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  1. Perrin Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Perrin Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Perrin Ranch Facility Perrin Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra...

  2. DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero Floorplans: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by ...

  3. West Perrine, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Perrine is a census-designated place in Miami-Dade County, Florida.1 References ...

  4. DOE Tour of Zero: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders DOE Tour of Zero: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders 1 of 14 New Town Builders, now known as Thrive, built 26 units at the Row Homes at Perrin's Row in Denver, Colorado, to the performance criteria of the U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. 2 of 14 Homeowners in the three-story row homes are projected to save $682 in annual energy costs thanks to the homes' efficient construction and

  5. HIA 2015 DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Town Homes at Perrin's Row Wheat Ridge, CO DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in

  6. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Greg Perrin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    maintenance, and repair; machining and other lab support. Printable Version Photovoltaics Research Home Silicon Polycrystalline Thin Films Multijunctions New Materials,...

  7. Molecular Mimicry Regulates ABA Signaling by SnRK2 Kinases and PP2C Phosphatases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soon, Fen-Fen; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; West, Graham M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tan, M.H. Eileen; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; He, Yuanzheng; Xu, Yong; Chalmers, Michael J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhang, Huiming; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Cutler, Sean; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Griffin, Patrick R.; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2014-10-02

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites.

  8. Hadlock, R.K.; Abbey, O.B. 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on ultimate heat sinks--cooling ponds Hadlock, R.K.; Abbey, O.B. 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COOLING PONDS; PERFORMANCE TESTING; NUCLEAR...

  9. Magnetic dipole sequences in {sup 83}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwengner, R.; Schnare, H.; Wagner, A.; Doenau, F.; Rainovski, G.; Frauendorf, S.; Jungclaus, A.; Hausmann, M.; Lieb, K. P.; Yordanov, O.; Napoli, D. R.; De Angelis, G.; Axiotis, M.; Marginean, N.; Brandolini, F.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2009-10-15

    High-spin states in {sup 83}Rb were populated in the reaction {sup 11}B+{sup 76}Ge at beam energies of 45 and 50 MeV. {gamma} rays were detected with the spectrometer GASP. The level scheme of {sup 83}Rb was extended up to 13.9 MeV. Mean lifetimes of 23 levels were determined using the Doppler-shift-attenuation method. Among the bands newly established is a sequence comprising intense M1 transitions and crossover E2 transitions. This sequence turns out to be irregular and thus shows that magnetic rotation as observed in the neighboring odd-odd isotopes is not realized in this odd-even nuclide. Excited states in {sup 83}Rb were interpreted in terms of the shell model using the model space {pi}(0f{sub 5/2},1p{sub 3/2},1p{sub 1/2},0g{sub 9/2}) {nu}(1p{sub 1/2},0g{sub 9/2}). The configurations predicted for the negative-parity M1 sequence reproduce the M1 transition strengths fairly well.

  10. EERE Success Story-Zero-order Reaction Kinetics (Zero-RK) Coding Is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designing the Next-Generation Engines | Department of Energy Zero-order Reaction Kinetics (Zero-RK) Coding Is Designing the Next-Generation Engines EERE Success Story-Zero-order Reaction Kinetics (Zero-RK) Coding Is Designing the Next-Generation Engines May 31, 2016 - 5:19pm Addthis A computer code developed by a trio of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers has significantly advanced predictive computer science for designing next-generation car and truck engines. The

  11. Circular dichroism of RbHe and RbN{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancor, B.; Wyllie, R.; Walker, T. G.; Babcock, E.

    2010-10-15

    We present measurements of the circular dichroism of optically pumped Rb vapor near the D{sub 1} resonance line. Collisions with the buffer gases {sup 3}He and N{sub 2} reduce the transparency of the vapor, even when fully polarized. We use two methods to measure this effect, show that the He results can be understood from RbHe potential curves, and show how this effect conspires with the spectral profile of the optical pumping light to increase the laser power demands for optical pumping of very optically thick samples.

  12. Structural basis for basal activity and autoactivation of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling SnRK2 kinases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Ley-Moy; Soon, Fen-Fen; Zhou, X. Edward; West, Graham M.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Griffin, Patrick R.; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric

    2014-10-02

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone that controls plant growth, development, and responses to abiotic stresses. Central for ABA signaling is the ABA-mediated autoactivation of three monomeric Snf1-related kinases (SnRK2.2, -2.3, and -2.6). In the absence of ABA, SnRK2s are kept in an inactive state by forming physical complexes with type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). Upon relief of this inhibition, SnRK2 kinases can autoactivate through unknown mechanisms. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length Arabidopsis thaliana SnRK2.3 and SnRK2.6 at 1.9- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The structures, in combination with biochemical studies, reveal a two-step mechanism of intramolecular kinase activation that resembles the intermolecular activation of cyclin-dependent kinases. First, release of inhibition by PP2C allows the SnRK2s to become partially active because of an intramolecular stabilization of the catalytic domain by a conserved helix in the kinase regulatory domain. This stabilization enables SnRK2s to gain full activity by activation loop autophosphorylation. Autophosphorylation is more efficient in SnRK2.6, which has higher stability than SnRK2.3 and has well-structured activation loop phosphate acceptor sites that are positioned next to the catalytic site. Together, these data provide a structural framework that links ABA-mediated release of PP2C inhibition to activation of SnRK2 kinases.

  13. Optical pumping in a microfabricated Rb vapor cell using a microfabricated Rb discharge light source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkatraman, V.; Kang, S.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.; Shea, H.

    2014-02-03

    Miniature (Rb discharge lamp light source, as well as (2) a conventional glass-blown Rb discharge lamp. The microfabricated Rb lamp cell is a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) light source, having the same inner cell volume of around 40 mm{sup 3} as that of the resonance cell, both filled with suitable buffer gases. A miniature (∼2 cm{sup 3} volume) test setup based on the M{sub z} magnetometer interrogation technique was used for observation of optical-radiofrequency double-resonance signals, proving the suitability of the microfabricated discharge lamp to introduce efficient optical pumping. The pumping ability of this light source was found to be comparable to or even better than that of a conventional glass-blown lamp. The reported results indicate that the micro-fabricated DBD discharge lamp has a high potential for the development of a new class of miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and quantum sensors.

  14. .sup.82 Sr-.sup.82 Rb Radioisotope generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grant, Patrick M.; Erdal, Bruce R.; O'Brien, Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved .sup.82 Sr-.sup.82 Rb radioisotope generator system, based upon the complexing ion exchange resin Chelex-100, has been developed. Columns of this material can be easily and rapidly milked, and the Rb-Sr separation factor for a fresh generator was found to be > 10.sup.7. Approximately 80 percent of the .sup.82 Rb present was delivered in a 15-ml volume of aqueous 0.2 M NH.sub.4 Cl solution. After more than 6 liters of eluant had been put through the generator, the Rb-Sr separation factor was still observed to be > 10.sup.5, and no unusual strontium breakthrough behavior was seen in the system over nearly three .sup.82 Sr half lives.

  15. Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  16. Microporous titanosilicate AM-2: Rb-exchange and thermal behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebelin, Nicola . E-mail: nicola@doebelin.org; Armbruster, Thomas

    2007-01-18

    Rb-exchange and thermal stability of the microporous titanosilicate AM-2 were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and chemical analysis of the mother liquid after exchange. The dehydration and thermal stability of the exchanged structure were monitored with in situ high temperature powder X-ray diffraction. Crystal structures were refined with Rietveld methods at 25 and 400 deg. C. The AM-2 structure was found to incorporate Rb{sup +} by replacing K{sup +}. After four exchange cycles and 166 h reaction time at 90 deg. C, the chemical composition was refined to K{sub 0.18}Rb{sub 1.82}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9}.H{sub 2}O. Extrapolation suggests that higher exchange ratios may be obtained after further cycles. H{sub 2}O was expelled by heating, leading to a dehydrated structure at 360 deg. C. Dehydration was associated with a change of space group symmetry from orthorhombic P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} to monoclinic P2{sub 1}, which proved to be reversible after rehydration. This change of symmetry leaves the AM-2 characteristic structural topology uninfluenced and causes only minor distortions. The monoclinic AM-2 structure breaks down above 600 deg. C to become X-ray amorphous, and at 750 deg. C a wadeite-type phase (K {sub x}Rb{sub 2-x}TiSi{sub 3}O{sub 9}) crystallises. This transformation is irreversible and leads to immobilisation of Rb{sup +}.

  17. Short-lived isomers in {sup 94}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.; Smith, A. G.; Varley, B. J.; Simpson, G. S.; Urban, W.; Soldner, T.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Scherillo, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Zlomaniec, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Roux, B.

    2008-07-15

    The medium-spin structure of the neutron-rich, odd-odd nucleus {sup 94}Rb was studied by means of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Excited levels were populated in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf and {sup 248}Cm. Two isomeric states were found at 1485.2 and 2074.8 keV with half-lives of 18 and 107 ns, respectively. The probable structures of the two isomers involve the fully aligned, proton-neutron configurations [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(g{sub 7/2})]{sub 8{sup +}} and [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(h{sub 11/2})]{sub 10{sup -}}, respectively. These new data give information on the single-particle energies in the region.

  18. The electrical transport properties of liquid Rb using pseudopotential theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, A. B. Bhatt, N. K. Thakore, B. Y. Jani, A. R.; Vyas, P. R.

    2014-04-24

    Certain electric transport properties of liquid Rb are reported. The electrical resistivity is calculated by using the self-consistent approximation as suggested by Ferraz and March. The pseudopotential due to Hasegawa et al for full electron-ion interaction, which is valid for all electrons and contains the repulsive delta function due to achieve the necessary s-pseudisation was used for the calculation. Temperature dependence of structure factor is considered through temperature dependent potential parameter in the pair potential. Finally, thermo-electric power and thermal conductivity are obtained. The outcome of the present study is discussed in light of other such results, and confirms the applicability of pseudopotential at very high temperature via temperature dependent pair potential.

  19. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Characterization Rb Promoted Iron Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar,A.; Jacobs, G.; Ji, Y.; Hamdeh, H.; Davis, B.

    2008-01-01

    Rubidium promoted iron Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts were prepared with two Rb/Fe atomic ratios (1.44/100 and 5/100) using rubidium nitrate and rubidium carbonate as rubidium precursors. Results of catalytic activity and deactivation studies in a CSTR revealed that rubidium promoted catalysts result in a steady conversion with a lower deactivation rate than that of the corresponding unpromoted catalyst although the initial activity of the promoted catalyst was almost half that of the unpromoted catalyst. Rubidium promotion results in lower methane production, and higher CO2, alkene and 1-alkene fraction in FTS products. M{umlt o}ssbauer spectroscopic measurements of CO activated and working catalyst samples indicated that the composition of the iron carbide phase formed after carbidization was -Fe5 C2 for both promoted and unpromoted catalysts. However, in the case of the rubidium promoted catalyst, '-Fe2.2C became the predominant carbidic phase as FTS continued and the overall catalyst composition remained carbidic in nature. In contrast, the carbide content of the unpromoted catalyst was found to decline very quickly as a function of synthesis time. Results of XANES and EXAFS measurements suggested that rubidium was present in the oxidized state and that the compound most prevalent in the active catalyst samples closely resembled that of rubidium carbonate.

  20. Ba2+-inhibitable /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes across membranes of vesicles from toad urinary bladder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garty, H.; Civan, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes have been measured in suspensions of vesicles prepared from the epithelium of toad urinary bladder. A readily measurable barium-sensitive, ouabain-insensitive component has been identified; the concentration of external Ba2+ required for half-maximal inhibition was 0.6 mM. The effects of externally added cations on /sup 86/Rb+ influx and efflux have established that this pathway is conductive, with a selectivity for K+, Rb+ and Cs+ over Na+ and Li+. The Rb+ uptake is inversely dependent on external pH, but not significantly affected by internal Ca2+ or external amiloride, quinine, quinidine or lidocaine. It is likely, albeit not yet certain, that the conductive Rb+ pathway is incorporated in basolateral vesicles oriented right-side-out. It is also not yet clear whether this pathway comprises the principle basolateral K+ channel in vivo, and that its properties have been unchanged during the preparative procedures. Subject to these caveats, the data suggest that the inhibition by quinidine of Na+ transport across toad bladder does not arise primarily from membrane depolarization produced by a direct blockage of the basolateral channels. It now seems more likely that the quinidine-induced elevation of intracellular Ca2+ activity directly blocks apical Na+ entry.

  1. High-spin states and level structure in {sup 84}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Shuifa; Han Guangbing; Wen Shuxian; Gu Jianzhong; Wu Xiaoguang; Zhu Lihua; He Chuangye; Li Guangsheng; Yu Beibei; Pan Feng; Zhu Jianyu; Draayer, J. P.; Wen Tingdun; Yan, Yupeng

    2010-07-15

    High-spin states in {sup 84}Rb have been studied by using the {sup 70}Zn({sup 18}O,p3n){sup 84}Rb reaction at beam energy of 75 MeV. The gamma-gamma coincidence, excitation function, and ratios for directional correlation of oriented states were determined. A new level scheme was established in which the positive- and negative-parity bands have been extended up to 17{sup +} and 17{sup -} with an excitation energy of about 7 MeV. The signature splitting and signature inversion of the positive-parity yrast band were observed. To understand the microscopic origin of the signature inversion in the yrast positive-parity bands of doubly odd Rb nuclei, as an example, we performed calculations using the projected shell model to describe the energy spectra in {sup 84}Rb. It can be seen that the main features are reproduced in the calculations. This analysis shows that the signature splitting, especially its inversion, can be reproduced by varying only the gamma deformation with increasing spin. To research the deformation of {sup 84}Rb carefully, we calculate the total Routhian surfaces of positive-parity yrast states by the cranking shell model formalism. In addition, the results of theoretical calculations about the negative-parity yrast band in {sup 84}Rb with configuration pi(p{sub 3/2},f{sub 5/2}) x nug{sub 9/2} are compared with experimental data, and a band diagram calculated for this band is also shown to extract physics from the numerical results.

  2. Half metallic ferromagnetism in alkali metal nitrides MN (M = Rb, Cs): A first principles study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murugan, A. Rajeswarapalanichamy, R. Santhosh, M. Sudhapriyanga, G.; Kanagaprabha, S.

    2014-04-24

    The structural, electronic and elastic properties of two alkali metal nitrides (MN: M= Rb, Cs) are investigated by the first principles calculations based on density functional theory using the Vienna ab-initio simulation package. At ambient pressure the two nitrides are stable in ferromagnetic state with CsCl structure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available results. The electronic structure reveals that these materials are half metallic in nature. A pressure-induced structural phase transition from CsCl to ZB phase is observed in RbN and CsN.

  3. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermorethe fission of ?,?Pu and ?,?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were consideredless

  4. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ?,?Pu and ?,?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  5. Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Generator | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb PET Generator Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of

  6. Status of lithium-filled specimen subcapsules for the HFIR-MFE-RB10J experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, J.P.; Howell, M.; Lenox, K.E.

    1998-09-01

    The HFIR-MFE-RB-10J experiment will be irradiated in a Removable Beryllium position in the HFIR for 10 reactor cycles, accumulating approximately 5 dpa in steel. The upper region of the capsule contains two lithium-filled subcapsules containing vanadium specimens. This report describes the techniques developed to achieve a satisfactory lithium fill with a specimen occupancy of 26% in each subcapsule.

  7. Rb+ adsorption at the quartz(101)-aqueous interface: comparison of resonant anomalous x-ray reflectivity with ab initio calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Kubicki, James D.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Zhang, Zhan; Wesolowski, David J.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study adsorption of Rb+ to the quartz(101)–aqueous interface at room temperature with specular X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, and density functional theory. The interfacial water structures observed in deionized water and 10 mM RbCl solution at pH 9.8 were similar, having a first water layer at height of 1.7 ± 0.1 Å above the quartz surface and a second layer at 4.8 ± 0.1 Å and 3.9 ± 0.8 Å for the water and RbCl solutions, respectively. The adsorbed Rb+ distribution is broad and consists of presumed inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes at heights of 1.8 ±more » 0.1 and 6.4 ± 1.0 Å, respectively. Projector-augmented planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential configurations for neutral and negatively charged quartz(101) surfaces at pH 7 and 12, respectively, reveal a water structure in agreement with experimental results. These DFT calculations also show differences in adsorbed speciation of Rb+ between these two conditions. At pH 7, the lowest energy structure shows that Rb+ adsorbs dominantly as an IS complex, whereas at pH 12 IS and OS complexes have equivalent energies. The DFT results at pH 12 are generally consistent with the two site Rb distribution observed from the X-ray data at pH 9.8, albeit with some differences that are discussed. In conclusion, surface charge estimated on the basis of the measured total Rb+ coverage was -0.11 C/m2, in good agreement with the range of the surface charge magnitudes reported in the literature.« less

  8. R.K. Owen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interests are in hiking, trail building through V.O.Cal, geocaching, LINUX, and code hacking. Currently, he is the key maintainer of the environment modules package, a...

  9. Two spatially separated phases in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Meng; Tian, Wei; Valdivia, P.; Chi, Songxue; Bourret-Courchesne, E.; Dai, Pengcheng; Birgeneau, R. J.

    2014-09-26

    We report neutron scattering and transport measurements on semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2, a compound isostructural and isoelectronic to the well-studied A0.8FeySe2(A = K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K) superconducting systems. Both resistivity and DC susceptibility measurements reveal a magnetic phase transition at T = 275 K. Neutron diffraction studies show that the 275 K transition originates from a phase with rhombic iron vacancy order which exhibits an in-plane stripe antiferromagnetic ordering below 275 K. In addition, the stripe antiferromagnetic phase interdigitates mesoscopically with an ubiquitous phase with √5 x√5 iron vacancy order. This phase has a magnetic transition at TN = 425 K andmore » an iron vacancy order-disorder transition at TS = 600 K. These two different structural phases are closely similar to those observed in the isomorphous Se materials. Based on the close similarities of the in-plane antiferromagnetic structures, moments sizes, and ordering temperatures in semiconducting Rb0.8Fe1.5S2 and K0.81Fe1.58Se2, we argue that the in-plane antiferromagnetic order arises from strong coupling between local moments. Superconductivity, previously observed in the A0.8FeySe2₋ zSz system, is absent in A0.8Fe1.5S2, which has a semiconducting ground state. We discuss the implied relationship between stripe and block antiferromagnetism and superconductivity in these materials as well as a strategy for further investigation.« less

  10. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of cloud microphysics can lead to improved simulations. The high-quality observations and broad participation of the modeling community in this study points to the importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds as a key target for climate modeling centers to improve with future cloud parameterization developments. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, G de Boer, M Chen, JN Cole, AD Del Genio, M Falk, MJ Foster, A Fridlind, JC Golaz, T Hashino, JY Harrington, C Hoose, MF

  11. Differential Light-Shift Cancellation in a Magnetic-Field-Insensitive Transition of {sup 87}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chicireanu, R.; Nelson, K. D.; Olmschenk, S.; Porto, J. V.; Lundblad, N.; Derevianko, A.

    2011-02-11

    The precise measurement of transition frequencies of trapped atomic samples is susceptible to inaccuracy arising from the inhomogeneous differential shift of the relevant energy levels in the presence of the trapping fields. We demonstrate near-complete cancellation of the differential ac Stark shift (''light shift'') of a two-photon magnetic-field-insensitive microwave hyperfine (clock) transition in {sup 87}Rb atoms trapped in an optical lattice. Up to 95(2)% of the differential light shift is cancelled while maintaining magnetic-field insensitivity. This technique should have applications in quantum information and frequency metrology.

  12. Inhibition of white light of sup 86 Rb sup + absorption in the root apex of corn. [Zea mays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKendree, W.L.; Smith, R.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Measurements of cell lengths made at 0.5 millimeter intervals in median longitudinal sections of the primary roots of corn (Zea mays) were used to construct a growth curve. The region 1.5 to 4.0 millimeters from the apex contained the largest number of elongating cells. Absorption of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} was measured using intact, dark-grown corn seedlings. Following uptake and exchange, the terminal 8.0 millimeters of each root was cut into four 2.0 millimeter segments. Maximum {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake occurred in the region from 0.0 to 4.0 millimeter from the root tip. Washing the intact primary root in fresh 2.0 millimolar CaSO{sub 4} for 2 hours prior to uptake augmented the rate of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake in all regions. Illumination with white light during washing caused a reduction of {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake as compared with controls washing in darkness, and the region of greatest light response was the region of elongation. Removal of the coleoptile prior to washing did not prevent the light inhibition of subsequent {sup 86}Rb{sup +} uptake. Removal of the root cap prior to washing in light partially reversed the light-induced inhibition of the washing response.

  13. Structure and optical properties of a noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, M.J.; Li, R.K.

    2013-01-15

    A new noncentrosymmetric borate, RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} (abbreviated as RSBO), has been grown from Rb{sub 2}O--B{sub 2}O{sub 3}--RbF flux and its crystal structure was determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. It crystallizes in space group Ama2 with cell parameters of a=11.128(10) A, b=12.155(15) A, c=6.952(7) A, Z=4. The basic structural units are isolated planar BO{sub 3} groups. Second harmonic generation (SHG) test of the title compound by the Kurtz-Perry method shows that RSBO can be phase matchable with an effective SHG coefficient about two-thirds as large as that of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP). Finally, based on the anionic group approximation, the optical properties of the title compound are compared with those of the structure-related apatite-like compounds with the formula 'A{sub 5}(TO{sub n}){sub 3}X'. - Graphical abstract: RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} and some other borate NLO compounds, namely Ca{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}F RCa{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3}O (R=Y or Gd) and Na{sub 3}La{sub 2}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as the derivatives of apatite. They have similar formula composed of five cations and three anion groups (we call them 5/3 structures). The detailed SHG coefficients and optical properties of the apatite-like NLO crystals were compared and summarized. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new noncentrosymmetric borate RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} was grown from flux. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be viewed as a derivative of the apatite-like structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure and its relationship to the optical properties of RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} are compared with other NLO crystals with apatite-like structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The basic structural units are the planar BO{sub 3} groups in the structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second harmonic generation (SHG) test shows that RbSr{sub 4}(BO{sub 3}){sub 3} can be phase matchable with an

  14. Dipole-dipole broadening of Rb ns-np microwave transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunwook; Tanner, P. J.; Claessens, B. J.; Shuman, E. S.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-08-15

    The dipole-dipole broadening of ns-np microwave transitions of cold Rb Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap has been recorded for 28{<=}n{<=}51. Since the electric dipole transition matrix elements scale as n{sup 2}, a broadening rate scaling as n{sup 4} is expected and a broadening rate of 8.2x10{sup -15}n{sup 4} MHz cm{sup 3} is observed. The observed broadening is smaller than expected from a classical picture due to the spin-orbit interaction in the np atoms. The broadened resonances are asymmetric and cusp shaped, and their line shapes can be reproduced by a diatomic model which takes into account the dipole-dipole interaction, including the spin-orbit interaction, the strengths of the allowed microwave transitions, and the distribution of the atomic spacings in the trap.

  15. Ionization of Rb Rydberg atoms in the attractive nsnp dipole-dipole potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunwook; Shuman, E. S.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2011-11-15

    We have observed the ionization of a cold gas of Rb Rydberg atoms which occurs when nsns van der Waals pairs of ns atoms of n{approx_equal} 40 on a weakly repulsive potential are transferred to an attractive dipole-dipole nsnp potential by a microwave transition. Comparing the measurements to a simple model shows that the initial 300-{mu}K thermal velocity of the atoms plays an important role. Excitation to a repulsive dipole-dipole potential does not lead to more ionization on a 15-{mu}s time scale than leaving the atoms in the weakly repulsive nsns state. This observation is slightly surprising since a radiative transition must occur to allow ionization in the latter case. Finally, by power broadening of the microwave transition, to allow transitions from the initial nsns state to the nsnp state over a broad range of internuclear spacings, it is possible to accelerate markedly the evolution to a plasma.

  16. Experimental observation of magic-wavelength behavior of {sup 87}Rb atoms in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundblad, N.; Schlosser, M.; Porto, J. V.

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate the cancellation of the differential ac Stark shift of the microwave hyperfine clock transition in trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms. Recent progress in metrology exploits so-called magic wavelengths, whereby an atomic ensemble can be trapped with laser light whose wavelength is chosen so that both levels of an optical atomic transition experience identical ac Stark shifts. Similar magic-wavelength techniques are not possible for the microwave hyperfine transitions in the alkali metals due to their simple electronic structure. We show, however, that ac Stark shift cancellation is indeed achievable for certain values of wavelength, polarization, and magnetic field. The cancellation comes at the expense of a small magnetic-field sensitivity. The technique demonstrated here has implications for experiments involving the precise control of optically trapped neutral atoms.

  17. Chloride-dependent acceleration of cell cycle via modulation of Rb and cdc2 in osteoblastic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maki, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Yamane, Junko; Niisato, Naomi; Morihara, Toru; Kubo, Toshikazu; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-10-05

    In the present study, we investigated if Cl{sup -} regulates the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The proliferation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells was diminished by lowering the extracellular Cl{sup -} concentration ([Cl{sup -}]{sub o}) in the culture medium. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} increased the periods of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. We further studied the effects of [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the key enzymes, Rb and cdc2, playing key roles in checking points of the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} and the G{sub 2}/M phases in cell cycle. The lowered in [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} diminished the active forms of enzymes, Rb and cdc2. We further found that the action of lowered [Cl{sup -}]{sub o} on the cell proliferation, the cell cycle, Rb and cdc2 was abolished by the presence of 2 mM glutamine, but not by that of pyruvate as another Krebs cycle substrate. Taken together, these observations indicate here for the first time that Cl{sup -} modulates Rb and cdc2, enhancing the proliferation of the MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells.

  18. Cation ordering and effect of biaxial strain in double perovskite CsRbCaZnCl6

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pilania, G.; Uberuaga, B. P.

    2015-03-19

    Here, we investigate the electronic structure, energetics of cation ordering, and effect of biaxial strain on double perovskite CsRbCaZnCl6 using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The two constituents (i.e., CsCaCl3 and RbZnCl3) forming the double perovskite exhibit a stark contrast. While CsCaCl3 is known to exist in a cubic perovskite structure and does not show any epitaxial strain induced phase transitions within an experimentally accessible range of compressive strains, RbZnCl3 is thermodynamically unstable in the perovskite phase and exhibits ultra-sensitive response at small epitaxial strains if constrained in the perovskite phase. We show that combining the two compositionsmore » in a double perovskite structure not only improves overall stability but also the strain-polarization coupling of the material. Our calculations predict a ground state with P4/nmm space group for the double perovskite, where A-site cations (i.e., Cs and Rb) are layer-ordered and B-site cations (i.e., Ca and Zn) prefer a rocksalt type ordering. The electronic structure and bandgap in this system are shown to be quite sensitive to the B-site cation ordering and is minimally affected by the ordering of A-site cations. We find that at experimentally accessible compressive strains CsRbCaZnCl6 can be phase transformed from its paraelectric ground state to an antiferroelectric state, where Zn atoms contribute predominantly to the polarization. Furthermore, both energy difference and activation barrier for a transformation between this antiferroelectric state and the corresponding ferroelectric configuration are predicted to be small. As a result, the computational approach presented here opens a new pathway towards a rational design of novel double perovskites with improved strain response and functionalities.« less

  19. Spectroscopy and applications of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Jayita Rahmlow, David; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E.; Gould, Phillip L.; Stwalley, William C.

    2013-11-07

    We report new results on the spectroscopy of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb. The observations are based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of ultracold KRb molecules starting in vibrational levels v?? = 1823 of the a?{sup 3}?{sup +} state and ionized via the intermediate 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} state. The a-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold {sup 39}K and {sup 85}Rb atoms to the 3(0{sup +}) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission. We discuss the potential applications of this state to future experiments, as a pathway for populating the lowest vibrational levels of the a state as well as the X state.

