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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

N /A

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action (one action alternative), and Alternative 3, which consisted of the No Build Action that is required by 10 CFR 1021.321(c). Based on the analysis in DOE/EA-1497, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting humans or the natural environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 42 USC 4321 et seq. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). To further minimize impacts to environmental media, the DOE will also implement a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for this action. The MAP is included as Appendix F of this EA, which is appended to this FONSI. The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, authorizes the creation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to store crude oil to reduce the United States' vulnerability to energy supply disruptions. Crude oil is stored in geologic formations, or salt domes, located under these facilities. The purpose of this proposed project is to construct a new RWIPL at the main site to replace the existing RWIPL which services this facility.

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

REDACTED - FINAL Environmental Assessment to Address Proposed Site Modifications at the Stragegic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intate Structure Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER This document has been approved for distribution to the public. All information classified by the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve as Sensitive Unclassified Information has been removed from this document. DOE/SPR/EA-1523 Environmental Assessment to Address Proposed Site Modifications at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure Site, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve 900 Commerce Road East New Orleans, Louisiana 70123 November 2005 i FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT PROPOSED SITE MODIFICATIONS AT THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE'S WEST HACKBERRY RAW WATER INTAKE STRUCTURE SITE, CALCASIEU PARISH, LOUISIANA AGENCY: Department of Energy

4

REDACTED - FINAL Environmental Assessment to Address Proposed Site Modifications at the Stragegic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intate Structure Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER This document has been approved for distribution to the public. All information classified by the Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve as Sensitive Unclassified Information has been removed from this document. DOE/SPR/EA-1523 Environmental Assessment to Address Proposed Site Modifications at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure Site, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve 900 Commerce Road East New Orleans, Louisiana 70123 November 2005 i FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT PROPOSED SITE MODIFICATIONS AT THE STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE'S WEST HACKBERRY RAW WATER INTAKE STRUCTURE SITE, CALCASIEU PARISH, LOUISIANA AGENCY: Department of Energy

5

DOE/EA-1497: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Intake Pipeline Replacement Project, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana (8/31/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT RAW WATER INTAKE PIPELINE REPLACEMENT STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE WEST HACKBERRY FACILITY AGENCY: Department of Energy (DOE) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: DOE has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1497, for the proposed replacement of the existing 107 centimeter (cm) [42 inch (in)] 6.87 kilometer (km) [4.27 mile (mi)] raw water intake pipeline (RWIPL). This action is necessary to allow for continued, optimum operations at the West Hackberry facility (main site/facility). The EA described the proposed action (including action alternatives) and three alternatives to the proposed action. The EA evaluated only the potential environmental consequences of

6

Best Management Practices Manual for Preventing Cooling Water Intake Blockages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blockage of the cooling water intake structure (CWIS) occurs frequently at nuclear and fossil power facilities worldwide, regardless of fuel type or cooling water body source. The loss of cooling water impacts facility safety and reliabilityprincipally at nuclear facilitiesand results in a loss of revenue. This Best Management Practices Manual for Preventing Cooling Water Intake Blockages presents a review of debris management at existing facilities and provides procedural and operation and maintenance (...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Impact of Drought on U.S. Steam Electric Power Plant Cooling Water Intakes and Related Water Resource Management Issues April 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1364 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

8

EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL ENDOTOXIN ON WATER INTAKE, FOOD INTAKE, AND BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE ALBINO RAT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1961, Dubos and Schaedler (1) reported a reduction in water intake in animals treated with bacterial endotoxin. Mice were raised in a pathogen-free environment and subsequently tested with one of several toxins. Alteration in daily water intake was found to occur at doses well below the LDs0. Because of the long-standing interest in this laboratory in drive states, their behavioral consequences, and physiological basis (2), this property of endotoxin was explored in the albino rat. Our animals were not raised in a pathogen-free environment. Using fairly large doses of toxin, we were able to confirm the findings of Dubos and Schaedler, and, in addition, demonstrate a profound toxin effect on food intake and body temperature. Using behavioral and physiological techniques, we made exploratory studies of resistance and sensitization to toxin and of its possible site of action. Materials and Methods Animals.--AU the animals were male Sprague-Dawley albino rats, 90 to 120 days old, weighing 300 gm or more. They were housed in individual wire cages in a temperature-controlled room, and were fed Purina lab chow and tap water. Water intakes were measured by making water bottles available for 30 minutes every day and weighing the bottles before and after consumption. After several "familiarization " days the rats would drink a fairly standard amount each day. Food intake was measured by weighing the food in the cages every 24 hours, the food being continuously available. Animals on food-intake measurement were given water ad lib and those on water-intake measurement were given food ad lib. Temperatures were taken with an ordinary rectal thermometer, lubricated and inserted almost its entire length. The animals showed no unusual distress and tolerated the procedure day after day. Thermometers were left in place 3 to 5 minutes and then read. Thermometem that dropped out were replaced for 3 additional minutes. A paper towel on the cage floor facilitated recovery of lost thermometers. Toxin.--A eommerdally prepared lipopolysaccharide extract of Eschericlda coli was used

E. Holmes; Neal; E. Miller, Ph.D.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE COOLING WATER INTAKE STRUCTURE, TANGUISSON POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report for the Environmental Effects of Cooling Water Intake Structures project (contract number/or chemicals) and as impingement (where the cooling water intake traps larger organisms against the intake and impingement of aquatic organisms in cooling water intakes.) For rules such as those outlined above

Schupp, Peter

10

Development and Design of a Cooling Water Intake Structure Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI contracted Alden Laboratories, Inc. to develop an entrainment and impingement database (EIDB) in response to information needs that were identified from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) proposed revisions to Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). The original objective for the use of the EIDB was to determine if various environmental and plant operational factors influence entrainment and impingement of fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). It was subsequently dete...

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Cooling Water Intake Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The types of cooling water systems to be evaluated are: Wet Cooling Tower - The condenser is cooled with water recirculated to a mechanical draft cooling tower. Because there...

12

Procedure for developing biological input for the design, location, or modification of water-intake structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To minimize adverse impact on aquatic ecosystems resulting from the operation of water intake structures, design engineers must have relevant information on the behavior, physiology and ecology of local fish and shellfish. Identification of stimulus/response relationships and the environmental factors that influence them is the first step in incorporating biological information in the design, location or modification of water intake structures. A procedure is presented in this document for providing biological input to engineers who are designing, locating or modifying a water intake structure. The authors discuss sources of stimuli at water intakes, historical approaches in assessing potential/actual impact and review biological information needed for intake design.

Neitzel, D.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced intake technology for cooling-water intakes: current status and future direction  

SciTech Connect

A synthesis of a meeting on research and developments related to cooling water intake structures and a critical analysis of the current status of the screening technology are presented. Among the conclusions and recommendations of this workshop were the following: there is a very definite shift towards fine mesh screening for the protection of larval forms; because of the biological variability and site related factors, a single screening technology cannot be expected to solve entrainment/impingement problems at all sites; variations are highly likely in the degree of success in safely screening organisms under laboratory conditions or in prototype and full scale testing, therefore tests conducted under field conditions should have more weight than lab tests in final decision making; selection of the intake design should be based on a comprehensive total system optimization including cost, plant reliability, importance of species to be screened, ecological impacts, demonstrated necessity for larval exclusion etc.; and tests should be standardized as much as possible in order to obtain comparable results at various sites. (LCL)

Sharma, R.K.; Fritz, E.S.; Murarka, I.P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Impacts of Volumetric Flow Rate of Water Intakes on Fish Populations and Communities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses issues related to causes and effects of fish impingement and entrainment at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). It analyzes the possible relationship between the volume of water withdrawn by a water intake and the status of fish populations and aquatic communities in the source water body.

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

Utility of Variable Speed Drives for Fish Protection at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the utility of a variable frequency drive (VFD) for reducing cooling water flow and potentially the extent of impingement and entrainment of fish and shellfish at power plant cooling water intakes. Reduction of impingement and entrainment at cooling water intakes is the objective of Clean Water Act 316(b) requirements that are being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

Laboratory Evaluation of the Beaudrey Water Intake Protection Screen for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intak e Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the final results of laboratory evaluations on the performance of a fine-mesh (2.0 mm) water intake protection (WIP) screen manufactured by Beaudrey to protect larval and early juvenile fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). This screening technology relies on the use of a vacuum system to collect organisms from the surface of the screen and transport them to a fish return system. This is the first study to investigate the survival of larval and early juvenile fish that hav...

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

17

Beaudrey Water Intake Protection (WIP) Screen Pilot-Scale Impingement Survival Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Beaudrey Water Intake Protection (WIP) Screen Pilot-scale Impingement Survival Study is a fish protection technology evaluation project designed to support Omaha Public Power District's (OPPD) Clean Water Act 316(b) permitting needs. The report gives the results of a one-year study that consisted of impingement monitoring and impingement survival monitoring conducted on fish removed by the Beaudrey WIP screen. The studies were conducted during 2008 at Intake No. 3 of OPPD's North Omaha Station (NOS) ...

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

18

Relationships between circadian rhythms and ethanol intake in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intake/(ethanol + water intake)). This exposure lasted 5intake/(ethanol + water intake). Statistical Analysesand water bottles were weighed to determine g/kg intake as

Trujillo, Jennifer L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assessment of Ice Plugging of the Cooling Water Intake at American Electric Power's Conesville Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Electrical Power (AEP) Conesville power plant is shutting down the last unit that uses a once-through cooling system. Currently, warm water from the existing cooling system is routed to the intake area to control ice buildup. After the last unit is shut down, there will be no control of the ice buildup in the trash racks, making complete blockage of the intake facility a possibility. A sediment-control structure was built in 2000 to prevent sediment buildup at the intake facility. The sedime...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

NMAC Circulating and Service Water Intake Screens and Debris Removal Equipment Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plants use many different types of equipment to remove trash, debris, and aquatic material at the intake structures for circulating and service water systems. Commonly used equipment includes rotating and stationary screens, trash racks, debris filters, service water strainers, and debris disposal systems.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Field Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Strobe Lights for Preventing Impingement of Fish at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of a cooling water intake structure reflect the "best technology available" for minimizing adverse environmental impacts, such as impingement of fish on intake screens. In the Southeast U.S., over 90% of fish impinged on cooling-water intake screens of thermal power stations are threadfin shad (Dorosoma petenense) or gizzard shad (D. cepedianum). Much of this impingement occurs in winter coincident with c...

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing Env ironmental Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes environmental enhancement or restoration approaches that may be applicable for mitigating impingement and entrainment impacts associated with cooling water intake structures (CWISs).

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of Strobe Lights for Reducing Fish Impingement at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of a two-year effort that examined the effectiveness for reducing impingement of freshwater fish at cooling water intake structures at two of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) power plants. This research project also was supported by a Water Quality Cooperative Grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Research results advance our understanding on the utility of strobe lights as a fish protection technology for meeting Clean Water Act 316(b) requirements.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

Original article Microinjection of NMDA Receptor Agents into the Central Nucleus of the Amygdale Alters Water Intake in Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective(s) The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a forebrain structure which is important in regulation of ingestive behavior and there is direct and circumstantial evidence to indicate that some circuits involved with feeding behavior include glutamatergic elements. The present study examined whether administration of NMA (N-Methyl-DL-aspartic acid) or MK801 into the CeA altered water intake under deprivation. Materials and Methods Animals were deprived for 24 hr before tested for water intake. NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamatergic receptor agonist, NMA and its antagonist, MK801 were infused bilaterally, and water intake measured for 1 hr thereafter. Results The intra-CeA injection of NMDA glutamatergic agonist, NMA (0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 µg/rat) increased water intake (Pwater intake significantly (Pwater intake in this nucleus.

Jalal Solati; Ramin Hajikhani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Performance Evaluation of Behavioral Deterrents for Reducing Impingement at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an examination into the effectiveness of behavioral fish deterrents (light and sound) for reducing impingement of freshwater fish at a cooling water intake structure (CWIS) located at an Alabama Power Company (APC) power plant. This research project also was supported and performed by APC. Research results advance our understanding of the effectiveness of strobe lights and sound as a fish protection technology for meeting Clean Water Act §316(b) requirements.

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

Ohio River Ecological Research Program: Economic Valuation of Impingement Losses at Cooling Water Intakes on the Ohio River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides estimates of the economic value of fish impinged at 13 intake structures withdrawing cooling water from the Ohio River. The information is designed for permit applicants, environmental staff, and facility managers seeking to increase their understanding of the economic value of fish impinged at these intakes for comparison to the costs of installing intake alternatives that could reduce impingement mortality. This report is a companion to EPRI reports 1014337 and 1008473, which provi...

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Field Evaluation of Wedgewire Screens for Protecting Early Life Stages of Fish at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wedgewire screens are designed to minimize entrainment and impingement of aquatic organisms at power plant cooling water intake structures (CWIS). This report presents the results of a field study evaluating the effectiveness of cylindrical wedgewire screens for protecting the early life stages (eggs and larvae) of fish at cooling water intakes. The study examines multiple screen design parameters and hydraulic conditions in the Chesapeake Bay with a variety of estuarine species. Information in this repo...

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

Playful bottle: a mobile social persuasion system to motivate healthy water intake Ubicomp'09  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study of mobile persuasion system explores the use of a mobile phone, when attached to an everyday object used by an everyday behavior, becomes a tool to sense and influence that behavior. This mobile persuasion system, called Playful Bottle system, makes use of a mobile phone attached to an everyday drinking mug and motivates office workers to drink healthy quantities of water. A camera and accelerometer sensors in the phone are used to build a vision/motion-based water intake tracker to detect the amount and regularity of water consumed by the user. Additionally, the phone includes hydration games in which natural drinking actions are used as game input. Two hydration games are developed: a single-user TreeGame with automated computer reminders and a multi-user ForestGame with computer-mediated social reminders from members of the group playing the game. Results from 7-week user study with 16 test subjects suggest that both hydration games are effective for encouraging adequate and regular water intake by users. Additionally, results of this study suggest that adding social reminders to the hydration game is more effective than system reminders alone.

Meng-chieh Chiu; Shih-ping Chang; Yu-chen Chang; Hao-hua Chu; Cheryl Chia-hui Chen; Fei-hsiu Hsiao; Ju-chun Ko

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Impact of drought on U.S. steam electric power plant cooling water intakes and related water resource management issues.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements their overall research effort by evaluating water availability at power plants under drought conditions. While there are a number of competing demands on water uses, particularly during drought conditions, this report focuses solely on impacts to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet. Included are both fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants. One plant examined also uses biomass as a fuel. The purpose of this project is to estimate the impact on generation capacity of a drop in water level at U.S. steam electric power plants due to climatic or other conditions. While, as indicated above, the temperature of the water can impact decisions to halt or curtail power plant operations, this report specifically examines impacts as a result of a drop in water levels below power plant submerged cooling water intakes. Impacts due to the combined effects of excessive temperatures of the returned cooling water and elevated temperatures of receiving waters (due to high ambient temperatures associated with drought) may be examined in a subsequent study. For this study, the sources of cooling water used by the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet were examined. This effort entailed development of a database of power plants and cooling water intake locations and depths for those plants that use surface water as a source of cooling water. Development of the database and its general characteristics are described in Chapter 2 of this report. Examination of the database gives an indication of how low water levels can drop before cooling water intakes cease to function. Water level drops are evaluated against a number of different power plant characteristics, such as the nature of the water source (river vs. lake or reservoir) and type of plant (nuclear vs. fossil fuel). This is accomplished in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the nature of any compacts or agreements that give priority to users (i.e., which users must stop withdrawing water first) is examined. This is examined on a regional or watershed basis, specifically for western water rights, and also as a function of federal and state water management programs. Chapter 5 presents the findings and conclusions of this study. In addition to the above, a related intent of this study is to conduct preliminary modeling of how lowered surface water levels could affect generating capacity and other factors at different regional power plants. If utility managers are forced to take some units out of service or reduce plant outputs, the fuel mix at the remaining plants and the resulting carbon dioxide emissions may change. Electricity costs and other factors may also be impacted. Argonne has conducted some modeling based on the information presented in the database described in Chapter 2 of this report. A separate report of the modeling effort has been prepared (Poch et al. 2009). In addition to the U.S. steam electric power plant fleet, this modeling also includes an evaluation of power production of hydroelectric facilities. The focus of this modeling is on those power plants located in the western United States.

Kimmell, T. A.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

30

What is "Normative" at Cooling Water Intakes? Defining Normalcy Before Judging Adverse  

SciTech Connect

Judgments of adverse environmental impact from cooling water intake structures need to be preceded by an appreciation of what is normal. In its repo~ Return to the River, the Independent Scientd5c Group (now called the Independent Scientfilc Advisory Board) --the scientific peer review arm of the Northwest Power Planning Council-- advanced the notion of a "normative river ecosystem" as a new conceptual foundation for salrnonid recovery in the Columbia River basin. With this perspective, the sum of the best scientific understanding of how organisms and aquatic ecosystems function should be the norm or standard of measure for how we judge the effects of human activities on aquatic systems. ,For the best likelihood of recovery, key aspects of altered systems should be brought back toward nonnative (although not necessarily fully back to the historical or pristine state); new alterations should be judged for adversity by how much they move key attributes away from normative or what might be considered normal. In this presentation, I ask what "normative" is for the setting of cooling water intake structures and how this concept could help resolve long-standing disputes between groups interested in avoiding darnage to all organisms that might be entrained or impinged and those who take a more population or community perspective for judging adverse environmental impact. In essence, I suggest that if a water intake does not move the aquatic ecosystem outside the "normative" range, based on expressions of norrrdcy such as those discussed, then no adverse impact has occurred. Having an explicit baseline in normal or normative would place 316(b) analyses on the same conceptual foundation as 316(a) analyses, which strive to demonstrate the continuation of a balanced, indigenous community of aquatic organisms at the power station Iocation.

Coutant, C.C.

1998-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Environmental Assessment for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry Facility Raw Water Intake Pipeline Replacement Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed action and three alternatives, including a No Build alternative, were evaluated along the existing RWIPL alignment to accommodate the placement of the proposed RWIPL. Construction feasibility, reasonableness and potential environmental impacts were considered during the evaluation of the four actions (and action alternatives) for the proposed RWIPL activities. Reasonable actions were identified as those actions which were considered to be supported by common sense and sound technical principles. Feasible actions were those actions which were considered to be capable of being accomplished, practicable and non-excessive in terms of cost. The evaluation process considered the following design specifications, which were determined to be important to the feasibility of the overall project. The proposed RWIPL replacement project must therefore: (1) Comply with the existing design basis and criteria, (2) Maintain continuity of operation of the facility during construction, (3)Provide the required service life, (4) Be cost effective, (5)Improve the operation and maintenance of the pipeline, and (6) Maintain minimal environmental impact while meeting the performance requirements. Sizing of the pipe, piping construction materials, construction method (e.g., open-cut trench, directional drilling, etc.) and the acquisition of new Right-of-Way (ROW) were additionally evaluated in the preliminary alternative identification, selection and screening process.

N /A

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Energy penalty analysis of possible cooling water intake structurerequirements on existing coal-fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act requires that cooling water intake structures must reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. Many existing power plants in the United States utilize once-through cooling systems to condense steam. Once-through systems withdraw large volumes (often hundreds of millions of gallons per day) of water from surface water bodies. As the water is withdrawn, fish and other aquatic organisms can be trapped against the screens or other parts of the intake structure (impingement) or if small enough, can pass through the intake structure and be transported through the cooling system to the condenser (entrainment). Both of these processes can injure or kill the organisms. EPA adopted 316(b) regulations for new facilities (Phase I) on December 18, 2001. Under the final rule, most new facilities could be expected to install recirculating cooling systems, primarily wet cooling towers. The EPA Administrator signed proposed 316(b) regulations for existing facilities (Phase II) on February 28, 2002. The lead option in this proposal would allow most existing facilities to achieve compliance without requiring them to convert once-through cooling systems to recirculating systems. However, one of the alternate options being proposed would require recirculating cooling in selected plants. EPA is considering various options to determine best technology available. Among the options under consideration are wet-cooling towers and dry-cooling towers. Both types of towers are considered to be part of recirculating cooling systems, in which the cooling water is continuously recycled from the condenser, where it absorbs heat by cooling and condensing steam, to the tower, where it rejects heat to the atmosphere before returning to the condenser. Some water is lost to evaporation (wet tower only) and other water is removed from the recirculating system as a blow down stream to control the building up of suspended and dissolved solids. Makeup water is withdrawn, usually from surface water bodies, to replace the lost water. The volume of makeup water is many times smaller than the volume needed to operate a once-through system. Although neither the final new facility rule nor the proposed existing facility rule require dry cooling towers as the national best technology available, the environmental community and several States have supported the use of dry-cooling technology as the appropriate technology for addressing adverse environmental impacts. It is possible that the requirements included in the new facility rule and the ongoing push for dry cooling systems by some stakeholders may have a role in shaping the rule for existing facilities. The temperature of the cooling water entering the condenser affects the performance of the turbine--the cooler the temperature, the better the performance. This is because the cooling water temperature affects the level of vacuum at the discharge of the steam turbine. As cooling water temperatures decrease, a higher vacuum can be produced and additional energy can be extracted. On an annual average, once-through cooling water has a lower temperature than recirculated water from a cooling tower. By switching a once-through cooling system to a cooling tower, less energy can be generated by the power plant from the same amount of fuel. This reduction in energy output is known as the energy penalty. If a switch away from once-through cooling is broadly implemented through a final 316(b) rule or other regulatory initiatives, the energy penalty could result in adverse effects on energy supplies. Therefore, in accordance with the recommendations of the Report of the National Energy Policy Development Group (better known as the May 2001 National Energy Policy), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), has studied the energy penalty resulting from converting plants with once-through cooling to wet towers or indirect-dry towers. Five l

Veil, J. A.; Littleton, D. J.; Gross, R. W.; Smith, D. N.; Parsons, E.L., Jr.; Shelton, W. W.; Feeley, T. J.; McGurl, G. V.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

Central, peripheral, and contextual regulation of food intake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A, Grinker, JA. Food and water intake, meal patterns andreceptors in food and water intake. Neuropharmacology.hyperdipsic response (>10 ml water intake within 30 min) to

Parylak, Sarah Lynne; Parylak, Sarah Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Use of fish larva morphometry to predict exclusion capabilities of small-mesh screens at cooling-water intakes  

SciTech Connect

A relationship between total lengths and body depths of certain fish larvae was used to predict the effectiveness of small-mesh screens in limiting entrainment of fish larvae at cooling-water intakes. Total length-body depth regressions were linear for eight species (293 larvae) common to Lake Michigan near the J. H. Campbell Power Plant at Port Sheldon, Michigan. Regressions indicated that 35 to 100% (depending on species) of the fish larvae that had been entrained by the J. H. Campbell Plant in 1978 would have been excluded if 0.5-mm mesh screening had been employed in the plant's cooling water intake system instead of 9.5-mm bar mesh vertical traveling screens. These calculations do not take into consideration approach velocities of intake water, larva avoidance behavior, or mortality due to impingement on or extrusion through the screens.

