessment Report ... of Energy Washington, D.C. SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility Technology Readiness ...

  6. Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Hazards Analysis Report for the Low-Activity Waste Facility Reagent Systems – July 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Hazards Analysis Report for the Low-Activity Waste Facility Reagent Systems

  7. Geological site characterization for the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reneau, S.L.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the results of geological site characterization studies conducted from 1992 to 1994 on Pajarito Mesa for a proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (MWDF). The MWDF is being designed to receive mixed waste (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive components) generated during Environmental Restoration Project cleanup activities at Los Alamos. As of 1995, there is no Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted disposal site for mixed waste at the Laboratory, and construction of the MWDF would provide an alternative to transport of this material to an off-site location. A 2.5 km long part of Pajarito Mesa was originally considered for the MWDF, extending from an elevation of about 2150 to 2225 m (7060 to 7300 ft) in Technical Areas (TAs) 15, 36, and 67 in the central part of the Laboratory, and planning was later concentrated on the western area in TA-67. The mesa top lies about 60 to 75 m (200 to 250 ft) above the floor of Pajarito Canyon on the north, and about 30 m (100 ft) above the floor of Threemile Canyon on the south. The main aquifer used as a water supply for the Laboratory and for Los Alamos County lies at an estimated depth of about 335 m (1100 ft) below the mesa. The chapters of this report focus on surface and near-surface geological studies that provide a basic framework for siting of the MWDF and for conducting future performance assessments, including fulfillment of specific regulatory requirements. This work includes detailed studies of the stratigraphy, mineralogy, and chemistry of the bedrock at Pajarito Mesa by Broxton and others, studies of the geological structure and of mesa-top soils and surficial deposits by Reneau and others, geologic mapping and studies of fracture characteristics by Vaniman and Chipera, and studies of potential landsliding and rockfall along the mesa-edge by Reneau.

  8. Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to

  9. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by

  10. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 8. Additional analysis in response to peer review recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    Contents: Introduction; Combustion Engineering; Air Dispersion and Deposition Modeling; Accident Analysis; Exposure Assessment; Toxicology; and Ecological Risk Assessment.

  11. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. This Page Change is limited in scope to changes necessary to invoke DOE-STD-1104, Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Document, and revised DOE-STD-3009-2014, Preparation of Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis as required methods. DOE O 420.1C Chg 1, dated 2-27-15, supersedes DOE O 420.1C.

  12. Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Gas Utilization Facility Biomass Facility Facility Gas Utilization Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  13. Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Total Energy Facilities Biomass Facility Facility Total Energy Facilities Sector Biomass Facility Type...

  14. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  15. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-05-20

    To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

  16. Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Risk Ranking Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking Nuclear Facility Risk Ranking The CNS has purview of over ninety EM nuclear facilities across the DOE complex. To ensure that limited resources are applied in a risk-informed and balanced approach, the CNS performed a methodical assessment of the EM nuclear facilities. This risk-informed approach provides a data-driven foundation on which to construct a balanced set of operating plans and staff assignments. 2015 Risk Analysis Methodology.jpg

  17. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-12-22

    The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

  18. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21

    DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

  19. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-20

    The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

  20. 3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, C.M. Sr.

    2001-04-17

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

  1. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - Glovebox Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SRNL Our Facilities - Glovebox Facilities Govebox Facilities are sealed, protectively-lined compartments with attached gloves, allowing workers to safely handle dangerous materials...

  2. CRAD, NNSA- Facility Representatives (FR)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CRAD for Facility Representatives (FR). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs.

  3. SLAC Accelerator Test Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FACET & TF Careers & Education Archived FACET User Facility Quick Launch About FACET & Test Facilities Expand About FACET & Test Facilities FACET & Test Facilities User Portal...

  4. Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality Safety Assessments at the Criticality Experiments Facility and Training Assembly for Criticality Safety and Appraisal of the Criticality Experiments Facility Startup Plan, October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of an independent oversight review of criticality safety assessment activities conducted by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nevada Site Office

  5. Evaluation of beryllium exposure assessment and control programs at AWE, Cardiff Facility, Rocky Flats Plant, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.S.; Foote, K.L.; Slawski, J.W.; Cogbill, G.