  20. A full dimensional investigation of infrared spectroscopy of the RbCs dimer using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huihui; Yang, Yonggang Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2013-12-28

    The geometry and infrared absorption spectrum of (RbCs){sub 2} have been studied by full dimensional quantum dynamics simulations. For this purpose, the potential energy and dipole moment surfaces are generated by means of a cluster expansion with all two and three mode correlations, and fitted to analytical expressions with negligible deviations. Accordingly, the ground state (RbCs){sub 2} has a diamond geometry with D{sub 2h} symmetry. The infrared spectrum with frequencies up to 120 cm{sup −1}, exhibits rich details of the fundamentals, overtones, and combination bands; the highest fundamental frequency of (RbCs){sub 2} is only 40.26 cm{sup −1}. The present study unravels important details of the interactions between the widely investigated ultracold RbCs molecules.

  1. Rb+ adsorption at the quartz(101)-aqueous interface: comparison of resonant anomalous x-ray reflectivity with ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Kubicki, James D.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Zhang, Zhan; Wesolowski, David J.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study adsorption of Rb+ to the quartz(101)–aqueous interface at room temperature with specular X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, and density functional theory. The interfacial water structures observed in deionized water and 10 mM RbCl solution at pH 9.8 were similar, having a first water layer at height of 1.7 ± 0.1 Å above the quartz surface and a second layer at 4.8 ± 0.1 Å and 3.9 ± 0.8 Å for the water and RbCl solutions, respectively. The adsorbed Rb+ distribution is broad and consists of presumed inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes at heights of 1.8 ± 0.1 and 6.4 ± 1.0 Å, respectively. Projector-augmented planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential configurations for neutral and negatively charged quartz(101) surfaces at pH 7 and 12, respectively, reveal a water structure in agreement with experimental results. These DFT calculations also show differences in adsorbed speciation of Rb+ between these two conditions. At pH 7, the lowest energy structure shows that Rb+ adsorbs dominantly as an IS complex, whereas at pH 12 IS and OS complexes have equivalent energies. The DFT results at pH 12 are generally consistent with the two site Rb distribution observed from the X-ray data at pH 9.8, albeit with some differences that are discussed. In conclusion, surface charge estimated on the basis of the measured total Rb+ coverage was -0.11 C/m2, in good agreement with the range of the surface charge magnitudes reported in the literature.

  2. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces at 10-50 degrees C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 degrees C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alpha-TiO2 (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH(-0.40)) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The complexation of medium cations increases significantly with increasing

  3. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) Surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite ({alpha}-SnO{sub 2}) surfaces at 10-50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH{sub 2} group is more acidic than the bridging Sn{sub 2}OH group, with protonation constants (log K{sub H}) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural {alpha}-TiO{sub 2} (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na{sup +} and Rb{sup +}, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na{sup +} between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb{sup +} is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na{sup +}/Rb{sup +} was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH{sup -0.40}) and the protonated bridging group (Sn{sub 2}OH{sup +0.36}) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The

  4. Topologically identical, but geometrically isomeric layers in hydrous α-, β-Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O and anhydrous Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Na; Klepov, Vladislav V.; Villa, Eric M.; Bosbach, Dirk; Suleimanov, Evgeny V.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.

    2014-07-01

    The hydrothermal reaction of uranyl nitrate with rubidium nitrate and arsenic (III) oxide results in the formation of polymorphic α- and β-Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O (α-, β-RbUAs) and the anhydrous phase Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})] (RbUAs). These phases were structurally, chemically and spectroscopically characterized. The structures of all three compounds are based upon topologically identical, but geometrically isomeric layers. The layers are linked with each other by means of the Rb cations and hydrogen bonding. Dehydration experiments demonstrate that water deintercalation from hydrous α- and β-RbUAs yields anhydrous RbUAs via topotactic reactions. - Graphical abstract: Three different layer geometries observed in the structures of Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})] and α- and β- Rb[UO{sub 2}(AsO{sub 3}OH)(AsO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2})]·H{sub 2}O. Two different coordination environments of uranium polyhedra (types I and II) are shown schematically on the top of the figure. - Highlights: • Three new uranyl arsenates were synthesized from the hydrothermal reactions. • The phases consist of the topologically identical but geometrically different layers. • Topotactic transitions were observed in the processes of mono-hyrates dehydration.

  5. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  6. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermore » the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered« less

  7. Crystal structural study of ternary molybdate LiRbBi{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klevtsova, R.F.; Glinskaya, L.A.; Alekseev, V.I.

    1994-03-01

    Single crystals of the title compound have been synthesized and its crystal structure has been determined. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c, Z = 2 (a = 5.3056, b = 12.976, c = 19.578 {angstrom}, {beta} = 92.583{degrees}, R = 0.029). A distinctive feature of the structure is lacy layers of eight-vertex Bi polyhedra and Mo tetrahedra connected to them via common vertices. The adjacent layers are linked together by ten-vertex Rb polyhedra and Li octahedra.

  8. First-principles studies of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of a novel thorium compound Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brik, M.G.

    2014-04-01

    The structural, electronic, and optical properties of a recently synthesized thorium compound Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} have been calculated in the density functional theory framework for the first time. The calculated direct band gap was 1.471 eV (generalized gradient approximation) and 1.171 eV (local density approximation), with both results being close to the experimental result of 1.83 eV. High covalency/iconicity of the Th–Se/Rb–Se bonds was demonstrated by calculating effective Mulliken charges of all ions. The polarized calculations of the complex dielectric function are presented; dependence of the calculated index of refraction was fitted to the Sellmeyer equation in the wavelength range from 500 to 2500 nm. - Graphical abstract: Calculated band structure of Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15}. - Highlights: • The first theoretical analysis of the Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} properties is reported. • Structural, electronic and optical properties of Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} were calculated. • An indirect character of Rb{sub 2}Th{sub 7}Se{sub 15} band gap was confirmed. • Dependence of the refractive index on the wavelength was calculated.

  9. Performance of a prototype atomic clock based on lin parallel lin coherent population trapping resonances in Rb atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.; Horrom, Travis; Belcher, Nathan; Novikova, Irina

    2010-03-15

    We report on the performance of the first table-top prototype atomic clock based on coherent population trapping (CPT) resonances with parallel linearly polarized optical fields (lin parallel lin configuration). Our apparatus uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) tuned to the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with the current modulation at the {sup 87}Rb hyperfine frequency. We demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by the proper choice of rf modulation power and further improve our prototype clock stability by optimizing the parameters of the microwave lock loop. Operating in these optimal conditions, we measured a short-term fractional frequency stability (Allan deviation) 2x10{sup -11}{tau}{sup -1/2} for observation times 1 s{<=}{tau}{<=}20 s. This value is limited by large VCSEL phase noise and environmental temperature fluctuation. Further improvements in frequency stability should be possible with an apparatus designed as a dedicated lin parallel lin CPT resonance clock with environmental impacts minimized.

  10. Novel defect pyrochlores ABi/sub 2/B/sub 5/O/sub 16/ (A = Cs, Rb; B = Ta, Nb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlert, M.K., Greedan, J.E.; Subramanian, M.A.

    1988-07-01

    The crystal structures of three oxides with compositions CsBi/sub 2/Nb/sub 5/O/sub 16/, CsBi/sub 2/Ta/sub 5/O/sub 16/, and RbBi/sub 2/Ta/sub 5/O/sub 16/ have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. A common structure of the defect pyrochlore types has been found. Atomic positions in space group Fd3m are 3.2 O and 3.2 Cs(Rb) in 8b, 6.4 Bi in 16d, 16 Ta(Nb) in 16c, and 48 O in 48f. There is some evidence that the Rb atoms actually occupy 32e sites. On electrostatic grounds it is highly unlikely that the Cs(Rb) and O atoms are randomly distributed in 8b. Evidence for short-range order is apparent in the X-ray powder diffraction data. Cell constants are 10.528(1) A (Cs, Nb), 10.504(1) A (Cs, Ta), and 10.510(2) A (Rb, Ta), respectively, with 48f x parameters 0.3139(2) (Cs, Nb), 0.3152(2) (Cs, Ta), and 0.3153(2) (Rb, Ta). Isotropic temperature factors for the 8b and 16d site atoms ranged from 3 to 6 (A)/sup 2/. These large values suggest anharmonic behavior or high mobility for some of the ions. Evidence for this is found in the presence of significant dielectric loss effects in all of the compounds studied.

  11. Constrained Surface Complexation Modeling: Rutile in RbCl, NaCl, and NaCF3SO3 Media to 250 °C

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Předota, Milan; Ridley, Moira K.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive set of molecular-level results, primarily from classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations, are used to constrain CD-MUSIC surface complexation model (SCM) parameters describing rutile powder titrations conducted in RbCl, NaCl, and NaTr (Tr = triflate, CF3SO3–) electrolyte media from 25 to 250 °C. Rb+ primarily occupies the innermost tetradentate binding site on the rutile (110) surface at all temperatures (25, 150, 250 °C) and negative charge conditions (-0.1 and -0.2 C/m2) probed via CMD simulations, reflecting the small hydration energy of this large, monovalent cation. Consequently, variable SCM parameters (Stern-layer capacitance values and intrinsic Rb+ bindingmore » constants) were adjusted relatively easily to satisfactorily match the CMD and titration data. The larger hydration energy of Na+ results in a more complex inner-sphere distribution, which shifts from bidentate to tetradentate binding with increasing negative charge and temperature, and this distribution was not matched well for both negative charge conditions, which may reflect limitations in the CMD and/or SCM approaches. Finally, in particular, the CMD axial density profiles for Rb+ and Na+ reveal that peak binding distances shift toward the surface with increasing negative charge, suggesting that the CD-MUSIC framework may be improved by incorporating CD or Stern-layer capacitance values that vary with charge.« less

  12. Calcium accumulated by sickle cell anemia red cells does not affect their potassium (86Rb+) flux components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, O.E.; Lew, V.L.; Bookchin, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    We investigate here the hypothesis that the high Ca content of sickle cell anemia (SS) red cells may produce a sustained activation of the Ca2+-dependent K+ permeability (Gardos effect) and that the particularly high Ca levels in the dense SS cell fraction rich in irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) might account for the Na pump inhibition observed in these cells. We measured active and passive 86Rb+ influx (as a marker for K+) in density-fractionated SS cells before and after extraction of their excess Ca by exposure to the Ca ionophore (A23187) and ethylene glycol tetra-acetic acid and with or without adenosine triphosphate depletion or addition of quinine. None of these maneuvers revealed any evidence of a Ca2+-dependent K leak in SS discocytes or dense cells. Na pump inhibition in the dense SS cells was associated with normal activation by external K+ and a low Vmax that persisted after Ca extraction from the cells. These results are consistent with our recent findings that the excess Ca in these cells is compartmentalized in intracellular inside-out vesicles and unavailable as free Ca2+ to the inner membrane surface. Although the steady-state free cytoplasmic Ca2+ in oxygenated SS cells must be below the levels needed to activate the K+ channel, possible brief activation of the channels of some SS cells resulting from transient elevations of cell Ca2+ during deoxygenation-induced sickling cannot be excluded. The dense, ISC-rich SS cell fraction showed a Ca2+-independent increase in the ouabain-resistant, nonsaturable component of 86Rb+ influx that, if uncompensated by Na+ gain, could contribute to the dehydration of these cells.

  13. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  14. DOE Tour of Zero: Row Homes at Perrin's Row by New Town Builders...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Homeowners in the three-story row homes are projected to save 682 in annual energy costs ... drip irrigation reduce irrigation water usage outside. 5 of 14 ENERGY STAR appliances ...

  15. DOE ZERH Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project with 26 units in the cold climate that got a HERS 54 without PV, or HERS 28 with PV, with 2x6 24” on center walls with R-23 blown fiberglass; slab foundation with R-10 rigid at slab edge; plus R-10 rigid exterior; R-22 ICF basement walls; vented attic with R-50 blown fiberglass; 92 AFUE furnace, 13 SEER AC.

  16. Synthesis and structural characterization of the new clathrates K8Cd4Ge42, Rb8Cd4Ge42, and Cs8Cd4Ge42

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schafer, Marion; Bobev, Svilen

    2016-03-25

    This paper presents results from our exploratory work in the systems K-Cd-Ge, Rb-Cd-Ge, and Cs-Cd-Ge, which yielded the novel type-I clathrates with refined compositions K8Cd3.77(7)Ge42.23, Rb8Cd3.65(7)Ge42.35, and Cs7.80(1)Cd3.65(6)Ge42.35. The three compounds represent rare examples of clathrates of germanium with the alkali metals, where a d10 element substitutes a group 14 element. The three structures, established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, indicate that the framework-building Ge atoms are randomly substituted by Cd atoms on only one of the three possible crystallographic sites. Furthermore, this and several other details of the crystal chemistry are elaborated.

  17. Shape resonances in ground-state diatomic molecules: General trends and the example of RbCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londono, B. E.; Mahecha, J. E.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Crubellier, A.

    2010-07-15

    The presence of shape resonances due to tunneling through the centrifugal barrier modifies strongly the dynamics of cold atom scattering. As shown on the example of the ground and lowest triplet electronic states of the {sup 85}Rb{sup 133}Cs molecule, the crucial parameter is, as usual for cold collisions, the scattering length. A general description of shape resonances of diatomic molecules is given from three simple single channel asymptotic models, whose respective performances are discussed. The first model, which consists of a R{sup -6} potential limited at short range by a repulsive wall, positioned to reproduce the s-wave scattering length, accounts satisfactorily for the main system-independent properties of shape resonances. Introduction in the model of energy- and angular-momentum-dependent nodal lines specific to the inner part of the potential greatly improves its efficiency. When the energy and angular momentum dependence of the nodal lines cannot be deduced from full potential calculations or from experiment, a rough, but universal, estimate of these properties is obtained by extending the R{sup -6} behavior of the potential up to the origin.

  18. Synthesis and structural characterization of a new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Lingyun; Pan, Shilie; Wang, Ying; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Xiaoxia; Han, Shujuan

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. • Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5−}, exist in the title compound. • Spectral properties and thermal analysis of Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} were reported. - Abstract: A new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}, has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. The compound crystallizes in the space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 (No. 96) of the tetragonal system with a = 10.148(4) Å, c = 16.689(14) Å, V = 1718.8(17) Å{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5−}, a central BO{sub 4} tetrahedron sharing all its four vertices with neighboring sulfate tetrahedra, exist in the title compound, and then the rubidium atoms are situated in the voids of the resulting structure. The IR spectrum confirms the presence of BO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4} units. The UV–vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum exhibits a band gap of about 3.99 eV. The TG-DSC analysis suggests that Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} is an incongruent melting compound.

  19. X-ray absorption studies of mixed salt polymer electrolytes: ZnBr{sub 2}/CaBr{sub 2}-PEO, ZnBr{sub 2}/LiBr-PEO, and ZnBr{sub 2}/RbBr-PEO complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBreen, J.; Yang, X.Q.; Lee, H.S.; Okamoto, Y.

    1995-02-01

    Polyethylene oxide (PEO)-salt systems are an important new class of electrolytes that are being considered for many uses. X-ray absorption (XAS) studies of ZnBr{sub 2}-PEO complexes, at the Zn K edge, at temperatures between 25 and 120 C, indicate that additions of bromide salts of Li, Rb, or Ca result in the formation of ZnBr{sub 4}{sup {minus} 2} complexes with a Zn-Br bond length of 2.42 {angstrom}. XAS, at the Rb K edge, in mixed RbBr/ZnBr{sub 2}-PEO complexes with an excess of ZnBr{sub 2}, shows that the ZnBr{sub 2} causes the RbBr to dissolve in the polymer. The Rb{sup +} ions are weakly complexed with the PEO with an Rb-O bond distance of 2.93 {angstrom}.

  20. Observation of cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap using a laser-pulse-train technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menegatti, Carlos R.; Marangoni, Bruno S.; Marcassa, Luis G.

    2011-11-15

    In this work, we have developed and characterized a laser-pulse-train technique to observe cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap. The molecules are produced in a magneto-optical trap, and then loaded into a crossed optical dipole trap. The time evolution of the molecular population is obtained by applying a laser pulse train, which photoionizes the ground-state molecules through intermediate molecular bands. Our results show that this technique allows us to obtain a faster data acquisition rate of the time evolution of the molecule population than other techniques.

  1. A combined Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic study of Mg-suite norite 78238: Further evidence for early differentiation of the Moon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmunson, J; E.Borg, L; Nyquist, L E; Asmerom, Y

    2008-11-17

    Lunar Mg-suite norite 78238 was dated using the Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr, and U-Pb isotopic systems in order to constrain the age of lunar magma ocean solidification and the beginning of Mg-suite magmatism, as well as to provide a direct comparison between the three isotopic systems. The Sm-Nd isotopic system yields a crystallization age for 78238 of 4334 {+-} 37 Ma and an initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} value of -0.27 {+-} 0.74. The age-initial {var_epsilon}{sub Nd}{sup 143} (T-I) systematics of a variety of KREEP-rich samples, including 78238 and other Mg-suite rocks, KREEP basalts, and olivine cumulate NWA 773, suggest that lunar differentiation was completed by 4492 {+-} 61 Ma assuming a Chondritic Uniform Reservoir bulk composition for the Moon. The Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of 78238 were disturbed by post-crystallization processes. Nevertheless, selected data points yield two Rb-Sr isochrons. One is concordant with the Sm-Nd crystallization age, 4366 {+-} 53 Ma. The other is 4003 {+-} 95 Ma and is concordant with an Ar-Ar age for 78236. The {sup 207}Pb-{sup 206}Pb age of 4333 {+-} 59 Ma is concordant with the Sm-Nd age. The U-Pb isotopic systematics of 78238 yield linear arrays equivalent to younger ages than the Pb-Pb system, and may reflect fractionation of U and Pb during sample handling. Despite the disturbed nature of the U-Pb systems, a time-averaged {mu} ({sup 238}U/{sup 204}Pb) value of the source can be estimated at 27 {+-} 30 from the Pb-Pb isotopic systematics. Because KREEP-rich samples are likely to be derived from source regions with the highest U/Pb ratios, the relatively low {mu} value calculated for the 78238 source suggests the bulk Moon does not have an exceedingly high {mu} value.

  2. High temperature redox reactions with uranium: Synthesis and characterization of Cs(UO{sub 2})Cl(SeO{sub 3}), Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 2}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}, and RbNa{sub 5}U{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 7}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babo, Jean-Marie; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2013-10-15

    Cs(UO{sub 2})Cl(SeO{sub 3}) (1), Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 2}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 3} (2), and RbNa{sub 5}U{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 7} (3) single crystals were synthesized using CsCl, RbCl, and a CuCl/NaCl eutectic mixture as fluxes, respectively. Their lattice parameters and space groups are as follows: P2{sub 1}/n (a=6.548(1) Å, b=11.052(2) Å, c=10.666(2) Å and β=93.897(3)°), P1{sup ¯} (a=7.051(2) Å, b=7.198(2) Å, c=8.314(2) Å, α=107.897(3)°, β=102.687(3)° and γ=100.564(3)°) and C2/c (a=17.862(4) Å, b=6.931(1) Å, c=20.133(4) Å and β=109.737(6)°. The small anionic building units found in these compounds are SeO{sub 3}{sup 2−} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} tetrahedra, oxide, and chloride. The crystal structure of the first compound is composed of [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2−} chains separated by Cs{sup +} cations. The structure of (2) is constructed from [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O{sub 11}]{sup 16−} chains further connected through selenite units into layers stacked perpendicularly to the [0 1 0] direction, with Rb{sup +} cations intercalating between them. The structure of compound (3) is made of uranyl sulfate layers formed by edge and vertex connections between dimeric [U{sub 2}O{sub 16}] and [SO{sub 4}] polyhedra. These layers contain unusual sulfate–metal connectivity as well as large voids. - Graphical abstract: A new family of uranyl selenites and sulfates has been prepared by high-temperature redox reactions. This compounds display new bonding motifs. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Low-dimensional Uranyl Oxoanion compounds. • Conversion of U(IV) to U(VI) at high temperatures. • Dimensional reduction by both halides and stereochemically active lone-pairs.

  3. Synthesis and structure of R{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (R = Rb or Cs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serezhkin, V. N.; Peresypkina, E. V.; Grigor’eva, V. A.; Virovets, A. V.; Serezhkina, L. B.

    2015-01-15

    Crystals Rb{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (I) and Cs{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}] (II) have been synthesized and studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Crystals I are monoclinic, with the following parameters: a = 12.2118(5) Å, b = 10.2545(3) Å, c = 11.8754(4) Å, β = 110.287(1)°, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 4, and R = 0.0523. Crystals II are orthorhombic, with a = 13.7309(3) Å, b = 10.5749(2) Å, c = 10.1891(2) Å, sp. gr. Pnma, Z = 4, and R = 0.0411. The basic structural units of crystals I and II are one-core complexes [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}]{sup 2−}, which belong to the crystallochemical group cis-AB{sub 2}{sup 01}M{sub 2}{sup 1} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = NO{sub 3}{sup −}, M{sup 1} = NCS{sup −}), which are combined into a framework via electrostatic interactions with ions of alkaline metals R (R = Rb or Cs). The structural features of crystals I and II, which condition the formation of [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2}]{sup 2−} complexes with a cis rather than a trans position of isothiocyanate ions in the coordination sphere of uranyl ions, are discussed.

  4. Luminescent properties of phosphor converted LED using an orange-emitting Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hee Jo; Yim, Dong Kyun; Cho, In-Sun; Roh, Hee-Suk; Kim, Ju Seong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Hong, Kug Sun

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Phase-pure Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} powders were synthesized by a solid state reaction process. ► The optimum emission intensity was observed at the Eu{sup 2+} ion concentration of 0.006. ► The dipole–dipole interaction was the major concentration quenching mechanism. ► The pc-LED coated with Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} had higher CRI than commercial red phosphor. -- Abstract: A series of orange-emitting Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors were synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The as-prepared phosphors were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), fluorescence spectroscopy, and spectroradiometry. XRD showed that all prepared samples exhibited a monoclinic Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the photoluminescence efficiency of Rb{sub 2}Ca{sub 1−x}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sub x}{sup 2+} phosphors increased with increasing Eu{sup 2+} concentration until x = 0.006, then decreased at higher concentrations, due to a concentration quenching effect. The thermal activation energy was also measured to be 0.40 eV. Furthermore, a phosphor-converted LED (pc-LED) coated with Rb{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.994}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sub 0.006}{sup 2+} was fabricated, which exhibited bright orange emission under a forward bias, from 200 to 300 mA. The color rendering index (CRI) of pc-LED coated with Rb{sub 2}Ca{sub 0.994}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sub 0.006}{sup 2+} was higher than the CRI of pc-LED coated with commercial red phosphor, due to the broad emission band of Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor. In applying with three-band pc-LEDs, moreover, white pc-LED using Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor had a higher CRI, than using commercial phosphor. These results indicated that Rb{sub 2}CaP{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor could be a good candidate for a near-UV based w-LED.

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project with 26 units in the cold climate that got a HERS 54 without PV, or HERS 28 with PV, with 2x6 24” on center walls with R-23 blown fiberglass; slab foundation with R-10 rigid at slab edge; plus R-10 rigid exterior; R-22 ICF basement walls; vented attic with R-50 blown fiberglass; 92 AFUE furnace, 13 SEER AC.

  6. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; et al

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperaturemore » behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.« less

  7. Constrained Surface Complexation Modeling: Rutile in RbCl, NaCl, and NaCF3SO3 Media to 250 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machesky, Michael L.; Předota, Milan; Ridley, Moira K.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive set of molecular-level results, primarily from classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations, are used to constrain CD-MUSIC surface complexation model (SCM) parameters describing rutile powder titrations conducted in RbCl, NaCl, and NaTr (Tr = triflate, CF3SO3) electrolyte media from 25 to 250 °C. Rb+ primarily occupies the innermost tetradentate binding site on the rutile (110) surface at all temperatures (25, 150, 250 °C) and negative charge conditions (-0.1 and -0.2 C/m2) probed via CMD simulations, reflecting the small hydration energy of this large, monovalent cation. Consequently, variable SCM parameters (Stern-layer capacitance values and intrinsic Rb+ binding constants) were adjusted relatively easily to satisfactorily match the CMD and titration data. The larger hydration energy of Na+ results in a more complex inner-sphere distribution, which shifts from bidentate to tetradentate binding with increasing negative charge and temperature, and this distribution was not matched well for both negative charge conditions, which may reflect limitations in the CMD and/or SCM approaches. Finally, in particular, the CMD axial density profiles for Rb+ and Na+ reveal that peak binding distances shift toward the surface with increasing negative charge, suggesting that the CD-MUSIC framework may be improved by incorporating CD or Stern-layer capacitance values that vary with charge.

  8. Identification of a genetic interaction between the tumor suppressor EAF2 and the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) signaling pathway in C. elegans and prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Liquan; Wang, Dan; Fisher, Alfred L.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-05-02

    the growth and survival of prostate cancer cells. Together these findings identify a novel physical and functional interaction between EAF2 and the Rb pathway.

  9. Milestone Report - M4FT-15OR03120218 - A Literature Search on the Effects of the Decay of 85Kr to 85Rb on Long-term Storage Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Spencer, Barry B.

    2015-10-01

    Reprocessing of UNF that has been out of the reactor for less than about 50 y requires the removal of 85Kr from the process off-gas streams. This is needed despite the relatively small amount of that isotope in the combined Xe and Kr inventory (Table 1). The decay of 85Kr to 85Rb presents challenges to the materials that will potentially be used to remove and store the Kr recovered from the off-gas. To address some of these problems, a thorough literature survey was completed, and the results of that analysis are summarized in this document.

  10. One-pot occurrence of two polymorphs of Rb{sub 2}Sc[Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}]F and their structural, spectroscopic and computational characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahlenberg, Volker; Manninger, Tanja; Perfler, Lukas; Többens, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    Single-crystal growth experiments in the system RbF–Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}–SiO{sub 2} resulted in the crystallization of two forms of Rb{sub 2}Sc[Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}]F within the same run. Basic crystallographic data of the two concomitant polymorphs at ambient conditions are as follows: phase I: space group I4/m, a=11.2619(3) Å, c=8.3053(4) Å, V=1053.36(6) Å{sup 3}, Z=4; phase II: space group P2{sub 1}/m, a=11.5085(6) Å, b=8.3805(3) Å, c=11.6750(6) Å, β=111.147(6)°, V=1050.19(9) Å{sup 3}, Z=4. The structures were determined by direct methods and refined to residuals of R(|F|)=0.0231 (phase I) for 516 and 0.0249 (phase II) for 2050 independent observed reflections with I>2σ(I). Phase I showed twinning by merohedry which was accounted for during the refinement process. Both compounds are based on multiple chains of [SiO{sub 4}]-tetrahedra forming closed columns or tubes. The multiplicity of the unbranched fundamental chains is two (for phase I) and four (for phase II), respectively. The periodicity of the multiple chains has a value of four in both modifications which is also reflected in similar translation periods along the chain directions (phase I: t{sub [001]}=8.31 Å; phase II: t{sub [010]}=8.38 Å). Alternatively, both polymorphs can be described as mixed octahedral–tetrahedral frameworks, which can be classified according to their polyhedral microensembles. A topological analysis of both networks is presented. Structural investigations have been supplemented by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The interpretation of the spectroscopic data including the allocation of the bands to certain vibrational species has been aided by DFT-calculations. - Graphical abstract: Mixed tetrahedral–octahedral framework of the tetragonal polymorph of Rb{sub 2}Sc[Si{sub 4}O{sub 10}]F. - Highlights: • We report the crystal structures of two polymorphs of Rb{sub 2}ScSi{sub 4}O{sub 10}F. • Both phases crystallized concomitantly in the same flux-growth experiment. • The

  11. High-Pressure Single-Crystal Neutron Scattering Study of Magnetic and Fe Vacancy Orders in (Tl,Rb)2 Fe4 Se5 Superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Feng; Bao, Wei; Chi, Song-Xue; Santos, Antonio M. dos; Molaison, Jamie J.; Fang, Ming-Hu; Wang, Hang-Dong; Mao, Qian-Hui; Wang, Jin-Chen; Liu, Juan-Juan; Sheng, Jie-Ming

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic and iron vacancy orders in superconducting (Tl,Rb)2Fe4Se5 single-crystals by using a high-pressure neutron diffraction technique. Similar to the temperature effect, the block antiferromagnetic order gradually decreases upon increasing pressure while the Fe vacancy superstructural order remains intact before its precipitous disappearance at the critical pressure Pc = 8.3 GPa. Combined with previously determined Pc for superconductivity, our phase diagram under pressure reveals the concurrence of the block AFM order, the √5 × √5 iron vacancy order and superconductivity for the 245 superconductor. Lastly, a synthesis of current experimental data in a coherent physical picture is attempted.