Schneeberger, P.J.; Jude, D.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company  

SciTech Connect

Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing Env ironmental Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report describes environmental enhancement or restoration approaches that may be applicable for mitigating impingement and entrainment impacts associated with cooling water intake structures (CWISs). These approaches are described with respect to their underlying objectives, implementation and operational requirements, costs, current use by government and the private sector, and advantages and limitations for potentially mitigating CWIS operational impacts.

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Evaluation of two concepts for protection of fish larvae at cooling water intakes. Final report May 75-Mar 80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of a laboratory evaluation of 'impinge-release' and 'fish-avoidance' concepts for protecting fish larvae at cooling water intakes. Impinge-release requires a vertical-traveling screen that limits impingement time to several minutes, the maximum time depending on the species to be protected. A stationary slotted screen in flowing water was used to evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrapment. Both concepts showed high potential for protecting larvae as well as older life stages.

Tomljanovich, D.A.; Heuer, J.H.; Brellenthin, J.B.; Johnson, J.T.; Magliente, S.H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The effect of bacterial endotoxins on the water intake and body weight of mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the many effects of the injection of bacterial endotoxins into experimental animals is a profound, albeit transient loss of body weight. As previously reported, this weight loss occurs even with mice of the new NCS colony, although these animals are remarkably resistant to the lethal effects of endotoxins (1, 2). More recently we have observed that mice stop drinking for many hours after receiving endotoxins and this suggested that the weight loss caused by these materials might be due in part at least to the dehydration resulting from decreased water intake. Several related aspects of these phenomena are described in the present paper. Methods The origin of the cultures of Escherlchia coli 17, Klebsidla pncumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus (strain Giorgio), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (BCG-P) and their maintenance have been described in preceding publications (1-4). Endotoxins from cultures of Esch. coli 17 and Klebsidla paeumonlae were prepared in our laboratory by the techniques described earlier. Two other preparations of endotoxin were used. One is a commercial product prepared from

J. Dubos, Ph.D.; Alum Russell; W. Schaedler

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evaluation of Factors Affecting Juvenile and Larval Fish Survival in Fish Return Systems at Cooling Water Intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has funded laboratory studies on biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens for safely collecting larval and juvenile fish. However, little information exists on effects of fish return systems on larval or early juvenile survival. This report presents results of two years of laboratory evaluations on factors affecting larval fish survival in fish return systems at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). This project is generating additional data necessary to de...

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

40

Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Techniques to Define the Hydraulic Zone of Influence of Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past, the hydraulic zone of influence (HZI) of a cooling water intake structure (CWIS) has been inferred from the results of field sampling programs. Today, however, advanced hydraulic modeling techniques can be used to define the HZI of a CWIS using personal computers. This report provides information that can be used to quantitatively or qualitatively describe the "area of influence" or HZI of a power plant CWIS, as required under new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Water Act (C...

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Daily intake of antioxidants in relation to survival among adult patients diagnosed with malignant glioma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II patients, moderate intake of water-soluble folate wasfor tertiles of daily intake of water-soluble antioxidants4: Associations between intake of water-soluble antioxidants

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The effects of the HEALTHY study intervention on middle school student dietary intakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.0016). The reported water intake was approximately 2 fluids reported fruit and water intake. Subsequent interventionsbaked chips; and 5) water intake. The original questionnaire

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Technical Evaluation of the Utility of Intake Approach Velocity as an Indicator of Potential Adverse Environmental Impact under Clea n Water Act Section 316(b)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses issues related to causes of fish impingement at cooling water intake structures (CWISs), specifically the relationship of water velocity, site geometry, fish swimming ability, and environmental conditions. CWIS approach velocity is central to the ongoing U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) effort to regulate CWISs under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. Energy producers, federal and state resource agencies and regulators, and the public will find this report a valuable r...

2000-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Water Rx - The Problem of Pharmaceuticals in Our Nation's Waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN OUR NATION'S WATERS intake via drinking water wastherapeutic dose and intake via drinking water was 150,000

Leitman, Melanie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Does it Hold Water? Repudiating the "Singular Entity" or "Unitary Waters" Approach to the Clean Water Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstrates that the intake water is drawn from the samedemonstrates that the intake water is drawn from the samean industrial user "intake credits" for water withdrawn from

Sattizahn, Gregory L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

RAW MATERIALS EVALUATION AND PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES FOR CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO SUGARS AND ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WISCONSIN j Table 10 BASE UTILITY RATE POWER STEAM WATER **raw materials costs. utility rate and chemicals costs are

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

COOLING WATER INTAKES AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field Testing of Behavioral Barriers for Fish Exclusion at Cooling-Water Intake Systems, Ontario Hydro Pickering Nuclear Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on site-specific considerations, behavioral barriers such as sound and lights may be more effective, less expensive, and more environmentally suitable for excluding fish from power plant intakes than physical barriers. Specifically, field tests at Ontario Hydro's Pickering station on Lake Ontario indicated that behavioral barriers excluded alewife, an important prey species in the Great Lakes.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Taps: The Dangers of Drinking Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of food groups and water intake to colon cancer risk. Cancerexamined both solid food intake and water consumption. Women

Burgess, Michael

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Drinking Water Security and Safety Amendments of 2002: Is America's Drinking Water Infrastructure Safer Four Years Later?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumping station, or water intake could deprive large areasthe pre-treatment and water intake part of the system; and 'around intakes; intruder resis- tant fences enclosing water

Shermer, Steven D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Water Retrieval by Norway Rats: Behavior as Deduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by five rest. Average water intake for the days fiveon score sheets. Average water intake per day for five days

Wallace, R J

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Molecular Basis for Water Taste in Drosophila  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the regulation of water intake are essential for animalsimportance in regulating water intake. Although taste cells

Cameron, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Developing the Resource Potential of a Shallow Water Table  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

apply compara­ Also, soil water intake rates tend deliveryabove the water table at which plant intake and upward

Grimes, D. W; Henderson, D. W

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

ASSOCIATION AMONG FLUID, GRAIN INTAKE AND WEIGHT GAIN IN HOLSTEIN BULL CALVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine water intake. Forty-four Holstein bull calves were evaluated to investigate the effects of starter intake, body weight, temperature and time to predict water intake. A model was developed using PROC GLM in SAS. Least square means separation were used to identify significant effects. Starter intake was a significant variable (P water intake of a calf, especially after day 21 when starter intake and water intake were both increasing. Water intake was increased by calves with fecal scores of 1 and 2. However, water intake was significantly different for calves with fecal scores of 3 or 4 with a (P water intake. The interaction between scours and fecal score were not significant. Water intakes significantly differ in calves that had scour and in calves not experimented scours.

Gonzalez Ferreira, Marcelo A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1975 - 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtakes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and daily drinking-water intake, calculated using NRC (2001)they represent total water intake. Feeding certain mineralsand daily drinking water intake, which was calcu- lated

Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators. The plant's water intake structure, which isoff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory, andat the aquarium's water system intake located in a deep

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtemperatures and water samples at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Thermographthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

From Tissues to Landscapes: How Thermal Physiology, Water Use, and Climate Influence Patterns of Landscape Use in Elephants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lowest value (resting), but water intake is limited to thatbehavioral option (Table 3). Water intake via food and drinkliterature (Appendix II). Water intake via food was coupled

Dunkin, Robin Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low Molecular Weight Organic Contaminants in Advanced Treatment: Occurrence, Treatment and Implications to Desalination and Water Reuse Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plant cooling water, intakes for desalination systemsimmediately after the intake water storage tank. Prior toconcentrations in pilot plant intake water potentially due

Agus, Eva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Bayesian inference algorithm on Raw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the performance of Raw, a parallel hardware platform developed at MIT, running a Bayesian inference algorithm. Motivation for examining this parallel system is a growing interest in creating a self-learning ...

Luong, Alda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Current and Long-Term Effects of Delta Water Quality on Drinking Water Treatment Costs from Disinfection Byproduct Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current Delta water Plant and Intake Location System Size (future water quality conditions at different Delta intakesusing the intake with the better water quality between Old

Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Haunschild, Kristine; Lund, Jay R.; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Raw fabric hardware implementation and characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Raw architecture is scalable, improving performance not by pushing the limits of clock frequency, but by spreading computation across numerous simple, replicated tiles. The first Raw processors fabricated have 16 RISC ...

Sun, Albert (Albert G.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Exploring Adaptations to Famine: Rats Selectively Bred for Differential Intake of Saccharin Differ on Deprivation-Induced Hyperactivity and Emotionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or daily chow or water intake. Tests in early generationsequal to normal daily water intake. ANOVAs on food intakeintake (ml) in a 24-hr two-bottle test, expressed relative to a pre-established daily water

Dess, Nancy K.; Arnal, Jill; Chapman, Clinton D.; Siebel, Sara; VanderWeele, Dennis A.; Green, Kenneth F.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Intake technologies: Research status: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes recent research activities related to fish protection at water intake structures, with particular emphasis on research reported on or conducted at pumped cooling-water intakes. Information gathered from 51 organizations (33 utilities, seven equipment manufacturers, six research organizations, two private engineering firms, one steel mill, and two government agencies) is provided along with specific summaries of EPRI-sponsored research on behavioral barriers at pumped and hydroelectric facilities. The level of research activity indicted by utilities at pumped intakes has decreased recently, although the interest in potential plant operational impact mitigative techniques remains high. Two studies sponsored by EPRI at pumped cooling-water intake structures evaluated the individual and combined deterrent capabilities of three devices: an air bubble curtain, pneumatic guns, and underwater strobe lights. A study conducted during 1985 and 1986 at Ontario Hydro's nearshore test facility, located in Lake Ontario off the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station intake, indicated that all three devices and combinations of devices elicited an avoidance response in alewife. The pneumatic gun exhibited the highest deterrent capability and the air bubble curtain the lowest. Studies conducted using the same deterrent devices at the intake of Central Hudson Gas and Electric Corporation's Roseton Generating Station on the Hudson River did not indicate an overall avoidance response; some species-specific responses to the devices were noted. 22 refs., 9 tabs.

McGroddy, P.M.; Matousek, J.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Intake research facilities manual. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to assemble descriptive information on testing facilities that could be used for future investigations of technologies designed to reduce losses of aquatic organisms at cooling water intakes. The manual is intended for use by utilities and their contractors to determine when existing test facilities can be utilized for future research. A list of 34 facilities was developed, and descriptive information on the environment, physical layout, and capabilities of each facility was collected for presentation on standardized sheets. Reference lists of the facilities, sorted into groups based on waterbody type, geographic location, intake type, available fish species, and intake technology, are presented to facilitate identification of groups of facilities with similar characteristics. The reference lists and descriptive information will allow efficient preliminary site evaluation by utilities interested in future intake technology research. 11 refs., 66 figs., 8 tabs.

McGroddy, P.M.; Pease, T.E.; Matousek, J.A.; Edson, R.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or place limits on water intake, but in China they areto impose limits on the intake of water and to slow water

Zusman, Eric

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Pre-Screen Loss and Fish Facility Efficiency for Delta Smelt at the South Delta's State Water Project, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

except toward the end of the water intake period when waterentrained into water diversion intakes or impinged on intakeintake technical analysis. Prepared for California Department of Water

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1984  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Trinidadthat monitors the cool- ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Surface Water Temperatures and Salinities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1974  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.for rocks near water laboratory intake Granite Canyon 55.0'W

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1991  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off tlw rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen- erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has a large-volume water intake from which the daily wateroff the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Off rocks near water Intake for laboratory Thermograph

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta: The Evolution and Implementation of Water Policy: An Historical Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the City of Antioch water intake, a. 100 mg/l, as measurechloride or better water at the city's intake as measured atquality of water is provided at the intakes to the Contra

Jackson, W. Turrentine; Paterson, Alan M

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1986  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1983  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. MonoStation Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Granitethat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the gen­ erators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Economic Potential for Agriculture Water-Saving Using Alternative Irrigation Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

four percent of aggregate water intake in the approximation,or reused) to total intake water. The DWR data give a quiteIntake of \\~ater by CalHorn:a (million acre ~lantlfacttlring feet) Firms Water

Vaux, Henry James Jr.; Marsh, Albert W

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory.Station Off rocks near water intake for laboratory Farallónthat monitors the cool­ ing intake water for the generators.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1993  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. T hthat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.of hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Technical Comments on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System — Proposed Regulations to Establish Requirements for Cooling Water Intake Structures at Existing Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) technical comments on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) June 11, 2012 Notice of Data Availability (NODA) Related to Impingement Mortality Control Requirements and its June 12, 2012 NODA Related to EPA’s Stated Preference Survey. These NODAs provide additional information to support EPA’s effort to develop a final Rule that implements the requirements of the Clean Water ...

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

Part II: Potential Usefullness of Antitranspirants for Increasing Water Use Efficiency in Plants: Applied Investigations with Antitranspirants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fruit (Figure 34). Water intake was not curtailed bya 50% retardation in water intake to the fruit, the actualsystems the greatest water intake was by fruit not treated

Davenport, David C; Martin, Paul E; Hagan, Robert M; Fisher, Mary Ann

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

next to the cistern, has a water-intake in the cistern thatpressure. For water quality a floating intake pump is to becolumn. A floating intake ensures that water with the best

Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

RawSolar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RawSolar RawSolar Jump to: navigation, search Name RawSolar Place Berkeley, California Sector Solar Product California-based startup aiming to commercialise concentrating solar thermal parabolic dish systems for process heat applications. Coordinates 38.748315°, -90.334929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.748315,"lon":-90.334929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

UV Treated Water Dangers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there are chances of developing cancer or such growth due to radiation on drinking water & it's continuous intake? What are other hazards that may cause problems for human...

92

DOE/EA-1602: Alternative Intake Project Transmission Line and Interconnection Final Environmental Assessment (November 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Intake Project Alternative Intake Project Transmission Line and Interconnection Final Environmental Assessment November 2008 DOE/EA-1602 DOE/EA-1602 Final Environmental Assessment for the Western Area Power Administration Alternative Intake Project Transmission Line and Interconnection As part of its comprehensive water quality strategy to protect and improve water quality for its customers, the Contra Costa Water District (CCWD) is implementing the Alternative Intake Project (AIP). The AIP will enable CCWD to relocate some of its existing diversions to Victoria Canal, a Delta location with higher-quality source water than is currently available at its Old River and Rock Slough intakes. The AIP project purpose is to protect and improve the quality of water delivered to CCWD's untreated-

93

Entrainment and impingement at cooling water intakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Literature on the effects of power plant entrainment on phytoplankton and zooplankton is reviewed. A variety of quantitative techniques for assessing population and ecosystem effects of impingement and entrainment on major fish and invertebrate species is discussed. (DAD)

Uziel, M.S.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

95

Equal Employment Opportunity Intake Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Read this form to learn about the EEO intake process. You can print out this form, fill it in, and email to civilrights@hq.doe.gov and make sure to call us (202) 586-8383 to confirm receipt. 

96

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is ?open. ? An open air intake water heater is assigned theof air intake, physical size and load profile of the waterwater heater does not consume a fossil fuel, the air-intake

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - A Novel Concept for Reducing Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Management A Novel Concept for Reducing Water Usage and Increasing Efficiency in Power Generation - University of Pittsburgh A unique gas turbine intake air cooling...

98

Design for the Environment Products (Raw Data) | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design for the Environment Products (Raw Data) Manufacturing DataTools ResearchTech Services Apps Challenges Blogs Let's Talk Manufacturing You are here Data.gov Communities...

99

Influence of Raw Materials on the Properties of Anodes & Their ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Then the course will outline different process steps and describe the influence of raw materials, such as petroleum coke, coal tar pitch, and anode butts on the ...

100

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No....  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

shall perform a structural assessment of concrete structures at the Big Hill Raw Water Intake Structure, the Big Hill Brine Disposal Pump Pad, and the Bryan Mound Raw...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

CX-000482: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Project Number MS-09-116 - Structural Assessment of Big Hill Raw Water Intake Structure, Big Hill Brine Disposal Pump Pad and Bryan Mound Raw Water Intake...

102

Algorithms for raw material dosage control for cement plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw material used for producing cement is obtained using several components which we must dosages so that the mixture should have a uniform chemical composition. This paper work proposes fuzzy algorithms for performing this process. Using them turns ... Keywords: algorithm, cement, control, dosage, fuzzy, raw material

Stela Rusu-Anghel; Ovidiu Tirian; Osaci Mihaela; Dinis Corina

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Intake Operation for Deep Cooling Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of a submerged intake, rather than a conventional surface intake, would improve the thermal performance of most cooling reservoirs in the United States. Projected operating cost savings at a typical plant would range from $1 million to $10 million because of decreased intake temperatures during the summer.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Cyclone Occurrence Mapping: Equal Area or Raw Frequencies?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological data extracted from maps and charts is frequently normalized for area because grid cell size changes with latitude. Raw and area-normalized cyclone frequency data were compared. Area normalization deforms mean frequency patterns. ...

Bruce P. Hayden

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Alcoholic fermentation of raw cassava starch by Rhizopus koji without cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using only wheat bran koji from the Rhizopus strain, raw cassava starch and cassava pellets converted reasonably well to alcohol (ethanol) without cooking at 35 degrees C and pH 4.5-5.0. When the initial broth contained 30 g raw cassava starch, 10 g Rhizopus species koji, and 100 mL tap water, 12.1 g of alcohol was recovered by final distillation from fermented broth. In this case, 12.1 g alcohol corresponds to an 85.5% conversion rate based on the theoretical value of the starch content. When the initial broth contained 40 g cassava starch, 14.1 g of alcohol was recovered, where 14.1 g corresponds to a 74.5% conversion rate. The alcoholic fermentation process described in the present work is considered more effective and reasonable than the process using raw starch without cooking reported until now, since the new process makes it unnecessary to add yeast cells and glucoamylase preparation. (Refs. 15).

Fuijo, Y.; Suyanadona, P.; Attasampunna, P.; Ueda, S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Alcoholic fermentation of raw cassava starch by Rhizopus koji without cooking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using only wheat bran koji from the Rhizopus strain, raw cassava starch and casava pellets converted reasonably well to alcohol (ethanol) without cooking at 35/sup 0/C and pH 4.5-5.0. When the initial broth contained 30 g raw cassava starch, 10 g Rhizopus sp. koji, and 100 mL tap water, 12.1 g of alcohol was recovered by final distillation from fermented broth. In this case, 12.1 g alcohol corresponds to an 85.5% conversion rate based on the theoretical value of the starch content. When the initial broth contained 40 g cassava starch, 14.1 g of alcohol was recovered, where 14.1 g corresponds to a 74.5% conversion rate. The alcoholic fermentation process described in the present work is considered more effective and reasonable than the process using raw starch without cooking reported until now, since the new process makes it unnecessary to add yeast cells and glucoamylase preparation.