    1995-04-28

    Site visits were made to DOE beryllium handling facilities at the Rocky Flats Plant; Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, LLNL; as well as to the AWE Cardiff Facility. Available historical data from each facility describing its beryllium control program were obtained and summarized in this report. The AWE Cardiff Facility computerized Be personal and area air-sampling database was obtained and a preliminary evaluation was conducted. Further validation and documentation of this database will be very useful in estimating worker Be. exposure as well as in identifying the source potential for a variety of Be fabrication activities. Although all of the Be control programs recognized the toxicity of Be and its compounds, their established control procedures differed significantly. The Cardiff Facility, which was designed for only Be work, implemented a very strict Be control program that has essentially remained unchanged, even to today. LLNL and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant also implemented a strict Be control program, but personal sampling was not used until the mid 1980s to evaluate worker exposure. The Rocky Flats plant implemented significantly less controls on beryllium processing than the three previous facilities. In addition, records were less available, management and industrial hygiene staff turned over regularly, and less control was evident from a management perspective.

  6. Recharge Data Package for the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste 2001 Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Fayer; EM Murphy; JL Downs; FO Khan; CW Lindenmeier; BN Bjornstad

    2000-01-18

    Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are currently stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) is to vitrify the waste and place the product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is known as the Hanford ILAW Performance Assessment (PA) Activity, hereafter called the ILAW PA project. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require predictions of contaminant migration from the facility. To make such predictions will require estimates of the fluxes of water moving through the sediments within the vadose zone around and beneath the disposal facility. These fluxes, loosely called recharge rates, are the primary mechanism for transporting contaminants to the groundwater. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving the shallow-land disposal of ILAW. Specifically, recharge estimates are needed for a filly functional surface cover; the cover sideslope, and the immediately surrounding terrain. In addition, recharge estimates are needed for degraded cover conditions. The temporal scope of the analysis is 10,000 years, but could be longer if some contaminant peaks occur after 10,000 years. The elements of this report compose the Recharge Data Package, which provides estimates of recharge rates for the scenarios being considered in the 2001 PA. Table S.1 identifies the surface features and

  7. WIPP Facility Work Plan for Solid Waste Management Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-02-25

    This 2001 Facility Work Plan (FWP) has been prepared as required by Module VII, Section VII.M.1 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, NM4890139088-TSDF (the Permit); (NMED, 1999a), and incorporates comments from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) received on December 6, 2000 (NMED, 2000a). This February 2001 FWP describes the programmatic facility-wide approach to future investigations at Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs) specified in the Permit. The permittees are evaluating data from previous investigations of the SWMUs and AOCs against the newest guidance proposed by the NMED. Based on these data, the permittees expect that no further sampling will be required and that a request for No Further Action (NFA) at the SWMUs and AOCs will be submitted to the NMED. This FWP addresses the current Permit requirements. It uses the results of previous investigations performed at WIPP and expands the investigations as required by the Permit. As an alternative to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) specified in Module VII of the Permit, current NMED guidance identifies an Accelerated Corrective Action Approach (ACAA) that may be used for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). This accelerated approach is used to replace the standard RFI Work Plan and Report sequence with a more flexible decision-making approach. The ACAA process allows a Facility to exit the schedule of compliance contained in the Facility’s Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) permit module and proceed on an accelerated time frame. Thus, the ACAA process can be entered either before or after an RFI Work Plan. According to the NMED's guidance, a facility can prepare an RFI Work Plan or Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) for any SWMU or AOC (NMED, 1998). Based on this guidance, a SAP constitutes an acceptable alternative to the RFI Work Plan specified in the Permit.

  8. Assessing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dental disease in minutes Understanding climate change Keeping watch on the world SPRING 2007 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y A Q UA RT E R LY R E S E A R C H & D E V E LO P M E N T MAG A Z I N E - VO LUM E 9 , N O. 1 Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly maga- zine published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the Department of Energy. With main facilities in

  9. Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The nuclear sites list and map shows how DOE nuclear operations are mostly divided between nuclear weapons stockpile maintenance, research and environmental cleanup. The operations are performed within several different facilities supporting nuclear reactor operations, nuclear research, weapons disassembly, maintenance and testing, hot cell operations, nuclear material storage and processing and waste disposal.