  12. Binding energies of the ground triplet state a{sup 3}?{sub u}{sup +} of Rb{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} in terms of the generalized Le RoyBernstein near-dissociation expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sovkov, V. B.; Ivanov, V. S. [V.A. Fock Institute of Physics and Department of Physics of St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya Street 1, Petrodvoretz, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)] [V.A. Fock Institute of Physics and Department of Physics of St. Petersburg State University, Ulyanovskaya Street 1, Petrodvoretz, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-07

    Formulae of Le RoyBernstein near-dissociation theory are derived in a general isotopeinvariant form, applicable to any term in the rotational expansion of a diatomic ro-vibrational term value. It is proposed to use the generalized Le RoyBernstein expansion to describe the binding energies (ro-vibrational term values) of the ground triplet state a{sup 3}?{sub u}{sup +} of alkali metal dimers. The parameters of this description are determined for Rb{sub 2} and Cs{sub 2} molecules. This approach gives a recipe to calculate the whole variety of the binding energies with characteristic accuracies from ?1 10{sup ?3} to 1 10{sup ?2} cm{sup ?1} using a relatively simple algebraic equation.

  13. Proceedings of the wellbore sampling workshop Traeger, R.K. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Harding, B.W. 58 GEOSCIENCES; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; BOREHOLES; SAMPLING;...

  14. Test report : Raytheon / KTech RK30 energy storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Raytheon/KTech has developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Raytheon/KTech Zinc-Bromide Energy Storage System.

  15. Direct evidence for a pressure-induced nodal superconducting gap in the Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2 superconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guguchia, Z.; Amato, A.; Kang, J.; Luetkens, H.; Biswas, P. K.; Prando, G.; von Rohr, F.; Bukowski, Z.; Shengelaya, A.; Keller, H.; Morenzoni, E.; Fernandes, Rafael M.; Khasanov, R.

    2015-11-09

    The superconducting gap structure in iron-based high-temperature superconductors (Fe-HTSs) is non-universal. Contrasting with other unconventional superconductors, in the Fe-HTSs both d-wave and extended s-wave pairing symmetries are close in energy. Probing the proximity between these very different superconducting states and identifying experimental parameters that can tune them is of central interest. Here we report high-pressure muon spin rotation experiments on the temperature-dependent magnetic penetration depth in the optimally doped nodeless s-wave Fe-HTS Ba0.65Rb0.35Fe2As2. Upon pressure, a strong decrease of the penetration depth in the zero-temperature limit is observed, while the superconducting transition temperature remains nearly constant. More importantly, the low-temperature behaviour of the inverse-squared magnetic penetration depth, which is a direct measure of the superfluid density, changes qualitatively from an exponential saturation at zero pressure to a linear-in-temperature behaviour at higher pressures, indicating that hydrostatic pressure promotes the appearance of nodes in the superconducting gap.

  16. A9RB1B5.tmp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Real Gross State Product (Billion $2009) New England ................ 858 869 863 867 869 874 878 883 888 892 896 901 864 876 894 Middle Atlantic .............. 2,399 2,435 2,450 2,455 2,459 2,473 2,487 2,499 2,507 2,519 2,531 2,542 2,435 2,479 2,525 E. N. Central ................. 2,236 2,250 2,269 2,277 2,278 2,288 2,298 2,309 2,322 2,333 2,344 2,353 2,258 2,293 2,338 W. N. Central ................ 1,048 1,055 1,057 1,058 1,060 1,066 1,072 1,078 1,084 1,090 1,096 1,102 1,054 1,069 1,093 S.

  17. Synthesis and structural characterization of new defect pyrochlore type A{sub x}Ln{sub y}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 6+z} antimoniates (0Rb, Cs, Tl; Ln = Eu, Gd, and Y) prepared by coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Haimouti, A.; Zambon, D.; El-Ghozzi, M.; Avignant, D.; Leroux, F.; El Aatmani, M.; Daoud, M

    2003-07-14

    New cubic defect pyrochlore type A{sub x}Ln{sub y}Sb{sub 2}O{sub 6+z} antimoniates (0Rb, Cs, Tl; Ln=Eu, Gd, and Y) (space group Fd3m) were prepared by calcination in air at 650 deg. C of compositions obtained by a coprecipitation method. Their crystal structures were refined by the Rietveld procedure and further confirmed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) experiments. Refinements of the X-ray powder diffraction data show a partial and statistical occupation of the 8b site by alkaline or thallous ions and oxygen and lead to values close to 0.33 for the only refinable positional x parameter of the 48f oxygenated site.

  18. Six novel transition-metal phosphite compounds, with structure related to yavapaiite: Crystal structures and magnetic and thermal properties of A{sup I}[M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}] (A=K, NH{sub 4}, Rb and M=V, Fe)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamchaoui, Farida; Alonzo, Veronique; Universite Europeenne de Bretagne ; Venegas-Yazigi, Diego; Rebbah, Houria; Le Fur, Eric

    2013-02-15

    Six new transition metal(III) phosphites A{sup I}[V{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}], where A=K (1), NH{sub 4} (2) and Rb (3) and A{sup I}[Fe{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}] where A=K (4), NH{sub 4} (5) and Rb (6) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and the solid-state structures were solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. These compounds crystallize in the hexagonal system, space group P6{sub 3}mc (no. 186), with a=5.3294(2) A and c=12.3130(5) A for 1, a=5.3330(2) A and c=12.8760(4) A for 2, a=5.3459(2) A and c=12.6850(8) A for 3, a=5.3256(1) A and c=12.2362(3) A for 4, a=5.3229(2) A and c=12.8562(4) A for 5, a=5.3393(2) A and c=12.6913(5) A for 6, with Z=2 in the six phases. The crystal structures of these compounds are isotypic and exhibit a layered structure stacked along the c-axis with the A{sup +} cations located in the interlayer space. The [M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup -} sheets are formed by MO{sub 6} octahedra interconnected by HPO{sub 3} tetrahedral phosphite oxoanions through sharing vertices. Thermal analysis shows a large range of stability for compounds containing potassium and rubidium cations with decomposition starting around 550 K for stable compounds and above 840 K for the most stable compounds leading in general to pyrophosphate compounds. Triangular nets of metallic centers are observed within the layers in which antiferromagnetic interactions are evidenced by magnetic susceptibility measurements suggesting magnetic frustration. - Graphical abstract: Six new transition metal(III) phosphites A{sup I}[M{sup III}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}], where A=K, NH{sub 4}, Rb and M=V, Fe, have been synthesized. The crystal structures of these compounds are isotypic and exhibit a lamellar structure related to Yavapaiite. The M(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2} layers separated by cationic species present the metallic centers in a triangular arrangement. Bulk antiferromagnetic behavior is observed for all the studied compounds. Highlights: Black

  19. High temperature synthesis of two open-framework uranyl silicates with ten-ring channels: Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 19} and Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babo, Jean-Marie; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2013-01-15

    The uranyl silicates Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 19} and Rb{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 5}O{sub 13} were obtained by mixing stoichiometric amounts of uranium metal, tellurium dioxide, silicon dioxide, and an excess of correspondent alkali metal halide flux. These compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic space groups Pnma and C222 with eight and two units per unit cell, respectively. Their crystal structures are dominated by zippered pentagonal bipyramidal chains of UO{sub 7} and silicates layer that are further connected into 3D frameworks. The cesium compound has silicate double layers while rubidium has a single layer. Six-ring voids and ten-ring channels are found in both compounds. - Graphical abstract: A view of the three-dimensional network structure of Cs{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}Si{sub 8}O{sub 19}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three-dimensional uranium silicates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analogs of natural uranyl silicate minerals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexity and symmetry ambiguity of uranyl silicates.

  20. New hypodiphosphates of the alkali metals: Synthesis, crystal structure and vibrational spectra of the hypodiphosphates(IV) M{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (M=Rb and Cs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Peng; Wiegand, Thomas; Eckert, Hellmut

    2012-10-15

    The new hypodiphosphates(IV) Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (1) and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] (2) were synthesized by soft chemistry reactions from aqueous solutions of hypophosphoric acid and the corresponding heavy alkali-metal carbonates. Their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize isotypic in the triclinic space group P-1 with one formula unit in the unit cell. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units in staggered conformation for the P{sub 2}O{sub 6} skeleton and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. In the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} ion the hydrogen atoms are in a 'trans-trans' conformation. O{center_dot}H-O hydrogen bonds between the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups consolidate the structures into a three-dimensional network. The FT-Raman and {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H and MAS NMR spectra of the title compounds have been recorded and interpreted, especially with respect to their assignment to the (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) groups. Thermogravimetric data of 2 have been interpreted in terms of a thermal decomposition model. - Graphical Abstract: The layered compounds Rb{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] and Cs{sub 2}[(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})] have been synthesized and investigated. Both crystallize isotypic. The structures are built up by discrete (H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}){sup 2-} and (H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6}) units and the corresponding alkali-metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis and single-crystal structure of new alkali hypodiphosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures are characterized by [(H{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})(H{sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 6})]{sup 2-} units and M{sup +} cations

  1. EERE Success Story-Zero-order Reaction Kinetics (Zero-RK) Coding...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A computer code developed by a trio of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers has significantly advanced predictive computer science for designing ...

  2. International Linear Collider-A Technical Progress Report (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Elsen, Eckhard ; DESY ; Harrison, Mike ; Brookhaven ; Hesla, Leah ; Fermilab ; Ross, Marc ; Fermilab ; Royole-Degieux, Perrine ; Paris, IN2P3 ; Takahashi, Rika ; ...

  3. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... MILITARY GROVE HAMILTONMSD BIG CR EEKALD TAYLOR CREEK COAL DEGAS MAT UBBY CREEK ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  4. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  5. File:EIA-Ventura-E-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  6. File:EIA-BlackWarrior-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  7. File:EIA-Appalach4-southOH-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  8. File:EIA-Ventura-E-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  9. File:EIA-Appalach7-TN-KY-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  10. File:EIA-Williston-S-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  11. File:EIA-PSJ-SE-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  12. File:EIA-Denver-N-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  13. File:EIA-Denver-Mid-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  14. File:EIA-MTB-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  15. File:EIA-Denver-S-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  16. File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  17. File:EIA-PSJ-SE-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  18. File:EIA-UP-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  19. File:EIA-FL-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  20. File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  1. File:EIA-shaleusa1.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2008-10-01 Extent Regional Countries...

  2. File:EIA-Appalach5-eastWV-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  3. File:EIA-PSJ-NW-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  4. File:EIA-Appalach2-OH-PA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  5. File:EIA-PRB-N-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  6. File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  7. File:EIA-Appalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  8. File:EIA-PRB-S-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  9. File:EIA-PRB-S-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  10. File:EIA-WTB-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  11. File:EIA-Ventura-W-Cent-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  12. File:EIA-Denver-N-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  13. File:EIA-GGR-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  14. File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  15. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  16. File:EIA-Appalach4-southOH-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  17. File:EIA-PSJ-NW-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  18. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  19. File:EIA-UP-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  20. File:EIA-Denver-S-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  1. File:EIA-MTB-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  2. File:EIA-AK-NorthSlope-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  3. File:EIA-Denver-Mid-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  4. File:EIA-Williston-NE-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  5. File:EIA-Williston-NW-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  6. File:EIA-Appalach3-eastPA-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  7. File:EIA-WTB-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  8. File:EIA-Eastern-OR-WA-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  9. File:EIA-AK-NPRA-ANWR-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  10. File:EIA-FL-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  11. File:EIA-Williston-NW-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  12. File:EIA-shaleusa3.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2008-12-01 Extent Regional Countries...

  13. File:EIA-BlackWarrior-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  14. File:EIA-AK-CookInlet-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  15. File:EIA-Eastern-OR-WA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  16. File:EIA-Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  17. File:EIA-PRB-N-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  18. File:EIA-Appalach2-OH-PA-LIQ.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  19. File:EIA-Ventura-W-Cent-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  20. File:EIA-Williston-NE-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  1. File:EIA-Williston-S-Liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  2. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  3. File:EIA-GGR-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional...

  4. EA-1853: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of No Significant Impact EA-1853: Finding of No Significant Impact Perrin Ranch Wind Energy Interconnection Project, Coconino County, Arizona Based on findings and analysis in...

  5. Materials Data on RbCd(NO2)3 (SG:200) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on RbSO3 (SG:150) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Rb2SO4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on RbSF5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on RbInI4 (SG:161) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Rb2PtI6 (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on RbTiI3 (SG:185) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-25

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Rb2ZnI3 (SG:11) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Rb2TeI6 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbI3 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on RbAg2SbS4 (SG:154) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Rb2WS4 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on RbBSe3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on RbBS2 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Rb2B2Se7 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Rb4(BSe)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Rb3ZnBr5 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb2Hg(BSe)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Rb3BS3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on Rb3Cu2Cl7 (SG:68) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-25

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Vapor Pressure and Molecular Composition of Vapors of the RbF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the vapor phase of the respective systems. Farther work on the NaF-ZrFsub 4 system points to the existence of the gaseous complex NaZrsub 2Fsub 9 rather than NaZrFsub ...

  6. Materials Data on RbBO2 (SG:167) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on Rb2PdSe16 (SG:117) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on RbAg7S4 (SG:85) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Rb4(BS)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on RbCr3O8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Rb2Te5 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)3 (SG:10) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Rb4Sn2Au7 (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbBr (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on RbAu (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Rb4P21I (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on RbB(CN)4 (SG:88) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Rb(WO3)6 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Rb2Hg7 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on RbHg11 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Rb5Hg19 (SG:87) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb6C5 (SG:189) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-10

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on RbCO3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on RbScBP2HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on RbGaBP2HO9 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on RbZn2P2HO8 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on RbP(HO)2 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on RbP(HO2)2 (SG:43) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on RbMnP3HO10 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on Rb2Si2O5 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on RbAl(H2N)4 (SG:85) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-29

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Precise Measurement of Strontium-82 Radioactivity in the Sr-Rb...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Although analysis is continuing, we have the preliminary result that the medical isotope community should expect 14.93(37) -rays of 776.5 keV for every 100 atoms of 82Sr in the ...

  13. Materials Data on RbPaF6 (SG:67) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on RbLi2(IO3)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Electron transport in carbon nanotube/RbAg{sub 4}I{sub 5} film...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    University, Beijing 100084 (China) Key Lab for Advanced Materials Processing Technology of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, ...

  16. Materials Data on RbInTe2 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on RbSbS2 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Rb3Os2Br9 (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on RbCaF3 (SG:221) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on RbAuF4 (SG:140) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Rb(TeO3)2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-04-15

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb6Te2O9 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Utah Nevada California Arizona Idaho Oregon Wyoming

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration 0 2 4 1 3 ...

  4. BR UFF BIG PINEY WILD ROSE BLU E GAP BR UFF UNIT WAMSUT TER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  5. SILO LILLI SID NEY SW BIG SPRINGS SLOSS LITT LE H OOT SILO JUR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  6. Ventura_E_gas.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration ...

  7. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration ...

  8. Ventura_E_BOE.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration ...

  9. PR B_WY_C BM HILIGHT POWELL KIT TY WELL D RAW SC OT T MIKES D

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  10. Ventura_E_liquids.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information Administration ...

  11. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  12. Webster Co. Kanawha Co. Cabell C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King (2) (1) Z, Inc., (2) Energy Information ...

  13. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created May 2008; projection is UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) ...

  14. THE FIRST H-BAND SPECTRUM OF THE MASSIVE GAS GIANT PLANET BETA...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Maire, J ; Marchis, F ; Marley, M S ; Marois, C ; Millar-Blanchaer, M ; Morzinski, K ; Norton, A ; Oppenheimer, B R ; Palmer, D ; Patience, J ; Perrin, M D ; Poyneer, L ; Pueyo, L ...

  15. Utah Nevada California Arizona Idaho Oregon Wyoming

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created May 2008; projection is UTM-12, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), and Robert F. King (2) (1) Z, ...

  16. BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created June 2005; projection is UTM-13, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King ...

  17. SILO LILLI SID NEY SW BIG SPRINGS SLOSS LITT LE H OOT SILO JUR

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created August 2005; projection is UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert ...

  18. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created June 2005; projection is UTM-13, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King ...

  19. WAT TENBERG SPIN DLE EAT ON BONN Y GREELEY ROGGEN WAVERLY SH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created August 2005; projection is UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert ...

  20. Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... MILITARY GROVE HAMILTONMSD BIG CR EEKALD TAYLOR CREEK COAL D EGAS MAT UBBY CREEK ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  1. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... MILITARY GROVE HAMILTONMSD BIG CR EEKALD TAYLOR CREEK COAL D EGAS MAT UBBY CREEK ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  2. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  3. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SCAIRT WOMAN WILLMEN JIM CREEK TAYLOR SIMON BUTTE SCHEFIELD BULL ... UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Town...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project ...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Denver...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Palo Duro Homes, Via del Cielo, Santa Fe, NM...

  6. EA-1853: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Perrin Ranch Wind submitted an interconnection request to Western in 2010 to interconnect the proposed project to the existing Moenkopi-Yavapai 500-kV transmission line. Western is...

  7. William & Mary Undergrad Receives JSA Research Assistantship | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab William & Mary Undergrad Receives JSA Research Assistantship William & Mary Undergrad Receives JSA Research Assistantship Alice Perrin, a senior physics major at The College of William and Mary Alice Perrin, a senior physics major at The College of William and Mary is the recipient of the 2014-15 Jefferson Science Associates Minority/Female Undergraduate Research Assistantship (JSA MFURA) at Jefferson Lab. Her assistantship project involves setting up a testing facility to

  8. Materials Data on Rb2Ti(Si2O5)3 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Neutron diffraction and scattering study on M/sub x/WO/sub 3/ (M=Rb and K)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, M.; Fujishita, H.; Moodenbaugh, A.R.; Hoshino, S.; Grier, B.H.

    1982-01-01

    To study the relationship between the lattice instability and the superconductivity of nonstoichiometric hexagonal tungsten bronze, M/sub x/WO/sub 3/, neutron diffraction and scattering studies were made. Two types of the structural phase transitions were observed. One is associated with the distortion of the corner linked WO/sub 6/ octahedra. The other is associated with the ordering of the M atoms which partially fill the sites in the WO/sub 3/ cage. A long period modulation of the structure appears for some values of x at low temperature. The discussion on the x dependence of the superconducting transition temperature is presented.

  10. Materials Data on RbGa2P2H5O11 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Rb2Ni2(MoO4)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Single-mode vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers for {sup 87}Rb-based chip-scale atomic clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derebezov, I. A. Haisler, V. A.; Bakarov, A. K.; Kalagin, A. K.; Toropov, A. I.; Kachanova, M. M.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Semenova, O. I.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2010-11-15

    The results of numerical simulation and study of lasing characteristics of semiconductor verticalcavity surface-emitting lasers based on Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As alloys are presented. Lasers exhibit stable single-mode lasing at a wavelength of 795 nm at low operating currents {approx}1.5 mA and an output power of 350 {mu}W, which offers prospects of their applications in next-generation chip-scale atomic clocks

  13. PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... with BY00 Rssearoh Divisioaor the etudy of the leoti6lytlo pro&as for Th produotioa, WEB also dwoloping a method of ThC14 "d suggested that Amoe review this pmaesee i " B. ...

  14. Colloid formation study of U, Th, Ra, Pb, Po, Sr, Rb, and Cs in briny (high ionic strength) groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, T.C.; Smith, M.R.; Laul, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Colloid formation of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, polonium, strontium, rubidium, and cesium in briny (high ionic strength) groundwaters is studied to predict their capability as vectors for transporting radionuclides. This knowledge is essential in developing models to infer the transport of radionuclides from the source region to the surrounding environment. Except polonium, based on the experimental results, colloid formation of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, strontium, rubidium, and cesium is unlikely in brines with compositions similar to the synthetic Palo Duro Basin brine. This observation of no colloid formation is explained by electrokinetic theory and inorganic solution chemistry.

  15. Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki ... DOESC-ARMTR-148 Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product Version 1.0 RK Newsom C Sivaraman ...

  16. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-120 Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman SA McFarlane October 2012 DISCLAIMER This ... Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman SA ...

  17. Studies on Temperature Dependence of Rubidium Lamp for Atomic Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosal, Bikash; Banik, Alak; Vats, Vaibhav; Pal, Sukamal; Bahl, R. K

    2011-10-20

    Rb lamp is a very critical component of the Rb atomic clock's Physics Package. The Rb lamp's performance is very sensitive to temperature and its stability. In this paper we discuss the behaviors of Rb Lamp with temperature. The Rb lamp exciter power and temperature of Rb bulb are very important parameters in controlling the performance of the Rb Lamp. It is observed that at temperatures beyond 110 deg. C, the lamp mode changes from the ring to red mode resulting in abnormal broadening of emission lines and self reversal. The results of our studies on spectral analysis of Rb lamp under various operating conditions are reported in the paper.

  18. A restated conceptual model for the Humboldt House-Rye Patch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    within the subbasin are anticipated as exploration and development proceeds. Author R.K. Ellis Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 2011 DOI Not Provided...

  19. The Humboldt House-Rye Patch geothermal district: an interim...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    completed gathering and reinjection piping network. Authors A. Waibel, D.D. Blackwell and R.K. Ellis Conference GRC Annual Meeting; Morelia, Mexico; 20031015 Published Geothermal...

  20. Innogrow BV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Innogrow BV Place: Utrecht, Netherlands Zip: 3503 RK Product: Innogrow has developed a greenhouse product for gardening and thermal energy source....

  1. Ecofys Subsidiary of Econcern | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Econcern Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ecofys Subsidiary of Econcern Address: PO Box 8408 Place: Utrecht Zip: 3503 RK Region: Netherlands Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  2. Rachna Khurana > > Center Alumni > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rachna Khurana rk455@cornell.edu Formerly a member of the Coates Group, Rachna received her PhD in Summer 2014

  3. Generating Bioenergy Solutions for the Clean Energy Economy of Tomorrow |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Generating Bioenergy Solutions for the Clean Energy Economy of Tomorrow Generating Bioenergy Solutions for the Clean Energy Economy of Tomorrow June 10, 2014 - 2:50pm Addthis Imagine Tomorrow participants Pavan Kumar (from left), Isaak Nanneman, Ethan Perrin, Andrew Wang and Oisin Doherty were selected by the Bioenergy Technologies Office to present their idea at the Biomass 2014 conference next month. The student team from Redmond, Washington, was chosen for their idea

  4. LMS/RBL/S11219 Task Order LM00-502

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Samples were collected from a total of two onsite wells, four private wells from nearby ... well) 05142013 ND 2.04 ND RB-D-03 (private well) 05142013 ND 0.637 ND RB-W-01 ...

  5. Bandwidth and Electron Correlation-Tuned Superconductivity in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bandwidth and Electron Correlation-Tuned Superconductivity in Rb 0.8 Fe 2 ( Se 1 - z S z ) ... Title: Bandwidth and Electron Correlation-Tuned Superconductivity in Rb 0.8 Fe 2 ( Se 1 - ...

  6. MEMORANDUM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    shed b ---...g-rkFL---... EeLnEDLNvoLv-SIL 'Control q Health Physics Protection 0 AEWMED managed operations q Little or None 0 AECYMED responsible for E ...

  7. User Science Images

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mp111 marcdayhydrogenflame.jpg ASCR: Lab-scale Flame Simulation September 1, 2009 | Author(s): M.S.Day, J.B. Bell, R.K. Cheng, S. Tachibana, V.E. Beckner and M.J. Lijewski...

  8. Raman Lidar Profiles-Temperature (RLPROFTEMP) Value-Added Product...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Newsom, RK ; Sivaraman, C ; McFarlane, SA Publication Date: 2012-10-31 OSTI Identifier: 1053989 Report Number(s): DOESC-ARMTR-120 PNNL-21965 DOE Contract Number: ...

  9. Assessing the Rye Patch geothermal field, a classic Basin-and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    if one or two additional wells are drilled for injection. Authors Sanyal, S.K., McNitt, J.R., Butler, S.J., Klein, C.W., and Ellis and R.K. Conference GRC Annual Meeting;...

  10. P-type doping of GaN (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Wong, R.K. Publication Date: 2000-04-10 OSTI Identifier: 764386 Report Number(s): LBNL--45553 R&D Project: 513310; TRN: US0100055 DOE Contract Number: AC03-76SF00098 ...

  11. A PFUZLIMIK4RY ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE GROUND SHAKING HAZARD...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Report prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Project, Chapter 4, variably paged. Wong, I.G., Green, R.K., Olig, S.S., and Youngs, R.R., 1995, Assessing ...

  12. CHAPTER

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... which may be a northern extension of the Sierra Nevada batholith (Smith and others, 1971). ... Hose, R.K., Blake, M.C., Jr., and Smith, R.M., 1976, Geology and mineral deposits ...

  13. High-Alloy Ferritic Steels: Martensitic Stainless Steels, Precipitatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Metall Trans 12A (1981) 2138-2141. 7. LW Tsay, WC Lee, RK Shiue and JK Wu. Notch tensile properties of laser-surface-annealed 17-4 PH stainless steel in hydrogen-related ...

  14. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    49 Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product RK Newsom C Sivaraman TR Shippert LD Riihimaki July 2015 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

  15. Siantar, C.L.; Bergstrom, P.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Cox, L.J.; Daly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Bergstrom, P.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Cox, L.J.; Daly, T.P.; Garrett, D.; House, R.K.; Moses, E.I.;...

  16. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fast Monte Carlo for radiation therapy: the PEREGRINE Project","Hartmann Siantar, C.L.; Bergstrom, P.M.; Chandler, W.P.; Cox, L.J.; Daly, T.P.; Garrett, D.; House, R.K.; Moses,...

  17. Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage: Performance and Cost Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R.K. Ahluwalia, J-K Peng and T. Q. Hua Compressed and Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop Crystal City Marriott, Arlington VA February 14-15, 2011 This presentation does not ...

  18. Section 63

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R.K. Garcia, P. van Delst, and W.L. Smith University of Wisconsin - Madison Madison, ... problem (which grew to about 4% and W.L. Smith, 1996: Atmospheric Emitted Radiance in the ...

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introducing WEBMADS Dedecker, R.G., Quinn, G.M., Garcia, R.K., and Revercomb, H.E., ... WEB-MADS is a Web based prototype version of MADS that allows remote access to the same ...

  20. Microsoft Word - S05988_2009RioLTHMPResults.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... ND a,c ND d RB-S-03 (on site well) 05142009 ND a ND RB-D-03 (private well) 05132009 ND ND RB-W-01 (private well) 05132009 ND a ND Johnson Artesian Well (private well) 05...

  1. Performance of wells in solution-gas-drive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camacho-V, R.G. ); Raghavan, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The authors examine buildup responses in solution-gas-drive reservoirs. The development presented here parallels the development for single-phase liquid flow. Analogs from pseudopressures and time transformations are presented and gas-drive-solutions are correlated with appropriate liquid-flow solutions. The influence of the skin region is documented. The basis for the success of the producing GOR method to compute the saturation distribution at shut-in is presented. The consequences of using the Perrine-Martin analog to analyze buildup data are discussed.

  2. Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 8}-cluster-based superconducting compounds Cs{sub 2}Mo{sub 12}Se{sub 14} and Rb{sub 4}Mo{sub 18}Se{sub 20}: Evidence for a strongly correlated and anisotropic electron system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brusetti, R.; Laborde, O.; Sulpice, A.; Calemczuk, R.; Potel, M.; Gougeon, P.