Fujio, Y.; Suyanadona, P.; Attasampunna, P.; Ueda, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o f f the rocks near the water intake f o r the laboratory.a t monitors the cooling intake water f o r the generators.Thermograph record o f intake water a t P a c i f i c Gas

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Test of the Flow Velocity Enhancement System (FVES) for Deflecting Aquatic Vegetation from the Intake of Genoa Power Station #3, Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the results of an evaluation of the Flow Velocity Enhancement System (FVES), a new technology for generating motive water in the water column to deflect downstream drifting aquatic weeds from cooling water intakes. The research was conducted at Dairyland Power’s Genoa Generating Station on the upper Mississippi River in Wisconsin.BackgroundBlockage of cooling water intake structures (CWIS) by waterborne debris occurs frequently at ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

REQUIREMENTS FOR RAW MATERIALS IN AN EXPANDING NUCLEAR POWER ECONOMY  

SciTech Connect

The need for breeding does not appear to be highly cost for a moderately optimistic expanding nuclear power economy between 1960 and 2000. Since the expansion rate of the US nuclear economy is assumed to be high at least 2/3 of the U-235 recovered from natural uranium is used to supply reactor inventory. It is the remaining 1/3 of the available U-235 that can be saved by breeder breeders or a breeder and converter are the doubling time and a parameter expressing the total fissile inventory per magawatt of electricity. In fact, the need for new raw material in any given year is reduced more by specific power than by changing from a converter to a value of total inventory per magawatt of electricity and the content and value of plutonium or U-233 than on raw material cost. The use of 12% vs. 4% annual lease charge can change the inventory costs more significantly than either the Pu (or U-233)/U-235 value ratio or raw material cost. Net fuel burn costs vary more with the product of net conversion ratio and Pu (or U-233)/U-235 value ratio than with the cost of raw material. (auth)

Arnold, E.D.; Ullmann, J.W.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Environmental Lighting Has a Selective Influence on Ethanol Intake in Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rats. PHYSIOL BEHAV 66(2) 323–328, 1999.—The effect of lighting condition on levels of absolute ethanol intake were systematically examined in the present study. Wistar rats were exposed to one of three lighting conditions: constant light, constant dark, and a standard 12?12 light/dark cycle. The animals were acclimatized to lighting conditions for 2 weeks prior to ethanol (EtOH) acquisition with water and food available ad lib. EtOH was then presented in increasing concentrations from 2 % (v/v; 95 % with tap water) to 10 % on alternate days in free choice with water. Immediately following the acquisition phase, a maintenance period was initiated that began with everyday presentations of 10 % EtOH solution in free choice with water. After 10 days, lighting conditions for the constant light and dark groups were switched to normal lighting (12/12 light/ dark). EtOH and water intake were recorded for an additional 10 days. Rats exposed to constant light during EtOH acquisition and maintenance consumed less EtOH during the maintenance period than rats exposed to normal lighting conditions. When lighting conditions were switched to a normal cycle, water consumption increased significantly but EtOH intake did not change. Rats living in constant dark during EtOH acquisition and maintenance consumed less EtOH during the acquisition period when compared with rats living in normal lighting conditions. Unlike animals trained under constant lighting, switching to normal lighting conditions had no effect on EtOH or water intake. There were no differences in water consumption levels among the groups during acquisition and maintenance, suggesting a specificity of the effects of lighting condition on EtOH intake. The present study, therefore, has attempted to show that an environmental variable such as lighting may exert

F. L. W. Goodwin; S. Amir; Z. Amit

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Improved intake air filtration systems  

SciTech Connect

This report comprises the results of a project sponsored by the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association (Improved Intake Air Filtration Systems). The quality of the inlet air consumed by pipeline gas turbines plays a significant role in the performance, maintenance, and economy of turbine operations. The airborne contaminants may cause degradation of compressor blades and hot gas path components, primarily by erosion, corrosion, and fouling. Machines in the pipeline fleet have a typical average loss of 3.5% in output, chiefly caused by fouling of the gas turbine compressor. It also showed that: Air contamination could be significantly reduced by the use of more efficient air filtration systems, especially through the reduction of the quantity of smaller particles ingested.'' Filters which incorporated electrostatically charged fibers (achieved through the use of triboelectric [TE] effects) offered the most promising means for developing an improvement over paper media. The purpose of this program was to validate the use of new technology for self-cleaning air inlet filtration on gas turbine pumping applications. An approach utilizing triboelectrification of fabric filters was examined by testing to determine the penetration (efficiency), cleanability, pressure drop vs flow, and dust-holding capacity of seven pairs of filter cartridges: six fabric and one paper.

Lawson, C.C. (Lawson (Calvin C.), North Wildwood, NJ (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Guidelines for Makeup Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of boiler and heat recovery steam generator HRSG cycle makeup water is central to ensuring the necessary purity of boiler or HRSG water, feedwater, and steam. It plays an important role in ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil and combined cycle plants. This report presents up-to-date guidelines based on proven approaches for producing makeup water from various raw water supplies. Major losses of availability in fossil fuel plants are attributable to water and steam contam...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

The design and implementation of a 3D graphics pipeline for the raw reconfigurable architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the design and implementation of a 3D graphics pipeline, built on top of the "Raw" processor developed at MIT. The Raw processor consists of a tiled array of CPUs, caches, and routing processors connected ...

Taylor, Kenneth William, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A Raw processor interface to an 802.11b/g RF front end  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Raw microprocessor is a tiled architecture processor designed by the Computer Architecture Group at MIT. Raw was designed in part to be extremely good at performing streaming-type algorithms such as those found in ...

Walker, Benjamin Philip Eugene Zaks

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Characteristics of the RAW Filtered Leapfrog Time-stepping Scheme in the Ocean General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Robert-Asselin-Williams (RAW) filtered leapfrog scheme is implemented and tested in the Taiwan multi-scale community ocean model (TIMCOM). The characteristics of the RAW filter are carefully examined through two benchmark tests (the classical ...

Chih-Chieh Young; Yu-Chiao Liang; Yu-Heng Tseng; Chun-Hoe Chow

116

Sensitivity of Surface Analyses over the Western United States to RAWS Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal, state, and other wildland resource management agencies contribute to the collection of weather observations from over 1000 Remote Automated Weather Stations (RAWS) in the western United States. The impact of RAWS observations on surface ...

David T. Myrick; John D. Horel

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Abstract Effects of perivagal administration of capsaicin on post-surgical food intake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vagus nerve has been related to the short-term control of food intake. This involvement has previously been explored by examining the food intake of animals after recovery from a vagotomy or immediately after the intervention, among other methods. In the present work, a study was conducted on the impact of the perivagal application of capsaicin (a specific neurotoxic treatment that destroys most of the vagal afferent pathways) on the intake of water and solid (experiment 1) or liquid (experiment 2) food presented after the surgery The results of experiment 1 showed that lesioned animals consume significantly larger amounts of food and water compared with controls at 6, 12, and 24 h (but not at 48 or 72 h) after the surgical intervention. Likewise, experiment 2 revealed a greater intake of liquid food by capsaicin-treated animals at the first post-surgical sessions. These data are discussed in terms of the role played by vagal afferent fibers in the control of shortterm food intake.

Maria A. Zafra; Filomena Molina; Amadeo Puerto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

• Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Potential Impacts of OTEC Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under Development on Kauai, HI  

SciTech Connect

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a marine renewable energy technology with the potential to contribute significantly to the baseload power needs of tropical island communities and remote U.S. military installations. As with other renewable energy technologies, however, there are potential challenges to its commercialization: technological, financial, social, and environmental. Given the large volumes of seawater required to drive the electricity-producing cycle, there is potential for the intakes to negatively impact the marine resources of the source waterbody through the impingement and entrainment of marine organisms. The goal of this project was to identify feasible warm water intake designs for a land-based OTEC facility proposed for development in Port Allen, Kauai and to characterize the populations of ichthyoplankton near the proposed warm water intake location that could be at risk of entrainment. The specific objectives of this project were to: • Complete a site-specific assessment of available and feasible warm water intake technologies to determine the best intake designs for minimizing impacts to aquatic organisms at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. • Complete a field sampling program to collect biological data to characterize the baseline populations of ichthyoplankton near the sites being considered for the warm water intake at the proposed land-based OTEC site in Port Allen, Kauai. Various intake design options are presented with the focus on providing adequate environmental protection to the local ichthyoplankton population while providing an economically viable intake option to the OTEC developer. Further definition by NOAA and other environmental regulators is required to further refine the designs presented to meet all US regulations for future OTEC development.

Oney, Stephen K. [OTE Corporation; Hogan, Timothy [Alden Research Laboratory; Steinbeck, John [Tenera Environmental

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Purifying contaminated water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for removing biorefractory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, Christian G. (San Pablo, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Music meter and tempo tracking from raw polyphonic audio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a method for the extraction of music meter and tempo from raw polyphonic audio recordings, assuming that music meter remains constant throughout the recoding. Although this assumption can be restrictive for certain musical genres, it is acceptable for a large corpus of folklore eastern music styles, including Greek traditional dance music. Our approach is based on the selfsimilarity analysis of the audio recording and does not assume the presence of percussive instruments. Its novelty lies in the fact that music meter and tempo are jointly determined. The method has been applied to a variety of musical genres, in the context of Greek traditional music where music meter can be 2 3 4 5 7 9 12 4, 4, 4, 4, 8, 8, 8 and tempo ranges from 40bpm to 330bpm. Experiments have, so far, demonstrated the efficiency of our method (music meter and tempo were successfully extracted for over 95 % of the recordings).

Aggelos Pikrakis; Iasonas Antonopoulos; Sergios Theodoridis

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Factors Affecting Raw Material Inventory Management in the Northeastern United States Pulp and Paper Industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Raw material inventory management is an area of concern for many pulp and paper companies in the Northeastern United States, and procurement managers for pulp… (more)

Todd, Kevin Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

EA-1523: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Address Proposed Site Modifications at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure Site, Parish, Louisiana The U.S....

124

Microsoft Word - BM-MM-1026 NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tools, equipment, and supervision required to replace sparge piping at the BM Raw Water Intake Structure (RWIS). Tasks include replacement in kind of three piping spools....

125

Microsoft Word - BM-MM-821A.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

required to supplement the BM site firewater from an alternate source when the BM raw water intake is out of service for repair. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing...

126

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No....  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and services required to install erosion protection on the adjacent banks of the BH Raw Water Intake Structure. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR...

127

CX-009511: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Bryan Mound site firewater from an alternate source when the Bryan Mound raw water intake is out of service for repair. CX-009511.pdf More Documents & Publications...

128

Hydrochemical Method of Low-quality Raw Materials Processing to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This allows conducting the alumina production at low consumption of energy ... Century Greenfield & DCS systems & Waste Water Plant Zero Waste & LNG ...

129

Research on Requirement Forecasting of Raw Materials for Boiler Manufacturing Enterprise Based on Exponential Smoothing Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The best purchases of raw materials of manufacturing enterprises can be determined by accurate requirement forecasting to decide order quantities. According to the characteristics of the boiler manufacturers, the weighted coefficients and initial values ... Keywords: manufacturing enterprises, raw materials, requirement forecasting, exponential smoothing, weighting coefficients

Du Yanwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Pyrolysis of secondary raw material from used frying oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A totally green chemistry alternative that would lead both to energy production from renewable feedstocks and to solutions of parts of ecological problems related to waste disposals would be very attractive. Pyrolysis of used frying oils seems to be one option for this attractive alternative as we propose to demonstrate in this study. Since 2002, the whole production of waste edible oils (around 100 000 tons per year in France) must be collected and transformed into secondary raw material by specific companies. The general aim of the present work is to produce one of the following target sources of energy: (i) H2 for fuel cells, (ii) H2/CO in satisfactory ratios to produce biodiesel by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reaction, or (iii) hydrocarbon mixtures with high added value. Therefore, in this work, the conversion of a crude used frying oil, named VEGETAMIXOIL^(r); from Ecogras Company (France), was investigated (weight composition: C 73.6%; O 9.7%; H 12.2%). In support of our knowledge related to fatty acids and me...

Billaud, Francis; Coniglio, Lucie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Corrosion Studies Of Raw And Treated Biomass-Derived Pyrolysis Oils  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid pyrolysis of biomass generates a liquid with properties that are particularly attractive for production of hydrocarbons that could be substituted for liquid fuels derived from petroleum. However, the high oxygen content of the biomass derived liquids presents a number of problems because of the high water content and the considerable concentration of carboxylic acids. Measurements of total acid number (TAN) of pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) samples show that values in the 90-100 range are fairly common. This level of acidity has been shown to cause corrosion problems that have to be addressed in the selection of structural materials that are used in the production, subsequent processing, storage and transport of the pyrolysis oils. Chemical analyses have been performed and laboratory corrosion studies have been conducted in order to assess the aggressiveness of the raw pyrolysis oil from several sources as well as the corrosion caused by a bio-oil that has been treated to reduce the acid and oxygen content. Components of biomass pyrolyzers have also been fabricated from various candidate alloys, and these components have been exposed for extended periods during operation of the pyrolyzers. This paper will report on results of these analyses and corrosion studies.

Keiser, James R [ORNL; Howell, Michael [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Connatser, Raynella M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A two-stage intelligent optimization system for the raw slurry preparing process of alumina sintering production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The raw slurry preparing is a key process to guarantee product for alumina sintering production. To obtain the qualified raw slurry in the presence of uncertainty, a two-stage intelligent optimization system, which weakens uncertainty effects through ... Keywords: Alumina sintering production, Expert reasoning, Integrated modeling, Intelligent optimization, Raw slurry preparing, Uncertainty

Chunhua Yang; Weihua Gui; Lingshuang Kong; Yalin Wang

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the

134

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (1996...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1996 - 2001) This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the 

135

Operational simulation model of the raw material handling in an integrated steel making plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is focused on the design and implementation of an operational simulation model (OSM) of the handling of raw material in an integrated steel making plant, considering operations of receiving, unloading, stocking, handling and supplying the ...

Robson Jacinto Coelho; Paula Fernandes Lana; Adriano César Silva; Takeo Fugiwara Santos; ArcelorMittal Tubarão; Marcelo Moretti Fioroni; Luiz Augusto G. Franzese; Daniel de Oliveira Mota; Paragon Tecnologia; Luiz Bueno da Silva

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 13 Soap Making Raw Materials: Their Sources, Specifications, Markets, and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 13 Soap Making Raw Materials: Their Sources, Specifications, Markets, and Handling Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tCha

137

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of raw and beneficiated Eastern oil shales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) with US Department of Energy (DOE) support has developed a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for Eastern oil shales. Bench-scale tests have been conducted with raw and beneficiated shales in an advanced multipurpose research reactor (AMRR). Raw Alabama shale and raw and beneficiated Indiana shales were retorted at 515{degrees}C using hydrogen pressures of 4 and 7 MPa. Shale feed rates to the AMRR were 15 to 34 kg/h. High oils yields and carbon conversions were achieved in all tests. Oil yield from Alabama shale hydroretorted at 7 MPa was 200% of Fischer Assay. Raw and beneficiated Indiana shales hydroretorted at 7 MPa produced oil yields of 170% to 195% of Fischer Assay, respectively. Total carbon conversions were greater than 70% for all tests conducted at 7 MPa.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The RAW Filter: An Improvement to the Robert–Asselin Filter in Semi-Implicit Integrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Errors caused by discrete time stepping may be an important component of total model error in contemporary atmospheric and oceanic simulations. To reduce time-stepping errors in leapfrog integrations, the Robert–Asselin–Williams (RAW) filter was ...

Paul D. Williams

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article, from our Health & Nutrition News department, discusses EFSA’s establishment of an upper intake level for DHA and EPA and the agency’s work on health claims. EFSA sets upper intake level for LC-PUFA Inform Magazine Biofuels and Bioproducts a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Engine Air Intake Manifold Having Built In Intercooler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbocharged V type engine can be equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation cooler integrated into the intake manifold, so as to achieve efficiency, cost reductions and space economization improvements. The cooler can take the form of a tube-shell heat exchanger that utilizes a cylindrical chamber in the air intake manifold as the heat exchanger housing. The intake manifold depends into the central space formed by the two banks of cylinders on the V type engine, such that the central space is effectively utilized for containing the manifold and cooler.

Freese, V, Charles E. (Westland, MI)

2000-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

EMBARGOED 00h00 -6 March 2007 Brussels, 5 March 2007 European Energy Policy puts industries using renewable raw materials at risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficient technologies (such as 2nd generation biofuels and cogeneration). The renewable raw materials based renewable raw materials at risk The European industries using renewable raw materials from agriculture the potential economic and environmental impact of current shortages and price increases of their raw material

143

CORROSIVITY AND COMPOSITION OF RAW AND TREATED PYROLYSIS OILS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast pyrolysis offers a relatively low cost method of processing biomass to produce a liquid product that has the potential for conversion to several types of liquid fuels. The liquid product of fast pyrolysis, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, contains a high oxygen content primarily in the form of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. These oils are typically very acidic with a Total Acid Number that is often in the range of 50 to 100, and previous studies have shown this material to be quite corrosive to common structural materials. Removal of at least some of the oxygen and conversion of this oil to a more useful product that is considerably less corrosive can be accomplished through a hydrogenation process. The product of such a treatment is considered to have the potential for blending with crude oil for processing in petroleum refineries. Corrosion studies and chemical analyses have been conducted using as produced bio-oil samples as well as samples that have been subjected to different levels of oxygen removal. Chemical analyses show treatment affected the concentrations of carboxylic acids contained in the oil, and corrosion studies showed a positive benefit of the oxygen removal. Results of these studies will be presented in this paper.

Keiser, Jim; Howell, Michael; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Sam; Elliott, Douglas C.

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

144

DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY  

SciTech Connect

A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

145

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways

Zach, R

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane production from landfills if organic waste is composted prior to. The quantities and rates of methane production were measured from simulated landfill cells containing composted and raw simulated refuse. The refuse was composted in an open pile and characterized by temperature, pH, ash content and C02 evolved during aerobic respiration. Assuming a 1 0% lignin content, the labile carbon fraction was reduced by an estimated 71 % during composting. Over a of six month period, simulated landfill cells filled with raw waste generated 66 M3 methane per Mg of dry refuse, while cells containing compost produced 31 M3 methane per Mg of dry compost. Per unit weight of dry raw material, composted waste placed in a landfill produced only 23% of the methane that was generated from raw refuse.

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Effects of the RAW Filter on the Climatology and Forecast Skill of the SPEEDY Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent study, Williams introduced a simple modification to the widely used Robert–Asselin (RA) filter for numerical integration. The main purpose of the Robert–Asselin–Williams (RAW) filter is to avoid the undesired numerical damping of the ...

Javier Amezcua; Eugenia Kalnay; Paul D. Williams

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

UNSUSTAINABLE PROPOSAL: THE PRODUCTION OF RAW MATERIALS FOR FUTURE BIOFUEL PROCESSING PLANTS IN ENTRE RÍOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of international bodies, academic institutions and well-known civil society organisation are currently debating and ‘consulting ’ on the sustainable production of energy commodities. Discussions on the establishment of standards, sustainability criteria and certification will give the production of raw materials for biofuels an air of acceptability. But the discussions have ignored all the existing

Stella Semino; Lilian Joensen; Els Wijnstra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Raw material sources for the long-chain omega-3 market: Trends and sustainability. Part 2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report from the Global Organization for EPA and DHA (GOED 2008, where EPA is eicosapentaenoic acid and DHA is docosahexaenoic acid) indicates that the omega-3 market has reached $13 billion. Actually, about $180 million covers raw materials, $1.28

150

Purifying contaminated water. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process is presented for removing biorefactory compounds from contaminated water (e.g., oil shale retort waste-water) by contacting same with fragmented raw oil shale. Biorefractory removal is enhanced by preactivating the oil shale with at least one member of the group of carboxylic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, ethers, amines, amides, sulfoxides, mixed ether-esters and nitriles. Further purification is obtained by stripping, followed by biodegradation and removal of the cells.

Daughton, C.G.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

151

Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building  

SciTech Connect

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

152

ORISE: Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose Coefficients for Intakes of Radionuclides via Contaminated Wounds Dose coefficients for 38 radionuclides based on NCRP Wound Model and ICRP biokinetic models This report is intended to assist health physics and medical staff in more rapidly assessing the potential dosimetric consequences of a contaminated wound. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the International Commission on Radiological Protection element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Examples are also provided on using the dose coefficients to generate derived reference

153

High pressure separation of higher hydrocarbons from natural gas with a continuous regeneration of the adsorbent by raw gas  

SciTech Connect

In natural gas production it is common practice to remove water and frequently also higher hydrocarbons from the gas stream in order to prevent the formation and accumulation of liquids in the downstream pipeline system. Gas drying by condensation at low temperatures, which is the normal practice, becomes increasingly ineffective with rising pressures. In this case adsorption or absorption processes must be applied in order to meet the gas specifications. During trials performed in one of BEB's North German gas fields, a selected adsorption process was tested in a pilot plant in cooperation between BEB and Lurgi. In particular, regeneration with heated raw gas at adsorption pressure was investigated. The suitability of the process was confirmed using activated carbon as an adsorbent. Based -1- on the data obtained from the test, the operating plant could be optimally designed. The latest environmental legislation was taken into account as regards both the disposal of used activated carbon and the avoidance of environmental pollution.

Kaliner, J.; Schwettmann, F.; May, H.G.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Raw materials evaluation and process development studies for conversion of biomass to sugars and ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A range of cellulosic raw materials in the form of agricultural crop residue was analyzed for chemical composition and assessed for potential yields of sugars through chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of these materials. Corn stover was used as a representative raw material for a preliminary process design and economic assessment of the production of sugars and ethanol. With the process as presently developed, 23 gallons of ethanol can be obtained per ton of corn stover at a processing cost of about $1.80 per gallon exclusive of by-product credits. The analysis shows the cost of ethanol to be highly dependent upon (1) the cost of the biomass, (2) the extent of conversion to glucose, (3) enzyme recovery and production cost and (4) potential utilization of xylose. Significant cost reduction appears possible through further research in these directions.

Wilke, C.R.; Yang, R.D.; Sciamanna, A.S.; Freitas, R.P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Advanced Cooling Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Technology Cooling Technology This component of the program is focused on research to develop technologies that improve performance and reduce costs associated with wet cooling, dry cooling, and hybrid cooling technologies. In addition, the research area covers innovative methods to control bio-fouling of cooling water intake structures as well as advances in intake structure systems. Read More! It is technically possible to cool power plants with minimal water use. However, at this time such cooling methods are not as economically feasible as traditional cooling systems. Additional research and development is necessary to develop cooling systems that use as little water as possible, but at a reasonable cost. Water intake structures are also an area of concern, especially considering the Clean Water Act 316(b) regulation which requires that the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact. With plant intake structures, the particular concern is impingement and entrainment of aquatic organisms.