  10. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-04

    The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

  11. Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13

    Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

  12. Health assessment for Fletcher's Paint Works and Storage Facility Hazardous Waste Material, Milford, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, Region 1. CERCLIS No. NHD981067614. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-11

    Fletcher's Paint Works and Storage Facility Hazardous Waste Site (Fletcher's Paint Site) in Milford, New Hampshire, consists of three distinct entities: Fletcher's Paint Works at 21 Elm Street, Fletcher's Paint Storage Facility on Mill Street, and a drainage ditch leading from the storage facility property to Hampshire Paper Company property. The aggregation of these three properties was based on the similar nature of operations and wastes, the close proximity of the areas, the same target population, and the same underlying aquifer at risk of contamination. The aggregated site has contributed to the contamination of soil, groundwater, surface water, sediment, and air with various volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs), heavy metals, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Environmental monitoring related to the Fletcher's Paint Site has consisted of sampling of the Keyes Well by the NH WSPCC, and sampling at the paint works, storage facility and drainage ditch by NUS Corporation and EPA's Environmental Services Division (ESD). Contaminant levels at each location is discussed individually. Based upon the available information, the Fletcher's Paint NPL Site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to public health caused by potential exposure to hazardous substances, such as VOCs, PCBs, PAHs, and heavy metals, at concentrations that may result in adverse health effects. Exposure to contaminated soil and surface water, and potentially contaminated fish may be occurring. The site is located in a densely populated part of town, while the storage facility is readily accessible to children walking to and from school.

  13. Beam Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Test Facility Beam Test Facility Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 09:36 Coming Soon

  14. Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Methane Recovery Facility Biomass Facility Facility Metro Methane Recovery Facility Sector Biomass...

  15. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the

  16. High-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy eenvironmental management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folga, S.M.; Conzelmann, G.; Gillette, J.L.; Kier, P.H.; Poch, L.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides data and information needed to support the risk and impact assessments of high-level waste (HLW) management alternatives in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Available data on the physical form, chemical and isotopic composition, storage locations, and other waste characteristics of interest are presented. High-level waste management follows six implementation phases: current storage, retrieval, pretreatment, treatment, interim canister storage, and geologic repository disposal; pretreatment, treatment, and repository disposal are outside the scope of the WM PEIS. Brief descriptions of current and planned HLW management facilities are provided, including information on the type of waste managed in the facility, costs, product form, resource requirements, emissions, and current and future status. Data sources and technical and regulatory assumptions are identified. The range of HLW management alternatives (including decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches) is described. The required waste management facilities include expanded interim storage facilities under the various alternatives. Resource requirements for construction (e.g., land and materials) and operation (e.g., energy and process chemicals), work force, costs, effluents, design capacities, and emissions are presented for each alternative.

  17. Assessment Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Salt Waste Processing Facility Project - January 2013 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Salt Waste Processing Facility Project January 18, 2013 Independent...

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GEWEX Touts ARM Data Sets for Climate Assessment Activities Bookmark and Share ARM data sets are featured in the latest issue of GEWEX News. In the latest newsletter of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), the opening commentary features the use of data acquired from the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The detailed data sets are described as a "benchmark against which [global climate model] GCM developers can compare their model codes for

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2009 [Facility News] Fast Physics Project to Join ARM User Community Bookmark and Share In November, ARM representatives participated in a kickoff meeting for the FASTER (FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research) project at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This project is funded by the DOE Earth System Modeling program and involves ten institutions led by BNL. Researchers involved in the FASTER project will assess and improve fast processes in climate models using a combination of single

  20. 303-K Storage Facility closure plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-15

    Recyclable scrap uranium with zircaloy-2 and copper silicon alloy, uranium-titanium alloy, beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy, and zircaloy-2 chips and fines were secured in concrete billets (7.5-gallon containers) in the 303-K Storage Facility, located in the 300 Area. The beryllium/zircaloy-2 alloy and zircaloy-2 chips and fines are designated as mixed waste with the characteristic of ignitability. The concretion process reduced the ignitability of the fines and chips for safe storage and shipment. This process has been discontinued and the 303-K Storage Facility is now undergoing closure as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 and the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Dangerous Waste Regulations, WAC 173-303-040. This closure plan presents a description of the 303-K Storage Facility, the history of materials and waste managed, and the procedures that will be followed to close the 303-K Storage Facility. The 303-K Storage Facility is located within the 300-FF-3 (source) and 300-FF-5 (groundwater) operable units, as designated in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1992). Contamination in the operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5 is scheduled to be addressed through the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980 remedial action process. Therefore, all soil remedial action at the 304 Facility will be conducted as part of the CERCLA remedial action of operable units 300-FF-3 and 300-FF-5.