    1995-08-01

    We studied the normal and superconducting states of the title compounds by measuring the conductivity and magnetization of single crystals and powder samples. From the upper and lower critical fields we deduced the characteristic lengths and thermodynamical fields. These results are borne out by our specific-heat measurements. We recognize in these compounds many features of the Chevrel-phase superconductors, including very small coherence lengths and strong-coupling-like effects. However, we show that the electron system is much more anisotropic and still less delocalized in these materials where the Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 8} clusters have condensed in Mo{sub 6{ital n}}Se{sub 6{ital n}+2} finite chains. This condensation is accompanied by an enhancement of the magnetic response whereas the lengthening of the chains leads to a counteracting reduction of the density of carriers. This indicates that superconductivity is built upon highly correlated molecular states. Reviewing the available data on the other Chevrel-cluster-based superconductors confirms this picture and suggests that the small coherence lengths reflect the local character of the electron pairing. This comparison also shows that forming finite chains of Mo{sub 6}Se{sub 8} clusters makes the electron correlations more repulsive and pushes the electron system near the borderline between superconductivity and magnetism. In this respect these compounds could provide valuable complementary information on issues which are at the center of the research upon high-{ital Y}{sub {ital c}} superconductivity.

  3. Expression of eukaryotic polypeptides in chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2013-06-04

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  4. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2006-10-17

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  5. RNA binding protein and binding site useful for expression of recombinant molecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a gene expression system in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, preferably plant cells and intact plants. In particular, the invention relates to an expression system having a RB47 binding site upstream of a translation initiation site for regulation of translation mediated by binding of RB47 protein, a member of the poly(A) binding protein family. Regulation is further effected by RB60, a protein disulfide isomerase. The expression system is capable of functioning in the nuclear/cytoplasm of cells and in the chloroplast of plants. Translation regulation of a desired molecule is enhanced approximately 100 fold over that obtained without RB47 binding site activation.

  6. SREL Reprint #3328

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fred L. Cunningham2 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, ... of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection ... observed in any samples collected pre-RB administration. ...

  7. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked abstract for a synopsis of chemical analyses and Rb-Sr age determinations for gneissic...

  8. Comment permalink | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring Gilbert, R.O. (1987) 170 ... Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines Poola, R.B.; ...

  9. March 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring Gilbert, R.O. (1987) 170 ... Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines Poola, R.B.; ...

  10. Journal of Physical Chemistry A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid ... Equilibrated molecular structure of interlayer Cs+ (yellow), Rb+ ...

  11. Parameterization of GCM subgrid nonprecipitating cumulus and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The motivation is to improve the understanding and prediction of climate change by more accurately describing radiative and cloud processes. Authors: Stull, R.B. Publication Date: ...

  12. DISCLAIMER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-TR-101 Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook RK Newsom February 2012 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research RK Newsom, February 2012, DOE/SC-ARM-TR-101 iii Acronyms and Abbreviations AGL above ground level AMF ARM Mobile Facility AMFDL AMF Doppler Lidar ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement DL Doppler Lidar DMF Data Management Facility DOE U.S. Department of Energy DQO Data Quality Office GVAX Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment

  13. Breakdown of Angular Momentum Selection Rules in High Pressure Optical Pumping Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancor, B.; Wyllie, R.; Walker, T. G.; Babcock, E.

    2010-08-20

    We present measurements, by using two complementary methods, of the breakdown of atomic angular momentum selection rules in He-broadened Rb vapor. Atomic dark states are rendered weakly absorbing due to fine-structure mixing during Rb-He collisions. The effect substantially increases the photon demand for optical pumping of dense vapors.

  14. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Fax: 865-241-6932 * Internet: www.oakridge.doe.govemssab M Ma an ny y V Vo oi ic ce es s W Wo or rk ki in ng g f fo or r t th he e C Co om mm mu un ni it ty y O O a a ...

  15. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... * Fax: 865-241-6932 * Internet: www.oakridge.doe.govemssab M Ma an ny y V Vo oi ic ce es s W Wo or rk ki in ng g f fo or r t th he e C Co om mm mu un ni it ty y O O a a ...

  16. Zahirul Islam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revealed by X-Ray Diffraction in Pulsed Magnetic Fields," J.P.C. Ruff, J.-H. Chu, H.-H. Kuo, R.K. Das, H. Nojiri, I.R. Fisher, Z. Islam, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 027004 (2012)....

  17. Refueliing Infrastructure for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Lessons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    st tr ra at ti io on n a an nd d N Ne et tw wo or rk ki in ng g R Re ec ce ep pt ti io on n ( (l li ig gh ht t f fa ar re e) ) THURSDAY, APRIL 3 7:00 am R Re eg gi is st tr ra at ...

  18. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S. M.; Anderson, D. E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D. L.; Yu, S. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Houck, T. L.; Westenskow, G. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-05-07

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  19. Relativistic-Klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Anderson, D.E.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Vanecek, D.L.; Yu, S.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Westenskow, G.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1999-05-01

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2-kA, 1-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1{percent} energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-mr. The prototype accelerator will be used to study, physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Relativistic-klystron two-beam accelerator as a power source for future linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D E; Eylon, S; Henestroza, E; Houck, T L; Lidia, M; Vanecek, D L; Westenskow, G A; Yu, S S

    1998-10-05

    The technical challenge for making two-beam accelerators into realizable power sources for high-energy colliders lies in the creation of the drive beam and in its propagation over long distances through multiple extraction sections. This year we have been constructing a 1.2&A, l-MeV, induction gun for a prototype relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator (RK-TBA). The electron source will be a 8.9 cm diameter, thermionic, flat-surface cathode with a maximum shroud field stress of approximately 165 kV/cm. Additional design parameters for the injector include a pulse length of over 150-ns flat top (1% energy variation), and a normalized edge emittance of less than 300 pi-mm-n-n. The prototype accelerator will be used to study physics, engineering, and costing issues involved in the application of the RK-TBA concept to linear colliders. We have also been studying optimization parameters, such as frequency, for the application of the RK-TBA concept to multi-TeV linear colliders. As an rf power source the RK-TBA scales favorably up to frequencies around 35 GHz. An overview of this work with details of the design and performance of the prototype injector, beam line, and diagnostics will be presented.

  1. Measurement of K/sup +/ conductance in gastric vesicles from secreting stomach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabon, E.; Gunther, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    Specific inhibitors were used to identify two components of /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake in vesicles obtained from secreting rabbit stomachs. Rb/sup +/ transport was measured in vesicles as trace /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake following removal of external K/sup +/ from vesicles equilibrated in potassium gluconate. /sup 86/Rb)2= uptake mediated by the gastric H/sup +/K/sup +/-ATPase was identified by sensitivity to vanadate, ATP and pyridyl (1,2a) imidazole (SCH28080). In contrast, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ influx through a K/sup +/ conductance mechanism was inhibited by the protonophore (TCS) induced collapse of the K/sup +/ diffusion potential. K/sup +/ conductance sensitivity to quinine and the K/sup +/ channel blocker bis-Guanidinium (bis G-8) were demonstrated by inhibition of a K/sup +/ induced chase of intravesicular /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ previously loaded by /sup 86/Rb/sup +//K/sup +/ exchange in the presence of 2 ..mu..M SCH28080. The K/sup +/ conductance is Ba/sup 2 +/ and apamine insensitive and exhibits a monovalent cation specificity of Rb > Kapprox. = Cs >> Na, Li. KCl dependent H/sup +/ transport exhibited complete sensitivity to the H/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase inhibitors SCH28080 and vanadate. The measurements of Rb/sup +/ pathways distinctive for the H/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase and a K/sup +/ conductance support previous suggestions of a functional linkage between the H/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase and a K/sup +/ conductance in vesicles, obtained from stimulated stomach. The experimental discrimination between the two Rb/sup +/ pathways suggests that a separate mechanism is utilized for each transport pathway.

  2. Preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory Across Generations. An emerging Multidisciplinary Work Area and an NEA Project - 12218

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jantine; Pescatore, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    Disposal in engineered facilities built in stable, deep geological formations is the reference means for permanently isolating long-lived radioactive waste from the human biosphere. This management method is designed to be intrinsically safe and final, i.e. not dependent on human presence and intervention in order to fulfil its safety goal. There is however no intention to forgo, at any time, knowledge and awareness either of the repository or of the waste that it contains. The preservation of Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK and M) is seen as an integral part of radioactive waste management, supporting lengthy and complex socio-technical processes across pre-operational, operational and post-operational lifetimes. Long-term preservation of RK and M is an emerging multidisciplinary work area in which much learning is expected over the coming years. Novel methods are being sought that are least vulnerable to both natural degradation and to changes in socio-economic conditions. Progress has been made in individual countries, but there is a need to internationalise the thinking, compare approaches, investigate potential solutions and share decisions. This is the task of the NEA RK and M project. A major outcome of the project will be a 'menu-driven document' that will allow people to identify the main elements of a strategic action plan for RK and M preservation. In sum, the preservation of RK and M is a unprecedented task in which technical, scientific and social information is interwoven and needs to be developed and preserved across generations and across specialist boundaries. Important studies have been undertaken in the past decades to explore a variety of approaches to preserving RK and M across different timescales, including archives and markers. The work of the past in this area is useful, but innovative thinking is also needed. Seen from today's perspective, very little work is available on for example the contextualization of data for later use; on the

  3. Breakdown of ionic character of molecular alkali bromides in inner-valence photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, A. Iablonskyi, D.; Kettunen, J. A.; Cao, W.; Huttula, M.; Aksela, H.; Urpelainen, S.

    2014-05-28

    The inner-valence region of alkali bromide XBr (X=Li, Na, K, Rb) vapours has been studied experimentally by means of synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy. Experimental spectra were analyzed by comparing them with available theoretical results and previous experiments. Ionic character of alkali bromides is seen to change in the inner-valence region with increasing atomic number of the alkali atom. A mechanism involving mixing between Br 4s and Rb 4p orbitals has been suggested to account for the fine structure observed in inner-valence ionization region of RbBr.

  4. Chemical migration by contact metamorphism between pegmatite/country rocks: natural analogs for radionuclides migration. [Black Hills, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Walker, R.J.; Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J.; Simon, S.B.

    1983-10-01

    Comparison of trace element signatures of country rocks as a function of distance from the contact with two pegmatites, Tin Mountain and Etta, in the Black Hills of South Dakota, suggests that some elements such as K, Li, Rb, Cs, As, Sb, Zn and Pb, have migrated to distances of 4 to 40 meters during contact metamorphism. The relative degree of migration varies depending on the element. On the other hand, there is virtually no migration of rare earth elements (REE), Al, Sc, Cr, Hf, U, and Th. Biotite and muscovite are effective trace element traps for Li, Rb and Cs. Biotite has a greater affinity for Rb, Cs and Li than muscovite.

  5. Structure of the SPRY domain of human Ash2L and its interactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure of the SPRY domain of human Ash2L and its interactions with RbBP5 and DPY30 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure of the SPRY domain of human Ash2L and its ...

  6. DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... chiefly of the uranium and thorium series and lesser amounts from radioactive K-40 and Rb-87. Due to the high concentration of monazite, a thorium mineral, some regions in the ...

  7. Core Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Brookins &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Core Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes See linked abstract for a synopsis of chemical analyses and Rb-Sr age determinations for gneissic...

  8. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring Gilbert, R.O. (1987) 42 Land ... Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines Poola, R.B.; ...

  9. Celt Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: SY16 1RB Sector: Wind energy Product: JV between Euros Energy Europe and ScottishPower to develop UK wind farms. References: Celt Power Ltd1 This article...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Strain-Driven Approach to Quantum Criticality in A Fe 2 As 2 with A K , Rb, and Cs Eilers, Felix ; Grube, Kai ; Zocco, Diego A. ; Wolf, Thomas ; Merz, Michael ; Schweiss, Peter ; ...

  11. CHRISTIAN SEIGNEUR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Huang, M., G.R. Carmichael, S. Kulkarni, D.G. Streets, Z. Lu, Q. Zhang, R.B. Pierce, Y. Kondo, J.L. Jimenez, M.J. Cubison, B. Anderson, and A. Wisthaler, Sectoral and Geographical...

  12. Search for: "stirling engines" | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (223) document types (212) stirling cycle (208) performance testing (207) internal combustion engines (191) energy sources (185) Filter by Author Diver, R.B. (27) West, C.D. (24) ...

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectral Irradiance During CRYSTAL-FACE Pilewskie, P.(a), Guan, H.(b), Platnick, S.(c), Yang, P.(d), Bergstrom, R.(b), Wendisch, M.(e), Howard, S.(b), and Pommier, J.(b), Ames...

  14. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  15. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyoun-Ee; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy havign additions of monovalent iodides. Although the perferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy.

  16. PREPRINT I Field Air Injection Tests

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... b) 21.tL In(re rb) k (4) wherePb istile borehole injection pressure, rbthe borehole radius, andre the effective radius, orradius atwhichthe pressure returns totheambient value Pe. ...

  17. UCRL-ID-105163 Air-Injection Field Tests

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... I.tRTQm ln(rer b) 2L In(rerb) k (4) where Pb is the borehole injection pressure, rb the borehole radius, and re the effective radius, or radius at which the pressure returns to ...

  18. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Drekar, CASL Technical Report: CASL-U-2012-0080-000, June 30, 2012. Bakosi, J., N. Barnett, M.A. Christon, M.M. Francois, R.B. Lowrie and R. Sankaran, Integration of Hydra-TH...

  19. Final Report, IUT - B291527, January 1996 - March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henestroza, E.

    1996-04-23

    The following note investigates scaling the 11.4-GHz TBNLC design of a relativistic klystron two-beam accelerator for a 30-GHz, 50-bunch accelerator design. We will refer to this point design as the RK-CLIC. We do not expect that the design will be optimal, but offer it as a starting point for discussions. In this memo, we begin with a general description of the RK-CLIC and drive beam dynamics, discuss required changes to major components, estimate the efficiency of wall plug to microwave power, and estimate costs. To be of interest the design must be such that it: (1) Can be installed at modest cost, (2) Operate with high wall plug to reconversion efficiency, and (3) Have acceptable drive beam dynamics.

  20. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrieving Cloud and Aerosol Properties from the ARM Raman Lidar Download a printable PDF Submitter: Thorsen, T., NASA - Langley Research Center Fu, Q., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Thorsen TJ, Q Fu, RK Newsom, DD Turner, and JM Comstock. 2015. "Automated retrieval of cloud and aerosol properties from the ARM Raman lidar, Part I: Feature detection." Journal of

  1. Summary of On-Board Storage Models and Analyses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On-Board Storage Models and Analyses Summary of On-Board Storage Models and Analyses Presentation by R.K. Ahluwalia at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007 deliv_analysis_ahluwalia.pdf (547.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Potential Carriers and Approaches for Hydrogen Delivery Analyses of Hydrogen Storage Materials and On-Board Systems Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

  2. SREL Reprint #3042

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Evaluation of Soil Solid Amendments for TCE Biodegradation in a Biobarrier System Yelena Katsenovich, Zuhal Öztürk, Marshall Allen, and Gary R. Wein Abstract: Permeable biobarrier systems (PBSs) are being recognized as low-cost passive bioremediation technologies for chlorinated organic contamination. This innovative technology can play a crucial and effective role in site restorations. Laboratory-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the biodegradation of trichloroethylene (TCE)

  3. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials The influence of grain size on the mechanical properties ofsteel Morris Jr., J.W. (2001) 119 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 117 Mechanical properties and energy absorption characteristics of a polyurethane foam Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Henderson, C.; Skala,

  4. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 583 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 454 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 454 Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical

  5. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Materials The influence of grain size on the mechanical properties ofsteel Morris Jr., J.W. (2001) 805 Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 649 Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 583 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.;

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Retrieving Critical Relative Humidity from Ground-based Remote-sensing Observations PI Contact: Van Weverberg, K., Met Office Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, IA Boutle, CJ Morcrette, and RK Newsom. 2016. "Towards retrieving critical relative humidity from ground-based remote-sensing observations." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, , doi:

  7. Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark; Perkins, Raymond R.

    2000-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

  8. Defect Migration and Recombination in Nanoindentation of Silica Glass |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Defect Migration and Recombination in Nanoindentation of Silica Glass Authors: Nomura, K., Chen, Y., Kalia, R.K., Nakano, A., Vashishta, P. Deformation, plasticity, and flow in silica-based glasses have been studied for decades, and yet important questions remain about the atomistic mechanisms underlying these processes. Our molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation indicate that these mechanical processes have a unified underlying atomistic

  9. Embrittlement of Metal by Solute Segregation-Induced Amorphization |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Embrittlement of Metal by Solute Segregation-Induced Amorphization Authors: Chen, H-P., Kalia, R.K., Kaxiras, E., Lu, G., Nakano, A., Nomura, K-I., van Duin, A.C.T., Vashishta, P., Yuan, Z. Impurities segregated to grain boundaries of a material essentially alter its fracture behavior. A prime example is sulfur segregation-induced embrittlement of nickel, where an observed relation between sulfur-induced amorphization of grain boundaries and

  10. Indium Oxide Thin Films by Atomic Layer Deposition Using Trimethylindium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ozone | Argonne National Laboratory Indium Oxide Thin Films by Atomic Layer Deposition Using Trimethylindium and Ozone Title Indium Oxide Thin Films by Atomic Layer Deposition Using Trimethylindium and Ozone Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2016 Authors Mane, AU, Allen, AJ, Kanjolia, RK, Elam, JW Journal Journal of Physical Chemistry C Volume 120 Start Page 9874 Issue 18 Pagination 10 Date Published 04182016 Abstract We investigated the atomic layer deposition (ALD)

  11. Summary of On-Board Storage Models and Analyses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On-Board Storage Models and Analyses R.K. Ahluwalia, T. Q. Hua and J-K Peng Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership Delivery, Storage and Hydrogen Pathways Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Columbia, MD 2 Objective: To determine the performance of the on-board system relative to the storage targets (capacity, efficiency, etc) 1. On-Board System Configuration 2. Dehydrogenation Reactor Dehydrogenation kinetics Trickle bed hydrodynamics Dehydrogenation reactor model Reactor

  12. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2013: Reliability, Resiliency & Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2013 Reliability, Resiliency & Savings i Authors and Acknowledgements This report was written and compiled by Sandra Curtin and Jennifer Gangi of Fuel Cells 2000, an activity of the Breakthrough Technologies Institute in Washington, D.C. Special thanks to Peter Callowhill of NetGain Energy Advisors for contributing the PPA section and to Matthew Crescimanno and Eirik Mørk for assisting in research. Support was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy's

  13. Sulfur-impurity Induced Amorphization of Nickel | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility Sulfur-impurity Induced Amorphization of Nickel Authors: Yuan, Z., Chen, H.P, Wang, W., Nomura, K., Kalia, R.K., Nakano, A., Vashishta, P. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have shown an essential role of sulfur segregation-induced amorphization of crystalline nickel leading to its embrittlement at a critical sulfur concentration of ∼14%, but the atomistic mechanism of the amorphization remains unexplained. Here, molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the

  14. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 534 Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 488 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 364 Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from

  15. July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 513 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 241 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 194 Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from

  16. June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information June 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 431 Optimization of Operating Parameters for Minimum Mechanical Specific Energy in Drilling Hamrick, Todd (2011) 292 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 288 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.;

  17. Most Viewed Documents - Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information - Engineering Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) Lunar Wireless Power Transfer Feasibility Study Sheldon Freid, et al. (2008) Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) Heat transfer model of above and underground insulated piping systems Kwon, K.C. (1998) Stress analysis and evaluation of a rectangular pressure vessel. [For

  18. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more » as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  19. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- and B-→ D(→ K+π-)π- decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B-→ D(→ K+π-)K- suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10-3, R+(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10-3, R-(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10-3more »as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B- → D(→ K+π-)π- decay are also reported.« less

  20. High Precision Measurement of Isotope Effects on Noncovalent Host-Guest Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-06-23

    Isotope effects (IEs) are a powerful tool for examining the reactivity of, and interactions between, molecules. Recently, secondary IEs have been used to probe the nature of noncovalent interactions between guest and host molecules in supramolecular systems. While these studies can provide valuable insight into the specific interactions governing guest recognition and binding properties, IEs on noncovalent interactions are often very small and difficult to measure precisely. The Perrin group has developed an NMR titration method capable of determining ratios of equilibrium constants with remarkable precision. They have used this technique to study small, secondary equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) on the acidity of carboxylic acids and phenols and on the basicity of amines, measuring differences down to thousandths of a pK{sub a} unit. It occurred to us that this titration method can in principle measure relative equilibrium constants for any process which is fast on the NMR timescale and for which the species under comparison are distinguishable by NMR. Here we report the application of this method to measure very small EIEs on noncovalent host-guest interactions in a supramolecular system.

  1. GABA/sub B/ receptor activation inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated potassium channels in synaptosomes: involvement of G-proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ticku, M.K.; Delgado, A.

    1989-01-01

    /sup 86/Rb-efflux assay from preloaded synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was developed to study the effect of GABA/sub B/ receptor agonist baclofen on Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. Depolarization of /sup 86/Rb-loaded synaptosomes in physiological buffer increased Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux by 400%. The /sup 86/Rb-efflux was blocked by quinine sulfate, tetraethylammonium, and La/sup 3 +/ indicating the involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. (-)Baclofen inhibited Ca/sup 2 +/-activated /sup 86/Rb-efflux in a stereospecific manner. The inhibitory effect of (-)baclofen was mediated by GABA/sub B/ receptor activation, since it was blocked by GABA/sub B/ antagonist phaclofen, but not by bicuculline. Further, pertussis toxin also blocked the ability of baclofen or depolarizing action to affect Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels. These results suggest that baclofen inhibits Ca/sup 2 +/-activated K/sup +/-channels in synaptosomes and these channels are regulated by G-proteins. This assay may provide an ideal in vitro model to study GABA/sub B/ receptor pharmacology.

  2. Effect of angiotensin II, ATP, and ionophore A23187 on potassium efflux in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobo, M.V.; Marusic, E.T.

    1986-02-01

    Angiotensin II stimulus on perifused bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells elicited an increase in 86Rb efflux from cells previously equilibrated with the radioisotope. When 45Ca fluxes were measured under similar conditions, it was observed that Ca and Rb effluxes occurred within the first 30 s of the addition of the hormone and were independent of the presence of external Ca. The 86Rb efflux due to angiotensin II was inhibited by quinine and apamin. The hypothesis that the angiotensin II response is a consequence of an increase in the K permeability of the glomerulosa cell membrane triggered by an increase in cytosolic Ca is supported by the finding that the divalent cation ionophore A23187 also initiated 86Rb or K loss (as measured by an external K electrode). This increased K conductance was also seen with 10(-4) M ATP. Quinine and apamin greatly reduced the effect of ATP or A23187 on 86Rb or K release in adrenal glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that Ca-dependent K channels or carriers are present in the membranes of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells and are sensitive to hormonal stimulus.

  3. Observation of Temperature-Induced Crossover to an Orbital-Selective Mott

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase in AxFe2-ySe2 (A=K, Rb) Superconductors (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Observation of Temperature-Induced Crossover to an Orbital-Selective Mott Phase in AxFe2-ySe2 (A=K, Rb) Superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observation of Temperature-Induced Crossover to an Orbital-Selective Mott Phase in AxFe2-ySe2 (A=K, Rb) Superconductors Authors: Yi, M. ; Lu, D.H. ; Yu, R. ; Riggs, S.C. ; Chu, J.-H. ; Lv, B. ; Liu, Z. ; Lu, M. ; Cui, Y.-T. ; Hashimoto, M. ; Mo, S.-K.

  4. Chemical migration by contact metamorphism between pegmatite and country rocks: natural analogs for radionuclide migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Walker, R.J.; Shearer, C.K.; Papike, J.J.; Simon, S.B.

    1984-01-01

    Comparison of trace element signatures of country rocks as a function of distance from the contact with two pegmatites, Tin Mountain and Etta, in the Black Hills of South Dakota, suggests that some elements such as K, Li, Rb, Cs, As, Sb, Zn and Pb, have migrated to distances of 4 to 40 meters during contact metamorphism. The relative degree of migration varies depending on the element. On the other hand, there is virtually no migration of rare earth elements (REE), Al, Sc, Cr, Hf, U, and Th. Biotite and muscovite are effective trace element traps for Li, Rb, and Cs. Biotite has a greater affinity for Rb, Cs and Li than muscovite. 9 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  5. Cask weeping mitigation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumhansl, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM); Teter, David M. (Edgewood, NM); McConnell, Paul (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-18

    A method (and concomitant kit) for treating a surface to reduce subsequent .sup.137Cs nuclide desorption comprising contacting the surface with a first cation-containing solution, the cation being one or more of Cs.sup.+, Rb.sup.+, Ag.sup.+, Tl.sup.+, K.sup.+, and NH.sub.4.sup.+, and contacting the surface with a second cation-containing solution, the cation being one or more of Cs.sup.+, Rb.sup.+, Ag.sup.+, Tl.sup.+, K.sup.+, and NH.sub.4.sup.+, thereby reducing amounts of radioactive cesium embedded in clays found on the surface.

  6. Synergistic extraction of some univalent cations into nitrobenzene by using cesium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-...

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makrlik, Emanuel; Selucky, P.; Vanura, Petr; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + CsL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Cs+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = K+, Rb+, NH+4,Ag+, Tl+; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: NH+4 < K+ < Ag+ < Rb+ < Tl+.

  7. Production and Trapping of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, DeMille

    2015-04-21

    We report a set of experiments aimed at the production and trapping of ultracold polar molecules. We begin with samples of laser-cooled and trapped Rb and Cs atoms, and bind them together to form polar RbCs molecules. The binding is accomplished via photoassociation, which uses a laser to catalyze the sticking process. We report results from investigation of a new pathway for photoassociation that can produce molecules in their absolute ground state of vibrational and rotational motion. We also report preliminary observations of collisions between these ground-state molecules and co-trapped atoms.

  8. Isotopes Products

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotopes Products Isotopes Products Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Products stress and rest Stress and rest Rb-82 PET images in a patient with dipyridamole stress-inducible lateral wall and apical ischemia. (http://www.fac.org.ar/scvc/llave/image/machac/machaci.htm#f2,3,4) Strontium-82 is supplied to our customers for use in Sr-82/Rb-82 generator technologies. The generators in turn are supplied to

  9. Roof bolting equipment & technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-04-15

    Technology provides an evaluator path to improvement for roof bolting machines. Bucyrus offers three different roof bolts models for various mining conditions. The LRB-15 AR is a single-arm boiler recommended for ranges of 32 inches and above; the dual-arm RB2-52A for ranges of 42 inches and above; and the dual-arm RB2-88A for ranges of 54 inches and above. Design features are discussed in the article. Developments in roof bolting technology by Joy Mining Machinery are reported. 4 photos.

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station:

  11. Ooe/^g Progress Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ooe/^g Progress Report Department of Energy EY-76-S-03-0034 DOE/ER/70126-Tl DE87 007544 IfL 7^^-^^ RESEARCH IN CHEMICAL KINETICS DeparLuicuL ul CliemisLiy University of California Irvine, California 92717 Progress Report on work carried out during the contract period from: January 1, 1978 - September 30, 1978 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR F. S. Rowland A44Srf ^ DISTnSLTiOfi n^ '^V< r ' r.rk^ !' J':";.']lfE5 » Progress Report Contract No. EY-76-S-03-003A, P. A. #126 "Research in Chemical

  12. September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 190 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 117 Stress analysis and evaluation of a rectangular pressure vessel. [For equipment for sampling Hanford tank radwaste] Rezvani, M.A.; Ziada, H.H. (Westinghouse Hanford Co.,

  13. R. K. Owen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. K. Owen R. K. Owen Profile4x5 R.K.Owen R. K. Owen Ph.D. Sr Computer Systems Engineer Infrastructure Services National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center rkowen@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-7556 Fax: (510) 486-4340 Web: http://owen.sj.ca.us/rkowen/ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 59R4010A Berkeley, CA 94720 US Biographical Sketch R.K. Owen received his Ph.D. in physics from UC Berkeley, specializing in atomic and molecular physics. His dissertation topic

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AERI Observations in the Arctic: Monthly-Average Radiance Spectra and Longwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Walden, V.P., Revercomb, H.E., Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Ciganovich, N., Dedecker, R.G., Dirkx, T., Garcia, R.K., Herbsleb, R., Howell, H.B., McRae, D., Short, J., and Tobin, D., Cooperative Institute of Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/Space Science and Engineering Center/University of Wisconsin Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Atmospheric Emitted Radiance

  15. mom_sc99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley Nat'l Lab Data Organization & I/O C.Ding & Y.He Data Organization and I/O in a Parallel Ocean Circulation Model Chris Ding and Yun He NERSC Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California 2 NERSC, Lawrence Berkeley Nat'l Lab Data Organization & I/O C.Ding & Y.He Collaboration between NERSC and GFDL R. Pacanowski, V. Balaji, S. Griffles, J. Shelton, B. Ross Geophyisical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory R.K Owen, H. Anand, S. Luzmoor, H.