156

Process and system for treating waste water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of treating raw or primary waste water using a powdered, activated carbon/aerated biological treatment system is disclosed. Effluent turbidities less than 2 JTU (Jackson turbidity units), zero TOC (total organic carbon) and in the range of 10 mg/l COD (chemical oxygen demand) can be obtained. An influent stream of raw or primary waste water is contacted with an acidified, powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture. Lime is then added to the slurry to raise the pH to about 7.0. A polyelectrolyte flocculant is added to the slurry followed by a flocculation period -- then sedimentation and filtration. The separated solids (sludge) are aerated in a stabilization sludge basin and a portion thereof recycled to an aerated contact basin for mixing with the influent waste water stream prior to or after contact of the influent stream with the powdered, activated carbon/alum mixture.

Olesen, Douglas E. (Kennewick, WA); Shuckrow, Alan J. (Pasco, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF URANIUM TETRAFLUORIDE FROM URANIUM RAW MATERIAL  

SciTech Connect

This process consists oi the following steps: dissolving and leaching uranium raw material with sulfuric acid, adding a tetravalent uranium solution obtained by electrolytic reduction to the leach, subjecting the leach exuded by suifuric acid to an extraction with an organic solvent to refine and concentrate uranium, converting the extract to a tetravalent uranous solution by electrolytic reduction, and reacting hydrogen fluoride with the uranous solution to produce uranium tetrafluoride. (R.J.S.)

Ito, C.; Okuda, T.; Hamabe, N.

1962-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

158

Water Pinch Technology for Process Water Reduction: Success Story at Solutia's Krummrich Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A site-wide water conservation and wastewater minimization study complementing the previous energy study was undertaken by a consulting engineering company specializing in pinch analysis for Solutia's W. G. Krummrich plant in Sauget, Illinois. The 1995 fresh water intake and wastewater effluent for the site were approximately 2400 gpm and 2000 gpm, respectively. The effluent from the plant was treated off-site by two publicly owned treatment works (POTWs). The total annual cost to Solutia for city water ...

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

CX-008342: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Replace Big Hill Raw Water Intake System Oil Water Separator Tank with Concrete Tank GFE CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/18/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

160

CX-008348: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-008348: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Big Hill Raw Water Intake System Oil Water Separator Tank with Concrete Tank CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improving quality through partnerships : development of a raw material supplier relationship management program in the biotech industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In biotechnology, much focus is put on the science behind proteins and cells; less attention has traditionally gone to the raw materials used to produce medicines. However, in the recent past, internal and external drivers ...

Cadena, Noramay J., 1981-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Comparison between Raw Ensemble Output, (Modified) Bayesian Model Averaging, and Extended Logistic Regression Using ECMWF Ensemble Precipitation Reforecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a 20-yr ECMWF ensemble reforecast dataset of total precipitation and a 20-yr dataset of a dense precipitation observation network in the Netherlands, a comparison is made between the raw ensemble output, Bayesian model averaging (BMA), and ...

Maurice J. Schmeits; Kees J. Kok

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Water Pinch Success Story at Solutia's Krummrich Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A site-wide water conservation and wastewater minimization study complementing the previous energy study was undertaken by a consulting engineering company specializing in Pinch Analysis for Solutia’s W.G. Krummrich plant in Sauget, Illinois. The 1995 fresh water intake and wastewater effluent for the site were approximately 2400 gpm and 2000 gpm, respectively. The effluent from the plant was treated off-site by two publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs). The total annual cost to Solutia for city water intake and effluent treatment was about $8.5 million/yr. The major objective of the Water Pinch study was to identify practical, technically feasible projects to reduce city water intake and wastewater effluent at the plant, so as to reduce annual operating costs. Twenty-three specific projects were identified from the water Pinch study that would reduce the city water intake by 520 gpm (21%) and wastewater effluent by 580 gpm (29%). Two of these projects involved the recovery of product that was being lost in the wastewater effluent. Annual cost savings to Solutia (post 2001) were estimated to be over $1.6 million/yr from wastewater conservation projects, and $2.5 million/yr from renegotiation of the tariff structure, for a total savings of 48%.

Kumana, J. D.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

New Stochastic Annual Limits on Intake for Selected Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Annual limits on intake (ALI) have historically been tabulated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (e.g., ICRP 1979, 1961) and also by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988). These compilations have been rendered obsolete by more recent ICRP dosimetry methods, and, rather than provide new ALIs, the ICRP has opted instead to provide committed dose coefficients from which an ALI can be determined by a user for a specific set of conditions. The U.S. Department of Energy historically has referenced compilations of ALIs and has defined their method of calculation in its radiation protection regulation (10 CFDR 835), but has never provided a specific compilation. Under June 2007 amendments to 10 CFR 835, ALIs can be calculated by dividing an appropriate dose limit, either 5-rem (0.05 Sv) effective dose or 50 rem (0.5 Sv) equivalent dose to an individual organ or tissue, by an appropriate committed dose coefficient. When based on effective dose, the ALI is often referred to as a stochastic annual limit on intake (SALI), and when based on the individual organ or tissue equivalent limit, it has often been called a deterministic annual limit on intake (DALI).

Carbaugh, Eugene H.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

165

An investigation into the use of biokinetic models when assessing intakes of plutonium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of internal dosimetry is to assess the dose to an individual from an intake of a radionuclide. This usually encompasses assessing the intake amount based on some form of bioassay measurement used with a biokinetic model. There are many published biokinetic models that describe the transfer of radionuclides throughout the body. It would be beneficial at times if one could interchange certain biokinetic models with another to assess an intake based on bioassay data to save time and make calculations simpler. This research compared the daily excretion rates by interchanging widely used biokinetic models in different combinations. These model combinations were then used to assess an unknown intake of a case study. It was shown that the ICRP-30 and ICRP-66 respiratory tract models can only be interchanged at specific times post intake to give similar excretion results from an inhalation intake. It is feasible to interchange the ICRP-67 plutonium systemic model or the newer Luciani and Polig plutonium systemic model to assess an intake based on fecal bioassay data, but not urine bioassay data for ingestion intakes. It is not feasible to interchange the systemic models when assessing intakes from a wound or injection. Using different combinations of biokinetic models predicted intakes within 30% for a case study which included a relatively long inhalation chronic intake followed by a much shorter chronic inhalation intake. It was shown that the predicted initial chronic intake for each combination of models gave fecal excretion values which deviated the most from the worker's fecal bioassay data. This could mean that the biokinetic models yield inaccurate excretion rates for long chronic intakes.

Hrycushko, Brian Andrew

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Method of making water gas  

SciTech Connect

The process of manufacturing water gas by alternate air and steam blasting is discussed. The process consists in providing two separate fuel beds of bituminous fuel in two intercommunicating water-gas generators; hot air blasting from the top part of the fuel bed in one generator to the top portion of the other fuel bed in the second generator; and blasting from the bottom part of the fuel bed in the first generator to the bottom part of the fuel bed in the second generator. By evolving volatile matter in the fuel bed in the first generator, and introducing secondary air between the fuel beds to burn the volatile matter and thereby facilitate the carbonization of raw fuel and to store heat in the fuel bed in the second generator, generation of water gas by steam blasting the heated fuel beds will result.

Evans, O.B.

1931-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001 - 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) 2001 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information, such as global PSP (W/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion of the available data: from August 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011. A separate dataset is available for the period between September 23, 1996 and August 23, 2001.The NWTC website provides up to the day updates to this data, from as early as August 24, 2001 through yesterday, as well as instrument specifications.

168

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (1996 - 2001) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1996 - 2001) 1996 - 2001) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information (Global, kWs/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and dew point, as well as wind speed and direction at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m. Included here is a portion of the available data: from September 23, 1996 - August 23, 2001. A separate dataset is available for Aug 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011 in OpenEI. The NWTC website provides current data (updated daily), from as early as August 24, 2001, as well as instrument specifications.

169

Alcoholic fermentation of raw sweet potato by a nonconventional method using Endomycopsis fibuligera glucoamylase preparation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, alcoholic fermentation has received much attention as an alternative energy source. In conventional alcoholic fermentation from starchy materials, precooking is necessary for liquefaction and saccharification of the broth, which requires a large amount of heat energy - about 30-40% of all energy spent for alcohol production. Ueda and his co-workers have attempted to produce ethanol from raw starch in a single-step process, which combines liquefaction, saccharification, and yeast fermentation without cooking and autoclaving by using glucoamylase preparation from Aspergillus niger in order to save the cost of energy consumption by cooking. Ueda has also reported alcoholic fermentation of sweet potato without cooking by using Rhizopus glucoamylase preparation. In the present communication, we report the effectiveness of alcoholic fermentation of sweet potato without cooking by using Endomycopsis fibuligers glucoamylase preparation. (Refs. 5).

Saha, B.C.; Ueda, S.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Estimation of selenium (Se) intake from Se in serum, whole blood, toenails, or urine  

SciTech Connect

Because Se content of food varies widely, estimates of intake based on Se status are more accurate than those based on food composition tables. 77 free-living subjects from South Dakota and Wyoming, where the range of Se intake was large, provided blood, toenails, and 24-hour urines. Se intake, measured by chemical analysis of 4-8 days of duplicate-plate food composites from each subject, was estimated on the basis of the Se indices. To predict the natural logarithm of Se intake from serum Se the best fit was provided by : {minus}0.465 + 0.568{asterisk}SSe. Addition of lean body mass (LBM (kg)) and energy intake (EI (MJ)) to the model markedly improved the fit. Models based on Se in blood or urine gave slightly better estimates than those based on toenail Se. Consideration of data in addition to indices of Se status resulted in improved estimates of intake.

Longnecker, M.P.; Taylor, P.R.; Levander, O.A.; Flack, V.; Veillon, C.; McAdam, P.A.; Patterson, K.Y.; Holden, J.; Stampfer, M.J.; Morris, J.S.; Willett, W.C. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States) NCI, Rockville, MD (United States) USDA, Beltsville, MD (United States) Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States) Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nuclear reactor with low-level core coolant intake  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A natural-circulation boiling-water reactor has skirts extending downward from control rod guide tubes to about 10 centimeters from the reactor vessel bottom. The skirts define annular channels about control rod drive housings that extend through the reactor vessel bottom. Recirculating water is forced in through the low-level entrances to these channels, sweeping bottom water into the channels in the process. The sweeping action prevents cooler water from accumulating at the bottom. This in turn minimizes thermal shock to bottom-dwelling components as would occur when accumulated cool water is swept away and suddenly replaced by warmer water.

Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

CX-008863: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dredging of the West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/14/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

173

CX-008862: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Variable Frequency Drivers for Raw Water Intake Structure Pumps Government Furnished Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/16/2012 Location(s): Texas, Texas, Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

174

CX-000486: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WH-09-119 - Replace Fiberglass CoversTroughs on Traveling Screens at West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01122010 Location(s): West Hackberry,...

175

CX-009218: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-009218: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Sparge Piping at Bryan Mound Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09202012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s):...

176

CX-007511: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Repair Erosion Problems at Big Hill Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12052011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s):...

177

CX-006884: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Replace Big Hill Raw Water Intake Structure Screen Wash PipingCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 09/22/2011Location(s): Big Hill, TexasOffice(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office, Sandia Site Office

178

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mound Raw Water Intake Structure CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12292009 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office December 29, 2009...

179

Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

180

Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

1981-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agl085 THE GLYCINE REUPTAKE INHIBITOR ORG 25935 DECREASES ETHANOL INTAKE AND PREFERENCE IN MALE WISTAR RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — Previous findings from our group indicate that accumbal glycine receptors (GlyRs) are involved in mediating the dopamine (DA) activating effects of ethanol (EtOH), and that administration of glycine locally into the nucleus accumbens (nAc) reduces EtOH consumption in EtOH high-preferring rats. Aims: The present study examines the influence of a systemically administered glycine reuptake inhibitor, Org 25935, on EtOH preference and intake, in male Wistar rats with an EtOH preference>60 % (during continuous access to a bottle of EtOH, 6 % v/v, and a bottle of water), called EP>60 rats, as well as in animals with an EtOH preference 60 and EPwater. Results: Org 25935 decreased EtOH intake and EtOH preference, as compared with vehicle, whereas water intake was unaffected. This effect was dose-dependent, developed gradually and was sustained for up to 40 days, also after introduction of an alcohol deprivation period. Conclusion: It is suggested that Org 25935, and possibly also other GlyT1 inhibitors, can represent a new pharmacological treatment principle for alcohol dependence or abuse.

Anna Molander; Helga Höifödt Lidö; Elin Löf; Mia Ericson; Bo Söderpalm

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Potential Entrainment of Dead or Moribund Fish Eggs and Larvae at Cooling Water Intake Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides evidence for the occurrence of dead or moribund (dying or close to death) fish eggs and larvae (collectively termed ichthyoplankton) in aquatic environments. Descriptions are provided for organisms found in samples displaying these conditions. Methodologies are suggested by which investigators can determine and verify the occurrence of this phenomenon when undertaking entrainment characterization or verification monitoring studies. The information presented here is designed for permi...

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

183

Playful bottle: a mobile social persuasion system to motivate healthy water intake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study of mobile persuasion system explores the use of a mobile phone, when attached to an everyday object used by an everyday behavior, becomes a tool to sense and influence that behavior. This mobile persuasion system, called Playful Bottle system, ... Keywords: hydration behavior, mobile computing, persuasive technology, ubiquitous computting

Meng-Chieh Chiu; Shih-Ping Chang; Yu-Chen Chang; Hao-Hua Chu; Cheryl Chia-Hui Chen; Fei-Hsiu Hsiao; Ju-Chun Ko

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Raw material sources for the long-chain omega-3 market:Trends and sustainability. Part 3.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When you think you have successfully developed an oil with the correct omega-3 configuration, in a volume that meets your needs, you will then be faced with another up-and-coming barrier: sustainability of the raw materials. This ties in with the headlines

185

SUMMARY REPORT, 1954-1959 RAW MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS AND GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the research work performed by the National Lead Company on the recovery of U from its ores is presented. A bibliography is presented which includes all reports on raw materials published by National Lead Company through Dec. 1958. Also included is a list of complete publications on raw materials from 1944 to 1954. (W.L.H.) low conditions at room temperature. Emphasis was placed on the effect of reaction parameters and mercury-recovery techniques on the Hg/sup 202/ content of the solid calomel formed in the reaction. For pure hydrogen chloride the Hg/sup 202/ content of the Calomel was found to be 39.9 plus or minus 0.3%, compared to the natural abundance of 29.8%. With 20 to 40 mole% of butadiene-1,3 in the hydrogen chloride, calomels containing 83 to 84% of Hg/sup 202/ were consistently obtained. The Hg/sup 202/ content of the calomel product was found to increase markedly when unsaturated hydrocarbons were added to the hydrogen chloride stream. The addends studied included butadiene - 1,3, benzene, isoprene, acetylene, propylene, and ethylene in order of decreasing effectiveness. From steady-state calculations the effectiveness of the addend can be shown to be determined by the rate ratio, k/sub 8// k/sub 4/. For the maximally enriching mixture of hydrogen chloride and butadiene, the effect of variations in lamp temperature and reaction pressure was studied. At lamp temperatures exceeding approximately 35 deg 'C, reduced enrichments were obtained owing to emission-line broadening. A progressive reduction in enrichment was also observed with substrate pressures greater than 25 mm, owing presumably to Lorentz-broadening of the hyperfine absorption contours of the Hg/sup N/ in the reaction cell. The Hg/sup 202/ content of the calomel product was determined by resonance radiation absorbiometry. The apparent Hg/sup 202/ abundances of the mercury recovered from the calomel product were found to depend strongly on the method used for isolating the enriched mercury from the calomel. Evidence was obtained for the occurrence of isotopically degradative exchange reactions during the recovery process. A recovery technique was developed which appeared to eliminate this exchange degradation. (auth)

Beverly, R.G. ed.

1959-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Oil shale retorting and retort water purification process  

SciTech Connect

An oil shale process is provided to retort oil shale and purify oil shale retort water. In the process, raw oil shale is retorted in an in situ underground retort or in an above ground retort to liberate shale oil, light hydrocarbon gases and oil shale retort water. The retort water is separated from the shale oil and gases in a sump or in a fractionator or quench tower followed by an API oil/water separator. After the retort water is separated from the shale oil, the retort water is steam stripped, carbon adsorbed and biologically treated, preferably by granular carbon adsorbers followed by activated sludge treatment or by activated sludge containing powdered activated carbon. The retort water can be granularly filtered before being steam stripped. The purified retort water can be used in various other oil shale processes, such as dedusting, scrubbing, spent shale moisturing, backfilling, in situ feed gas injection and pulsed combustion.

Venardos, D.G.; Grieves, C.G.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of timing of rumen energy supply on food intake in lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of timing of rumen energy supply on food intake in lactating dairy cows P Faverdin, N of this experiment was to compare the effects of energy supply to the rumen before or during a meal on dry matter of rumen fill on food intake occurs directly whereas the effect of energy supply is delayed and probably

Recanati, Catherine

188

Use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater demands are steadily increasing throughout the United States. As its population increases, more water is needed for domestic use (drinking, cooking, cleaning, etc.) and to supply power and food. In arid parts of the country, existing freshwater supplies are not able to meet the increasing demands for water. New water users are often forced to look to alternative sources of water to meet their needs. Over the past few years, utilities in many locations, including parts of the country not traditionally water-poor (e.g., Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and North Carolina) have needed to reevaluate the availability of water to meet their cooling needs. This trend will only become more extreme with time. Other trends are likely to increase pressure on freshwater supplies, too. For example, as populations increase, they will require more food. This in turn will likely increase demands for water by the agricultural sector. Another example is the recent increased interest in producing biofuels. Additional water will be required to grow more crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels and to process the raw materials into biofuels. This report provides information about an opportunity to reuse an abundant water source -- treated municipal wastewater, also known as 'reclaimed water' -- for cooling and process water in electric generating facilities. The report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Innovations for Existing Plants research program (Feeley 2005). This program initiated an energy-water research effort in 2003 that includes the availability and use of 'nontraditional sources' of water for use at power plants. This report represents a unique reference for information on the use of reclaimed water for power plant cooling. In particular, the database of reclaimed water user facilities described in Chapter 2 is the first comprehensive national effort to identify and catalog those plants that are using reclaimed water for cooling.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation of antioxidative/antimicrobial potential of Oriental nutraceutical herb extracts in raw and cooked goat meat and beef products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the effects of alcohol extracts of several Oriental nutraceutical herbs on storage properties of raw and cooked ground goat meat and beef. White peony root, red peony root, sappanwood stem, rehmania root, moutan cortex root, angelica root, and rosemary leaves were dehydrated, extracted with 95% ethanol, and freed of the solvent. The sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary samples contained the largest amounts of total phenolics. Extracts were added to ground goat meat, and treated meat samples were aerobically stored at 4°C for 6 days, with or without cooking. Each herbal extract was also added to ground beef at 0.25% (w/w), with or without adding NaCl at 2% (w/w), and stored as raw and cooked patties. Peony (red or white) root extracts, whether added at 0.5, 1, or 2% levels, showed strong antioxidant effects in cooked goat meat, decreasing TBARS content more than 90% at day 6. The extracts were less antioxidative in raw goat meat, lowering the day-6 TBARS content less than 50%. The extracts from rehmania root, sappanwood, and moutan cortex were as antioxidative as the extracts from red and white peony roots, decreasing the TBARS content in cooked goat meat more than 88% at day 6. When red peony root extract was evaluated for antimicrobial activity in raw goat meat, it decreased APCs at day 3, but not at day 6. Extracts from white and red peony roots, sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary were highly antioxidative in both raw and cooked beef patties, decreasing TBARS more than 88% by day 6. However, rehmania and angelica root extracts were less inhibitory. The antioxidant activity of the herbal extracts correlated (P 0.05) with total phenolic levels. All the extracts, other than rosemary extract, showed no antimicrobial activity in raw beef patties at either day 3 or day 6, presumably due to the relatively high microbial counts found in the initial untreated meat. Rosemary extract decreased APCs only at day 3.

Han, Jaejoon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Several legislative acts are in place that could potentially impact water quality requirements and water use for fossil energy production as well as electricity generation. These acts regulate pollutant discharge and water intake directly and indirectly. Under regulations established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), these Acts serve to maintain and improve the Nation's water resources for uses including but not limited to agricultural, industrial, nutritional, and recreational purposes. The Clean Water Act - The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, more commonly known as the Clean Water Act, provides for the regulation of discharges to the nation's surface waters. To address pollution, the act specifies that the discharge of any pollutant by any person is unlawful except when in compliance with applicable permitting requirements. Initial emphasis was placed on "point source" pollutant discharge, but 1987 amendments authorized measures to address "non-point source" discharges, including stormwater runoff from industrial facilities. Permits are issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), which designates the highest level of water pollution or lowest acceptable standards for water discharges. NPDES permits are typically administered by the individual states. With EPA approval, the states may implement standards more stringent than federal water quality standards, but may not be less stringent. Certain sections of the Act are particularly applicable to water issues related to power generation. These include:

191

Laboratory Evaluation of Fine-mesh Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of four years of laboratory evaluations on performance of fine-mesh traveling water screens to protect larval fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). Prior to this study, the biological effectiveness of fine-mesh screens was uncertain because performance data from the few existing facilities that use fine-mesh screens have been highly variable. This project is producing additional data necessary to determine biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

192

Turbid water Clear water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

Jaffe, Jules

193

Experiment: Cooked vs. raw food reacting with H2O2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the enzymes is catalase and it is able to join two peroxide molecules together and then split them apart as water and oxygen. The other major enzyme is peroxidase and is able to...