  1. Mobile Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesMobile Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments McMurdo Station, Antarctica, 2015-2016 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to San Francisco, California, 2015 Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010

  2. Facility Type!

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR

  3. Research Facilities | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facilities Our state-of-the-art facilities are available to industry entrepreneurs, engineers, scientists, and universities for researching and developing their energy technologies. Our researchers and technicians who operate these labs and facilities are ready to work with you and share their expertise. Alphabetical Listings Laboratories Test and User Facilities Popular Facilities Energy Systems Integration Facility Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Process Development

  4. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the tank farm facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crummel, G.M.

    1998-05-18

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements.

  5. NREL: Research Facilities - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Research Facilities Home Laboratories Test & User Facilities Laboratories & Facilities by Technology...

  6. Facilities | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art bioenergy research facilities, researchers design ... facility to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate bioenergy processes and technologies. ...

  7. Research Facility,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Upon conclusion of the field campaign,

  8. Support - Facilities - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    During experiments at the Radiation Effects Facility users are assisted by the experienced ... shops are available to the users of the Radiation Effects Facility for design, ...

  9. Radiation Effects Facility - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Effects Facility Typical DUT(device under test) set-up at the end of the Radiation Effects beamline. The Radiation Effects Facility is available for commercial, ...

  10. Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHarrisburgFacilityBiomassFacility&oldid397545" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  11. Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBrookhavenFacilityBiomassFacility&oldid397235" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  12. Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment of the Surveillance Program of the High-Level Waste Storage Tanks at Hanford :.~I LALI i~E REJ 163 ROOM 1t 4 F77L.~ ~ -_77 .:earmn OfEeg Asitn Sertr fo niomn 4 z. r _________ rment of the Surveilance Prograrn of the High-Level Storage- Tanks at Hanford P. E WOOD Robert J. Catln, Deputy Directat - Office of Environmental Compliance and Overview Office of Environment MARCH 1980 Report to the U.S. Departrent of Energy Assistant Secretary for Environment Washkngon, DC C March 27, 1980

  13. Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kent County Waste to Energy Facility Biomass Facility Facility Kent County Waste to Energy...

  14. Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Stockton Regional Water Control Facility Biomass Facility Facility Stockton Regional...

  15. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 4, 2010 [Facility News] Request for Proposals Now Open Bookmark and Share The ARM Climate Research Facility is now accepting applications for use of the ARM mobile facilities, aerial facility, and fixed sites. Proposals are welcome from all members of the scientific community for conducting field campaigns and scientific research using the ARM Facility. Facility availability is as follows: ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) available FY2013 ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1) available March 2015

  16. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office Merit Review Craig Blue Director, Manufacturing Demonstration Facility Energy and ...

  17. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Protection and Technical Services

    2009-09-30

    This permit application provides facility information on the design, processes, and security features associated with the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit. The unit will receive and dispose of onsite and offsite containerized low-level mixed waste (LLMW) that has an approved U.S. Department of Energy nexus.

  18. Design/installation and structural integrity assessment of Bethel Valley low-level waste collection and transfer system upgrade for Building 3092 (Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes and assesses planned modifications to be made to the Building 3092 Central Off-Gas Scrubber Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The modifications are made in responsible to the requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, relating to environmental protection requirements for buried tank systems. The modifications include the provision of a new scrubber recirculation tank in a new, below ground, lines concrete vault, replacing and existing recirculation sump that does not provide double containment. A new buried, double contained pipeline is provided to permit discharge of spent scrubber recirculation fluid to the Central Waste Collection Header. The new vault, tank, and discharge line are provided with leak detection and provisions to remove accumulated liquid. New scrubber recirculation pumps, piping, and accessories are also provided. This assessment concludes that the planned modifications comply with applicable requirements of 40CFR264 Subpart J, as set forth in Appendix F to the Federal Facility Agreement, Docket No. 89-04-FF, covering the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  19. Email Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE MEETING November 17, 2010 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome and introductions ................................................................................................ 1 Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) Performance Assessment .............. 1 RCRA Permit Update ......................................................................................................... 6 Deep Vadose