  16. Publications and Presentations at Scientific Meetings | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Publications and Presentations at Scientific Meetings Calendar Year 2014: †Denotes papers on which a university or other collaborator was the lead author. Alessi D.S., J.S. Lezama-Pacheco, J.E. Stubbs, M. Janousch, J.R. Bargar, P. Persson, and R. Bernier-Latmani (2014) The product of microbial uranium reduction includes multiple species with U(IV)-phosphate coordination, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, in press. †Qafoku, N.P., B.N. Gartman, R.K. Kukkadapu,

  17. Rf power sources for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, M.A.; Callin, R.S.; Caryotakis, G.; Deruyter, H.; Eppley, K.R.; Fant, K.S.; Farkas, Z.D.; Fowkes, W.R.; Hoag, H.A.; Feinstein, J.; Ko, K.; Koontz, R.F.; Kroll, N.M.; Lavine, T.L.; Lee, T.G.; Loew, G.A.; Miller, R.H.; Nelson, E.M.; Ruth, R.D.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, J.W.; Wilson, P.B. ); Boyd, J.K.; Houk, T.; Ryne, R.D.; Westenskow, G.A.; Yu, S.S. (Lawrence Live

    1990-06-01

    The next generation of linear colliders requires peak power sources of over 200 MW per meter at frequencies above 10 GHz at pulse widths of less than 100 nsec. Several power sources are under active development, including a conventional klystron with rf pulse compression, a relativistic klystron (RK) and a crossed-field amplifier. Power from one of these has energized a 0.5 meter two- section High Gradient Accelerator (HGA) and accelerated a beam at over 80 MeV meter. Results of tests with these experimental devices are presented here.

  18. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3S 3 I if 4 ; RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE LIQUID EFFLUENT DISPOSAL PATHWAYS FORMERLY USED BY LINDE AIR PRODUCTS DIVISION (Union Carbide Corporation) Tonawanda, New York P.W . Frame, J.D. Berger, C.F. Riemke, L.A. Young W .O. Helton, R.D. Condra, C.F. Weaver October 8, 1981 W o rk performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 under Contract DE ACOS-76OROOO33 with the U.S. Department

  19. IO6490

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 ' f. (5 4 . . i/ IO6490 ~-~~ -Landfill, ' cleanup plan' is. expected by August peruneat OfEnergy tiy they hope mlxa~~amfari~cclcanupplan for four radioactive oitcs m the puwn of Tonawanda by early e- naidE.%rk,DOEsitcman- ~a,saidalltkrexarchandtech- fucd data cdkted at ctkc four 6ilc5 ha3 been forwarded ti his suptx.iors In WashingronJC. ' when it still awaits We' re still wal r .f$, co* liar iEP-+-* 6adMr. Wehmdaiinourd0cum8nu in February .bur unfommuely them' s a group in Wnshington we.

  20. IVASI I-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IVASI I- /& 1 -i /' / . /' A 1:' *' , tui POR-I RAI)IOI,OGICAI, sLlRvt:Y 01: 1' IlE SIblO?!DS s,w c STEEL Co!4'~Is'l R. W . Leggctt , J . Burden, bl. T. Ryan, D. L. Anderson, B. S. Ellis, and D. 3. Christian W o rk performed Health Physics Divisidn OAK RIDGE NATIOI\TAL LABOR4TORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee FEBRUARY 1977 for U. S. ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPblENT ADFIINISTRATION as part of The Radiological Surveys of Former Manhattan Engineering District/ Atomic Energy Commission Sites By .cc.ptmc.

  1. June 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 846 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 643 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 615 Automotive vehicle sensors Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J. (1995) 496 Optimization of Operating Parameters for

  2. June 2016 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Materials The influence of grain size on the mechanical properties ofsteel Morris Jr., J.W. (2001) 1024 Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 856 Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 846 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 615 Mechanical properties and

  3. April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 554 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 534 Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 488 The influence of grain size on the mechanical properties ofsteel Morris Jr., J.W.

  4. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Engineering Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 776 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 546 Conduction heat transfer solutions VanSant, J.H. (1980) 527 Automotive vehicle sensors Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J. (1995)

  5. December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information December 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Materials The influence of grain size on the mechanical properties ofsteel Morris Jr., J.W. (2001) 859 Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 776 Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 749 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.

  6. July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information July 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Materials Heat Treatment Procedure Qualification -- Final Technical Report Robert C. Voigt (2004) 513 Fatigue design curves for 6061-T6 aluminum Yahr, G.T. (1993) 346 Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A. (1995) 241 Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with nanoparticles Choi, S.U.S.; Eastman, J.A.

  7. High Resolution Infrared Study of the 2v9 and v4 Bands of 10BF2OH and 11BF2OH: Evidence of Large Amplitude Effects for the OH- Torsion and OH-Bending Modes in the 9(2) and 4(1) and Excited States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perrin, Annette M.; Bertseva, E.; Flaud, Jean-marie; Collett, Derron R.; Burger, H.; Masiello, Tony; Blake, Thomas A.

    2007-07-21

    High resolution (2-3x10-3cm-1) Fourier transform infrared spectra of gas phase 10B and 11B enriched and natural samples of BF2OH (difluoroboric acid) were recorded at Wuppertal and Richland. Starting from the results of previous studies [A.Perrin, M.Carvajal-Zaera, Z.Dutkiewicz, J.-M.Flaud, D.Collet, H.Bürger, J.Demaison, F.Willaert, H.Mäder, and N.W.Larsen, Mol. Phys. 102 , 1641 (2004); J. Breidung, J. Demaison, J.-F. D’Eu, L. Margulès, D. Collet, E.B. Mkadmi, A. Perrin and W. Thiel, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 228, 7, (2004)], it was possible to perform the first rovibrational analysis of the 2ν9 (first overtone of ν9, the OH torsion) and ν4 (BOH bending) bands located at about 1043.9 and 961.7 cm-1 and 1042.9 and 961.5 cm-1 for the 10BF2OH and 11BF2OH isotopic species respectively. Numerous “classic” perturbations were observed in the analysis of the 2ν9 and ν4 bands. The energy levels of the 92 bright state are indeed involved in a B- type Coriolis resonance with those of the 6191 dark state. The 41 levels are perturbed by a B-type Coriolis resonance and by an anharmonic resonance with the levels of the 7191 and the 6171 dark states respectively. In addition large amplitude effects were observed for the 2ν9 and also, more surprisingly, the ν4 bands. This results in splittings of the energy levels of about 0.005 and 0.0035 cm-1 for the 92 and 41 states respectively which are easily observable in the P and R branches for both bands. The theoretical model used to reproduce the experimental levels accounts for the classic vibration –rotation resonances. Also the large amplitude torsional (or bending) effects are accounted for within the frame of the IAM (Internal Axis Method) -like approach. The Coriolis resonances between the two torsional (or bending) substates are taken into account by {Jx,Jz} non orthorhombic terms in the v-diagonal blocks. This means that the zquantification axis deviates from the a inertial axis by an axis switching effect of ~35

  8. Specimen loading list for the varying temperature experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qualls, A.L.; Sitterson, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    The varying temperature experiment HFIR-RB-13J has been assembled and inserted in the reactor. Approximately 5300 specimens were cleaned, inspected, matched, and loaded into four specimen holders. A listing of each specimen loaded into the steady temperature holder, its position in the capsule, and the identification of the corresponding specimen loaded into the varying temperature holder is presented in this report.

  9. Nissan's new in-line DOHC six cylinder engine and its development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, Y.; Ito, K.; Kita, Y.; Kadowaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    The new RB20 engine series comprises in-line, 6-cylinder, 2-liter gasoline engines with an all-new design that succeed the L20 engine (1), whose performance has been upgraded numerous times since it was first released 20 years ago. The RB20 engine series includes a single-overhead-cam (SOHC) engine and a double-overhead-cam (DOHC) engine, each of which also has a turbocharged version, making a total of four different engine variations. This range of variations is intended to meet the broad, diversified needs of today's market. The main development theme set for the new engine family was to achieve ''improved performance that would appeal to the senses.'' Thus emphasis was not merely put on obtaining high performance figures, but on making real improvements in engine response and quietness that the driver could actually feel. This paper focuses on two of the four engine variations - the DOHC engine with and without a turbocharger. It discusses the basic engine construction, principal component parts and major development objectives. In the discussion that follows the DOHC engine without a turbocharger is referred to as RB20DE and the turbocharged DOHC engine is referred to as RB20DET.

  10. Nutlin-3 down-regulates retinoblastoma protein expression and inhibits muscle cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Erica M.; Niu, MengMeng; Bergholz, Johann; Jim Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2015-05-29

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation, cell death and differentiation. The MDM2 oncoprotein is a major negative regulator for p53 by binding to and targeting p53 for proteasome-mediated degradation. The small molecule inhibitor, nutlin-3, disrupts MDM2-p53 interaction resulting in stabilization and activation of p53 protein. We have previously shown that nutlin-3 activates p53, leading to MDM2 accumulation as concomitant of reduced retinoblastoma (Rb) protein stability. It is well known that Rb is important in muscle development and myoblast differentiation and that rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), or cancer of the skeletal muscle, typically harbors MDM2 amplification. In this study, we show that nutlin-3 inhibited myoblast proliferation and effectively prevented myoblast differentiation, as evidenced by lack of expression of muscle differentiation markers including myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC), as well as a failure to form multinucleated myotubes, which were associated with dramatic increases in MDM2 expression and decrease in Rb protein levels. These results indicate that nutlin-3 can effectively inhibit muscle cell differentiation. - Highlights: • Nutlin-3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and prevents differentiation into myotubes. • Nutlin-3 increases MDM2 expression and down-regulates Rb protein levels. • This study has implication in nutlin-3 treatment of rhabdomyosarcomas.

  11. Theoretical study on the ground state of the polar alkali-metal-barium molecules: Potential energy curve and permanent dipole moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gou, Dezhi; Kuang, Xiaoyu Gao, Yufeng; Huo, Dongming

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we systematically investigate the electronic structure for the {sup 2}Σ{sup +} ground state of the polar alkali-metal-alkaline-earth-metal molecules BaAlk (Alk = Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs). Potential energy curves and permanent dipole moments (PDMs) are determined using power quantum chemistry complete active space self-consistent field and multi-reference configuration interaction methods. Basic spectroscopic constants are derived from ro-vibrational bound state calculation. From the calculations, it is shown that BaK, BaRb, and BaCs molecules have moderate values of PDM at the equilibrium bond distance (BaK:1.62 D, BaRb:3.32 D, and BaCs:4.02 D). Besides, the equilibrium bond length (4.93 Å and 5.19 Å) and dissociation energy (0.1825 eV and 0.1817 eV) for the BaRb and BaCs are also obtained.

  12. Observation of ground-state Ramsey fringes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weel, M.; Kumarakrishnan, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    We have used trapped {sup 85}Rb atoms to demonstrate an atom interferometric measurement of atomic recoil in the frequency domain. The measurement uses echo techniques to generate a Ramsey fringe pattern. The pattern exhibits recoil components consistent with theoretical predictions. We find the measurement to be insensitive to magnetic field gradients and discuss the prospects for a precision measurement of the recoil frequency.

  13. COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1960-08-01

    A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

  14. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Second ARM Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance Comparison Fall 2003 Michalsky, J.J.(a), Dolce, R.(b), Dutton, E.G.(c), Long, C.N.(d), Jeffries, W.Q.(e), McArthur, L.J.B.(f),...

  15. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Water Chemistry

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Adam Brandt

    2015-12-15

    This shapefile contains 409 well data points on Tularosa Basin Water Chemistry, each of which have a location (UTM), temperature, quartz and Potassium/Magnesium geothermometer; as well as concentrations of chemicals like Mn, Fe, Ba, Sr, Cs, Rb, As, NH4, HCO3, SO4, F, Cl, B, SiO2, Mg, Ca, K, Na, and Li.

  16. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D. E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  18. C. SIrENET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    m. 61 12!?1/37 C. SIrENET PR jwnlrn RB-JUTA,000LffiBe kw4LV ID TM Ca#lsSION KSII~ ELECTRIC CL@'. VlTiiuFsf MRCS PL#il CMWIE-IELLa CYcLOTml FK

  19. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to an Orbital-Selective Mott Phase in A x Fe 2-y Se 2 (AK, Rb) Superconductors M. Yi, 1, 2 D. H. Lu, 3 R. Yu, 4 S. C. Riggs, 1, 2 J.-H. Chu, 1, 2 B. Lv, 5 Z. Liu, 1, 2 M. Lu,...

  20. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with any transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes

  1. Rapid quantification of mutant fitness in diverse bacteria by sequencing randomly bar-coded transposons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Waters, Robert J.; Lamson, Jacob S.; He, Jennifer; Hoover, Cindi A.; Blow, Matthew J.; Bristow, James; Butland, Gareth; Arkin, Adam P.; et al

    2015-05-12

    Transposon mutagenesis with next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to annotate gene function in bacteria, but existing protocols for TnSeq require laborious preparation of every sample before sequencing. Thus, the existing protocols are not amenable to the throughput necessary to identify phenotypes and functions for the majority of genes in diverse bacteria. Here, we present a method, random bar code transposon-site sequencing (RB-TnSeq), which increases the throughput of mutant fitness profiling by incorporating random DNA bar codes into Tn5 and mariner transposons and by using bar code sequencing (BarSeq) to assay mutant fitness. RB-TnSeq can be used with anymore » transposon, and TnSeq is performed once per organism instead of once per sample. Each BarSeq assay requires only a simple PCR, and 48 to 96 samples can be sequenced on one lane of an Illumina HiSeq system. We demonstrate the reproducibility and biological significance of RB-TnSeq with Escherichia coli, Phaeobacter inhibens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella amazonensis, and Shewanella oneidensis. To demonstrate the increased throughput of RB-TnSeq, we performed 387 successful genome-wide mutant fitness assays representing 130 different bacterium-carbon source combinations and identified 5,196 genes with significant phenotypes across the five bacteria. In P. inhibens, we used our mutant fitness data to identify genes important for the utilization of diverse carbon substrates, including a putative D-mannose isomerase that is required for mannitol catabolism. RB-TnSeq will enable the cost-effective functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness profiling. A large challenge in microbiology is the functional assessment of the millions of uncharacterized genes identified by genome sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis coupled to next-generation sequencing (TnSeq) is a powerful approach to assign phenotypes and functions to genes. However, the current strategies for TnSeq are

  2. Volume regulation by human lymphocytes. Role of calcium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Dupre, A.; Rothstein, A.

    1982-05-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes regulate their volumes in hypotonic solutions. In hypotonic media in which Na+ is the predominant cation, an initial swelling phase is followed by a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) associated with a net loss of cellular K+. In media in which K+ is the predominant cation, the rapid initial swelling is followed by a slower second swelling phase. /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes increased during RVD and returned to normal when the original volume was approximately regained. Effects similar to those induced by hypotonic stress could also be produced by raising the intracellular Ca++ level. In isotonic, Ca++-containing media cells were found to shrink upon addition of the Ca++ ionophore A23187 in K+-free media, but to swell in K+-rich media. Exposure to Ca++ plus A23187 also increased /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes. Quinine (75 microM), an inhibitor of the Ca++-activated K+ pathway in other systems blocked RVD, the associated K+ loss, and the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ efflux. Quinine also inhibited the volume changes and the increased /sup 86/Rb fluxes induced by Ca++ plus ionophore. The calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine, pimozide and chlorpromazine blocked RVD as well as Ca++ plus A23187-induced volume changes. Trifluoperazine also prevented the increase in /sup 86/Rb+ fluxes and K+ loss induced by hypotonicity. Chlorpromazine sulfoxide, a relatively ineffective calmodulin antagonist, was considerably less potent as an inhibitor of RVD than chlorpromazine. It is suggested than an elevation in cytoplasmic (Ca++), triggered by cell swelling, increases the plasma membrane permeability to K+, the ensuing increased efflux of K+, associated anions, and osmotically obliged water, leading to cell shrinking (RVD).

  3. Bonded Radii and the Contraction of the Electron Density of the Oxygen Atom by Bonded Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2013-02-21

    The bonded radii for more than 550 bonded pairs of atoms, comprising more than 50 crystals, determined from experimental and theoretical electron density distributions, are compared with the effective ionic, ri(M), and crystal radii, rc(M), for metal atoms, M, bonded to O atoms. At odds with the fixed ionic radius of 1.40 , assumed for the O atom in the compilation of the ionic radii, the bonded radius for the atom, rb(O), is not fixed but displays a relatively wide range of values as the O atom is progressively polarized by the M-O bonded interactions: as such, rb(O) decreases systematically from 1.40 (the Pauling radius of the oxide anion) as bond lengths decrease when bonded to an electropositive atom like sodium, to 0.64 (Braggs atomic radius of the O atom) when bonded to an electronegative atom like nitrogen. Both rb(M) and rb(O) increase in tandum with the increasing coordination number of the M atom. The bonded radii of the M atoms are highly correlated with both ri(M) and rc(M), but they both depart systematically from rb(M) and become smaller as the electronegativity of the M atom increases and the M-O bond length decreases. The well-developed correlations between both sets of radii and rb(M) testifies to the relative precision of both sets of radii and the fact that both sets are highly correlated the M-O bond 1 lengths. On the other hand, the progressive departure of rb(O) from the fixed ionic radius of the O atom with the increasing electronegativity of the bonded M atom indicates that any compilation of sets of ionic radii, assuming that the radius for the oxygen atom is fixed in value, is problematical and impacts on the accuracy of the resulting sets of ionic and crystal radii thus compiled. The assumption of a fixed O atom radius not only results in a negative ionic radii for several atoms, but it also results in values of rb(M) that are much as ~ 0.6 larger than the ri(M) and rc(M) values, respectively, particularly for the more

  4. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for large-scale watershed modeling could be useful for evaluating the quality of the water in regions that are dominated by nonpoint sources in order to identify potential “hot spots” for which mitigating strategies could be further developed. An analysis of water quality under future scenarios in which changes in land use would be made to accommodate increased biofuel production was developed for the Missouri River Basin (MoRB) based on a SWAT model application. The analysis covered major agricultural crops and biofuel feedstock in the MoRB, including pasture land, hay, corn, soybeans, wheat, and switchgrass. The analysis examined, at multiple temporal and spatial scales, how nitrate, organic nitrogen, and total nitrogen; phosphorus, organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, and total phosphorus; suspended sediments; and water flow (water yield) would respond to the shifts in land use that would occur under proposed future scenarios. The analysis was conducted at three geospatial scales: (1) large tributary basin scale (two: Upper MoRB and Lower MoRB); (2) regional watershed scale (seven: Upper Missouri River, Middle Missouri River, Middle Lower Missouri River, Lower Missouri River, Yellowstone River, Platte River, and Kansas River); and (3) eight-digit hydrologic unit (HUC-8) subbasin scale (307 subbasins). Results showed that subbasin-level variations were substantial. Nitrogen loadings decreased across the entire Upper MoRB, and they increased in several subbasins in the Lower MoRB. Most nitrate reductions occurred in lateral flow. Also at the subbasin level, phosphorus in organic, sediment, and soluble forms was reduced by 35%, 45%, and 65%, respectively. Suspended sediments increased in 68% of the subbasins. The water yield decreased in 62% of the subbasins. In the Kansas River watershed, the water quality improved significantly with regard to every nitrogen and phosphorus compound. The improvement was

  5. Spallation production of neutron deficient radioisotopes in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamriska, D.J.; Peterson, E.J.; Carty, J.

    1997-12-31

    The US Department of Energy produces a number of neutron deficient radioisotopes by high energy proton induced spallation reactions in accelerators at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico and Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York. Research isotopes are also recovered from targets irradiated at TRIUMF in British Columbia, Canada. The radioisotopes recovered are distributed for use in nuclear medicine, environmental research, physics research, and industry worldwide. In addition to the main product line of Sr-82 from either Mo or Rb targets, Cu-67 from ZnO targets, and Ge-68 and RbBr targets, these irradiation facilities also produce some unique isotopes in quantities not available from any other source such as Al-26, Mg-28, Si-32, Ti-44, Fe-52, Gd-148, and Hg-194. The authors will describe the accelerator irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos and Brookhaven National Laboratories. The high level radiochemical processing facilities at Los Alamos and brief chemical processes will be described.

  6. First Use of High Charge States for Mass Measurements of Short-Lived Nuclides in a Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A. T.; Dilling, J.; Simon, M. C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Mane, E.; Delheij, P.; Pearson, M. R.; Brunner, T.; Chowdhury, U.; Simon, V. V.; Brodeur, M.; Andreoiu, C.; Audi, G.; Lopez-Urrutia, J. R. Crespo; Ullrich, J.; Gwinner, G.; Lapierre, A.; Lunney, D.; Ringle, R.

    2011-12-30

    Penning trap mass measurements of short-lived nuclides have been performed for the first time with highly charged ions, using the TITAN facility at TRIUMF. Compared to singly charged ions, this provides an improvement in experimental precision that scales with the charge state q. Neutron-deficient Rb isotopes have been charge bred in an electron beam ion trap to q=8-12+ prior to injection into the Penning trap. In combination with the Ramsey excitation scheme, this unique setup creating low energy, highly charged ions at a radioactive beam facility opens the door to unrivaled precision with gains of 1-2 orders of magnitude. The method is particularly suited for short-lived nuclides such as the superallowed {beta} emitter {sup 74}Rb (T{sub 1/2}=65 ms). The determination of its atomic mass and an improved Q{sub EC} value are presented.

  7. X-ray studies of concentrated aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, K.F. Jr.; Warburton, W.K.; Fontaine, A.

    1987-07-01

    Concentrated aqueous solutions of three transition metal bromides (ZnBr/sub 2/, CuBr/sub 2/, and NiBr/sub 2/) and an alkali bromide (RbBr) have been studied with differential anomalous scattering (DAS) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The aq-ZnBr/sub 2/ solutions exhibit considerable inner-shell ion complexing with the formation of tetrahedral complexes about the Zn/sup 2 +/. In aq-CuBr/sub 2/, the Cu/sup 2 +/ has an octahedral coordination shell. Most of the anions are bound directly to the cations in both solutions. In contrast, there are only a few Ni--Br nearest neighbors in aq-NiBr/sub 2/. Instead, cations and anions share hydrating water molecules. Preliminary data show that any ion complexing in aq-RbBr must be weak. These results are in good agreement with published thermodynamic studies.

  8. Atom chip apparatus for experiments with ultracold rubidium and potassium gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivory, M. K.; Ziltz, A. R.; Fancher, C. T.; Pyle, A. J.; Sensharma, A.; Chase, B.; Field, J. P.; Garcia, A.; Aubin, S.; Jervis, D.

    2014-04-15

    We present a dual chamber atom chip apparatus for generating ultracold {sup 87}Rb and {sup 39}K atomic gases. The apparatus produces quasi-pure Bose-Einstein condensates of 10{sup 4} {sup 87}Rb atoms in an atom chip trap that features a dimple and good optical access. We have also demonstrated production of ultracold {sup 39}K and subsequent loading into the chip trap. We describe the details of the dual chamber vacuum system, the cooling lasers, the magnetic trap, the multicoil magnetic transport system, the atom chip, and two optical dipole traps. Due in part to the use of light-induced atom desorption, the laser cooling chamber features a sufficiently good vacuum to also support optical dipole trap-based experiments. The apparatus is well suited for studies of atom-surface forces, quantum pumping and transport experiments, atom interferometry, novel chip-based traps, and studies of one-dimensional many-body systems.

  9. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  10. I M E M O R A N D U M T O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    M E M O R A N D U M T O : FILE D A T E -------w----m-- F R O M :: /M1, L A U ------------e-e- S W J E C T : g/r'm n 'h a + ~ 'o n f l e c o w w n d a + t '~ ~ S ITE N A M E : /A C ios ?ith~fiC A L T E R N A T E ---w-------- ------------------_------- N A M E : ---------------------- CITY: 4 7 F u lfw S t N e b )/4rk -------------L------,,,,,_ S T A T E : N. 1: e - m -- O W N E R ( S ) .---me--- Past: ------------------------ Current: O w n e r contacted 0 yes a no; _-----------------------a- if

  11. Improved ambient-pressure organic superconductor. [Bis(ethylenedithio)TTF-MX/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, J.M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, M.A.

    1985-05-29

    Disclosed is a new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET)/sub 2/MX/sub 2/ wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET)/sub 2/AuI/sub 2/ exhibits a transition temperature of 5/sup 0/K which is high for organic superconductors.

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep

  13. Ambient-pressure organic superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jack M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K which is high for organic superconductors.

  14. Ambient-temperature superconductor symetrical metal-dihalide bis-(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Jack M.; Wang, Hsien-Hau; Beno, Mark A.

    1987-01-01

    A new class of organic superconductors having the formula (ET).sub.2 MX.sub.2 wherein ET represents bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene, M is a metal such as Au, Ag, In, Tl, Rb, Pd and the like and X is a halide. The superconductor (ET).sub.2 AuI.sub.2 exhibits a transition temperature of 5 K. which is high for organic superconductors.

  15. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences | OSTI, US

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil Peters, R.W.; Shem, L. (1993) 285 Statistical methods for environmental pollution monitoring Gilbert, R.O. (1987) 126 Building a secondary containment system Broder, M.F. (1994) 121 Study of using oxygen-enriched combustion air for locomotive diesel engines Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.

  16. Process for the production of .sup.18 F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmaleh, David R.; Levy, Shlomo; Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1986-01-01

    Process for the production of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose and the corresponding .sup.18 F-compound in which methyl 4,6-O-benzylidine-3-O-methyl-2-O-trifluoromethanesulfonyl-.beta.-D-mannopy ranoside is reacted with a triflating reagent, the resulting compound reacted with CsHF.sub.2, RbF or the corresponding .sup.18 F-compounds, and thereafter the alkyl groups removed by hydrolysis.

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectral Characterization of the Scattering and Absorption of Solar Radiation by Aerosols and Clouds: Results from Several Recent Field Studies Pilewskie, P.(a), Rabbette, M.(b), Bergstrom, R.(b), Pommier, J.(b), and Howard, S.(b), NASA Ames Research Center (a), Bay Area Environmental Research Institute (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Efforts to reduce the uncertainty in climate forcing due to the radiative effects of aerosols and clouds have led to the

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparisons Between Measured and Modeled Longwave Irradiances During Arctic Winter: Results from the Second International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer Comparison (IPARSC-II) Marty, Ch.(a), Storvold, R.(a), Philipona, R.(b), Delamere, J.(c), Dutton, E.(d), Michalsky, J.(e), Stamnes, K.(f), Eide, H.(f), and Stoffel, T.(g), Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks (a), World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland (b), Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Boston

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Aerosol IOP May 2003 Schwartz, S.E.(a), Ferrare R.(b), Ogren, J.E.(c), Daum, P.H.(a), Schmid, B.(d), and Ghan, S.(e), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), NASA Langley Research Center (b), NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (c), Bay Area Environmental Research (d), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (e) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Aerosol influences on shortwave radiation are substantial locally and globally. An aerosol optical

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of the Plane-Parallel Model from MISR Measurements Horvath, A.(a), Davies, R.(b), and Diner, D.J.(b), University of Arizona (a), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Due to its simplicity and computational speed, the 1-D plane-parallel model enjoys widespread popularity in the satellite remote sensing of cloud microphysical properties. Just how well this model describes real clouds is a question rather difficult to

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Monte Carlo Independent Column Approximation (McICA) Barker, H.W.(a), Pincus, R.(b), and Morcrette, J.-J.(c), Meteorological Service of Canada (a), NOAA (b), ECMWF (c) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Within the existing paradigm of modelling radiative transfer for large-scale atmospheric models (LSAMs), assumptions about the nature of subgrid-scale cloud structure are woven inextricably into the fabric of the radiative transfer solver. This makes for

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implementing Flexible Cloud Vertical Structure in GFDL's AM-2 Large-Scale Model Using Stochastic Clouds Pincus, R.(a), Klein, S.A.(b), and Hemmler, R.(b), NOAA-CIRES Climate DiagnosticsCenter (a), Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud vertical structure has a significant impact on radiation and precipitation fluxes, which can then feed back to the general circulation. In large-scale models with partial cloudiness

  3. Reply to “Comment on ‘Optically pumped spin-exchange polarized-electron source’ ”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirbhai, M.; Knepper, J.; Litaker, E. T.; Tupa, D.; Gay, T. J.