194

Water Intoxication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

Lingampalli, Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Water Use Registration and Reporting (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration and Reporting (Wisconsin) Registration and Reporting (Wisconsin) Water Use Registration and Reporting (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 2011 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources Large water supply systems (e.g. well or surface water intake pipes) with

196

Pharmaceutical Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Water treatment process for water for injection (WFI)...deionization WFI production Evaporation still or vapor compression...

197

Water Snakes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER SNAKES Contrary to popular belief, the Water Moccasin commonly known as the...

198

Investigating Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This 3-ring binder contains teaching plans for 12 lessons on topics such as "Water in Our Daily Lives," "The Water Cycle," "Amazing Aquifers," "Water and Soil," "Aquatic Ecosystems," and "Water Wise Use." Accompanying each lesson plan are activity and record sheets for hands-on learning experiences. This curriculum is intended for students in about 4th to 8th grades.

Howard Jr., Ronald A.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

CX-007509: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Categorical Exclusion Determination 9: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007509: Categorical Exclusion Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Use of RW Surge Line to Big Hill Anhydrite Pond for Raw Water Intake Structure Recycle CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office DOE M&O Contractor will cap the existing recycle line at the Big Hill raw water intake structure for repair work and install a valve in place of the existing surge relief valve to serve as a recycle valve to control flow from the Big Hill raw water intake pumps. The raw water surge line will discharge to the Big Hill anhydrite pond while repairs are being made to the recycle line. CX-007509.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000482: Categorical Exclusion Determination

200

Water cooled scavenged crankcase type otto internal combustion engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a system for a water cooled scavenged crankcase type two-cycle internal combustion engine comprising: a heat reclaimation system for extracting heat from an engine jacket for heating water supplied form an add-on reservoir via a heat exchanger located within the engine cylinder cooling system, the water being subsequently additionally heated by an exhaust pipe type heat exchanger to a superheated steam state and thence conveyed by a conduit to a steam lubricator for adjustably conveying in variably timed spaced succession intervals of regulated droplets of high viscous oil, fortified with adde graphite and tallow enrichment lubricant ingredients, and thence conveying such by steam at atmospheric pressure into an intake manifold which receives a carbureted air/fuel mixture into the crankcase via a manually operated auxiliary air intake device and way check valve and fire screen, due to suction effect of the piston up stroke action of the piston during engine operation.

Bidwell, H.

1988-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MFR PAPER 1355 Composition of the Edible Portion of Raw (Fresh or Frozen)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- trieval system containing available in- formation on the chemical and nutri- tional composition of fish investigation. Part I also summarized the data on the content of protein, fat, moisture, ash, carbohydrate of handling the fish after it left the water and before the flesh was analyzed for the various vitamins. Also

202

Floatabilities of treated coal in water at room temperature. Annual topical report, September 1992--August 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a research paper entitled ``Floatability of Treated Coal in Water at Room Temperature.`` Experimental data on equilibrium adsorption loadings of probe compounds on coal, and flotation of raw coals as well as treated coal were obtained, using Illinois No. 6 coal (PSOC-1539), Adaville No. 1 coal (PSOC-1544), Wyodak coal (PSOC-1545) and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal (PSOC-1549). The raw data of this Annual Topical Report are also available in the Quarterly Progress Report for the period April--June 1993 and the Quarterly Progress Report July--September 1993.

Kwon, K.C. [Tuskegee Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rohrer, R.L.; Lai, R.W.; Finseth, D.H. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

EPRI Clean Water Act 316(b) Fish Protection Technology Workshop Proceedings: September 30, 2004, Holden, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compact disc (CD) contains presentations made at the EPRI Clean Water Act §316(b) Fish Protection Technology Workshop held at the facilities of Alden Research Laboratory in Holden, Massachusetts on September 30, 2004. The presentations provide engineering and visual information on many types of cooling water intake structure fish protection technologies, including barrier nets, behavioral barriers (strobe lights and acoustic systems), traveling water screens, rotary screens, flat panel and cyli...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Effect of Dietary Intake of Stable Iodine on Dose-per-unit-intake Factors for 99Tc  

SciTech Connect

It is well-known that the human thyroid concentrates iodine more than 100 times the concentration in plasma. Also well-known is the fact that large amounts of stable iodine in the diet can limit thyroid uptake of total iodine; this is the basis for administering potassium iodide following a release of radioiodine from a nuclear reactor accident or nuclear weapon detonation. Many researchers have shown enhanced concentrations of both organic and inorganic iodine in saliva and breast milk. Technetium-99 is a long-lived (231,000 year half-life) radionuclide of concern in the management of high-level radioactive waste. There is no doubt that 99Tc, if it is in groundwater, will be found in the chemical form of pertechnetate, 99TcO4?. Pertechnetate is a large anion, almost identical in size to iodide, I?. The nuclear medicine literature shows that pertechnetate concentrates in the thyroid, salivary glands, and lactating breast in addition to the stomach, liver, and alimentary tract as currently recognized by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The fact that large intakes of stable iodine (127I) in the diet limit uptake of iodine by the thyroid leads one to generalize that stable iodine in the diet may also limit thyroid uptake of pertechnetate. While there is at least one report that iodine in the diet blocks uptake of 99mTcO4? by the thyroid and salivary glands (which have the same Na/I symporter, the biochemical concentration mechanism), the level of protective effect seen for blocking radioactive iodine is not expected for 99TcO4? because pertechnetate does not become organically bound in the thyroid and thus is not retained for months the way iodide is. While it does account for Tc concentration in the thyroid, the existing ICRP biokinetic model for technetium does not take enhanced concentrations in salivary gland and breast tissue into account. From the survey of the nuclear medicine literature, it is not possible to compute the effect of stable iodine in the diet on the dose per unit intake factors for 99Tc without developing an improved biokinetic model for technetium. Specific experiments should be designed to quantitatively evaluate 99TcO4? metabolism, excretion, and secretion, as well as to evaluate its chemical toxicity It is recommended that the ICRP reexamine its biokinetics models for Tc based on nuclear medicine data that have accumulated over the years. In particular, the ICRP ignores the lactation pathway, the enhanced concentration of Tc in breast and breast milk, and enhanced concentration of Tc (and I) in the salivary glands as well as in the thyroid. The ICRP should also explicitly incorporate the effect of stable iodine in the diet into both its models for iodine and technetium. The effect of concentration of Tc in breast milk needs further study for dosimetric implications to nursing infants whose mothers may ingest 99TcO4? from groundwater sources. The ICRP should also investigate the possibility of enhanced concentration of both I and Tc in the non-lactating female breast. To do these re-evaluations of biokinetic models, new experiments designed specifically to evaluate these questions concerning the biokinetics of Tc and I are needed.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Tankless Demand Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil & Indirect Water Heaters Water Heating A variety of...

206

Ground Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Nature Bulletin No. 408-A February 27, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation GROUND WATER We take...

207

Water Dogs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NA Question: I'd like to know about the water dogs and their life cycle? Replies: Water dog, or mud puppy, is a common name for a type of salamander that never develops lungs, but...

208

Process for blending coal with water immiscible liquid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for blending coal with a water immiscible liquid produces a uniform, pumpable slurry. Pulverized raw feed coal and preferably a coal derived, water immiscible liquid are continuously fed to a blending zone (12 and 18) in which coal particles and liquid are intimately admixed and advanced in substantially plug flow to form a first slurry. The first slurry is withdrawn from the blending zone (12 and 18) and fed to a mixing zone (24) where it is mixed with a hot slurry to form the pumpable slurry. A portion of the pumpable slurry is continuously recycled to the blending zone (12 and 18) for mixing with the feed coal.

Heavin, Leonard J. (Olympia, WA); King, Edward E. (Gig Harbor, WA); Milliron, Dennis L. (Lacey, WA)

1982-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

209

UV Waterworks: Reliable, Inexpensive Water Disinfection for the World  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 UV Waterworks: Reliable, Inexpensive Water Disinfection for the World The UV Waterworks water-disinfection unit, with a plastic cover and cutaway reflector revealing its interior. In the developing world, waterborne diseases such as cholera, typhoid fever, gastroenteritis, dysentery, and infectious hepatitis worldwide kill more than 400 children every hour and result in the loss of billions of hours of worker productivity each year. Municipal tap water is uncommon in many developing-country households, and two out of three people in the world must fetch water from outside their homes. In India, water-purity issues are particularly important during the monsoon season when heavy rainfall washes raw sewage and other contaminated material from the fields

210

Water Bugs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

211

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

212

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jointly maintain a fuel economy website (www.fueleconomy.gov), which helps fulfill their responsibility under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 to provide accurate fuel economy information [in miles per gallon (mpg)] to consumers. The site provides information on EPA fuel economy ratings for passenger cars and light trucks from 1985 to the present and other relevant information related to energy use such as alternative fuels and driving and vehicle maintenance tips. In recent years, fluctuations in the price of crude oil and corresponding fluctuations in the price of gasoline and diesel fuels have renewed interest in vehicle fuel economy in the United States. (User sessions on the fuel economy website exceeded 20 million in 2008 compared to less than 5 million in 2004 and less than 1 million in 2001.) As a result of this renewed interest and the age of some of the references cited in the tips section of the website, DOE authorized the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center (FEERC) to initiate studies to validate and improve these tips. This report documents a study aimed specifically at the effect of engine air filter condition on fuel economy. The goal of this study was to explore the effects of a clogged air filter on the fuel economy of vehicles operating over prescribed test cycles. Three newer vehicles (a 2007 Buick Lucerne, a 2006 Dodge Charger, and a 2003 Toyota Camry) and an older carbureted vehicle were tested. Results show that clogging the air filter has no significant effect on the fuel economy of the newer vehicles (all fuel injected with closed-loop control and one equipped with MDS). The engine control systems were able to maintain the desired AFR regardless of intake restrictions, and therefore fuel consumption was not increased. The carbureted engine did show a decrease in fuel economy with increasing restriction. However, the level of restriction required to cause a substantial (10-15%) decrease in fuel economy (such as that cited in the literature) was so severe that the vehicle was almost undrivable. Acceleration performance on all vehicles was improved with a clean air filter. Once it was determined how severe the restriction had to be to affect the carbureted vehicle fuel economy, the 2007 Buick Lucerne was retested in a similar manner. We were not able to achieve the level of restriction that was achieved with the 1972 Pontiac with the Lucerne. The Lucerne's air filter box would not hold the filter in place under such severe conditions. (It is believed that this testing exceeded the design limits of the air box.) Tests were conducted at a lower restriction level (although still considerably more severe than the initial clogged filter testing), allowing the air filter to stay seated in the air box, and no significant change was observed in the Lucerne's fuel economy or the AFR over the HFET cycle. Closed-loop control in modern fuel injected vehicle applications is sophisticated enough to keep a clogged air filter from affecting the vehicle fuel economy. However for older, open-loop, carbureted vehicles, a clogged air filter can affect the fuel economy. For the vehicle tested, the fuel economy with a new air filter improved as much as 14% over that with a severely clogged filter (in which the filter was so clogged that drivability was impacted). Under a more typical state of clog, the improvement with a new filter ranged from 2 to 6%.

Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Nutrition and Biochemistry of PhospholipidsChapter 13 Effects of Phosphatidylcholine Intake on Liver Function and Liver Carcinogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutrition and Biochemistry of Phospholipids Chapter 13 Effects of Phosphatidylcholine Intake on Liver Function and Liver Carcinogenesis Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press ...

214

Reusing Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reusing Water Reusing Water Reusing Water Millions of gallons of industrial wastewater is recycled at LANL by virtue of a long-term strategy to treat wastewater rather than discharging it into the environment. April 12, 2012 Water from cooling the supercomputer is release to maintain a healthy wetland. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We reuse the same water up to six times before releasing it back into the environment cleaner than when it was pumped. How many times does LANL reuse water? Wastewater is generated from some of the facilities responsible for the Lab's biggest missions, such as the cooling towers of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, one of the Lab's premier science research

215

A Ten-year Survey of Giardia Cysts in Drinking Water Supplies of Seoul, the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: To understand the distribution of Giardia cysts in drinking water supplies in Seoul, Korea, we collected water samples quarterly at 6 intakes in the Han River, its largest stream and 6 conventional water treatment plants (WTPs) serving drinking water, from 2000 to 2009. Giardia cysts in each of 10 L water were confirmed in 35.0 % of intake water samples and the arithmetic mean was 1.65 cysts/10 L (range 0-35 cysts/10 L). The lowest cyst density was observed at Paldang and Kangbuk intakes, and the pollution level was higher at 4 intakes downstream. It seemed that these 4 intakes were under influence of Wangsuk stream at the end of which cysts were found in all samples with the mean of 140 cysts/10 L. The annual mean number of cysts was 0.21-4.21 cysts/10 L, and the cyst level at the second half of the 10 years was about 1/5 of that at first half on average. The cysts were more frequently found in winter, and their mean density was 3.74 cysts/10 L in winter and 0.80-1.08 cysts/10 L in other seasons. All finished water samples collected at 6 WTPs were negative for Giardia in each of 100 L sample for 10 years and cyst removal by physical process was average 2.9-log. It was concluded that conventional water treatment at 6 WTPs of Seoul appears to remove the cysts effectively under the present level of their source water. Domestic wastewater from the urban region could be an important source of Giardia pollution

Mok-young Lee; Eun-joo Cho; Jin-hyo Lee; Sun-hee Han; Yong-sang Park

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Water Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning EUEC Energy & Environment Conference 2008, EPS,1292008 2 * Water Scarcity Seen Dampening Case...

217

Water and Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water in swimming pool Water and Energy The water and energy technology research focuses on improving the efficiency of energy and water use in water delivery, supply and...

218

Energy Basics: Water Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

about: Conventional Storage Water Heaters Demand (Tankless or Instantaneous) Water Heaters Heat Pump Water Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters...

219

PySpline: A Modern, Cross-Platform Program for the Processing of Raw Averaged XAS Edge and EXAFS Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PySpline is a modern computer program for processing raw averaged XAS and EXAFS data using an intuitive approach which allows the user to see the immediate effect of various processing parameters on the resulting k- and R-space data. The Python scripting language and Qt and Qwt widget libraries were chosen to meet the design requirement that it be cross-platform (i.e. versions for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux). PySpline supports polynomial pre- and post-edge background subtraction, splining of the EXAFS region with a multi-segment polynomial spline, and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the resulting k{sup 3}-weighted EXAFS data.

Tenderholt, A.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dependence of intake fraction on release location in a multi-media framework: A case study of four contaminants in North America  

SciTech Connect

The extent of human exposure to persistent anthropogenic environmental contaminants is a complex function of the amount of chemical emitted, its physico-chemical properties and reactivity, the nature of the environment, and the characteristics of the pathways for human exposure, such as inhalation, intake of food and water and dermal contact. For some chemicals, the location of emissions relative to areas of high population density or intense food production may also be an important factor. The relative importance of these variables is explored using the regionally segmented BETR North America contaminant fate model and data for food production patterns and population density for North America. The model is applied to four contaminants emitted to air: benzene, carbon tetrachloride, benzo[a]pyrene and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo dioxin. The total continental intake fraction (iF), relating exposure quantity to emission quantity, is employed as a metric for assessing population exposure to environmental contaminants. The results show that the use of continentally averaged parameters for population density and food production provides an accurate estimate of the median of iF calculated for emissions in individual regions, however iF can range from this median by up to 3 orders of magnitude, especially for chemicals transferred to humans through the food pathway. The location of population relative to food production and emissions of chemicals are important variables that should be considered in assessing the public health implications of chemical emissions.

MacLeod, Matthew; Bennett, Deborah H.; Perem, Merike; Maddalena, Randy L.; M cKone, Thomas E.; Mackay, Don

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Comparison of energy intake prediction algorithms for systems powered by photovoltaic harvesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small size photovoltaic modules can harvest enough energy to power many personal devices and wireless sensor nodes. The prediction of solar energy intake is possible thanks to the periodical availability of the sunlight and its cyclic behavior. Thus, ... Keywords: Energy harvesting, Photovoltaic systems, Power management, Prediction algorithms, Wireless sensor network

Carlo Bergonzini; Davide Brunelli; Luca Benini

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

IOM panel recommends tripling vitamin D intake: Panel’s conservative approach receives criticism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 102nd AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo, held in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, May 1–4, 2011, featured a Hot Topic Symposium and subsequent panel discussion on the new intake recommendations for vitamin D made by the US Institute of Medicine. Science and health writ

223

Effect of Protein Supplement Sources on Intake and Digestion of Steers Fed Low-quality Forage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential protein supplements to grazing cattle were evaluated in two projects. In the first project, Karanja seedcake samples were prepared and ruminally incubated using the in situ method to measure nutrient disappearance in cattle consuming low-quality forage. Organic matter and CP were fractionated by degradability into A, B, and C fractions. Organic matter fraction A degradability ranged from 59.6 to 89% (P < 0.05) for all the karanja seedcake samples. Fraction A of CP ranged from 61.6 to 96.2% degradability for all the samples (P < 0.05). Karanja seedcake samples were observed to contain highly degradable nutrients and our results indicate karanja seedcake may possibly be utilized in grazing cattle protein supplements, consequently increasing economic sustainability of biofuel production. In the second experiment, four non-protein nitrogen supplements were ruminally infused in steers consuming low-quality forage. Supplements included a 40% CP mineral mix (40MM), 60% CP mineral mix (60MM), 25% CP liquid (25L), or 35% CP liquid (35L). Protein provision stimulated forage OM intake and total OM intake for both liquid supplements. Forage OM intake tended to be greater for the liquid supplements; 25L (P = 0.06) and 35L (P = 0.08), then control. Total OM intake significantly increased (P < 0.01) for both liquid supplements, when compared to the control treatment. Total digestible OM intake was greater (P < 0.01) for 25L (3.4 kg/d) and 35L (3.36 kg/d) than control (2.94 kg/d). Forage and total OM intake were not significantly affected by 40MM or 60MM treatments. Total tract digestions (OM and NDF) were not observed to be significantly different (P ? 0.11) between supplements and control. Ruminal ammonia was greater (P < 0.01) for all supplements then control and total ruminal VFA concentrations increased from 84.7 to 98.7 mM for control versus supplemented. Supplementation with liquids had a significant effect on intake. Our results indicate of the four supplements, liquid supplements improved the utilization of low-quality forage by cattle, thus improving nutrient stewardship.

Stefan, Courtney Chanel

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Water pollution  

SciTech Connect

Ballast water, which is sea water that is carried in oil tankers to provide stability, can become contaminated with oil. Alyeska Pipeline Service Company runs a water treatment plant at its pipeline terminal at Prot Valdez, Alaska, to treat ballast water before it is discharged into the sea. GAO reviewed EPA's recently reissued National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the Port Valdez facility. In this report, GAO compares the effluent limits and other requirements under the reissued permit with those of the old permit, determines the reasons for changes in the reissued permit, and examines Alyeska's initial efforts to comply with the reissued permit's effluent limits and reporting requirements.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Work plan  

SciTech Connect

The work plan for Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing is outlined. There are two tandem tasks in the program, a literature and information review and evaluation and an experimental effort. The experimental work will address environmental control technologies for retort and product water, contamination of ground water by abandoned in situ retorts, raw and spent shale leachates, fugitive emissions from background oil shale retorting, and aquifer bridging during or after shale oil extraction.

Wewerka, E.M.; Wagner, P.; Wanek, P.L.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Three-Dimensional Wind Field Analysis from Dual-Doppler Radar Data. Part I: Filtering, Interpolating and Differentiating the Raw Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first of three dealing with the three-dimensional wind field analysis from dual-Doppler radar data. Here we deal with the first step of the analysis which consists in interpolating and filtering the raw radial velocity fields ...

J. Testud; M. Chong

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - Environmentally-Safe Control of Zebra Mussel Fouling - New York State Education Department Coal-fired power plants within North America need an effective, economical, and non-polluting technique for managing infestations of zebra mussels within their facilities, particularly in cooling water intake systems. Unfortunately, due to a lack of options, many facilities have relied on the use of broad-spectrum, chemical biocides for control of these freshwater, macro-fouling mussels. Biocide treatments, such as continuous chlorination for three weeks, are widely regarded as environmentally unacceptable. Chlorine, for example, can combine with organic compounds in water resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes, dioxins, and other potentially carcinogenic substances. Because of this, there is growing concern within the power generation industry that such broad-spectrum biocides will be banned by individual states and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This would result in a crisis situation for the electric utility industry. Even if such an outright ban does not occur, the reduction in the use of such biocides is generally viewed by coal-fired and other power generating industries as environmentally prudent and desirable.