  20. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  1. Groundwater quality assessment report for Solid Waste Storage Area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee -- 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6, located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) facility, is a shallow land burial site for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and other waste types. Wastes were disposed of in unlined trenches and auger holes from 1969 until May 1986, when it was determined that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated wastes were being disposed of there. DOE closed SWSA 6 until changes in operating procedures prevented the disposal of RCRA wastes at SWSA 6. The site, which reopened for waste disposal activities in July 1986, is the only currently operating disposal area for low-level radioactive waste at ORNL. In addition to SWSA 6, it was determined that hazardous wastes were treated at the Explosives Detonation Trench (EDT). Explosives and shock-sensitive chemicals such as picric acid, phosphorus, and ammonium nitrate were detonated; debris from the explosions was backfilled into the trench.

  2. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greager, E.M.

    1997-12-11

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether these systems are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan will ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated, at a minimum, every 3 years.

  3. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the plutonium uranium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegand, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  4. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the uranium trioxide facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohrasbi, J.; Johnson, D.L.; De Lorenzo, D.S.

    1993-12-01

    A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document is prepared using the specific guidelines identified in A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, WHC-EP-0438-01. This facility effluent monitoring plan assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan shall ensure long-range integrity of the effluent monitoring systems by requiring an update whenever a new process or operation introduces new hazardous materials or significant radioactive materials. This document must be reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it must be updated at a minimum of every three years.

  5. M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

  6. Risk assessment for the Waste Technologies Industries (WTI) hazardous waste incineration facility (East Liverpool, Ohio). Volume 5. Human health risk assessment; evaluation of potential risks from multipathway exposure to emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The report provide estimates of: (1) individual risks based on central tendency exposure; (2) individual risks based on maximum environmental concentrations; (3) risks to highly exposed or susceptible subgroups of the population (e.g., subsistence farmers and school children); (4) risks associated with specific activities that may result in elevated exposures (e.g., subsistence fishermen and deer hunters); and (5) population risk. This approach allows for the estimation of risks to specific segments of the population taking into consideration activity patterns, number of individuals, and actual locations of individuals in these subgroups with respect to the facility. The fate and transport modeling of emissions from the facility to estimate exposures to identified subgroups is described.

  7. Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 6, 2008 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? 2 Energy Assessments: What are the Benefits to Small and Medium Facilities? Webcast ...

  8. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-08-27

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  9. Assessment Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment, Y-12 National Security Complex - June 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Y-12 National Security Complex Uranium Processing Facility Project July 9,...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Bioscience Computing and Information Science Electromagnetics Facilities Electromagnetic Environments Simulator (EMES) Mode Stirred Chamber Lightning Facility Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Laboratory Other Facilities and Capabilities Programs & Capabilities Partnership Opportunities EM News & Reports Contact Information Engineering Science Geoscience Materials Science Nanodevices and Microsystems Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Facilities

  11. SUPERIOR ENERGY PERFORMANCE INDUSTRIAL FACILITY BEST PRACTICE SCORECARD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facilities seeking to use the Mature Energy Pathway to qualify for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™) certification will use the SEP Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard to assess the...

  12. EA-1795: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA EA-1795: Diamond Green Diesel Facility in Norco, LA April 1, 2011 EA-1795: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Diamond ...

  13. Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ... for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments ...

  14. DOE/EA-1927, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Final Environmental Assessment for Potential Land and Facilities Transfers, McCracken County, Kentucky

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EA for Conveyance of Land at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA Page 1 of 6 September 2015 DOE/EA-1915 MITIGATION ACTION PLAN PROPOSED CONVEYANCE OF LAND AT THE HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office ACTION: Mitigation Action Plan SUMMARY: This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is an integral part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Assessment for Proposed Conveyance of

  15. CRAD, Facility Safety - Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Facility Safety - Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements CRAD, Facility Safety - Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process.. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to

  16. CMI Unique Facility: Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility The Ferromagnetic Materials Characterization Facility is one of more than a dozen unique facilities developed by the Critical Materials Institute, an Energy Innovation Hub of the U.S. Department of Energy. CMI ferromagnetic materials characterization facility at The Ames Laboratory. In the search for substitute materials to replace rare earths in permanent magnets, whenever promising materials are identified,