    2015-05-26

    In the proceeding Comment [1] on our recent report of a Rb spin-exchange polarized-electron source [2], Williams et al. contend: (a) that our source is poorly characterized compared with modern GaAs sources, (b) that we have overstated the difficulties of using GaAs photoemission sources, and (c) that our explanation of various physics issues related to the source's operating principles are not cogent.

  4. Photoionization of optically trapped ultracold atoms with a high-power light-emitting diode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetz, Simone; Hoeltkemeier, Bastian; Amthor, Thomas; Weidemueller, Matthias [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Photoionization of laser-cooled atoms using short pulses of a high-power light-emitting diode (LED) is demonstrated. Light pulses as short as 30 ns have been realized with the simple LED driver circuit. We measure the ionization cross section of {sup 85}Rb atoms in the first excited state, and show how this technique can be used for calibrating efficiencies of ion detector assemblies.

  5. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parameterization Framework for Boundary-Layer Cumuli L.K. Berg Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R.B. Stull Atmospheric Science Programme Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences The University of British Columbia Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Introduction Clouds have an important influence on the earth's climate and can contribute to either a net warming or a net cooling of the atmosphere through their effects on the short and longwave energy budgets. On one hand,

  6. Reply to “Comment on ‘Optically pumped spin-exchange polarized-electron source’ ”

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pirbhai, M.; Knepper, J.; Litaker, E. T.; Tupa, D.; Gay, T. J.

    2015-05-26

    In the proceeding Comment [1] on our recent report of a Rb spin-exchange polarized-electron source [2], Williams et al. contend: (a) that our source is poorly characterized compared with modern GaAs sources, (b) that we have overstated the difficulties of using GaAs photoemission sources, and (c) that our explanation of various physics issues related to the source's operating principles are not cogent.

  7. Dependence of nuclear magnetic moments on quark masses and limits on temporal variation of fundamental constants from atomic clock experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flambaum, V.V.; Tedesco, A.F.

    2006-05-15

    We calculate the dependence of the nuclear magnetic moments on the quark masses, including the spin-spin interaction effects, and obtain limits on the variation of the fine structure constant {alpha} and (m{sub q}/{lambda}{sub QCD}) using recent atomic clock experiments examining hyperfine transitions in H, Rb, Cs, Yb{sup +}, and Hg{sup +} and the optical transition in H, Hg{sup +}, and Yb{sup +}.

  8. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more » and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  9. Elementary excitations and universal interaction in Bose-Einstein condensates at large scattering lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjonen, R.; Saarela, M.; Mazzanti, F.

    2011-10-15

    We present a theoretical analysis of excitation modes in Bose-Einstein condensates of ultracold alkali-metal gases for large scattering lengths, showing clear deviations from the Bogoliubov prediction as seen by Papp et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 135301 (2008)]. We construct the atom-atom interaction by deriving the T matrix of such systems from two coupled (open and closed) channels assuming that the Feshbach resonance dominates the latter. We calculate molecular bound-state energies as a function of the magnetic field and compare with available experiments. The s-wave phase shifts determine the local effective interaction with long-ranged repulsion and short-ranged attraction. We show that it becomes a universal function at large scattering lengths. Finally, we use this interaction to characterize the ground-state and elementary excitations of {sup 85}Rb, {sup 87}Rb, and {sup 23}Na gases. Good agreement with line shift experiments in {sup 85}Rb is achieved. We find that, at large scattering lengths, Bragg scattering experiments could directly measure the momentum dependence of the effective two-body potential.

  10. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Lambe, Andrew T.; Davidovits, Paul

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.

  11. Fabrication of nano Delafossite LiCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} as the new adsorbent in efficient removal of reactive blue 5 from aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khosravi, Iman; Yazdanbakhsh, Mohammad; Eftekhar, Melika; Haddadi, Zohreh

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? Fabrication of nano Delafossite LiCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} by solgel method. ? Kinetic study of the adsorption properties. ? Removal of reactive blue 5 (RB5) as a reactive dye by the prepared new nanocatalyst. - Abstract: In this paper, nanoparticles of delafossite-type LiCo{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 2} were prepared by solgel method in the presence of maleic acid as a chelating agent. The nanoparticles were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope, scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The nanoparticles showed the excellent adsorption properties towards reactive dye, reactive blue 5 (RB5). The adsorption studies were carried out at different pH values, various adsorbent dosages and contact time in a batch experiments. The kinetic studies indicate that the removal process obeys the second-order kinetic equation. Also, the isotherm evaluations reveal that the adsorption of RB5 by the nanoparticles follows the Freundlich model.

  12. Charging properties of cassiterite (alfa-SnO2) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, L.; Cummings, Peter T; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-01-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alfa-SnO2) surfaces at 10 50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH-range 4.0 to 4.5 at all conditions and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alfa-TiO2 (rutile), apparently due to the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, while adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable amounts of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on surface charge density (pH), while the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A Surface Complexation Model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH-0.40) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH-range (2.7 10), illustrating the ability of positively and negatively charged surface groups to coexist. Complexation of the medium cations

  13. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 75

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru; Singh, Balraj

    2013-08-15

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 75 (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr) have been evaluated and presented together with Adopted properties for levels and ? rays. New high-spin data are available for {sup 75}Ga, and {sup 75}Rb; and lifetime data for high-spin states in {sup 75}Br and {sup 75}Kr. For ?J =1, M1+E2 transitions in two rotational bands in {sup 75}Kr, several B(E2)(W.u.) values are anomalously high, deviating by 23 ? values from currently accepted RUL(E2) = 300. In the opinion of the evaluators, there is need to remeasure level lifetimes and multipole mixing ratios in {sup 75}Kr to resolve this serious discrepancy. New precise single-particle transfer cross section data are available for {sup 75}Ga, {sup 75}Ge, {sup 75}As and {sup 75}Se from several different reactions (2009Ka06,2008Sc03); these data give information for occupancy of valence neutron orbitals in the ground states of target nuclides: {sup 76}Ge, {sup 76}Se and {sup 78}Se. No significant new data since the 1999 NDS for A = 75 have been reported for {sup 75}As and {sup 75}Se. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 75}Co, {sup 75}Ni and {sup 75}Sr. For {sup 75}Fe, only the isotopic identification is made with one observed event. The radioactive decay schemes of {sup 75}Co and {sup 75}Ni are unknown while those for {sup 75}Rb and {sup 75}Sr are incomplete. This work supersedes the data presented in the previous NDS evaluation of A = 75 published by 1999Fa05.

  14. Composition and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of alkaline arc lavas: Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, A.K.; Hart, S.R.; Frey, F.A. )

    1990-05-10

    The SiO{sub 2}-undersaturated lavas from Lihir island, Papua New Guinea, like most arc lavas are highly enriched in Sr, Ba, K, Rb, and Cc and depleted in Hf, Ta, Nb, and Ti relative to ocean floor basalts and oceanic island basalts. These alkali-rich lavas have arc trace element signatures and Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic systematics. However, they are not a product of present-day subduction, as this volcanism has tapped mantle which was enriched by prior subduction episodes. The narrow range of Pb isotopic compositions suggest a cogenetic origin for these lavas. During the fractionation of the primitive Lihir lavas, elements normally considered incompatible (i.e., the light rare earth elements (LREE), Rb, Th, and P) have high bulk solid/melt partition coefficients (0.15-1.5). Relatively higher partition coefficients during formation of the evolved lavas produced crossing rare earth element (REE) patterns, and primitive lavas have higher incompatible elements abundances than evolved lavas. The Lihir lavas have lower alkali, Sr, Ba, K, Rb, Cs, and LREE abundances than other Tabar-Feni lavas. They are derived from a less enriched mantle source rather than by a higher degree of melting of a source similar to that of the other islands. The similarity of Sm/Nd ratios of these undersaturated arc lavas to those of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline arc lavas and the moderate chondrite-normalized La/Yb (la/Yb{sub cn} = 3-7) indicates that there has been limited enrichment of the LREE relative to the heavy REE during generation of the arc-modified source mantle. The alkaline nature of these lavas reflects their generation, in a tensional tectonic environment, from a fossil arc mantle region that has undergone extreme arc enrichment of alkali and alkaline earth elements during two earlier subduction episodes.

  15. Validity of ELTB Equation for Suitable Description of BEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dooyoung; Kim, Jinguanghao; Yoon, Jin-Hee

    2005-10-17

    The Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) has been found for various alkali-metal gases such as 7Li, 87Rb, Na, and H. For the description of atoms in this condensate state, the Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation has been widely used. However, the GP equation contains the nonlinear term, which makes this equation hard to solve. Therefore, physical quantities are usually obtained numerically, and sometimes it is difficult to extract a physical meaning from the calculated results. The nuclear theory group at Purdue University in the U.S. developed a new simple equation, the equivalent linear two-body (ELTB) equation, using the hyper-radius coordinates and tested it for one-dimensional BEC system. Their results are consistent with the numerical values from the GP equation within 4.5%.We test the validity of the ELTB equation for three-dimensional BEC system by calculating the energies per particle and the wave functions for 87Rb gas and for 7Li gas. We use the quantum-mechanical variational method for the BEC energy. Our result for 87Rb gas agrees with a numerical calculation based on the GP equation, with a relative error of 12% over a wide range of N from 100 to 10,000. The relative distances between particles for 7Li gas are consistent within a relative error of 17% for N {<=} 1300. The relatively simple form of the ELTB equation, compared with the GP equation, enables us to treat the N-body system easily and efficiently. We conclude that the ELTB equation is a powerful equation for describing BEC system because it is easy to treat.

  16. The mechanism of patulin's cytotoxicity and the antioxidant activity of indole tetramic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.T.; Showker, J.L. )

    1991-06-01

    In LLC-PK1 cells exposed to patulin (50 microM), lipid peroxidation, abrupt calcium influx, extensive blebbing, and total LDH release appeared to be serially connected events with each representing a step in the loss of structural integrity of the plasma membrane. The aforementioned patulin-induced events were prevented by concurrent incubation with butylated hydroxytoluene, deferoxamine, and cyclopiazonic acid, a fungal metabolite. Patulin also caused depletion of nonprotein sulfhydryls, increased 86Rb+ efflux, dome collapse, and eventually the loss of cell viability. These events were not prevented by antioxidants, results consistent with the hypothesis that they were also serially connected but occurring parallel to those previously mentioned. The earliest events observed in patulin-treated cells were the decrease in nonprotein sulfhydryls and increase in 86Rb+ efflux (5 min) which occurred before statistically significant alterations in protein-bound sulfhydryls. The increased potassium efflux (86Rb+ efflux) occurred via a pathway distinct from BaCl2, quinine, or tetraethylammonium sensitive potassium channels. This is the first published report of the antioxidant activity of indole tetramic acids (cyclopiazonic acid and cyclopiazonic acid imine). The protective effect of tetramic acids in LLC-PK1 cells was restricted to indole tetramic acids, and their prevention of lipid peroxidation did not involve iron chelation. The results of this study demonstrate that cyclopiazonic acid is a potent inhibitor of azide-insensitive, ATP-dependent, a23187-sensitive calcium uptake by the lysate of LLC-PK1 cells. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the endoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase is a sensitive target for cyclopiazonic acid in LLC-PK1 cells.

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMBE - a New ACRF Data Product for Climate Studies Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie S, RB McCoy, SA Klein, RT Cederwall, WJ Wiscombe, EE Clothiaux, KL Gaustad, J Golaz, S Hall, MP Jensen, KL Johnson, Y Lin, CN Long, JH Mather, RA McCord, SA McFarlane, G Palanisamy, Y Shi, and DD Turner. 2010. "ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large-Scale Structures and Diabatic Heating and Drying Profiles Revealed by TWP-ICE Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie S, T Hume, C Jakob, SA Klein, RB McCoy, and M Zhang. 2009. "Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE." Journal of Climate, 23(1), . Analyzed vertical

  19. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2013-10-15

    Experimental nuclear structure and decay data for all known A=91 nuclides (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been evaluated. This evaluation, covering data received by 1 September 2013, supersedes the 1998 evaluation by C. M. Baglin published in Nuclear Data Sheets86, 1 (1999) (15 December 1998 literature cutoff), and subsequent evaluations by C. M. Baglin added to the ENSDF database for Kr, Sr and Zr (29 December 2000 literature cutoff) and by B. Singh for {sup 91}Tc (6 November 2000 literature cutoff)

  20. Nuclear Data Sheets for A=85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Balraj; Chen, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Evaluated experimental data are presented for 13 known nuclides of mass 85 (Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo). Since the previous 1990 evaluation of A=85, {sup 85}Zn, {sup 85}Ga, {sup 85}Ge and {sup 85}nuclides are newly added here. Excited state data for {sup 85}Se, {sup 85}Zr have become available from radioactive decay and inbeam ?ray studies. New and improved highspin data are available for {sup 85}Br, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 85}Rb, {sup 85}Y, {sup 85}Nb and {sup 85}Mo. New direct and precise measurement of atomic masses of {sup 85}Ge, {sup 85}As, {sup 85}Se, {sup 85}Br, {sup 85}Rb, {sup 85}Zr, {sup 85}Nb and {sup 85}Mo have greatly improved the landscape of ? decayQ values and separation energies in this mass region. In spite of extensive experimental work on the isobaric nuclei of this mass chain several deficiencies remain. No excited states are known in {sup 85}Zn, {sup 85}Ga, {sup 85}As. Only a few excited state are assigned in {sup 85}Ge from {sup 85}Ga ? decay. From radioactivity studies, the decay schemes of {sup 85}Zn and {sup 85}Mo are not known, and those for {sup 85}Ga, {sup 85}Ge, {sup 85}As and 10.9s isomer of {sup 85}Zr are incomplete. Level lifetimes are not known for excited states in {sup 85}Se, {sup 85}Br, {sup 85}Nb and {sup 85}Mo. The {sup 85}Tc nuclide has not been detected in fragmentation experiments at GANIL, alluding to its unbound nature for proton emission. The {sup 85}Kr, {sup 85}Rb, {sup 85}Sr, and {sup 85}Y nuclides remain the most extensively studied from many different reactions and decays. The evaluation of A=85 nuclides has been done after a span of 23 years, thus includes an extensive amount of new data for almost each nuclide. This work supersedes the data for A=85 nuclides presented in earlier full NDS publication by J. Tepel in 1980Te04 and a later one published in an update mode by H. Sievers in 1991Si01.

  1. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2012-10-15

    Nuclear structure and decay data pertaining to all nuclides with mass number A = 92 (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been compiled and evaluated, and incorporated into the ENSDF data file. All literature available by 15 September 2012 has been considered. This evaluation supersedes the previous publication for this mass chain (Coral M. Baglin, Nuclear Data Sheets 91, 423 (2000) (November 2000 cutoff date)), and subsequent unpublished reevaluations by C.M. Baglin for {sup 92}Kr (January 2004 literature cut-off) and {sup 92}Sr (August 2003 literature cut-off).

  2. The Secretary of Energy'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ? >g*+. , . dc*rb&.+ :c-r.3-b. g ;.i' 8 . I. ' . . 3 @ g. -- Q ' \ 4,: 6 L;Is)zLTEsdi# ' -. . ! h -. The Secretary of Energy' Washington, bC 20585 u , October 10, 1997 ' The .Honorabie William S . Cohen Secretary ofDefense Washington, D.C. 20301 -' &arMr. Secietary: !I " .,.. *- . = . . # ' The Congress recently se@ to the President for signature the Energy and Water ,, Development Appropriations Act, 1998. Among other provisions, this bill would immediately transfer

  3. X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals Authors: Hunter, M.S., DePonte, D.P., Shapiro, D.A., Kirian, R.A., Wang, X., Starodub, D., Marchesini, S., Weierstall, U., Doak, R.B., Spence, J.C.H., and Fromme, P. Title: X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals Source: Biophysical Journal Year: 2011 Volume: 100 Pages: 198-206 ABSTRACT: Membrane proteins constitute >30% of the proteins in an average cell, and yet the number of currently known structures of unique membrane

  4. Shot-noise-limited magnetometer with sub-picotesla sensitivity at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Anielski, Pawel; Gawlik, Wojciech; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2014-11-15

    We report a photon shot-noise-limited (SNL) optical magnetometer based on amplitude modulated optical rotation using a room-temperature {sup 85}Rb vapor in a cell with anti-relaxation coating. The instrument achieves a room-temperature sensitivity of 70 fT/?(Hz) at 7.6 ?T. Experimental scaling of noise with optical power, in agreement with theoretical predictions, confirms the SNL behaviour from 5 ?T to 75??T. The combination of best-in-class sensitivity and SNL operation makes the system a promising candidate for application of squeezed light to a state-of-the-art atomic sensor.

  5. A new method for measurement of safety rod drop times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesic, M.; Stefanovic, D. ); Marinkovic, P. )

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a new method for the accurate measurement of safety rod drop times is proposed. It is based on a fast electromagnetic transducer and an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) conected to a computer system. Evaluation of recorded data is conducted by a developed computer code. The first measurements performed at the HERBE fast-thermal RB reactor show that a relative uncertainty (confidence level 95%) of less than 6% can be achieved in determination of rod drop time (with time intervals ranging from 0.4-10.0 s). Further improvements in accuracy are possible.

  6. Local surface plasmon mediated extraordinary optical transmission of multi-spatial-mode quantum noise reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, Benjamin J; Evans, Philip G; Pooser, Raphael C

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the coherent transduction of quantum noise reduction, or squeezed light, by Ag localized surface plasmons (LSPs). Squeezed light, generated through four-wave-mixing in Rb vapor, is coupled to a Ag nanohole array designed to exhibit LSP mediated extraordinary-optical transmission (EOT) spectrally coincident with the squeezed light source at 795 nm. We demonstrate that quantum noise reduction as a function of transmission is found to match closely with linear attenuation models, thus demonstrating that the photon-LSP-photon transduction process is coherent near the LSP resonance.

  7. Spin Self-Rephasing and Very Long Coherence Times in a Trapped Atomic Ensemble

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deutsch, C.; Reinhard, F.; Schneider, T.; Laloee, F.; Reichel, J. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, ENS, UPMC, CNRS, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Lacroute, C.; Rosenbusch, P. [LNE-SYRTE, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, CNRS, 61 av de l'Observatoire, 75014 Paris (France); Fuchs, J. N.; Piechon, F. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 8502, Univ. Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2010-07-09

    We perform Ramsey spectroscopy on the ground state of ultracold {sup 87}Rb atoms magnetically trapped on a chip in the Knudsen regime. Field inhomogeneities over the sample should limit the 1/e contrast decay time to about 3 s, while decay times of 58{+-}12 s are actually observed. We explain this surprising result by a spin self-rephasing mechanism induced by the identical spin rotation effect originating from particle indistinguishability. We propose a theory of this synchronization mechanism and obtain good agreement with the experimental observations. The effect is general and may appear in other physical systems.

  8. Observation of a Topological and Parity-Dependent Phase of m=0 Spin States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usami, Koji [PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 3-5, Sanbancho, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 332-0012 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kozuma, Mikio [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 3-5, Sanbancho, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 332-0012 (Japan)

    2007-10-05

    A Ramsey interrogation scheme was used to measure the phase shift of laser-cooled {sup 87}Rb clock-transition pseudospins arising as a result of a reversal of a bias-magnetic field, i.e., B{yields}-B, during the interrogation. While no phase shift occurred when the reversal was sudden, the Ramsey fringes were shifted by a factor of {pi} when the reversal was adiabatic. We thus verified the prediction that the spin states |F,m=0> acquire a purely topological and parity-dependent phase factor of (-1){sup F} as a result of B{yields}-B.

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Site and Computer Access Request System Doty, K.J.(a), Eagan, R.(b), Sisterson, D.L.(b), and Wagener, R.(a), Brookhaven National Laboratory (a), Argonne National Laboratory (b) The implementation and use of a collection of web-based tools for a Site and Computer Access Request system is presented. The system is used by ARM to provide advance notice of on-site visits to site managers in order to coordinate support as well as to provide a mechanism for managing remote and on-site access to ARM

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Overview of ARM Satellite Cloud and Radiation Budget Datasets Minnis, P.(a), Nguyen, L.(a), Smith Jr., W.L.(a), Doelling, D.R.(b), Heck, P.W.(c), Khaiyer, M.M.(b), Palikonda, R.(b), Young, D.F.(a), Spangenberg, D.A.(b), Chakrapani, V.(b), Walter, B.J.(b), and Nowicki, G.D.(b), NASA Langley Research Center (a), Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. (b), CIMSS/University of Wisconsin-Madison (c) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The derivation of cloud

  11. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  12. WE-D-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; Naqa, I El

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It has been realized that inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability is a multifactorial process involving dosimetric, clinical, and genetic factors. Therefore, we explore a new framework to integrate physical, clinical, and biological data denoted as radiogenomic modeling. In demonstrating the feasibility of this work, we investigate the association of genetic variants (copy number variations [CNVs] and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) with radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) while taking into account dosimetric and clinical variables in prostate cancer patients treated with curative irradiation. Methods: A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) was retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs25489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Dosevolume metrics were extracted from treatment plans of 54 patients who had complete dosimetric profiles. Treatment outcomes were considered to be a Result of functional mapping of radiogenomic input variables according to a logit transformation. Model orders were estimated using resampling by leave-one out cross-validation (LOO-CV). Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and LOO-CV. For continuous univariate dosimetric and clinical variables, Spearmans rank coefficients were calculated and p-values reported accordingly. In the case of binary variables, Chi-squared statistics and contingency table calculations were used. Results: Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ2=14.6 [p<0.001] and ED: χ2=4.88[p=0.0272]) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ2=0.278[p=0.599] and ED: χ2=0.112[p=0.732]). LOO-CV identified penile bulb D60 as the only significant QUANTEC predictor (rs=0.312 [p=0.0145]) for ED. Radiogenomic modeling yielded statistically significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (rs=0.243[p=0.0443], AUC=0.665) and ED (rs=0.276[p=0

  13. Lipidic phase membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lipidic phase membrane protein serial femtosecond crystallography Authors: Johansson LC, Arnlund D, White TA, Katona G, Deponte DP, Weierstall U, Doak RB, Shoeman RL, Lomb L, Malmerberg E, Davidsson J, Nass K, Liang M, Andreasson J, Aquila A, Bajt S, Barthelmess M, Barty A, Bogan MJ, Bostedt C, Bozek JD, Caleman C, Coffee R, Coppola N, Ekeberg T, Epp SW, Erk B, Fleckenstein H, Foucar L, Graafsma H, Gumprecht L, Hajdu J, Hampton CY, Hartmann R, Hartmann A, Hauser G, Hirsemann H, Holl P, Hunter

  14. mabiala_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyclotron Colloquium on Friday, August 17th, 2016, at 3:45 pm in Room 228 Refreshments will be served at 3:30 pm Dr. Justin Mabiala Cyclotron Institute Abstract: Pre-equilibrium emission and its possible relation to alpha-clustering in nuclei Cluster structure effects in nuclei have been investigated looking to the preequilibrium particles emitted in the 16O+65Cu and 19F+62Ni reactions at the same beam velocity of 16 AMeV which lead to the same 81Rb* compound nucleus. Despite the slight

  15. NUCLEAR DATA REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2004-12-01

    Non-neutron nuclear data are periodically reviewed and evaluated. The recommended values are published in the Table of the Isotopes of the Chemical Rubber Company's Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. A 2004 review has begun to re-examine some data of interest to the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) sub-commission on Geochronology dealing with radioactive decay constants and isotopic abundance ratios. Among the decay constants that are being evaluated are those of the following nuclides: {sup 40}K, {sup 87}Rb, {sup 138}La, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 176}Lu, {sup 174}Hf, {sup 187}Re, {sup 190}Pt, {sup 232}Th, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U.

  16. A clip-on Zeeman slower using toroidal permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzyzewski, S. P.; Akin, T. G.; Dahal, Parshuram; Abraham, E. R. I.

    2014-10-15

    We present the design of a zero-crossing Zeeman slower for {sup 85}Rb using rings of flexible permanent magnets. The design is inexpensive, requires no power or cooling, and can be easily attached and removed for vacuum maintenance. We show theoretically that such a design can reproduce a magnetic field profile of a standard zero-crossing Zeeman slower. Experimental measurements of a prototype and comparisons to theoretical simulations demonstrate the feasibility of the design and point toward future improvements. Simulations show an atom flux similar to other Zeeman slowers.

  17. Progress Report- DE-FG02-03ER46078-University of Houston

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Report- DE-FG02-08ER46486-University of Houston Neutron Compton Scattering as a Probe of Hydrogen Bonded (and other) Systems George Reiter December 22, 2010 Period: Feb 1, 2010-Jan 31, 2011 Summary of work: 3-D Measurements of Born-Oppenheimer Potential Measurements of the momentum distribution of Rb3H(SO4)2 at 120K and 170K have been analyzed, and a paper submitted to PRB. It is now in the review process. The import of the paper is that the effective Born Oppenheimer potential for the

  18. Conversion method of powder inelastic scattering data for one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke; Fujita, Prof. Masaki; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bewley, Robert I.; Bull, Dr. Martyn J.; Bennington, Dr. Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Extracting dispersive magnetic excitations from inelastic neutron scattering data usually requires large single crystals. We present a simple yet powerful method for extracting such information from polycrystalline or powder data for one-dimensional systems. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this data treatment by extracting dispersion curves from powder inelastic neutron scattering data on the one-dimensional spin-half systems: CuGeO3 and Rb2Cu2Mo3O12. For many such materials it is not possible to grow sufficiently large crystals and this method offers a quick and efficient way to study their magnetic excitations.

  19. The influence of pairing correlations on the isospin symmetry breaking corrections of superallowed Fermi beta decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k, A. E.; Gerceklioglu, M.; Selam, C.

    2013-05-15

    Within the framework of quasi-particle random phase approximation, the isospin breaking correction of superallowed 0{sup +} {yields} 0{sup +} beta decay and unitarity of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix have been investigated. The broken isotopic symmetry of nuclear part of Hamiltonian has been restored by Pyatov's method. The isospin symmetry breaking correction with pairing correlations has been compared with the previous results without pairing. The effect of pairing interactions has been examined for nine superallowed Fermi beta decays; their parent nuclei are {sup 26}Al, {sup 34}Cl, {sup 38}K, {sup 42}Sc, {sup 46}V, {sup 50}Mn, {sup 54}Co, {sup 62}Ga, {sup 74}Rb.

  20. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information 4 Most Viewed Documents for Geosciences Field examination of shale and argillite in northern Nye County, Nevada Connolly, J. R.; Woodward, L. A.; Emanuel, K. M.; Keil, K. (1981) 37 The Beaverhead impact structure, SW Montana and Idaho: Implications for the regional geology of the western U.S. Fiske, P.S.; Hargaves, R.B. (1994) 21 The Geysers Geothermal Field Update1990/2010 Brophy, P.; Lippmann, M.; Dobson, P.F.; Poux, B. (2010) 19 Creating a

  1. Precision polarization measurements of atoms in a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, F.; Vieira, D. J.; Zhao, X.