228

Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

Cha, Sangwon

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Water Boatman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Boatman Water Boatman Name: Joshua Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am doing a research on water boatman. I go through your web, I only find little information about it. Can you give me its habitat, its appearance, life cycles and communication between themselves and they defenses themselves? Replies: Find a good book in the library on insects, also on pond biology/ecology, as boatmen live in ponds and marshes. It should be easy to find. J.Elliott Try this web site: http://www.dnr.state.il.us/ctap.ctaphome.htm or http://www.dnr.state.il.us/nredu/nredpage.htm this is the state of Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources homepage and somewhere on there is a page called "bugpage". They have pictures and characteristics of aquatic insects there. good luck

230

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residentialgas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Estimation of dose commitment from an accidental intake of $sup 244$Cm  

SciTech Connect

Four employees at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory experienced an intake by inhalation of $sup 244$Cm as a result of an accidental release of this radionuclide. Urine and fecal samples were obtained and were analyzed in the Bioassay Laboratory at ORNL. Also, chest counts were made with the ORNL Whole- Body Counter. Ca-DTPA mists were inhaled within hours after the intake. These data together with data on the inhalation of $sup 244$Cm in the dog were used to obtain a 50-year dose commitment to lungs, skeleton, and liver. The 50-year dose commitment to skeleton for two of the employees was estimated to be about 170 rem. The estimation methods used for dose commitment together with the values for other organs obtained are presented and discussed. (auth)

Bernard, S.R.; Poston, J.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Removal of beryllium from drinking water by chemical coagulation and lime softening  

SciTech Connect

The effectiveness of conventional drinking water treatment and lime softening was evaluated for beryllium removal from two drinking water sources. Jar test studies were conducted to determine how common coagulants (aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride) and lime softening performed in removing beryllium from spiked waters. Centrifugation was used to simulate filtration. The two source waters used were raw Ohio River water and groundwater from the Great Miami Aquifer. The impact of initial beryllium concentration, coagulant dose, turbidity and pH on beryllium removal was examined and optimum treatment conditions were determined. Jar tests using alum and ferric chloride coagulants were able to achieve 95% and 85% removal of beryllium respectively from surface water. Removal efficiency increased as the pH was increased. Based on the data collected in the study, coprecipitation and precipitation are the two likely mechanisms responsible for beryllium removal.

Lytle, D.A.; Summers, R.S.; Sorg, T.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Internal combustion engine with rotary valve assembly having variable intake valve timing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine has rotary valves associated with movable shutters operable to vary the closing of intake air/fuel port sections to obtain peak volumetric efficiency over the entire range of speed of the engine. The shutters are moved automatically by a control mechanism that is responsive to the RPM of the engine. A foot-operated lever associated with the control mechanism is also used to move the shutters between their open and closed positions.

Hansen, Craig N. (Eden Prairie, MN); Cross, Paul C. (Shorewood, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Hydrogen and Water: An Engineering, Economic and Environmental Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The multi-year program plan for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Program (USDOE, 2007a) calls for the development of system models to determine economic, environmental and cross-cutting impacts of the transition to a hydrogen economy. One component of the hydrogen production and delivery chain is water; water's use and disposal can incur costs and environmental consequences for almost any industrial product. It has become increasingly clear that due to factors such as competing water demands and climate change, the potential for a water-constrained world is real. Thus, any future hydrogen economy will need to be constructed so that any associated water impacts are minimized. This, in turn, requires the analysis and comparison of specific hydrogen production schemes in terms of their water use. Broadly speaking, two types of water are used in hydrogen production: process water and cooling water. In the production plant, process water is used as a direct input for the conversion processes (e.g. steam for Steam Methane Reforming {l_brace}SMR{r_brace}, water for electrolysis). Cooling water, by distinction, is used indirectly to cool related fluids or equipment, and is an important factor in making plant processes efficient and reliable. Hydrogen production further relies on water used indirectly to generate other feedstocks required by a hydrogen plant. This second order indirect water is referred to here as 'embedded' water. For example, electricity production uses significant quantities of water; this 'thermoelectric cooling' contributes significantly to the total water footprint of the hydrogen production chain. A comprehensive systems analysis of the hydrogen economy includes the aggregate of the water intensities from every step in the production chain including direct, indirect, and embedded water. Process and cooling waters have distinct technical quality requirements. Process water, which is typically high purity (limited dissolved solids) is used inside boilers, reactors or electrolyzers because as it changes phase or is consumed, it leaves very little residue behind. Pre-treatment of 'raw' source water to remove impurities not only enables efficient hydrogen production, but also reduces maintenance costs associated with component degradation due to those impurities. Cooling water has lower overall quality specifications, though it is required in larger volumes. Cooling water has distinct quality requirements aimed at preserving the cooling equipment by reducing scaling and fouling from untreated water. At least as important as the quantity, quality and cost of water inputs to a process are the quantity, quality and cost of water discharge. In many parts of the world, contamination from wastewater streams is a far greater threat to water supply than scarcity or drought (Brooks, 2002). Wastewater can be produced during the pre-treatment processes for process and cooling water, and is also sometimes generated during the hydrogen production and cooling operations themselves. Wastewater is, by definition, lower quality than supply water. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities can handle some industrial wastewaters; others must be treated on-site or recycled. Any of these options can incur additional cost and/or complexity. DOE's 'H2A' studies have developed cost and energy intensity estimates for a variety of hydrogen production pathways. These assessments, however, have not focused on the details of water use, treatment and disposal. As a result, relatively coarse consumption numbers have been used to estimate water intensities. The water intensity for hydrogen production ranges between 1.5-40 gallons per kilogram of hydrogen, including the embedded water due to electricity consumption and considering the wide variety of hydrogen production, water treatment, and cooling options. Understanding the consequences of water management choices enables stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding water use. Water is a fundamentally regional commodity. Water resources vary in quality and qu

Simon, A J; Daily, W; White, R G

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

The effects of oxygen-enriched intake air on FFV exhaust emissions using M85  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of emission tests of a flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) powered by an SI engine, fueled by M85 (methanol), and supplied with oxygen-enriched intake air containing 21, 23, and 25 vol% O2. Engine-out total hydrocarbons (THCs) and unburned methanol were considerably reduced in the entire FTP cycle when the O2 content of the intake air was either 23 or 25%. However, CO emissions did not vary much, and NOx emissions were higher. HCHO emissions were reduced by 53% in bag 1, 84% in bag 2, and 59% in bag 3 of the FTP cycle with 25% oxygen-enriched intake air. During cold-phase FTP,reductions of 42% in THCs, 40% in unburned methanol, 60% in nonmethane hydrocarbons, and 45% in nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs) were observed with 25% enriched air; NO{sub x} emissions increased by 78%. Converter-out emissions were also reduced with enriched air but to a lesser degree. FFVs operating on M85 that use 25% enriched air during only the initial 127 s of cold-phase FTP or that use 23 or 25% enriched air during only cold-phase FTP can meet the reactivity-adjusted NMOG, CO, NO{sub x}, and HCHO emission standards of the transitional low-emission vehicle.

Poola, R.B.; Sekar, R.; Ng, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Baudino, J.H. [Autoresearch Labs., Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); Colucci, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Anode Raw Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Anodes for aluminum production are composed of coal tar pitch (CTP) ... This paper reports a study on the structure and porosity of calcined ...

237

Hydrogen and Water: An Engineering, Economic and Environmental Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The multi-year program plan for the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technology Program (USDOE, 2007a) calls for the development of system models to determine economic, environmental and cross-cutting impacts of the transition to a hydrogen economy. One component of the hydrogen production and delivery chain is water; water's use and disposal can incur costs and environmental consequences for almost any industrial product. It has become increasingly clear that due to factors such as competing water demands and climate change, the potential for a water-constrained world is real. Thus, any future hydrogen economy will need to be constructed so that any associated water impacts are minimized. This, in turn, requires the analysis and comparison of specific hydrogen production schemes in terms of their water use. Broadly speaking, two types of water are used in hydrogen production: process water and cooling water. In the production plant, process water is used as a direct input for the conversion processes (e.g. steam for Steam Methane Reforming {l_brace}SMR{r_brace}, water for electrolysis). Cooling water, by distinction, is used indirectly to cool related fluids or equipment, and is an important factor in making plant processes efficient and reliable. Hydrogen production further relies on water used indirectly to generate other feedstocks required by a hydrogen plant. This second order indirect water is referred to here as 'embedded' water. For example, electricity production uses significant quantities of water; this 'thermoelectric cooling' contributes significantly to the total water footprint of the hydrogen production chain. A comprehensive systems analysis of the hydrogen economy includes the aggregate of the water intensities from every step in the production chain including direct, indirect, and embedded water. Process and cooling waters have distinct technical quality requirements. Process water, which is typically high purity (limited dissolved solids) is used inside boilers, reactors or electrolyzers because as it changes phase or is consumed, it leaves very little residue behind. Pre-treatment of 'raw' source water to remove impurities not only enables efficient hydrogen production, but also reduces maintenance costs associated with component degradation due to those impurities. Cooling water has lower overall quality specifications, though it is required in larger volumes. Cooling water has distinct quality requirements aimed at preserving the cooling equipment by reducing scaling and fouling from untreated water. At least as important as the quantity, quality and cost of water inputs to a process are the quantity, quality and cost of water discharge. In many parts of the world, contamination from wastewater streams is a far greater threat to water supply than scarcity or drought (Brooks, 2002). Wastewater can be produced during the pre-treatment processes for process and cooling water, and is also sometimes generated during the hydrogen production and cooling operations themselves. Wastewater is, by definition, lower quality than supply water. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities can handle some industrial wastewaters; others must be treated on-site or recycled. Any of these options can incur additional cost and/or complexity. DOE's 'H2A' studies have developed cost and energy intensity estimates for a variety of hydrogen production pathways. These assessments, however, have not focused on the details of water use, treatment and disposal. As a result, relatively coarse consumption numbers have been used to estimate water intensities. The water intensity for hydrogen production ranges between 1.5-40 gallons per kilogram of hydrogen, including the embedded water due to electricity consumption and considering the wide variety of hydrogen production, water treatment, and cooling options. Understanding the consequences of water management choices enables stakeholders to make informed decisions regarding water use. Water is a fundamentally reg

Simon, A J; Daily, W; White, R G

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 31 Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-3 Fatty Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 31 Food Sources and Intakes of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf ...

239

Characterization studies for the reuse of phosphogypsum as a raw material in the civil construction industry of Brazil  

SciTech Connect

NORM stands for 'naturally occurring radioactive material', which is a material that naturally contains one or more radionuclides, mainly, uranium, thorium and potassium-40, and their radioactive decay products, such as radium and radon. An example of this material is the Phosphogypsum (PG), which results from the processing of phosphate ore into phosphoric acid for fertilizer production. In order to support regulation of the reuse of phosphogypsum as a raw material of the Brazilian civil construction industry, a characterization study was performed. The physical and chemical properties of PG and natural gypsum were determinate by evaluating the results of thermal (DTA and TG), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and laser granulometric analyses. The radioactivity concentration of each sample was measured by gamma spectrometry analyses. The results of thermal analyses demonstrated that phosphogypsum must be treated (initially heated in an electrical oven at 60 deg. C for 24 hours, then sieved and heated again at 160 deg. C for one hour) to obtain the same mineralogical properties of the gypsum used in the civil construction industry. The X- ray fluorescence analysis showed that PG and natural gypsum are similar with both being composed mainly of S, O, Ca, P and small quantities of trace elements (Ce, Ti, La, Sr, Zr, and Pr). The main crystalline compounds found in PG samples were gypsita (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) and in natural gypsum were bassanite (CaSO{sub 4}.0.5H{sub 2}O). The concentration of Ra-226, Ra-228 and Pb-210 present in PG samples was 467 Bq/kg, 224 Bq/kg and 395 Bq/kg, respectively. The levels of radioactivity in natural gypsum samples were much lower (around 3 Bq/kg). The same behavior was observed for the uranium and thorium content. The results of all the analyses showed that phosphogypsum can be a viable substitute for gypsum, after certain, beneficial processes. (authors)

Jacomino, V.M. [Development Center of Nuclear Technology, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Canut, M.; Magalhaes Gomes, A.; Yoshida, M.I. [Federal Univ. of Minas Geris, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Fields, D. [Roane State Community College, Mathematics and Sciences Div., Roane State Community College, Harriman, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Inhalation and Ingestion Intakes with Associated Dose Estimates for Level II and Level III Personnel Using Capstone Study Data  

SciTech Connect

Depleted uranium (DU) intake rates and subsequent dose rates were estimated for personnel entering armored combat vehicles perforated with DU penetrators (level II and level III personnel) using data generated during the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. Inhalation intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cascade impactors worn by sample recovery personnel and from cascade impactors that served as area monitors. Ingestion intake rates and associated dose rates were estimated from cotton gloves worn by sample recovery personnel and from wipe test samples from the interior of vehicles perforated with large caliber DU munitions. The mean DU inhalation intake rate for level II personnel ranged from 0.447 mg h-1 based on breathing zone monitor data (in and around a perforated vehicle) to 14.5 mg h-1 based on area monitor data (in a perforated vehicle). The mean DU ingestion intake rate for level II ranged from 4.8 mg h-1 to 38.9 mg h-1 based on the wipe test data including surface to glove transfer factors derived from the Capstone data. Based on glove contamination data, the mean DU ingestion intake rates for level II and level III personnel were 10.6 mg h-1 was and 1.78 mg h-1, respectively. Effective dose rates and peak kidney uranium concentration rates were calculated based on the intake rates. The peak kidney uranium concentration rate cannot be multiplied by the total exposure duration when multiple intakes occur because uranium will clear from the kidney between the exposures.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Lodde, Gordon M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Daxon, Eric G.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect on water and gas usage from cross-flow betweencontrols have on water and gas usage over a large number ofsystems, and their water and gas usage. Hourly schedules for

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Efficient Water Use & Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainability Goals Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary...

243

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A white paper describing produced water from production ofCE, Veil JA. 2009. Produced Water Volumes and Managementunderground formations (produced water) are often extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California’s Water Conservation Standards for ResidentialCalifornia Urban Water Conservation Council, 2006. http://http://www.nrdc.org/water/conservation/edrain/edrain.pdf

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Texas Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coil hot water storage tank, a backup instantaneous electric water heater, a hydronic fan coil unit for space heating, and an efficient plumbing manifold for domestic hot water...

246

Water Permits (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

247

Three-dimensional modeling of diesel engine intake flow, combustion and emissions-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computer code, KIVA, is being modified to include state-of-the-art submodels for diesel engine flow and combustion. Improved and/or new submodels which have already been implemented and previously reported are: Wall heat transfer with unsteadiness and compressibility, laminar-turbulent characteristic time combustion with unburned HC and Zeldo`vich NO{sub x}, and spray/wall impingement with rebounding and sliding drops. Progress on the implementation of improved spray drop drag and drop breakup models, the formulation and testing of a multistep kinetics ignition model and preliminary soot modeling results are described in this report. In addition, the use of a block structured version of KIVA to model the intake flow process is described. A grid generation scheme has been developed for modeling realistic (complex) engine geometries, and computations have been made of intake flow in the ports and combustion chamber of a two-intake-valve engine. The research also involves the use of the code to assess the effects of subprocesses on diesel engine performance. The accuracy of the predictions is being tested by comparisons with engine experiments. To date, comparisons have been made with measured engine cylinder pressure, temperature and heat flux data, and the model results are in good agreement with the experiments. Work is in progress that will allow validation of in-cylinder flow and soot formation predictions. An engine test facility is described that is being used to provide the needed validation data. Test results have been obtained showing the effect of injection rate and split injections on engine performance and emissions.

Reitz, R.D.; Rutland, C.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Influence of chemical characterization of oil shale solids on understanding water quality impacts  

SciTech Connect

Synfuels technologies will yield products and effluents that are a function of the raw material being processed and the process variables. Chemical and mineralogic characterization of solids generated in synfuels production provide valuable insight into health and environmental impacts associated with synfuels processing (coal liquefaction or gasification and shale oil extraction). This report deals with considerations relating to leachate generation from solid wastes, but the suggested research approach is applicable to understanding the nature and extent of all effluents from synfuels operations. Solid characterization studies of one raw shale core and two spent shale cores from Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site are described. These data are used to determine the effect of processing on the shale solids and also to evaluate a variety of water quality issues associated with in situ processing. The importance of solid characterization studies in developing an understanding of effluent composition and behavior and subsequently defining environmental impacts is described.

Peterson, E.J.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method and apparatus for extracting water from air  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water (ideally isothermal to a humidity of 1.0, then adiabatic thereafter). The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Method and apparatus for extracting water from air  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method and apparatus for extracting liquid water from moist air using minimal energy input. The method comprises compressing moist air under conditions that foster the condensation of liquid water. The air can be decompressed under conditions that do not foster the vaporization of the condensate. The decompressed, dried air can be exchanged for a fresh charge of moist air and the process repeated. The liquid condensate can be removed for use. The apparatus can comprise a compression chamber having a variable internal volume. An intake port allows moist air into the compression chamber. An exhaust port allows dried air out of the compression chamber. A condensation device fosters condensation at the desired conditions. A condensate removal port allows liquid water to be removed.

Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Callow, Diane Schafer (Albuquerque, NM); Marron, Lisa C. (Albuquerque, NM); Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Coastal Boundary Layer: Pattern, Mechanism, and Ecological Effects of Decreased Alongshore Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

entrainment in cooling water intakes: spatially explicitentrainment in cooling water intakes: spatially explicit

Nickols, Kerry Jean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

STRAWBERRY ISLAND PHASE III EROSION CONTROL AND WETLAND HABITAT RESTORATION: A CASE STUDY IN THE SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF IN-LIEU FEE MITIGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locates municipal water intakes beneath it. The Strawberrybelow: • A municipal water intake structure is located

Spierto, Timothy J.; Lazazzero, Sarah A.; Nelson, Patricia L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Water Beetles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beetles Beetles Nature Bulletin No. 639-A April 29, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis Supt. of Conservation WATER BEETLES The world is full of beetles. They live everywhere except in the oceans and in the polar regions. There are more of them than any other kind of insect. A quarter of a million species are known and new ones are being discovered every year. Whether it is a microscopic mushroom beetle a hundredth of an inch long, or a giant six-inch Hercules beetle from South America, it can be recognized by its wings. The upper pair forms a hard shell curving like a shield over the thin folded lower wings and the abdomen. In flight, the upper pair is extended like the wings of an airplane and the lower two become buzzing propellers.

255

Water watch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydropower Generation Report provides generation figures for the largest hydropower producers in each of six regions in the US. The report compares, for each month, the amount of hydroelectricity generated (in thousands of megawatt-hours) by each producers in the last two years to the ten-year average for that month. This database is used to figure long-term generation averages and percent of averages. The producers regularly provide current generation data to update the database. This issue of [open quotes]Water Watch[close quotes] focuses on winter snow conditions across the US as of mid-January. In addition, the department provides an outlook of spring flood potential. The information presented is based on data from the US Geological Survey, the National Weather Service, and the Soil Conservation Service.

Not Available

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &share some of the water-conservation techniques used at theWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Drinking Water Problems: Lead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in drinking water can damage the brain, kidneys, nervous system and red blood cells. This publication explains how lead can enter drinking water, how to have your water tested, and how to eliminate lead from drinking water.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

258

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &we share some of the water-conservation techniques used atWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners  

SciTech Connect

Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

NIST: NIF - Water Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water Sensitivity. Neutrons are extremely sensitive to small amounts of water. To quantify and calibrate this sensitivity we ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

262

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

Maria Cadeddu

264

WATER AND GROWTH: FUTURE WATER SUPPLIES FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Reclaimed Water As people use water, a wastewater stream is produced. Once cleaned to acceptable standards and is available as reclaimed water. #12;20 New growth in central Arizona will produce significant quantities to return for wastewater treatment51 . Of the reclaimed water produced, 30% is assumed available to meet

Gelt, Joe

265

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Proper maintenance can help vehicles perform as designed, positively affecting fuel economy, emissions, and the overall drivability. This effort investigates the effect of one maintenance factor, intake air filter replacement, with primary focus on vehicle fuel economy, but also examining emissions and performance. Older studies, dealing with carbureted gasoline vehicles, have indicated that replacing a clogged or dirty air filter can improve vehicle fuel economy and conversely that a dirty air filter can be significantly detrimental to fuel economy. The effect of clogged air filters on the fuel economy, acceleration and emissions of five gasoline fueled vehicles is examined. Four of these were modern vehicles, featuring closed-loop control and ranging in model year from 2003 to 2007. Three vehicles were powered by naturally aspirated, port fuel injection (PFI) engines of differing size and cylinder configuration: an inline 4, a V6 and a V8. A turbocharged inline 4-cylinder gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine powered vehicle was the fourth modern gasoline vehicle tested. A vintage 1972 vehicle equipped with a carburetor (open-loop control) was also examined. Results reveal insignificant fuel economy and emissions sensitivity of modern vehicles to air filter condition, but measureable effects on the 1972 vehicle. All vehicles experienced a measured acceleration performance penalty with clogged intake air filters.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Author manuscript, published in "SPARS'09- Signal Processing with Adaptive Sparse Structured Representations (2009)" 1 Compressed sensing based compression of SAR raw data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—Due to their noise-like features, SAR images are difficult to acquire with compressed sensing techniques. However, some parts of the images, typically associated to man-made structures, are compressible and we investigate two techniques exploiting that information to allow a compressive acquisition of the whole image. These techniques result in a significant enhancement of the image quality compared to classical compressed sensing. Moreover, compared to classical sampling and quantisation of the SAR raw data, they allow a significant reduction of bitrate with a limited increase of the distortion. However, their efficiency depends strongly on the presence of compressible parts in the image. I.

Gabriel Rilling; Mike Davies; Bernard Mulgrew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Asotin Creek ISCO Water Sample Data Summary: Water Year 2002, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pomeroy Ranger District operates 3 automated water samplers (ISCOs) in the Asotin Creek drainage in cooperation with the Asotin Model Watershed. The samplers are located on Asotin Creek: Asotin Creek at the mouth, Asotin Creek at Koch site, and South Fork Asotin Creek above the forks. At the end of Water Year (WY) 2001 we decided to sample from Oct. 1 through June 30 of each water year. This decision was based on the difficulty of obtaining good low flow samples, since the shallow depth of water often meant that instrument intakes were on the bed of the river and samples were contaminated with bed sediments. The greatest portion of suspended sediment is transported during the higher flows of fall and especially during the spring snow runoff period, and sampling the shorter season should allow characterization of the sediment load of the river. The ISCO water samplers collected a daily composite sample of 4 samples per day into one bottle at 6-hour intervals until late March when they were reprogrammed to collect 3 samples per day at 8-hour intervals. This was done to reduce battery use since battery failure had become an ongoing problem. The water is picked up on 24-day cycles and brought to the Forest Service Water Lab in Pendleton, OR. The samples are analyzed for total suspended solids (TSS), conductivity, and turbidity. A total dissolved solids value is estimated based on conductivity. The USGS gage, Asotin Creek at the mouth, No.13335050 has been discontinued and there are no discharge records available for this period.