  17. Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Targeted Review of the Safety Significant Ventilation System and Interconnected Portions of the Associated Safety Class Confinement System, and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55 Plutonium Facility Â… August 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of the Safety Significant Ventilation System and Interconnected Portions of the Associated Safety Class Confinement System, and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 55 Plutonium Facility August 2015 Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments Office of Enterprise Assessments U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents Acronyms

  18. Potential applications of artificial intelligence in computer-based management systems for mixed waste incinerator facility operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, A.L.; Singh, S.P.N.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) operates a mixed waste incinerator facility at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, designed for the thermal treatment of incinerable liquid, sludge, and solid waste regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conversion and Recovery Act (RCRA). Operation of the TSCA Incinerator is highly constrained as a result of the regulatory, institutional, technical, and resource availability requirements. This presents an opportunity for applying computer technology as a technical resource for mixed waste incinerator operation to facilitate promoting and sustaining a continuous performance improvement process while demonstrating compliance. This paper describes mixed waste incinerator facility performance-oriented tasks that could be assisted by Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the requirements for AI tools that would implement these algorithms in a computer-based system. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard Superior Energy Performance Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard Superior Energy Performance logo Facilities seeking to use the Mature Energy Pathway to qualify for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP(tm)) certification will use the SEP Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard to assess the maturity of the facility's energy management system. This scorecard describes credits that can be earned by implementing energy

  20. Uranium Processing Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uranium Processing Facility

  1. McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Facility Facility McKay Bay Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597, -82.3017728...

  2. Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated facilities for energy research Argonne National Laboratory is home to some of the nation's most powerful and sophisticated research facilities. As a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, Argonne offers access to the facilities listed below through a variety of arrangements. Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Center for Transportation Research Materials Engineering Research Facility Distributed Energy Research Center

  3. National User Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National User Facilities Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions ⇒ Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Berkeley Lab's User Facilities-Engines of Discovery Berkeley Lab's User Facilities provide state-of-the-art resources for scientists across the nation and around the world. About 10,000 researchers a year use these facilities, representing nearly one third of the total for all Department of Energy

  4. Hazardous Waste Certification Plan: Hazardous Waste Handling Facility, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the organization and methodology for the certification of hazardous waste (HW) handled in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Hazardous Waste Handling Facility (HWHF). The plan also incorporates the applicable elements of waste reduction, which include both up-front minimization and end- product treatment to reduce the volume and toxicity of the waste; segregation of the waste as it applies to certification; and executive summary of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the HWHF and a list of the current and planned implementing procedures used in waste certification. The plan provides guidance from the HWHF to waste generators, waste handlers, and the Systems Group Manager to enable them to conduct their activities and carry out their responsibilities in a manner that complies with several requirements of the Federal Resource Conservation and Resource Recovery Act (RCRA), the Federal Department of Transportation (DOT), and the State of California, Code of Regulations (CCR), Title 22.

  5. Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2009 Facility News ARM Aerial Facility Leads International Discussions on Aircraft Research Bookmark and Share Five research aircraft participated in the VAMOS...

  7. NREL: Wind Research - Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that...

  8. NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

  9. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interferometers Compared for ARM Mobile Facility Deployment in China Bookmark and Share ... Mobile Facility in 2008 for a field campaign to study Aerosol Indirect Effects in China. ...

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 11, 2007 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Moves to China in 2008 for Study of ... China generates exceptionally high amounts of aerosol particles whose influence on the ...

  11. Central Receiver Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Receiver Test Facility - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Applications National Solar Thermal Test Facility Nuclear Energy Systems ...

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman ... DOESC-ARM-14-003 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Report First Quarter: ...

  13. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman ... DOESC-ARM-14-028 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Report Fourth Quarter: ...

  14. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman ... DOESC-ARM-15-003 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Report First Quarter: ...

  15. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOESC-ARM-15-019 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report ... implemented by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. ...

  16. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOESC-ARM-15-020 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Report Second Quarter: ... maintained by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. ...

  17. ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Status Report A Koontz C Sivaraman April ... DOESC-ARM-14-014 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Ingest Report Second Quarter: ...

  18. ARM - NSA Barrow Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow Facility NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk Oliktok Point (AMF3) ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site NSA...

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual visitors and active user research computer accounts. Historical data show an apparent relationship between the...

  20. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13, 2014 Facility News Characterizing Ice Nuclei Over Southern Great Plains Bookmark and Share Placed on the upper platform of the SGP Guest Instrument Facility, this filter...