    2011-01-15

    Precision measurement of atomic and nuclear polarization is an essential step for beta-asymmetry measurement of radioactive atoms. In this paper, we report the polarization measurement of Rb atoms in an yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) far-off-resonance optical dipole trap. We have prepared a cold cloud of polarized Rb atoms in the YAG dipole trap by optical pumping and achieved an initial nuclear polarization of up to 97.2(5)%. The initial atom distribution in different Zeeman levels is measured by using a combination of microwave excitation, laser pushing, and atomic retrap techniques. The nuclear-spin polarization is further purified to 99.2(2)% in 10 s and maintained above 99% because the two-body collision loss rate between atoms in mixed spin states is greater than the one-body trap loss rate. Systematic effects on the nuclear polarization, including the off-resonance Raman scattering, magnetic field gradient, and background gas collisions, are discussed.

  2. Enhanced γ -Ray Emission from Neutron Unbound States Populated in β Decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Rice, S.; Gelletly, W.; Regan, P.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; et al

    2015-08-01

    Total absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the β -decay intensity to states above the neutron separation energy followed by γ -ray emission in 87,88Br and 94Rb. Accurate results were obtained thanks to the careful control of systematic errors. An unexpectedly large γ intensity was observed in all three cases extending well beyond the excitation energy region where neutron penetration is hindered by low neutron energy. The γ branching as a function of excitation energy was compared to Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. For 87Br and 88Br the branching reaches 57% and 20% respectively, and could be explained as a nuclear structuremore » effect. Some of the states populated in the daughter can only decay through the emission of a large orbital angular momentum neutron with a strongly reduced barrier penetrability. In the case of neutron-rich 94Rb the observed 4.5% branching is much larger than the calculations performed with standard nuclear statistical model parameters, even after proper correction for fluctuation effects on individual transition widths. The difference can be reconciled introducing an enhancement of one order-of-magnitude in the photon strength to neutron strength ratio. An increase in the photon strength function of such magnitude for very neutron-rich nuclei, if it proved to be correct, leads to a similar increase in the (n, γ) cross section that would have an impact on r process abundance calculations.« less

  3. High Voltage GaN Schottky Rectifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CAO,X.A.; CHO,H.; CHU,S.N.G.; CHUO,C.-C.; CHYI,J.-I.; DANG,G.T.; HAN,JUNG; LEE,C.-M.; PEARTON,S.J.; REN,F.; WILSON,R.G.; ZHANG,A.P.

    1999-10-25

    Mesa and planar GaN Schottky diode rectifiers with reverse breakdown voltages (V{sub RB}) up to 550V and >2000V, respectively, have been fabricated. The on-state resistance, R{sub ON}, was 6m{Omega}{center_dot} cm{sup 2} and 0.8{Omega}cm{sup 2}, respectively, producing figure-of-merit values for (V{sub RB}){sup 2}/R{sub ON} in the range 5-48 MW{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. At low biases the reverse leakage current was proportional to the size of the rectifying contact perimeter, while at high biases the current was proportional to the area of this contact. These results suggest that at low reverse biases, the leakage is dominated by the surface component, while at higher biases the bulk component dominates. On-state voltages were 3.5V for the 550V diodes and {ge}15 for the 2kV diodes. Reverse recovery times were <0.2{micro}sec for devices switched from a forward current density of {approx}500A{center_dot}cm{sup -2} to a reverse bias of 100V.

  4. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A.

    1999-01-01

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  5. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  6. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  7. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  8. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1?g/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-?, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  9. Search for b→u transitions in B±→[K∓π±π⁰]DK± decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; et al

    2011-07-06

    We present a study of the decays B±→DK± with D mesons reconstructed in the K⁺π⁻π⁰ or K⁻π⁺π⁰ final states, where D indicates a D⁰ or a D¯¯¯0 meson. Using a sample of 474×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider at SLAC, we measure the ratios R±≡((Γ(B±→[K∓π±π⁰]DK±))/((Γ(B±→[K±π∓π⁰]DK±)). We obtain R⁺=(5⁺12⁻10(stat)⁺2⁻4(syst))×10⁻³ and R⁻=(12⁺12⁻10(stat)⁺3⁻5(syst))×10⁻³, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R⁺<23×10⁻³ and R⁻<29×10⁻³. Using these measurements, we obtain an upper limit for the ratio rB of the magnitudes of the b→u and b→c amplitudes rB<0.13 at 90% probability.

  10. ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles: An easily recoverable effective photo-catalyst for the degradation of rose bengal and methylene blue dyes in the waste-water treatment plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Amit Kumar; Maji, Swarup Kumar; Adhikary, Bibhutosh

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs from a single-source precursor and characterized by XRD, TEM, UVvis spectra. The NPs were tested as effective photocatalyst toward degradation of RB and MB dyes. The possible pathway of the photocatalytic decomposition process has been discussed. The active species, OH, was detected by TA photoluminescence probing techniques. - Abstract: ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized from a single-source precursor complex [Fe{sub 3}O(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COO){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]NO{sub 3} by a simple thermal decomposition process and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UVvis spectroscopic techniques. The NPs were highly pure and well crystallized having hexagonal morphology with an average particle size of 35 nm. The prepared ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (maghemite) NPs show effective photo-catalytic activity toward the degradation of rose bengal (RB) and methylene blue (MB) dyes under visible light irradiation and can easily be recoverable in the presence of magnetic field for successive re-uses. The possible photo-catalytic decomposition mechanism is discussed through the detection of hydroxyl radical (OH) by terephthalic acid photo-luminescence probing technique.

  11. Salinity, temperature, oil composition, and oil recovery by waterflooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, G.Q.; Morrow, N.R.

    1997-11-01

    The effect of aging and displacement temperatures and brine and oil composition on wettability and the recovery of crude oil by spontaneous imbibition and waterflooding has been investigated. This study is based on displacement tests in Berea sandstone with three crude oils and three reservoir brines (RB`s). Salinity was varied by changing the concentration of total dissolved solids (TDS`s) of the synthetic brine in proportion. Salinity of the connate and invading brines can have a major influence on wettability and oil recovery at reservoir temperature. Oil recovery increased over that for the RB with dilution of both the initial (connate) and invading brine or dilution of either. Aging and displacement temperatures were varied independently. For all crude oils, water wetness and oil recovery increased with increase in displacement temperature. Removal of light components from the crude oil resulted in increased water wetness. Addition of alkanes to the crude oil reduced the water wetness, and increased oil recovery. Relationships between waterflood recovery and rate and extent of oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition are summarized.

  12. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straessle, R.; Ptremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140?C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  13. Differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts expressing lamin A mutated at a site responsible for Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy is improved by inhibition of the MEK-ERK pathway and stimulation of the PI3-kinase pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favreau, Catherine; Delbarre, Erwan; Courvalin, Jean-Claude; Buendia, Brigitte

    2008-04-01

    Mutation R453W in A-type lamins, that are major nuclear envelope proteins, generates Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. We previously showed that mouse myoblasts expressing R453W-lamin A incompletely exit the cell cycle and differentiate into myocytes with a low level of multinucleation. Here we attempted to improve differentiation by treating these cells with a mixture of PD98059, an extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (also known as mitogen-activated kinase, MEK) inhibitor, and insulin-like growth factor-II, an activator of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. We show that mouse myoblasts expressing R453W-lamin A were sensitive to the drug treatment as shown by (i) an increase in multinucleation, (ii) downregulation of proliferation markers (cyclin D1, hyperphosphorylated Rb), (iii) upregulation of myogenin, and (iv) sustained activation of p21 and cyclin D3. However, nuclear matrix anchorage of p21 and cyclin D3 in a complex with hypophosphorylated Rb that is critical to trigger cell cycle arrest and myogenin induction was deficient and incompletely restored by drug treatment. As the turn-over of R453W-lamin A at the nuclear envelope was greatly enhanced, we propose that R453W-lamin A impairs the capacity of the nuclear lamina to serve as scaffold for substrates of the MEK-ERK pathway and for MyoD-induced proteins that play a role in the differentiation process.

  14. Enhanced γ -Ray Emission from Neutron Unbound States Populated in β Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Agramunt, J.; Rubio, B.; Rice, S.; Gelletly, W.; Regan, P.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Rissanen, J.; Eronen, T.; Äystö, J.; Batist, L.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Elomaa, V. -V.; Estevez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A. R.; Gomez-Hornillos, B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jordan, M. D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Kondev, F. G.; Martínez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Podolyák, Zs.; Reponen, M.; Sonnenschein, V.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Total absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate the β -decay intensity to states above the neutron separation energy followed by γ -ray emission in 87,88Br and 94Rb. Accurate results were obtained thanks to the careful control of systematic errors. An unexpectedly large γ intensity was observed in all three cases extending well beyond the excitation energy region where neutron penetration is hindered by low neutron energy. The γ branching as a function of excitation energy was compared to Hauser-Feshbach model calculations. For 87Br and 88Br the branching reaches 57% and 20% respectively, and could be explained as a nuclear structure effect. Some of the states populated in the daughter can only decay through the emission of a large orbital angular momentum neutron with a strongly reduced barrier penetrability. In the case of neutron-rich 94Rb the observed 4.5% branching is much larger than the calculations performed with standard nuclear statistical model parameters, even after proper correction for fluctuation effects on individual transition widths. The difference can be reconciled introducing an enhancement of one order-of-magnitude in the photon strength to neutron strength ratio. An increase in the photon strength function of such magnitude for very neutron-rich nuclei, if it proved to be correct, leads to a similar increase in the (n, γ) cross section that would have an impact on r process abundance calculations.

  15. Uranium Bioreduction Rates across Scales: Biogeochemical Hot Moments and Hot Spots during a Biostimulation Experiment at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Chen; Wu, Hongfei; Li, Li; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2014-09-02

    We aim to understand the scale-dependent evolution of uranium bioreduction during a field experiment at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado. Acetate was injected to stimulate Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and to immobilize aqueous U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Bicarbonate was coinjected in half of the domain to mobilize sorbed U(VI). We used reactive transport modeling to integrate hydraulic and geochemical data and to quantify rates at the grid block (0.25 m) and experimental field scale (tens of meters). Although local rates varied by orders of magnitude in conjunction with biostimulation fronts propagating downstream, field-scale rates were dominated by those orders of magnitude higher rates at a few selected hot spots where Fe(III), U(VI), and FeRB were at their maxima in the vicinity of the injection wells. At particular locations, the hot moments with maximum rates negatively corresponded to their distance from the injection wells. Although bicarbonate injection enhanced local rates near the injection wells by a maximum of 39.4%, its effect at the field scale was limited to a maximum of 10.0%. We propose a rate-versus-measurement-length relationship (log R' = -0.63

  16. Effects of diffusion and surface interactions on the line shape of electron paramagnetic resonances in the presence of a magnetic field gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaden, M.; Zhao, K. F.; Wu, Z.

    2007-12-15

    In an evanescent wave magnetometer the Zeeman polarization is probed at micrometer to submicrometer distances from the cell surface. The electron paramagnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer in the presence of a magnetic field gradient exhibit edge enhancement seen previously in nuclear magnetic resonance lines. We present a theoretical model that describes quantitatively the shape of the magnetic resonance lines of an evanescent wave magnetometer under a wide range of experimental conditions. It accounts for diffusion broadening in the presence of a magnetic field gradient as well as interactions of spin polarized Rb atoms with the coated Pyrex glass surfaces. Depending on the field gradient, cell thickness, and buffer gas pressure, the resonance line may have the form of a single asymmetric peak or two peaks localized near the front and back surfaces in frequency space. The double-peaked response depends on average characteristics of the surface interactions. Its shape is sensitive to the dwell time, relaxation probability, and average phase shift of adsorbed spin polarized Rb atoms.

  17. Correlating sampling and intensity statistics in nanoparticle diffraction experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Öztürk, Hande; Yan, Hanfei; Hill, John P.; Noyan, I. Cevdet

    2015-07-28

    It is shown in a previous article [Öztürk, Yan, Hill & Noyan (2014).J. Appl. Cryst.47, 1016–1025] that the sampling statistics of diffracting particle populations within a polycrystalline ensemble depended on the size of the constituent crystallites: broad X-ray peak breadths enabled some nano-sized particles to contribute more than one diffraction spot to Debye–Scherrer rings. Here it is shown that the equations proposed by Alexander, Klug & Kummer [J. Appl. Phys.(1948),19, 742–753] (AKK) to link diffracting particle and diffracted intensity statistics are not applicable if the constituent crystallites of the powder are below 10 nm. In this size range, (i) themore » one-to-one correspondence between diffracting particles and Laue spots assumed in the AKK analysis is not satisfied, and (ii) the crystallographic correlation between Laue spots originating from the same grain invalidates the assumption that all diffracting plane normals are randomly oriented and uncorrelated. Such correlation produces unexpected results in the selection of diffracting grains. For example, three or more Laue spots from a given grain for a particular reflection can only be observed at certain wavelengths. In addition, correcting the diffracted intensity values by the traditional Lorentz term, 1/cos θ, to compensate for the variation of particles sampled within a reflection band does not maintain fidelity to the number of poles contributing to the diffracted signal. A new term, cos θB/cos θ, corrects this problem.« less

  18. Harrods commissions new CHP station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, P.

    1994-04-01

    Three new combined heat and power (CHP) sets have recently been commissioned at Harrods, the world-famous department store in the heart of London's fashionable Knightsbridge district. The sets provide all the electricity needed by the store for lighting, heating and air-conditioning and are powered by Ruston 6RK270 turbocharged, charge-air-cooled diesel engines each producing 1392 kW at 750 r/min. These high power-to-weight ratio units were chosen in view of severe engine room space limitations. Low-grade waste heat is extracted from the engine jacket water to preheat water for three new boilers supplying some 1600 kg/h of steam for process heat to the store. The engines drive Brush BJS HW 10 100/8 alternators and are fully automatic in operation through a Regulateurs Europa control system. Some 600 sensors feed data into a Satchwell Building Management System (BMS). In the event of a breakdown, the engine control system can be switched to manual. 5 figs.

  19. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy),more » T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.« less

  20. Conference report on the 3rd international symposium on lithium application for fusion devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Hirooka, Y.; Hu, J. S.; Mirnov, S. V.; Nygren, R.; Shimada, M.; Ono, M.; Tabares, F. L.

    2015-01-14

    The third International Symposium on Lithium Application for Fusion Device (ISLA-2013) was held on 9–11 October 2013 at ENEA Frascati Centre with growing participation and interest from the community working on more general aspect of liquid metal research for fusion energy development. ISLA-2013 has been confirmed to be the largest and the most important meeting dedicated to liquid metal application for the magnetic fusion research. Overall, 45 presentation plus 5 posters were given, representing 28 institutions from 11 countries. The latest experimental results from nine magnetic fusion devices were presented in 16 presentations from NSTX (PPPL, USA), FTU (ENEA, Italy), T-11M (Trinity, RF), T-10 (Kurchatov Institute, RF), TJ-II (CIEMAT, Spain), EAST(ASIPP, China), HT-7 (ASIPP, China), RFX (Padova, Italy), KTM (NNC RK, Kazakhstan). Sessions were devoted to the following: (I) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (facility overviews), (II) lithium in magnetic confinement experiments (topical issues), (III) special session on liquid lithium technology, (IV) lithium laboratory test stands, (V) Lithium theory/modelling/comments, (VI) innovative lithium applications and (VII) special Session on lithium-safety and lithium handling. There was a wide participation from the fusion technology communities, including IFMIF and TBM communities providing productive exchange with the physics oriented magnetic confinement liquid metal research groups. This international workshop will continue on a biennial basis (alternating with the Plasma–Surface Interactions (PSI) Conference) and the next workshop will be held at CIEMAT, Madrid, Spain, in 2015.

  1. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  2. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry andmore » wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.« less

  3. Application of EPA wetland research program approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolka, R., K.; Trettin, C., C.; Nelson, E., A.; Barton, C., D.; Fletcher, D., E.

    2002-01-01

    Kolka, R.K., C.C. Trettin, E.A. Nelson, C.D. Barton, and D.E. Fletcher. 2002. Application of the EPA Wetland Research Program Approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment. J. Env. Monitoring & Restoration 1(1):37-51. Forested wetland restoration assessment is difficult because of the timeframe necessary for the development of a forest ecosystem. The development of a forested wetland ecosystem includes the recovery of hydrology, soils, vegetation, and faunal communities. To assess forested wetland restoration projects, measures need to be developed that are sensitive to early changes in community development and are predictive of future conditions. In this study we apply the EPS's Wetland Research Program's (WRP) approach to assess the recovery of two thermally altered riparian wetland systems in South Carolina. In one of the altered wetland systems, approximately 75% of the wetland was planted with bottomland tree seedlings in an effort to hasten recovery. Individual studies addressing hydrology, soils, vegetation, and faunal communities indicate variable recovery responses.

  4. HGSYSTEMUF6. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, G; Chang, J.C.; Zhang, J.X.; Bloom, S.G.; Goode, W.D. Jr; Lombardi, D.A.; Yambert, M.W.

    1998-08-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry and wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.

  5. ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I , l ' I *; g j q / q / p - ; a _ . . . .o . P R E L IM I N A R Y S U R V E Y O F T H E F O R M E R G R A S S E L L I - R E S E A R C H L A B O R A T O R Y O F E .I. D U P O N T D E N E M O U R S A N D C O M P A N Y Cleveland, O h io W o rk p e r f o r m e d b y th e Health a n d S a fe ty R e s e a r c h Division O a k R i d g e N a tio n a l L a b o r a tory O a k R i d g e , T e n n e s s e e 3 7 8 3 0 M a r c h 1 9 8 0 O A K R I D G E N A T IO N A L L A B O R A T O R Y o p e r a te d b y U

  8. AGR-2 AND AGR-3/4 RELEASE-TO-BIRTH RATIO DATA ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Binh T; Einerson, Jeffrey J; Scates, Dawn M; Maki, John T; Petti, David A

    2014-09-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) low enriched fuel used in the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independently controlled and monitored capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. AGR configuration and irradiation conditions are based on prismatic HTGR technology distinguished primarily by the use of helium coolant, a low-power-density ceramic core capable of withstanding very high temperatures, and TRISO coated particle fuel. Thus, these tests provide valuable irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, and support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes. The release-rate-to-birth-rate ratio (R/B) for each of fission product isotopes (i.e., krypton and xenon) is calculated from release rates in the sweep gas flow measured by the germanium detectors used in the AGR Fission Product Monitoring (FPM) System installed downstream from each irradiated capsule. Birth rates are calculated based on the fission power in the experiment and fission product generation models. Thus, this R/B is a measure of the ability of fuel kernel, particle coating layers, and compact matrix to retain fission gas atoms preventing their release into the sweep gas flow, especially in the event of particle coating failures that occurred during AGR-2 and AGR-3/4 irradiations. The major factors that govern gaseous radioactive decay, diffusion, and release processes are found to be material diffusion coefficient, temperature, and isotopic decay constant. For each of all AGR capsules, ABAQUS-based three

  9. miR-132 and miR-212 are increased in pancreatic cancer and target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jong-Kook; Henry, Jon C.; Jiang, Jinmai; Esau, Christine; Gusev, Yuriy; Lerner, Megan R.; Postier, Russell G.; Brackett, Daniel J.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The expression of miR-132 and miR-212 are significantly increased in pancreatic cancer. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 target the tumor suppressor pRb, resulting in enhanced proliferation. {yields} miR-132 and miR-212 expression is increased by a {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, suggesting a novel mechanism for pancreatic cancer progression. -- Abstract: Numerous microRNAs (miRNAs) are reported as differentially expressed in cancer, however the consequence of miRNA deregulation in cancer is unknown for many miRNAs. We report that two miRNAs located on chromosome 17p13, miR-132 and miR-212, are over-expressed in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues. Both miRNAs are predicted to target the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor, Rb1. Validation of this interaction was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay and western blot in a pancreatic cancer cell line transfected with pre-miR-212 and pre-miR-132 oligos. Cell proliferation was enhanced in Panc-1 cells transfected with pre-miR-132/-212 oligos. Conversely, antisense oligos to miR-132/-212 reduced cell proliferation and caused a G{sub 2}/M cell cycle arrest. The mRNA of a number of E2F transcriptional targets were increased in cells over expressing miR-132/-212. Exposing Panc-1 cells to the {beta}2 adrenergic receptor agonist, terbutaline, increased the miR-132 and miR-212 expression by 2- to 4-fold. We report that over-expression of miR-132 and miR-212 result in reduced pRb protein in pancreatic cancer cells and that the increase in cell proliferation from over-expression of these miRNAs is likely due to increased expression of several E2F target genes. The {beta}2 adrenergic pathway may play an important role in this novel mechanism.

  10. Quadruple-layered perovskite (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitada, A.; Tsujimoto, Y.; Yamamoto, T. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Narumi, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kindo, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Aczel, A.A.; Luke, G.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Uemura, Y.J. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kiuchi, Y.; Ueda, Y. [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Yoshimura, K. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ajiro, Y. [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Kageyama, H., E-mail: kage@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    We will present the synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of a new quadruple-layered perovskite (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13}. Through a topotactic ion-exchange reaction with CuCl{sub 2}, the precursor RbCa{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} presumably having an incoherent octahederal tliting changes into (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} with a 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2c{sub p} superstructure (tetragonal; a=7.73232(5) A, c=39.2156(4) A). The well-defined superstructure for the ion-exchanged product should be stabilized by the inserted CuCl{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedral layers that firmly connect with neighboring perovskite layers. Magnetic studies show the absence of long-range magnetic ordering down to 2 K despite strong in-plane interactions. Aleksandrov Prime s group theory and Rietveld refinement of synchrotron X-ray diffraction data suggest the structure to be of I4/mmm space group with in-phase tilting along the a and b axes, a two-tilt system (++0). - Graphical Abstract: We present a quadruple-layered copper oxyhalide (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} synthesized through a topotactic ion-exchange reaction of RbCa{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} with CuCl{sub 2}. The compound has a well-defined superstructure. Magnetic studies suggest the absence of magnetic order even at 2 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (CuCl)Ca{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} was prepared by ion-exchange reaction of RbCa{sub 2}NaNb{sub 4}O{sub 13} with CuCl{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound has a 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2a{sub p} Multiplication-Sign 2c{sub p} superstructure (tetragonal; a=7.73 A, c=39.21 A). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such a well-defined superstructure was not observed in the precursor compound. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aleksandrov Prime s theory and Rietveld study suggest a (++0) octahedral tilting (I4/mmm). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic studies revealed the absence of magnetic order down to 2 K.

  11. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; Onozaki, N.; Amou, Y.; Kittaka, S.; Kobayashi, Riki; Shimura, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Suzuki, K.; et al

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a newmore » mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.« less

  12. Bose-Einstein condensate in a light-induced vector gauge potential using 1064-nm optical-dipole-trap lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu Zhengkun; Wang Pengjun; Chai Shijie; Huang Lianghui; Zhang Jing

    2011-10-15

    Using two crossed 1064-nm optical-dipole-trap lasers to be the Raman beams, an effective vector gauge potential for Bose-Einstein condensed {sup 87}Rb in the F=2 hyperfine ground state is experimentally created. The moderate strength of the Raman coupling still can be achieved when the detuning from atomic resonance is larger than the excited-state fine structure, since rubidium has 15 nm energy-level spitting. The atoms at the far detuning of the Raman coupling are loaded adiabatically into the dressed states by ramping the homogeneous bias magnetic field with different paths and the dressed states with different energies are studied experimentally. The experimental scheme can be easily extended to produce the synthetic magnetic or electric field by means of a spatial or time dependence of the effective vector potential.

  13. Magnetic phase diagram of a spin-1 condensate in two dimensions with dipole interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjaell, Jonas A.; Essin, Andrew M.; Moore, Joel E.

    2009-12-01

    Several new features arise in the ground-state phase diagram of a spin-1 condensate trapped in an optical trap when the magnetic-dipole interaction between the atoms is taken into account along with confinement and spin precession. The boundaries between the regions of ferromagnetic and polar phases move as the dipole strength is varied and the ferromagnetic phases can be modulated. The magnetization of the ferromagnetic phase perpendicular to the field becomes modulated as a helix winding around the magnetic field direction with a wavelength inversely proportional to the dipole strength. This modulation should be observable for current experimental parameters in {sup 87}Rb. Hence the much-sought supersolid state with broken continuous translation invariance in one direction and broken global U(1) invariance, occurs generically as a metastable state in this system as a result of dipole interaction. The ferromagnetic state parallel to the applied magnetic field becomes striped in a finite system at strong dipolar coupling.

  14. Optimized Bose-Einstein-condensate production in a dipole trap based on a 1070-nm multifrequency laser: Influence of enhanced two-body loss on the evaporation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauber, T.; Kueber, J.; Wille, O.; Birkl, G.

    2011-10-15

    We present an optimized strategy for the production of tightly confined Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) of {sup 87}Rb in a crossed dipole trap with direct loading from a magneto-optical trap. The dipole trap is created with light of a multifrequency fiber laser with a center wavelength of 1070 nm. Evaporative cooling is performed by ramping down the laser power only. A comparison of the resulting atom number in an almost pure BEC to the initial atom number and the value for the gain in phase space density per atom lost confirm that this straightforward strategy is very efficient. We observe that the temporal characteristics of evaporation sequence are strongly influenced by power-dependent two-body losses resulting from enhanced optical pumping to the higher-energy hyperfine state. We characterize these losses and compare them to results obtained with a single-frequency laser at 1030 nm.

  15. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Peres, M. L. Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W.; Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U.; Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30?T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ?R/?B is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  16. Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bentley, Glenn E.; Barnes, John W.

    1981-01-01

    A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H.sub.2 O.sub.2, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

  17. STATE YJ#wIY STbNs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  18. FY 2008 Annual Performance Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  19. Systems and methods for treating material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheele, Randall D; McNamara, Bruce K

    2014-10-21

    Systems for treating material are provided that can include a vessel defining a volume, at least one conduit coupled to the vessel and in fluid communication with the vessel, material within the vessel, and NF.sub.3 material within the conduit. Methods for fluorinating material are provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to fluorinate at least a portion of the material. Methods for separating components of material are also provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to at least partially fluorinate a portion of the material, and separating at least one fluorinated component of the fluorinated portion from the material. The materials exposed to the NF.sub.3 material can include but are not limited to one or more of U, Ru, Rh, Mo, Tc, Np, Pu, Sb, Ag, Am, Sn, Zr, Cs, Th, and/or Rb.

  20. Ternary oxide nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S.; Park, Tae-Jin

    2009-09-08

    A single crystalline ternary nanostructure having the formula A.sub.xB.sub.yO.sub.z, wherein x ranges from 0.25 to 24, and y ranges from 1.5 to 40, and wherein A and B are independently selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Br, Ca, Cd, Ce, Cl, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, F, Fe, Ga, Gd, Ge, Hf, Ho, I, In, Ir, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, Os, P, Pb, Pd, Pr, Pt, Rb, Re, Rh, Ru, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Tc, Te, Ti, Tl, Tm, U, V, W, Y, Yb, and Zn, wherein the nanostructure is at least 95% free of defects and/or dislocations.

  1. A continuous cold atomic beam interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Hongbo; Feng, Yanying Yan, Xueshu; Jiang, Zhikun; Chen, Shu; Wang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Zhaoying

    2015-03-07

    We demonstrate an atom interferometer that uses a laser-cooled continuous beam of {sup 87}Rb atoms having velocities of 10–20 m/s. With spatially separated Raman beams to coherently manipulate the atomic wave packets, Mach–Zehnder interference fringes are observed at an interference distance of 2L = 19 mm. The apparatus operates within a small enclosed area of 0.07 mm{sup 2} at a bandwidth of 190 Hz with a deduced sensitivity of 7.8×10{sup −5} rad/s/√(Hz) for rotations. Using a low-velocity continuous atomic source in an atom interferometer enables high sampling rates and bandwidths without sacrificing sensitivity and compactness, which are important for applications in real dynamic environments.

  2. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  3. AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, Collin

    2014-07-01

    contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  4. Reducing collective quantum state rotation errors with reversible dephasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Kevin C.; Norcia, Matthew A.; Weiner, Joshua M.; Bohnet, Justin G.; Thompson, James K.