Peterson, Stacia

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Partnering to Save Water  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

269

COOLING WATER ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES AT U.S. NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared for the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), for the purpose of providing a status report on the challenges and opportunities facing the U.S. commercial nuclear energy industry in the area of plant cooling water supply. The report was prompted in part by recent Second Circuit and Supreme Court decisions regarding cooling water system designs at existing thermo-electric power generating facilities in the U.S. (primarily fossil and nuclear plants). At issue in the courts have been Environmental Protection Agency regulations that define what constitutes “Best Technology Available” for intake structures that withdraw cooling water that is used to transfer and reject heat from the plant’s steam turbine via cooling water systems, while minimizing environmental impacts on aquatic life in nearby water bodies used to supply that cooling water. The report was also prompted by a growing recognition that cooling water availability and societal use conflicts are emerging as strategic energy and environmental issues, and that research and development (R&D) solutions to emerging water shortage issues are needed. In particular, cooling water availability is an important consideration in siting decisions for new nuclear power plants, and is an under-acknowledged issue in evaluating the pros and cons of retrofitting cooling towers at existing nuclear plants. Because of the significant ongoing research on water issues already being performed by industry, the national laboratories and other entities, this report relies heavily on ongoing work. In particular, this report has relied on collaboration with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), including its recent work in the area of EPA regulations governing intake structures in thermoelectric cooling water systems.

Gary Vine

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Excess consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and sodium in children and adolescents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with 100% juice or water intake Milk intake inverselyOnce water is included with dietary intake, the differenceswater based on heath risks of excessive sodium intake and

Banerjee, Victoria; Dankiewicz, Cheryl

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Labs21 Laboratory Modeling Guidelines using ASHRAE 90.1-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

based on limiting water intake. Intake Louvers Intake DamperIntake Sound Attenuator 0.03” w.g. per ASHRAE DFDB @ 500 fpm Preheat Coil – Hot Water &

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ecological Restoration Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act: Issues in Implementation: Presentation at the AFS-EPRI 2004 Symp osium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compact disc (CD) contains presentations made at the EPRI sponsored symposium "Ecological Restoration Under §316(b) of the Clean Water Act: Issues in Implementation" held in association with the annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society (AFS), Madison, WI, August 22-25, 2004. The CD extends the technical information presented in the 2003 EPRI report (1007454) "Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing ...

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation of Biocriteria as a Concept, Approach and Tool for Assessing Impacts of Entrainment and Impingement under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the current state of development of multimetric bioassessment and biocriteria for assessing the biological integrity of aquatic ecosystems. The report also examines the suitability of multimetric bioassessment for regulating cooling water intake structures (CWIS) under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). This report will be valuable to industry, resource agencies, non-governmental environmental organizations, and universities involved in research, management, and protection...

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Internal Dose Magnitude Estimation Using Annual Limits on Intake (ALI) Comparisons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008, current version: 07/2013) Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008, current version: 07/2013) Rapid Internal and External Dose Magnitude Estimation The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site REAC/TS PO Box 117, MS-39 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (865)576-3131 www.orise.orau.gov/reacts prepared by: Stephen L. (Steve) Sugarman, MS, CHP, CHCM Health Physics Project Manager Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory Coordinator Early Internal and External Dose Estimation (initial version: 08/2008, current version: 07/2013) Internal Dose Magnitude Estimation Using Annual Limits on Intake (ALI) Comparisons and Derived Reference Levels (DRLs) Assessing the radiological condition of injured personnel is an important part of the health physicist's job, although hopefully, one that is not done very often. There are many things to be

275

Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy--ORNL/TM-2009/021  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

021 021 Effect of Intake Air Filter Condition on Vehicle Fuel Economy February 2009 Prepared by Kevin Norman Shean Huff Brian West DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

276

Fecal near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy calibrations for predicting diet quality and intake of donkeys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of these studies was to develop near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy calibration equations from diet-fecal pair datasets to predict the diet quality and intake of donkeys. One hundred-forty diet-fecal pair samples were generated from two independent in vivo feeding trials conducted in the United States (N = 100) and Africa (N = 40). At each site, ten female donkeys were fed mixed diets blended from 25 forage and crop residues. The modified partial least square model (MPLS) was used to develop calibration equations for crude protein (CP), digestible organic matter (DOM), dry matter digestibility (DDM) and organic matter digestibility (OMD), for the US, Africa and US/Africa combined datasets, and dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) intake calibrations from the US datasets. Crude protein (CP) equations were developed with standard error of calibration (SEC) 0.90, (SEL = 0.5). The US, US/Africa and Africa CP equations had SEC value of 0.77, 0.97 and 0.88 with corresponding R2 of 0.97, 0.95 and 0.88, respectively. Validation of the US CP equation resulted in a standard error of prediction (SEP) of 1.79 with corresponding coefficient of correlation (r2) of 0.82 and slope of 0.84 indicating high accuracy of prediction. In vivo derived DOM equations were also developed for the US, Africa and US/Africa datasets with SEC values of 2.58, 4.91 and 3.52, and R2 of 0.60, 0.81 and 0.84, respectively. In addition, the SEC and R2 values were 3.25 and 0.72 for US OMD, 3.28 and 0.79 for US DDM, and 4.2 and 0.85 for US/Africa OMD, and 4.3 and 0.87 for US/Africa DDM equation, respectively. Calibration equations for predicting DMI and OMI have resulted in SEC values of 3.45 and 3.21 (g/kgw0.75) and R2 values of 0.89 and 0.84, respectively. The present study explored the relationship between DMI and diet quality attributes. Crude protein and digestible organic matter to crude protein ration (DOM/CP) with r2 values of 0.60 and 0.39, respectively, have shown good correlations with intake. The present studies have confirmed the potential for the fecal NIRS profiling for predicting CP, DOM, DDM, OMD, DMI and OMI of donkeys. Both calibration and validation results have indicated that the present donkey equations were comparable to previously developed equations for ruminants; they have the capability for accurate prediction of diet quality and intake, and can be a useful tool for monitoring the nutritional well-being of donkeys with acceptable accuracy. Research works to further expand the present calibration equations with additional diet-fecal samples particularly from Africa that did not meet the required accuracy level is recommended.

Kidane, Negusse Fessehaye

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Utilizing intake-air oxygen-enrichment technology to reduce cold- phase emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen-enriched combustion is a proven, serious considered technique to reduce exhaust hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from automotive gasoline engines. This paper presents the cold-phase emissions reduction results of using oxygen-enriched intake air containing about 23% and 25% oxygen (by volume) in a vehicle powered by a spark-ignition (SI) engine. Both engineout and converter-out emissions data were collected by following the standard federal test procedure (FTP). Converter-out emissions data were also obtained employing the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) ``Off-Cycle`` test. Test results indicate that the engine-out CO emissions during the cold phase (bag 1) were reduced by about 46 and 50%, and HC by about 33 and 43%, using nominal 23 and 25% oxygen-enriched air compared to ambient air (21% oxygen by volume), respectively. However, the corresponding oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions were increased by about 56 and 79%, respectively. Time-resolved emissions data indicate that both HC and CO emissions were reduced considerably during the initial 127 s of the cold-phase FTP, without any increase in NO, emissions in the first 25 s. Hydrocarbon speciation results indicate that all major toxic pollutants, including ozone-forming specific reactivity factors, such as maximum incremental reactivity (NUR) and maximum ozone incremental reactivity (MOIR), were reduced considerably with oxygen-enrichment. Based on these results, it seems that using oxygen-enriched intake air during the cold-phase FTP could potentially reduce HC and CO emissions sufficiently to meet future emissions standards. Off-cycle, converter-out, weighted-average emissions results show that both HC and CO emissions were reduced by about 60 to 75% with 23 or 25% oxygen-enrichment, but the accompanying NO{sub x}, emissions were much higher than those with the ambient air.

Poola, R.B.; Ng, H.K.; Sekar, R.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Baudino, J.H. [Autoresearch Labs., Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); Colucci, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards .. 4 Multi-FamilyWater Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards 11 Multi-FamilyWater Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards 48 Multi-Family

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

MHK Technologies/Deep Water Pipelines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Pipelines Water Pipelines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Water Pipelines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters Technology Resource Click here Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Technology Type Click here Closed-cycle Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Examples include 24 pipe for Mini OTEC four 12 55 pipelines at Hawaii Natural Energy Laboratory with intakes from 2200 to 3000 deep used for OTEC research Significant work on 8 ft DoE pipeline in 1980s India OTEC pipe concept design in 1999 Developed gripper for novel OTEC Cold water pipe concept developed by Lockheed Martin Related technology of SeaWater Air Conditioning has resulted in five other subsea pipelines for Cornell University a resort in Bora Bora and Toronto saving 80 MW of air conditioning power

280

Water heater heat reclaimer  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to the conservation of energy in a domestic gas water heater by utilizing the hot exhaust gases in a gas water heater for the preheating of the incoming unheated water into the water heater. The exhaust gases from a domestic gas water heater carry wasted heat and the present invention provides a mean to reclaim part of the wasted heat for the preheating of the incoming unheated water during hot water usage periods. During non hot water usage periods the heat in the exhaust gases is not reclaimed to prevent overheating of the water and also to prevent the formation of water deposit in the preheating assembly or heat reclaimer. During the non hot water usage periods the heat produced in the water heater is normally needed only to maintain the desired water temperature of the stored water in the water tank of the water heater. Due to the rapid heating or recovery rate, the present invention enables the use of a smaller water heater. The use of a smaller water heater reduces the normal heat loss from the stored hot water thereby further reduces energy consumption.

Wie, C.T.

1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE OF A FORMULA SAE INTAKE SYSTEM USING FUSED DEPOSITION MODELING AND FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the composite fabric occur during layup, there is no need to restart the process as the ABS shell provides's resistivity to heat. The final manifold, featuring the completed composite layup and assembly of all mounts. Figure 7. Completed intake system, following the composite layup process and final assembly of sensors

Senger, Ryan S.

282

Energy or nitrogen supply to sheep fed Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves-based diets : effects on intake and digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy or nitrogen supply to sheep fed Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves-based diets : effects preliminary results of a study dealing with the effect of energy (spineless cactus) or nitrogen (urea) supply by urea supply (D2) but tended to decrease with cactus supply (D3). Highest intake of acacia was recorded

Recanati, Catherine

283

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

284

Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They...

285

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Water, Water Everywhere: How Can We Understand It?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Science Afternoon. Water, Water Everywhere: How Can We Understand It? An exploration of water using physical models and computer simulation. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Drinking Water Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water, and the potential health effects of each contaminant regulated. People who use water from private sources such as wells can also use these standards as a guide in checking whether their water is safe.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BH-DS-171  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DS-171 DS-171 Title: Use RW Surge Line to BH Anhydrite Pond for RWIS Recycle Description: DOE M&O Contractor will cap the existing recycle line at the BH raw water intake structure for repair work and install a valve in place of the existing surge relief valve to serve as a recycle valve to control flow from the BH raw water intake pumps. The raw water surge line will discharge to the BH anhydrite pond while repairs are being made to the recycle line. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart 0 are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment

290

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SPATIAL DATA ON ENERGY, ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIOECONOMIC, HEALTH AND DEMOGRAPHIC THEMES AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY: 1978 INVENTORY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the survey include (1) purpose of water intake (2) originof fresh water intake (3) water discharged or type oftreated and untreated intake water (2) daily average flow

Burkhart Ed., B.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Ultraviolet Water Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV Ray of Hope for Safer Drinking Water. ... It is not, however, too soon for the American Water Works Association to express its appreciation. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

293

NETL: Water - Energy Interface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Water - Energy Interface Innovations for Existing Plants Water - Energy Interface Previous Next...

294

Membranes for Clean Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membranes for Clean Water. Summary: ... Description: Impact. Access to affordable, clean water is vital to the nation's economic growth and security. ...

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

Drinking Water Problems: Copper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp.

Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water and wasted embodied energy. While 5% of California'senergy intensive (94). Water- inefficient fixtures and fittings (toilets, showerheads, urinals, faucets) represent both wasted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Review: Globalization of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using virtual water (e.g. coffee produced in an environmentis produced in an environment in which it takes less water

Tennant, Matthew Aaron

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Water-heating dehumidifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Research Addressing Power Plant Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Addressing Power Plant Water Management to Minimize Water Use while Providing Reliable Electricity Generation Water and Energy 2 Water and Energy are inextricably linked. Because...

300

Stable slurries of solid carbonaceous fuel and water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a pumpable slurry of solid carbonaceous fuel and water with reduced viscosity and sedimentation rate for use as feed to a partial oxidation gas generator for the production of raw synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas by reacting in the gas generator with a free-oxygen containing gas. The slurry comprises about 50 to 75 weight percent of high rank comminuted solid carbonaceous fuel having 5.0 weight percent or below of organically combined oxygen wherein the solid carbonaceous fuel is selected from the group consisting of anthracite coal, petroleum coke, coal liquefaction solid residue, asphaltic bitumen, and mixtures thereof; and about 0.001 to 0.100 parts by weight of a surfactant for each part by weight of the solid carbonaceous fuel.

Yaghmaie, F.; McKeon, R.J.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lawn Water Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties, management practices and watering techniques.

McAfee, James

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

The relationship between residual feed intake and feeding behavior in growing heifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to determine if feeding behavior traits are correlated with performance and feed efficiency traits in growing heifers. Individual dry matter intake (DMI) was measured in Brangus heifers (n = 115) fed a roughage-based diet (ME = 2.1 Mcal/kg) for 70 d using Calan gate feeders (6 heifers/pen). Residual feed intake (RFI) was computed as the residuals from linear regression of DMI on mid-test BW0.75 and average daily gain (ADG). Heifers with the highest (n = 18) and lowest (n = 18) RFI were identified for feeding behavior measurements. During days 28 through 56 of the 70-d feeding trial, continuous video recordings were obtained for all heifers. Video images of two sets of four 24-h periods, two weeks apart, were analyzed for the focal animals. All occurrences of feeding were timed and counted per day, and the eight 24-h periods averaged to derive the overall feeding event (FE) and meal duration and frequency for each focal heifer. Total feeding event duration was defined as the total min per day the animal’s head was down in the feed bunk. A meal included all visits an animal made to the feed bunk that were separated by less than 5 min. The mean RFI values for the low and high RFI heifers were (mean ± SE) - 1.03 and 1.00 ± 0.03 kg/d, respectively. Low RFI heifers consumed 21.9% less (P < 0.0001) DMI, but had similar BW and ADG compared to high RFI heifers. Heifers with low RFI spent more time (P < 0.0001) eating (152 vs 124 ± 4.26 min/d) at a lower eating rate (62.8 vs 99.6 ± 3.28 g/min), but had similar FE frequencies compared to high RFI heifers. Feeding event duration was negatively correlated with RFI while FE frequency and FE eating rate were positively correlated with RFI. However, meal duration and frequency were not correlated with RFI. Therefore, measuring FE characteristics could prove more useful than analyzing meals when trying to predict RFI. Additionally, eating rate appeared to be more closely related to RFI than any of the other feeding behavior traits measured.

Bingham, Glenda Marie

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fixtures Market Overview: Water Savings Potential forNew Jersey. American Water Works Association ResearchResidential End Uses of Water (REUWS). 1999. American Water

McNeil, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Service Water Piping Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the years 1988 and 1989, EPRI organized the Service Water Working Group (SWWG) to identify and help resolve the many issues surrounding service water (SW) systems in nuclear power plants. One issue identified by the SWWG was corrosion in service water piping systems. Interest in this issue resulted in the development of several technical reports: Guidelines for the Repair/Replacement Welding of Nuclear Service Water Systems, TR-100386; Guide for the Examination of Service Water System Piping, TR-10206...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Energy Water Linkage: Projected Water Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 2004 Executive Summary Thermoelectric generation requires large volumes of water, primarily for cooling. An analysis was conducted to estimate the demand...

306

Desalination discharge in shallow coastal waters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For the design of a desalination plant, the intake and outfall structures need to be properly addressed. From an environmental viewpoint, it is important to… (more)

Shao, Dongdong.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices Guide: Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : B e s t P r a c t i c e s Modeling exhaust dispersion for specifying acceptable exhaust/intake designs Introduction This guide provides general information on specify- ing acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also offers various quantitative approaches (dispersion modeling) that can be used to determine expected concentration (or dilution) levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint pro- gram of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

308

Reactor water cleanup system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Taft, William E. (Los Gatos, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Instantaneous gas water heater  

SciTech Connect

Hot water supply temperature is set by a temperature setting device in response to an instantaneous flow rate signal from a water flow rate sensor arranged in a water supply pipe and a feeding water temperature signal from a feeding water temperature sensor which are compared with a predetermined hot water supply temperature and calculated in a control unit. A proportional valve and other devices in a gas supply pipe are controlled in response to the result of the comparison and calculation to define a required volume of gas for ignition and heating. At the same time, a fan damper is controlled by a damper control device so as to adjust the volume of combustion air. A signal representing discharging hot water temperature from a discharging hot water temperature sensor arranged in a hot water feeding pipe is fed back to the control unit and calculated therein, and a valve in the hot water supply pipe is adjusted in response to the result of calculation to attain the desired hot water supply temperature. In order to prevent freezing in the system in winter season, a signal from a thermostat in the water feeding pipe is transmitted to a heater arranged in an air supply chamber so as to heat a heat exchanger pipe and, at the same time, heaters arranged in the water feeding pipe and the hot water supply pipe are also controlled to prevent freezing.

Tsutsui, O.; Kuwahara, H.; Murakami, Sh.; Yasunaga, Sh.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

310

Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

controls. This response applies to markets that have a demand for central water heating systems Distribution Systems Subtask 2.1 Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability systems in multifamily buildings. This market characterization study is helping HMG develop

311

A NOVEL CONCEPT FOR REDUCING WATER USAGE AND INCREASING EFFICIENCY IN POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to apply a unique ice thermal storage (ITS) technology to cooling the intake air to gas turbines used for power generation. In Phase I, the work includes theoretical analysis, computer simulation, engineering design and cost evaluation of this novel ITS technology. The study includes two typical gas turbines (an industrial and an aeroderivative type gas turbine) operated at two different geographic locations: Phoenix, AZ and Houston, TX. Simulation runs are performed to generate data for both power output (KW) and heat rate (Btu/KWh) as well as water recovery (acre ft/yr) in terms of intake air temperature and humidity based on weather data and turbine performance curves. Preliminary engineering design of a typical equipment arrangement for turbine inlet air-cooling operation using the ITS system is presented. A cost analysis has been performed to demonstrate the market viability of the ITS technology. When the ITS technology is applied to gas turbines, a net power gain up to 40% and a heat rate reduction as much as 7% can be achieved. In addition, a significant amount of water can be recovered (up to 200 acre-ft of water per year for a 50 MW turbine). The total cost saving is estimated to be $500,000/yr for a 50 MW gas turbine generator. These results have clearly demonstrated that the use of ITS technology to cool the intake-air to gas turbines is an efficient and cost effective means to improve the overall performance of its power generation capacity with an important added benefit of water recovery in power plant operation. Thus, further development of ITS technology for commercial applications in power generation, particularly in coal-based IGCC power plants is warranted.

Shiao-Hung Chiang; Guy Weismantel

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

ii Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling and slickwater hydrofracturing have enabled shale gas to become a significant contributor to the United States ’ energy supply. Hydrofracturing typically requires 2MM – 6.5MM gallons of water per shale gas well. About 15-25 % of this water returns to the surface as “flowback ” within 30 days after hydrofracturing. “Produced water ” continues to flow at a much reduced rate, e.g. 2-10 bbl/day, for the life of the well. In addition to high salinity and hardness levels (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), much Marcellus produced water also contains significant levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), particularly radium. The near absence of disposal wells in Pennsylvania initially forced much of the produced water to be trucked into Ohio for disposal by deep-well injection (UIC). Currently up to 95 % of the

Principal Investigator; James M. Silva; James M. Silva; Hope Matis; William L. Kostedt Iv; Vicki Watkins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

ECOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS OF THE SOLAR ALTERNATIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3% are expected. The cold water intake Efficiencies on thethermal patterns cold water intake, hot water heat exchanger

Davidson, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation and initial water intake of the buffer over asaturated with water. Water intake is a slow process because

Steefel, Carl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Download

317

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease CausationChapter 29 Omega-3 versus Omega-6 Fatty Acid Intake and Immunity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatty Acids in Health Promotion and Disease Causation Chapter 29 Omega-3 versus Omega-6 Fatty Acid Intake and Immunity Health Nutrition Biochemistry Omega 3 eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable

318

Comparison of Intake Gate Closure Methods At Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, And McNary Dams Using Risk-Based Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to compare the benefits and costs of modifications proposed for intake gate closure systems at four hydroelectric stations on the Lower Snake and Upper Columbia Rivers in the Walla Walla District that are unable to meet the COE 10-minute closure rule due to the installation of fish screens. The primary benefit of the proposed modifications is to reduce the risk of damage to the station and environs when emergency intake gate closure is required. Consequently, this report presents the results and methodology of an extensive risk analysis performed to assess the reliability of powerhouse systems and the costs and timing of potential damages resulting from events requiring emergency intake gate closure. As part of this analysis, the level of protection provided by the nitrogen emergency closure system was also evaluated. The nitrogen system was the basis for the original recommendation to partially disable the intake gate systems. The risk analysis quantifies this protection level.