    2014-12-29

    We demonstrate that reversible dephasing via inhomogeneous broadening can greatly reduce collective quantum state rotation errors, and observe the suppression of rotation errors by more than 21?dB in the context of collective population measurements of the spin states of an ensemble of 2.110{sup 5} laser cooled and trapped {sup 87}Rb atoms. The large reduction in rotation noise enables direct resolution of spin state populations 13(1) dB below the fundamental quantum projection noise limit. Further, the spin state measurement projects the system into an entangled state with 9.5(5) dB of directly observed spectroscopic enhancement (squeezing) relative to the standard quantum limit, whereas no enhancement would have been obtained without the suppression of rotation errors.

  5. inner-sphere complexation of cations at the rutile-water interface: A concise surface structural interpretation with the CD and MUSIC model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, Mora K.; Hiemstra, T; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.; Machesky, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Acid base reactivity and ion-interaction between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions is most frequently investigated at the macroscopic scale as a function of pH. Experimental data are then rationalized by a variety of surface complexation models. These models are thermodynamically based which in principle does not require a molecular picture. The models are typically calibrated to relatively simple solid-electrolyte solution pairs and may provide poor descriptions of complex multicomponent mineral aqueous solutions, including those found in natural environments. Surface complexation models may be improved by incorporating molecular-scale surface structural information to constrain the modeling efforts. Here, we apply a concise, molecularly-constrained surface complexation model to a diverse suite of surface titration data for rutile and thereby begin to address the complexity of multi-component systems. Primary surface charging curves in NaCl, KCl, and RbCl electrolyte media were fit simultaneously using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model [Hiemstra T. and Van Riemsdijk W. H. (1996) A surface structural approach to ion adsorption: the charge distribution (CD) model. J. Colloid Interf. Sci. 179, 488 508], coupled with a Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer. In addition, data for the specific interaction of Ca2+ and Sr2+ with rutile, in NaCl and RbCl media, were modeled. In recent developments, spectroscopy, quantum calculations, and molecular simulations have shown that electrolyte and divalent cations are principally adsorbed in various inner-sphere configurations on the rutile 110 surface [Zhang Z., Fenter P., Cheng L., Sturchio N. C., Bedzyk M. J., Pr edota M., Bandura A., Kubicki J., Lvov S. N., Cummings P. T., Chialvo A. A., Ridley M. K., Be ne zeth P., Anovitz L., Palmer D. A., Machesky M. L. and Wesolowski D. J. (2004) Ion adsorption at the rutile water interface: linking molecular and macroscopic

  6. Nuclear shape transitions in neutron-rich medium-mass nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarriguren, P.; Rodriguez-Guzman, R.; Robledo, L. M.

    2012-10-20

    We study the isotopic evolution of the ground-state nuclear shapes in neutron-rich Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo isotopic chains. Both even-even and odd-A nuclei are included in the analysis. For the latter we also study the systematics of their one-quasiparticle low-lying configurations. The theoretical approach is based on a selfconsistent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism with finite range Gogny energy density functionals. Neutron separation energies, charge radii, and the spin-parity of the ground states are calculated and compared with available data. Shape-transition signatures are identified around N= 60 isotones as discontinuities in both charge radii isotopic shifts and spin-parities of the ground states. The nuclear deformation including triaxiality is shown to play a relevant role in the understanding of the bulk and spectroscopic features of the ground and low-lying one-quasiparticle states.

  7. Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations on multi-valence-electron systems: Benchmarks on Ga-like ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Feng; Yang Jiamin; Wang Chuanke; Jing Longfei; Chen Shubo; Jiang Gang; Liu Hao; Hao Lianghuan

    2011-10-15

    High-accuracy calculations of term energies and wavelengths of resonance lines in Ga-like ions have been performed as benchmarks in the request for accurate treatments of relativity, electron correction, and QED effects in multi-valence-electron systems. The calculated energy levels are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and the experimentally compiled energy values of the National Institute for Standards and Technology wherever available. The calculated values including core-valence correction are found to be in good agreement with other theoretical and experimental values for low- to medium-Z ions. On the basis of our calculations, some theoretical wavelengths for Ga-like Rb vii to Mo xii are also given. For higher-Z ions, computed wavelengths are compared well with the experimental results [E. Traebert, J. Clementson, P. Beiersdorfer, J. A. Santana, and Y. Ishikawa, Phys. Rev. A 82, 062519 (2010), I. N Draganicet al., J. Phys. B 44, 025001 (2011)].

  8. Localized collapse and revival of coherence in an ultracold Bose gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuirk, J. M.; Zajiczek, L. F. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    We study the collapse and revival of coherence induced by dipolar spin waves in a trapped gas of {sup 87}Rb atoms. In particular, we observe spatially localized collapse and revival of Ramsey fringe contrast and show how the pattern of coherence depends on the strength of the spin-wave excitation. We find that the spatial character of the coherence dynamics is incompatible with a simple model based only on position-space overlap of wave functions. We show that this phenomenon requires a full phase-space description of the atomic spin using a quantum Boltzmann transport equation, which highlights spin-wave-induced coherent spin currents and the ensuing dynamics they drive.

  9. Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bentley, G.E.; Barnes, J.W.

    1979-10-17

    A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

  10. β -Decay Half-Lives of 110 Neutron-Rich Nuclei across the N=82 Shell Gap: Implications for the Mechanism and Universality of the Astrophysical r Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorusso, G.; Nishimura, S.; Xu, Z. Y.; Jungclaus, A.; Shimizu, Y.; Simpson, G. S.; Söderström, P. -A.; Watanabe, H.; Browne, F.; Doornenbal, P.; Gey, G.; Jung, H. S.; Meyer, B.; Sumikama, T.; Taprogge, J.; Vajta, Zs.; Wu, J.; Baba, H.; Benzoni, G.; Chae, K. Y.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Fukuda, N.; Gernhäuser, R.; Inabe, N.; Isobe, T.; Kajino, T.; Kameda, D.; Kim, G. D.; Kim, Y. -K.; Kojouharov, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Kubo, T.; Kurz, N.; Kwon, Y. K.; Lane, G. J.; Li, Z.; Montaner-Pizá, A.; Moschner, K.; Naqvi, F.; Niikura, M.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Orlandi, R.; Patel, Z.; Podolyák, Zs.; Sakurai, H.; Schaffner, H.; Schury, P.; Shibagaki, S.; Steiger, K.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Wendt, A.; Yagi, A.; Yoshinaga, K.

    2015-05-01

    The β -decay half-lives of 110 neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from Rb 37 to Sn 50 were measured at the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory. The 40 new half-lives follow robust systematics and highlight the persistence of shell effects. The new data have direct implications for r -process calculations and reinforce the notion that the second (A≈130 ) and the rare-earth-element (A≈160 ) abundance peaks may result from the freeze-out of an (n,γ)⇌(γ,n) equilibrium. In such an equilibrium, the new half-lives are important factors determining the abundance of rare-earth elements, and allow for a more reliable discussion of the r process universality. It is anticipated that universality may not extend to the elements Sn, Sb, I, and Cs, making the detection of these elements in metal-poor stars of the utmost importance to determine the exact conditions of individual r -process events.

  11. Ternary alkali-metal and transition metal or metalloid acetylides as alkali-metal intercalation electrodes for batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nemeth, Karoly; Srajer, George; Harkay, Katherine C; Terdik, Joseph Z

    2015-02-10

    Novel intercalation electrode materials including ternary acetylides of chemical formula: A.sub.nMC.sub.2 where A is alkali or alkaline-earth element; M is transition metal or metalloid element; C.sub.2 is reference to the acetylide ion; n is an integer that is 0, 1, 2, 3 or 4 when A is alkali element and 0, 1, or 2 when A is alkaline-earth element. The alkali elements are Lithium (Li), Sodium (Na), Potassium (K), Rubidium (Rb), Cesium (Cs) and Francium (Fr). The alkaline-earth elements are Berilium (Be), Magnesium (Mg), Calcium (Ca), Strontium (Sr), Barium (Ba), and Radium (Ra). M is a transition metal that is any element in groups 3 through 12 inclusive on the Periodic Table of Elements (elements 21 (Sc) to element 30 (Zn)). In another exemplary embodiment, M is a metalloid element.

  12. Millimeter wave detection via Autler-Townes splitting in rubidium Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Joshua A. Holloway, Christopher L.; Schwarzkopf, Andrew; Anderson, Dave A.; Miller, Stephanie; Thaicharoen, Nithiwadee; Raithel, Georg

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate the detection of millimeter waves via Autler-Townes splitting in {sup 85}Rb Rydberg atoms. This method may provide an independent, atom-based, SI-traceable method for measuring mm-wave electric fields, which addresses a gap in current calibration techniques in the mm-wave regime. The electric-field amplitude within a rubidium vapor cell in the WR-10 wave guide band is measured for frequencies of 93.71 GHz and 104.77?GHz. Relevant aspects of Autler-Townes splitting originating from a four-level electromagnetically induced transparency scheme are discussed. We measured the E-field generated by an open-ended waveguide using this technique. Experimental results are compared to a full-wave finite element simulation.

  13. AGR-2 irradiation test final as-run report, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise

    2014-08-01

    contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  14. Influence of mobile ion concentrations on the chemical composition of geothermal waters in granitic areas; Example of hot springs form Piemonte Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michard, G.; Grimaud, D. ); D'Amore, F.; Fancelli, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The six hot springs from Vinadio and the springs from Valdieri (Piemonte, Italy) have similar emergence temperatures ({approximately}50{degrees} C), similar deep temperatures ({approximately}115{degrees} C) and their chloride content varies from 0.9 to 30 mmol/kg. Major elements and some trace elements concentrations (Li, Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba, Mn) correlate closely with Na concentrations. The correlations in a log-log diagram are linear with a slope close to the electric charge of the ion. This is explained, for major elements, by an equilibrium between a complete assemblage of minerals and a water containing varying amounts of chloride. It is suggested, from the Cl/Br ratio, that chloride originates by halite dissolution during the descent of the water.

  15. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  16. Recharge Data for Hawaii Island

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Recharge data for Hawaii Island in shapefile format. The data are from the following sources: Whittier, R.B and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human Health and Environmental Risk Ranking of On-Site Sewage Disposal systems for the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final, Prepared for Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics. Oki, D. S. 1999. Geohydrology and Numerical Simulation of the Ground-Water Flow System of Kona, Island of Hawaii. U.S. Water-Resources Investigation Report: 99-4073. Oki, D. S. 2002. Reassessment of Ground-water Recharge and Simulated Ground-Water Availability for the Hawi Area of North Kohala, Hawaii. U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigation report 02-4006.

  17. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  18. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  19. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  20. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  1. Reactive Collisions in Crossed Molecular Beams

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Herschbach, D. R.

    1962-02-01

    The distribution of velocity vectors of reaction products is discussed with emphasis on the restrictions imposed by the conservation laws. The recoil velocity that carries the products away from the center of mass shows how the energy of reaction is divided between internal excitation and translation. Similarly, the angular distributions, as viewed from the center of mass, reflect the partitioning of the total angular momentum between angular momenta of individual molecules and orbital angular momentum associated with their relative motion. Crossed-beam studies of several reactions of the type M + RI yields R + MI are described, where M = K, Rb, Cs, and R = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 3}H{sub 5}, etc. The results show that most of the energy of reaction goes into internal excitation of the products and that the angular distribution is quite anisotropic, with most of the MI recoiling backward (and R forward) with respect to the incoming K beam. (auth)

  2. Remote NMR/MRI detection of laser polarized gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander; Saxena, Sunil; Moule, Adam; Spence, Megan; Seeley, Juliette A.; Pierce, Kimberly L.; Han, Song-I; Granwehr, Josef

    2006-06-13

    An apparatus and method for remote NMR/MRI spectroscopy having an encoding coil with a sample chamber, a supply of signal carriers, preferably hyperpolarized xenon and a detector allowing the spatial and temporal separation of signal preparation and signal detection steps. This separation allows the physical conditions and methods of the encoding and detection steps to be optimized independently. The encoding of the carrier molecules may take place in a high or a low magnetic field and conventional NMR pulse sequences can be split between encoding and detection steps. In one embodiment, the detector is a high magnetic field NMR apparatus. In another embodiment, the detector is a superconducting quantum interference device. A further embodiment uses optical detection of Rb--Xe spin exchange. Another embodiment uses an optical magnetometer using non-linear Faraday rotation. Concentration of the signal carriers in the detector can greatly improve the signal to noise ratio.

  3. Enhancement of ultracold molecule formation by local control in the nanosecond regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carini, J. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.; Gould, P. L.

    2015-02-01

    We describe quantum simulations of ultracold 87Rb2 molecule formation using photoassociation (PA) with nanosecond-time-scale pulses of frequency chirped light. In particular, we compare the case of a linear chirp to one where the frequency evolution is optimized by local control (LC) of the phase, and find that LC can provide a significant enhancement. The resulting optimal frequency evolution corresponds to a rapid jump from the PA absorption resonance to a downward transition to a bound level of the lowest triplet state. We also consider the case of two frequencies and investigate interference effects. The assumed chirp parameters should be achievable with nanosecond pulse shaping techniques and are predicted to provide a significant enhancement over recent experiments with linear chirps.

  4. Enhancement of ultracold molecule formation by local control in the nanosecond regime

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carini, J. L.; Kallush, S.; Kosloff, R.; Gould, P. L.

    2015-02-01

    We describe quantum simulations of ultracold 87Rb2 molecule formation using photoassociation (PA) with nanosecond-time-scale pulses of frequency chirped light. In particular, we compare the case of a linear chirp to one where the frequency evolution is optimized by local control (LC) of the phase, and find that LC can provide a significant enhancement. The resulting optimal frequency evolution corresponds to a rapid jump from the PA absorption resonance to a downward transition to a bound level of the lowest triplet state. We also consider the case of two frequencies and investigate interference effects. The assumed chirp parameters should be achievablemore » with nanosecond pulse shaping techniques and are predicted to provide a significant enhancement over recent experiments with linear chirps.« less

  5. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  6. Energy Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    This eighth annual report of the Division covers work done during FY 1981 (October 1, 1980, through September 30, 1981). As with these documents in the past, the format follows approximately the organizational structure of the Energy Division. Chapters 2 through 6 summarize the activities of the sections of the Division: Environmental Impact Section, headed by H.E. Zittel; Regional and Urban Studies Section, R.M. Davis; Economic Analysis Section, R.B. Shelton; Data and Analysis Section, A.S. Loebl; and Efficiency and Renewables Research Section, J.W. Michel. In addition, work on a variety of projects which cut across section lines is reported in Chapter 7, Integrated Programs. These activities are under the supervision of T.J. Wilbanks, Associate Director for the Division. Separate abstracts are included for individual projects.

  7. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report Volume IV Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  8. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report Volume V Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  9. Evaluation of a commercially available passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with LiF:F-2 saturable absorber for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, Cantwell; Goueguel, Christian; Sanghapi, Herve; Jinesh, Jain; McIntyre, Dustin

    2015-12-11

    Interest in passively Q-switched microchip lasers as a means for miniaturization of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) apparatus has rapidly grown in the last years. To explore the possibility of using a comparatively UV–vis transparent absorber, we herein present the first report on the evaluation of a commercially available flash lamp-pumped passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with LiF: saturable absorber as an excitation source in LIBS. Quantitative measurements of barium, strontium, rubidium and lithium in granite, rhyolite, basalt and syenite whole-rock glass samples were performed. Using a gated intensified benchtop spectrometer, limits of detection of 0.97, 23, 37, and 144 ppm were obtained for Li, Sr, Rb, and Ba, respectively. Finally, we discuss the advantages of using such a laser unit for LIBS applications in terms of ablation efficiency, analytical performances, output energy, and standoff capabilities.

  10. Frequency mixing crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A.; Davis, Laura E.; Webb, Mark

    1992-01-01

    In a laser system for converting infrared laser light waves to visible light comprising a source of infrared laser light waves and means of harmoic generation associated therewith for production of light waves at integral multiples of the frequency of the original wave, the improvement of said means of harmonic generation comprising a crystal having the chemical formula X.sub.2 Y(NO.sub.3).sub.5 .multidot.2 nZ.sub.2 o wherein X is selected from the group consisting of Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, and Tl; Y is selected from the group consisting of Sc, Y, La, Ce, Nd, Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, Al, Ga, and In; Z is selected from the group consisting of H and D; and n ranges from 0 to 4.

  11. Repetition rate stabilization of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser via opto-mechanical control of the intracavity group velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xuling; He, Boqu; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Yang; Bai, Dongbi; Wang, Chao; Liu, Geping; Luo, Daping; Liu, Fengjiang; Li, Wenxue; Zeng, Heping; Yang, Kangwen; Hao, Qiang

    2015-01-19

    We present a method for stabilizing the repetition rate of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser by inserting an electronic polarization controller (EPC) in the fiber laser cavity. The device exhibited good integration, low cost, and convenient operation. Such a repetition rate stabilization may facilitate an all-fiber laser comb system with high integration. The repetition rate was phase-locked to a Rb reference more than 72 h with a low feedback voltage applied to one channel of the EPC. The repetition rate was 74.6 MHz. The standard deviation and the repetition rate linewidth were 1.4 and 1.7 mHz, respectively.

  12. Extended Coherence Time on the Clock Transition of Optically Trapped Rubidium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleine Buening, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E.; Klempt, C.; Arlt, J.; Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Rosenbusch, P.; Piechon, F.

    2011-06-17

    Optically trapped ensembles are of crucial importance for frequency measurements and quantum memories but generally suffer from strong dephasing due to inhomogeneous density and light shifts. We demonstrate a drastic increase of the coherence time to 21 s on the magnetic field insensitive clock transition of {sup 87}Rb by applying the recently discovered spin self-rephasing [C. Deutsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 020401 (2010)]. This result confirms the general nature of this new mechanism and thus shows its applicability in atom clocks and quantum memories. A systematic investigation of all relevant frequency shifts and noise contributions yields a stability of 2.4x10{sup -11{tau}-1/2}, where {tau} is the integration time in seconds. Based on a set of technical improvements, the presented frequency standard is predicted to rival the stability of microwave fountain clocks in a potentially much more compact setup.

  13. Neutron activation analysis of NBS oyster tissue (SRM 1566) and IAEA animal bone (H-5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Laul, J.C.

    1983-10-01

    Data have been presented for 35 elements determined by INAA for NBS oyster tissue (SRM 1566) and for 38 elements determined by INAA and RNAA for IAEA animal bone (H-5). The experimental data showed excellent agreement with published values wherever the comparison exists. Additional trace-element data in the ppb range have been presented for the elements Sc, Sb, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, W and Th in NBS oyster tissue. Also, additional trace-element data for IAEA animal bone (H-5) in the ppb range for the elements Al, Sc, Co, Rb, Cs, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Tm, Yb, lu, Hf, Ta and Th have been presented.

  14. Accurate potential energy, dipole moment curves, and lifetimes of vibrational states of heteronuclear alkali dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Dmitry A.; Varganov, Sergey A.; Derevianko, Andrei

    2014-05-14

    We calculate the potential energy curves, the permanent dipole moment curves, and the lifetimes of the ground and excited vibrational states of the heteronuclear alkali dimers XY (X, Y = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs) in the X{sup 1}?{sup +} electronic state using the coupled cluster with singles doubles and triples method. All-electron quadruple-? basis sets with additional core functions are used for Li and Na, and small-core relativistic effective core potentials with quadruple-? quality basis sets are used for K, Rb, and Cs. The inclusion of the coupled cluster non-perturbative triple excitations is shown to be crucial for obtaining the accurate potential energy curves. A large one-electron basis set with additional core functions is needed for the accurate prediction of permanent dipole moments. The dissociation energies are overestimated by only 14 cm{sup ?1} for LiNa and by no more than 114 cm{sup ?1} for the other molecules. The discrepancies between the experimental and calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies are less than 1.7 cm{sup ?1}, and the discrepancies for the anharmonic correction are less than 0.1 cm{sup ?1}. We show that correlation between atomic electronegativity differences and permanent dipole moment of heteronuclear alkali dimers is not perfect. To obtain the vibrational energies and wave functions the vibrational Schrdinger equation is solved with the B-spline basis set method. The transition dipole moments between all vibrational states, the Einstein coefficients, and the lifetimes of the vibrational states are calculated. We analyze the decay rates of the vibrational states in terms of spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission and absorption induced by black body radiation. In all studied heteronuclear alkali dimers the ground vibrational states have much longer lifetimes than any excited states.

  15. Nuclear Data Sheets for A=77

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh B.; Nica N.; Singh,B.; Nica,N.

    2012-05-01

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 77 (Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y) have been evaluated and presented together with adopted properties for levels and {gamma} rays. New high-spin data are available for {sup 77}Ga, {sup 77}Br and {sup 77}Kr. New precise single-particle transfer cross section data are available for {sup 77}Ge, {sup 77}As, {sup 77}Se and {sup 77}Br from eight different reactions (2009Ka06,2008Sc03); these data give information for occupancy of valence neutron orbitals in the ground states of target nuclides: {sup 76}Ge, {sup 76}Se and {sup 78}Se. No significant new data since the 1997 NDS for A = 77 (1997Fa12) have been reported for {sup 77}Rb and {sup 77}Sr. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 77}Ni, {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y. Level schemes from the radioactive decays of {sup 77}Ni to {sup 77}Cu and {sup 77}Y to {sup 77}Sr are unknown, while those for the decays of {sup 77}Cu to {sup 77}Zn and {sup 77}Ga to {sup 77}Ge are incomplete. Detailed gamma-ray data for {sup 77}Ge from thermal-neutron capture in {sup 76}Ge, together with extensive gamma-ray data from {sup 77}Ge decay to {sup 77}As have become available from 2012Me04. This work benefited from earlier evaluations (1997Fa12,1989Fa07,1980Si05,1973Ur02) of A = 77 nuclides, however, the data presented here supersede those in above evaluations.

  16. A behaviorally-explicit approach for delivering vaccine baits to mesopredators to control epizootics in fragmented landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beasley, James C.; Atwood, Todd C.; Byrne, Michael E.; Vercauteren, Kurt C.; Johnson, Shylo R.; Olin E. Rhodes, Jr.; Schnell, Matthias Johannes

    2015-01-14

    Despite the widespread use of aerial baiting to manage epizootics among free-ranging populations,particularly in rabies management, bait acceptance and seroconversion rates often are lower than required to eliminate spread of disease. Our objectives in this study, therefore, were to evaluate the performance of stratified bait distribution models derived from resource selection functions (RSF) on uptake of placebo rabies baits by raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), as well as the probability of bait uptake as a function of proximity to bait distribution areas in fragmented agricultural ecosystems. Among 478 raccoons and 108 opossums evaluated for presence of Rhodamine B (RB) across 8 sites, only 26% of raccoons and 20% of opossums exhibited marking consistent with bait consumption 14–24 days post-baiting. The effective area treated, based on 90% kernel density estimators of marked individuals, ranged from 99–240 ha larger than bait distribution zones, with RB marked individuals captured up to 753m beyond the bait zone. Despite incorporation of RSF data into bait distribution models, no differences in uptake rates were observed between treatment and control sites. These data likely reflect the underlying constraints imposed by the loss and fragmentation of habitat on animal movement in heterogeneous landscapes, forcing individuals to optimize movements at coarse (i.e., patch-level) rather than fine spatial scales in highly fragmented environments. Our data also confirm that the probability of bait acceptance decreases with increasing distance from bait zone interiors, even within the zone itself. Thus, although bait acceptance was confirmed beyond bait zone boundaries, the proportion of vaccinated individuals may comprise a small minority of the population at increasing distances from baiting interiors. These data suggest focal baiting creates a buffered area of treated individuals around bait zones or bait stations

  17. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Mineralization for High Organic and Nitrate Waste Streams for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Williams, M.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NOx in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 deg. C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 deg. C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {>=}1000 deg. C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NOx. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O. (authors)

  18. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING MINERALIZATION FOR HIGH ORGANIC AND NITRATE WASTE STREAMS FOR THE GLOBAL NUCLEAR ENERGY PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

    2008-01-11

    Waste streams that may be generated by the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Advanced Energy Initiative may contain significant quantities of organics (0-53 wt%) and/or nitrates (0-56 wt%). Decomposition of high nitrate streams requires reducing conditions, e.g. organic additives such as sugar or coal, to reduce the NO{sub x} in the off-gas to N{sub 2} to meet the Clean Air Act (CAA) standards during processing. Thus, organics will be present during waste form stabilization regardless of which GNEP processes are chosen, e.g. organics in the feed or organics for nitrate destruction. High organic containing wastes cannot be stabilized with the existing HLW Best Developed Available Technology (BDAT) which is HLW vitrification (HLVIT) unless the organics are removed by preprocessing. Alternative waste stabilization processes such as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) operate at moderate temperatures (650-750 C) compared to vitrification (1150-1300 C). FBSR converts organics to CAA compliant gases, creates no secondary liquid waste streams, and creates a stable mineral waste form that is as durable as glass. For application to the high Cs-137 and Sr-90 containing GNEP waste streams a single phase mineralized Cs-mica phase was made by co-reacting illite clay and GNEP simulated waste. The Cs-mica accommodates up to 30% wt% Cs{sub 2}O and all the GNEP waste species, Ba, Sr, Rb including the Cs-137 transmutation to Ba-137. For reference, the cesium mineral pollucite (CsAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}), currently being studied for GNEP applications, can only be fabricated at {ge} 1000 C. Pollucite mineralization creates secondary aqueous waste streams and NO{sub x}. Pollucite is not tolerant of high concentrations of Ba, Sr or Rb and forces the divalent species into different mineral host phases. The pollucite can accommodate up to 33% wt% Cs{sub 2}O.

  19. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, and 151B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Abbott; Binh T. Pham

    2012-06-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) cycles 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, and 151B), as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). The AGR-2 data streams addressed include thermocouple temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rate, pressure, and moisture content), and fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data for each of the six capsules in the experiment. A total of 3,307,500 5-minute thermocouple and sweep gas data records were received and processed by NDMAS for this period. There are no AGR-2 data for cycle 150A because the experiment was removed from the reactor. Of these data, 82.2% were determined to be Qualified based on NDMAS accuracy testing and data validity assessment. There were 450,557 Failed temperature records due to thermocouple failures, and 138,528 Failed gas flow records due to gas flow cross-talk and leakage problems that occurred in the capsules after cycle 150A. For FPMS data, NDMAS received and processed preliminary release rate and release-to-birth rate ratio (R/B) data for the first three reactor cycles (cycles 149B, 150B, and 151B). This data consists of 45,983 release rate records and 45,235 R/B records for the 12 radionuclides reported. The qualification status of these FPMS data has been set to In Process until receipt of QA-approved data generator reports. All of the above data have been processed and tested using a SAS-based enterprise application software system, stored in a secure Structured Query Language database, and made available on the NDMAS Web portal (http://ndmas.inl.gov) for both internal and external VHTR project participants.

  20. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Y.T.; Payne, S.A.; Hayden, J.S.; Campbell, J.H.; Aston, M.K.; Elder, M.L.

    1996-06-11

    In a high energy laser system utilizing phosphate laser glass components to amplify the laser beam, the laser system requires a generated laser beam having an emission bandwidth of less than 26 nm and the laser glass components consist essentially of (on an oxide composition basis) in mole percent: P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 50--75; Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {gt}0--10; K{sub 2}O, {gt}0--30; MgO, 0--30; CaO, 0--30; Li{sub 2}O, 0--20; Na{sub 2}O, 0--20; Rb{sub 2}O, 0--20; Cs{sub 2}O, 0--20; BeO, 0--20; SrO, 0--20; BaO, 0--20; ZnO, 0--20; PbO, 0--20; B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--10; La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--8; Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.01--8; wherein the sum of MgO and CaO is >0--30; the sum of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, Rb{sub 2}O, and Cs{sub 2}O is 0--20; the sum of BeO, SrO, BaO, ZnO, and PbO is 0--20; the sum of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} is 0--10; and Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} represents the sum of the oxides of active lasing lanthanides of atomic number 58--71. 21 figs.