Gore, Bryan F; Blackburn, Tye R; Heasler, Patrick G; Mara, Neil L

2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Energy-Water Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emerging Issues and Challenges Emerging Issues and Challenges DOE/EIA 2010 Energy Conference Mike Hightower Sandia National Laboratories mmhight@sandia.gov, 505-844-5499 Energy and Water are ... Interdependent Water for Energy and Energy for Water Energy and power production require water: * Thermoelectric cooling * Hydropower * Energy minerals extraction/mining * Fuel Production (fossil fuels, H 2 , biofuels) * Emission control Water production, processing, distribution, and end-use require energy: * Pumping * Conveyance and Transport * Treatment * Use conditioning * Surface and Ground water Water Consumption by Sector U.S. Freshwater Consumption, 100 Bgal/day Livestock 3.3% Thermoelectric 3.3% Commercial 1.2% Domestic 7.1% Industrial 3.3% Mining 1.2% Irrigation 80.6% Energy uses 27 percent of all non-agricultural fresh water

320

Water Management Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water efficiency water efficiency at Federal sites Background The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during fiscal year 2010. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y-12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements. The water-assessment team learned key lessons from the Y-12 assessment. Therefore, the aim of this document is to share these key lessons to help other large process-driven sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) and beyond develop a comprehensive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Water Management Planning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

water efficiency water efficiency at Federal sites Background The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored a water assessment at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, during fiscal year 2010. Driven by mandated water reduction goals of Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, the objective of the water assessment was to develop a comprehensive understanding of the current water-consuming applications and equipment at Y-12 and to identify key areas for water efficiency improvements. The water-assessment team learned key lessons from the Y-12 assessment. Therefore, the aim of this document is to share these key lessons to help other large process-driven sites at the Department of Energy (DOE) and beyond develop a comprehensive

322

Water | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Water Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

323

Report on Produced Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. The cost of managing such a large volume of water is a key...

324

Boiling Water in Microwave  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boiling Water in Microwave A 26-year old man decided to have a cup of coffee. He took a cup of water and put it in the microwave to heat it up (something that he had done numerous...

325

A gathering of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Walking on water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ingenious methods employed by insects and spiders to move across a water surface rely on microphysics that is of little use to larger water walkers but of considerable interest to the microfluidics community.

Bush, John W. M.

327

Madrid Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Assessment of Hot Water System Page 1 of 2 HOT WATER SYSTEM In general, the plumbing system in MAGIC BOX is designed to concentrate all devices, be they storage,...

328

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Needs breath. Adding compost to sandy soils helps thesoil retain water longer—the compost acts like a sponge,from applications of compost and other organic matter. For

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Water Prism Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the design and implementation of Water Prism, a decision support system that evaluates alternative management plans to obtain water resource sustainability at the regional, watershed or local levels. It considers surface, ground and impoundment waters, and all water using sectors (industrial, agricultural, municipal, electric power and the environment). This report will be of value to environment, generation, and planning managers within power companies, government agencies, ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

Demystifying water treatment  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly accountable for the environmental quality and cost of managing their waste and process water streams, customers require more precise data about the constituents in their water. This has forced suppliers to unlock some of the secrets of water treatment. In the open exchange of information, users are trading in esoteric formulations for products that are more chemical efficient and environmentally benign. Factoring more prominently in the water treatment equation are service and supply. This paper reviews some of these simpler treatments.

Hairston, D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

History 4 Water Used For Fuel Production.. 4 Coal Production .. 6 Carbon Capture and Sequestration .. 7 Natural Gas

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroelectricity for agriculture and hydroelectricity. Large volumes of waterElectricity Production Hydroelectricity The most common type

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

What's In My Water?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

You can learn about the quality of your water by sending a sample to a laboratory for analysis. This publication will help you understand the lab report by explaining the properties, components and contaminants often found in water. It describes the sources of water contaminants, problems that can be caused by those contaminants, suggestions for correcting problems, and the safe levels of each contaminant in water for household use, for irrigation and for livestock.

Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. WH-OM-1081  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 81 Title: Dredging of the WH Raw Water Intake Structure Description: Subcontractor shall shall provide all materials, tools, equipment, supplies, transportation, labor, supervision, and services required to perform the work associated with the dredging of the WH Raw Water Intake Structure approach channel of mud, silt, and debris, to include cleaning the pump intake sump. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

336

Summary report on water quality, sediment and water chemistry data for water and sediment samples collected from source areas to Melton Hill and Watts Bar reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination of surface water and sediments in the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir (CR/WBR) system as a result of past and present activities by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and also activities by non-ORR facilities are being studied by the Clinch River Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP). Previous studies have documented the presence of heavy metals, organics, and radionuclides in the sediments of reservoirs in the vicinity. In support of the CR-ERP, during the summer of 1991, TVA collected and evaluated water and sediment samples from swimming areas and municipal water intakes on Watts Bar Reservoir, Melton Hill Reservoir (which is considered part of the Clinch River and Watts Bar Reservoir System), and Norris Reservoir, which was considered a source of less-contaminated reference or background data. Results of this study indicated that the levels of contamination in the samples from the Watts Bar and Melton Hill Reservoir sites did not pose a threat to human health. Despite the numerous studies, until the current work documented by this report, relatively few sediment or water samples had been collected by the CR-ERP in the immediate vicinity of contaminant point sources. This work focused on water and sediment samples taken from points immediately downstream from suspected effluent point sources both on and off the ORR. In August and September, 1994, TVA sampled surface water and sediment at twelve locations in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. Eleven of the sampling sites were selected based on existence of pollutant discharge permits, known locations of hazardous waste sites, and knowledge of past practices. The twelfth sample site was selected as a relatively less contaminated reference site for comparison purposes.

Tomaszewski, T.M.; Bruggink, D.J.; Nunn, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Saving Water Saves Energy  

SciTech Connect

Hot water use in households, for showers and baths as wellas for washing clothes and dishes, is a major driver of household energyconsumption. Other household uses of water (such as irrigatinglandscaping) require additional energy in other sectors to transport andtreat the water before use, and to treat wastewater. In California, 19percent of total electricity for all sectors combined and 32 percent ofnatural gas consumption is related to water. There is a criticalinterdependence between energy and water systems: thermal power plantsrequire cooling water, and water pumping and treatment require energy.Energy efficiency can be increased by a number of means, includingmore-efficient appliances (e.g., clothes washers or dishwashers that useless total water and less heated water), water-conserving plumbingfixtures and fittings (e.g., showerheads, faucets, toilets) and changesin consumer behavior (e.g., lower temperature set points for storagewater heaters, shorter showers). Water- and energy-conserving activitiescan help offset the stress imposed on limited water (and energy) suppliesfrom increasing population in some areas, particularly in drought years,or increased consumption (e.g., some new shower systems) as a result ofincreased wealth. This paper explores the connections between householdwater use and energy, and suggests options for increased efficiencies inboth individual technologies and systems. Studies indicate that urbanwater use can be reduced cost-effectively by up to 30 percent withcommercially available products. The energy savings associated with watersavings may represent a large additional and largely untappedcost-effective opportunity.

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy-Water Nexus  

SciTech Connect

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

Horak, W.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Corrosion in Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion of chemical lead in industrial and domestic waters...ppm hardness 22 72 Yes Slow 6.35 0.25 Cooling tower water, oxygenated, from Lake Erie 16â??29 60â??85 Complete None 134.6 5.3 Los Angeles aqueduct water, treated with chlorine

340

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Water treatment on wheels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design options and combinations of fixed and mobile demineralization equipment give power plant operators the flexibility to continually optimize their water treatment system to meet rapidly changing needs. The article classifies water treatment service contracts for demineralized water into four categories and presents associated design, economic and operational advantages to power plant designers, constructors, owners and operators. 1 tab.

Taylor, R.T.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reducing the concentration of many undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite. 1 tab.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1990-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water to remove them.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

344

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews the various options available: WET-DRY towers, or DRY-WET, or combination WET and DRY towers!

Adler, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Water treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

75: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York) Eligibility...

347

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 March 2013. (12) Water Conservation Master Plan; East Baywww.ebmud.com/for-customers/water-conservation- rebates-and-services/water-conservation-master-plan, accessed 15

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Developing and evaluating distributions for probabilistic human exposure assessments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lognormal Distributions for Water Intake by Children". Risk1998). "Lognormal Distributions for Total Water Intake andTap Water Intake by Pregnant and Lactating Women in the

Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and was able to reduce water intake by half through doublingreporting reductions in water intake of up to 50% (Polleyplant), identifying water intake savings exceeding 50%, with

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Temporal Patterning of Oral Stereotypies in Restricted-fed Fowls: 1. Investigations with a Sibgle Daily Meal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relationship between water intake and the production of "between food and water intake and the effects of waterlAl. behaviour patterns. Intakes of feed and water following

Savory, C J; Kostal, L

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Bibliography and Literature Database, Ecology of the Southern California Bight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at offshore cooling water intake structures in southernassociated with an offshore water intake structure / Helvey,associated with two water intake structures. Report for

Allen, L

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. L. 1979. A review of water intake screening options forcapacity of cooling water intake structures for minimizingvessels. a. Warm and Cold Water Intakes Volumes - A single

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Indoor air movement acceptability and thermal comfort in hot-humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

after the exposure and water intake were recorded every 30rate were recorded. Water intake was also registered basedrate where recorded. Water intake was also registered based

Candido, Christhina Maria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

San Diego Bay Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

yearly intervals. Cooling water intake system demonstration.sewage spills. Cooling water intake system demonstration ..summary cooling water intake system demonstration (in

Brueggeman, Peter

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Building-related symptoms among U.S. office workers and risks factors for moisture and contamination: Preliminary analyses of U.S. EPA BASE Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system Standing water near intake of any ventilation systemold Good Standing water near intake of any AH no Frequencynor standing water near air intakes were associated with

Mendell, Mark J.; Cozen, Myrna

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Water-Miscible (Water-Soluble) Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...the growth of microorganisms such as bacteria, algae, and fungi. If disposal is of no concern, phenolics can be used. The soaps, wetting agents, and couplers used as emulsifiers in water-miscible fluids reduce surface

357

Wiang Haeng coal-water fuel preparation and gasification, Thailand - task 39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a four-task program to assess the responsiveness of Wiang Haeng coal to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 37.4 wt% for the raw coal to about 20 wt% for the HWD coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel indicates an increase from 4450 to 6650 Btu/lb by hydrothermal treatment. Raw and HWD coal were then gasified at various mild gasification conditions of 700{degrees}C and 30 psig. The tests indicated that the coal is probably similar to other low-rank coals, will produce high levels of hydrogen, and be fairly reactive.

Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Young, B.C. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Water News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water News Water News Bioenergy Buildings Geothermal Government Energy Management Homes Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Advanced Manufacturing Solar Vehicles Water Wind Blog Archive Recent...

359

The economic conception of water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American City: municipal water supply investments. Ph. D.A . (2004). Boosting Water Productivity. In: Worldwatch1975). Issues in Village Water Supply. Washington, D . C ,

Hanemann, W. Michael

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Planning Water Use in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Par Pond water balance  

SciTech Connect

A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs Read more Selecting a New Water Heater Tankless? Storage? Solar? Save money on your water heating bill by choosing the right type of energy-efficient water heater for your needs. Read more Sizing a New Water Heater When buying a new water heater, bigger is not always better. Learn how to buy the right size of water heater. Read more You can reduce your monthly water heating bills by selecting the appropriate water heater for your home or pool and by using some energy-efficient water heating strategies. Some simple do-it-yourself projects, like insulating hot water pipes and lowering your water heating temperature, can also help you save money and energy on your water heating.

363

Production of algal-based biofuel using non-fresh water sources.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this LDRD involves development of a system dynamics model to understand the interdependencies between water resource availability and water needs for production of biofuels. Specifically, this model focuses on availability and feasibility of non-traditional water sources from dairy wastewater, produced water from crude oil production and from coal-bed methane gas extraction for the production of algal-based biofuel. The conceptual simulation framework and historical data are based on two locales within New Mexico, the San Juan basin in the northwest and the Permian basin in the southeast, where oil and gas drilling have increased considerably in the last ten years. The overall water balance ignores both transportation options and water chemistry and is broken down by county level. The resulting model contains an algal growth module, a dairy module, an oil production module, and a gas production module. A user interface is also created for controlling the adjustable parameters in the model. Our preliminary investigation indicates a cyclical demand for non-fresh water due to the cyclical nature of algal biomass production and crop evapotranspiration. The wastewater from the dairy industry is not a feasible non-fresh water source because the agricultural water demand for cow's dry feed far exceeds the amount generated at the dairy. The uncertainty associated with the water demand for cow's dry matter intake is the greatest in this model. The oil- and gas-produced water, ignoring the quality, provides ample supply for water demand in algal biomass production. There remains work to address technical challenges associated with coupling the appropriate non-fresh water source to the local demand.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Reno, Marissa Devan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Production of algal-based biofuel using non-fresh water sources.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this LDRD involves development of a system dynamics model to understand the interdependencies between water resource availability and water needs for production of biofuels. Specifically, this model focuses on availability and feasibility of non-traditional water sources from dairy wastewater, produced water from crude oil production and from coal-bed methane gas extraction for the production of algal-based biofuel. The conceptual simulation framework and historical data are based on two locales within New Mexico, the San Juan basin in the northwest and the Permian basin in the southeast, where oil and gas drilling have increased considerably in the last ten years. The overall water balance ignores both transportation options and water chemistry and is broken down by county level. The resulting model contains an algal growth module, a dairy module, an oil production module, and a gas production module. A user interface is also created for controlling the adjustable parameters in the model. Our preliminary investigation indicates a cyclical demand for non-fresh water due to the cyclical nature of algal biomass production and crop evapotranspiration. The wastewater from the dairy industry is not a feasible non-fresh water source because the agricultural water demand for cow's dry feed far exceeds the amount generated at the dairy. The uncertainty associated with the water demand for cow's dry matter intake is the greatest in this model. The oil- and gas-produced water, ignoring the quality, provides ample supply for water demand in algal biomass production. There remains work to address technical challenges associated with coupling the appropriate non-fresh water source to the local demand.

Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Reno, Marissa Devan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

200 THE INGESTION OF RADIUM 226 IN FOOD AND WATER IN GREAT BRITAIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN an earlier paper (Turner, Radley and Mayneord, 1958a) it was shown that the concentrations of naturally occurring alpha activity occurring in human bones, derived from different parts of this country, could differ by factors of the order of 10 to 1. Later papers (Turner, Radley and Mayneord, 1958b and 1961) reported measurements of the natural alpha activities, due largely to members of the radium series, present in a wide range of foods and drinking waters available in Great Britain. In the present study these data have been used to compare the mean daily intakes of radium 226 per person, from food and water respectively, in different occupational groups as well as among the populations of a number of regions of the country. It seemed possible that such comparisons would provide an indication of the relative importance of food and water in determining the range of human bone activities, due to radium 226, which might be expected among the general population. Daily intakes of alpha activity from food The daily consumptions of different foods per head of population of each

R. C. Turner

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating August 19, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis A variety of systems are available for water heating in homes and buildings. Learn about: Conventional Storage Water...

368

Virginia Tech Hot Water Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The team chose to use a water-to-water heat pump (WWHP) connected to an earth coupled heat exchanger to provide water heating. This system provides not only domestic hot water...

369

Water | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Home Water Power Forum Description: Forum for information related to the Water Power Gateway The Water Power Community Forum provides you with a way to engage with other...

370

Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Designs; Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This publication is one in series of best practice guides for ''Laboratories for the 21st Century,'' a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions.

Petersen, R. L.; Carter, J. J.; Cochran, B. C.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Publicly Submitted White Papers - Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Water. Advanced ... Strategies; AQUEOUS PHASE MERCURY REMOVAL: Strategies for a Secure Future Water Supply; ...

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suppressant:Water & Aqueous Solutions. ... Reuther, JJ; 1991. Fine Water Sprays for Fire Protection: A Halon Replacement Option.. ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

373

Raw Materials and Casting Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 11, 2010... steam turbine that would be operated in 700-760C steam conditions were tested. ... aerospace applications is a process that dates back about 80 years. ... Raising the temperature (primarily) and pressure (to a lesser extent) ...

374

Solar Water Heating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

publication provides basic informa- publication provides basic informa- tion on the components and types of solar water heaters currently available and the economic and environmental benefits of owning a system. Although the publica- tion does not provide information on building and installing your own system, it should help you discuss solar water heating systems intelligently with a solar equipment dealer. Solar water heaters, sometimes called

375

Selecting a new water heater  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Water | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

daylighting, passive solar and active solar. They also have an 80 gallon solar hot water heater. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A guide to...

377

Shield for Water Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Siimplified shielding calculations indicating the proposed design for the water boiler assembly will reduce the radiation at normal operaton to values well below those which are considered tolerable.

Balent, R.

1951-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Consumer Products: California Energy Commission PetitionCLOTHES_WASHERS.PDF> California Energy Commission. ApplianceMapTesting.lasso California Energy Commission, The Water

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Influence of Water Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...BP. Boffardi, Corrosion Inhibitors in the Water Treatment Industry, Corrosion: Fundamentals, Testing, and Protection, Vol 13A, ASM Handbook, ASM International, 2003, p 891â??906...

380

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

ELDON water heater  

SciTech Connect

Experience with the installation of an ELDON water heater in the TLC Services, Inc. laundry facility is reported. Piping diagram and pictures are included. (MHR)

Wood, H.E.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies integrated with desalination systems. Renew.IC, Soldatos PG. 2008. Water desalination cost literature:review and assessment. Desalination 223(1–3): 448–56 107.

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil recovery involves the injection of large quantities ofbarrel of oil equivalent (2). Although large quantities ofvarying, quantities of often low-quality water (2, 32). Oil

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear plants use steam turbines, and cooling water asmajority is used for steam-driven turbines, which generatedelectricity using steam engines, gas turbines, or Stirling

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Salty Water Cerenkov Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The addition of certain solutes to a water Cerenkov detector will introduce new charge-current channels for the detection of $\

W. C. Haxton

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wool and Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Wool and Water is a creative work of 36 poems. This collection examines the relationship between the silent and vocal, between the pastoral and… (more)

Frederick, Kira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Wool and water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wool and Water is a creative work of 36 poems. This collection examines the relationship between the silent and vocal, between the pastoral and urban.… (more)

Frederick, Kira.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Supplying Water Social Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handbook of Engaged Learning Projects SUPPLYING OUR WATER NEEDS: Africa Project Summary Scenario Student Pages References Index SubjectContent Area: World CulturesSocial Studies...

389

Saving Water Saves Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Procedure for Dishwashers, Federal Register, Vol. 68,e.g. , ,clothes washers or dishwashers that use less totalhes Washers Toilet s Dishwashers Figure 2a. Household Water

McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produced water into aging oil wells to help maximize oilpores until it reaches oil wells. This process can last forrock formations and reach oil wells. Using both processes,

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

OpenEI - Water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005...

392

Water Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Addthis Related Articles Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics Heat Pump Water Heater...

393

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.

Matheney, Kara J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Modeling 18° Water Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of 18° Water formation is investigated with an isopycnic-coordinate model of the North Atlantic. A 30-year spinup integration is used as a “control” experiment in which the upper water column in the Sargasso Sea is shown to be in ...

Robert Marsh; Adrian L. New

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Water Waves and Integrability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

Rossen I. Ivanov

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them.

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

400

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nutrients are available. Blowdown - the water discharged from a boiler or cooling tower to dispose and explains the procedures the owner/operator intends to take to perform assessment monitoring. Attenuation procedures. Equipotential Line - a line in a two-dimensional ground-water flow field such that the total

Soerens, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Water, Land and People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water, Land and People Water, Land and People Nature Bulletin No. 251 January 8, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER, LAND AND PEOPLE "Water, Land and People" is the title of a book which, like "Road to Survival", should be read by every American. Water, and its uses or control, has become a vital national problem. Some places, some years, we have too much of it and suffer disastrous floods. Elsewhere we have too little. In cities like New York and Los Angeles -- even in many inland towns -- and in the western lands which depend upon irrigation, the demand far exceeds the supply. Our Congress is beseeched for huge appropriations to provide flood control, navigation, electric power and irrigation.

402

Water Efficiency Program Prioritization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Program Efficiency Program Prioritization Federal Energy Management Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy January 2009 Will Lintner (william.lintner@ee.doe.gov) Federal Energy Management The Goal - EO 13423 Beginning in 2008, Federal agencies must reduce water consumption intensity through life- effective measures, relative to the baseline of the agency's water consumption in fiscal year 2007 by 2 percent annually through the end of FY 2015 or 16 percent by the end of FY 2015. 2 Water Use Intensit ty (gal/sqft) Federal Sector Glide-Path to Meeting WUI Reduction Goal 55 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 FY 07 FY 08 FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 FY 15 Total Federal sector FY07 WUI Glide-Path for meeting WUI reduction goal (16%) 3 Next Steps * Compile Water Data FY 2008. The baseline for water

403

Assessment and control of water contamination associated with shale oil extraction and processing. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory's research on assessment and control of water contamination associated with oil shale operations is directed toward the identification of potential water contamination problems and the evaluation of alternative control strategies for controlling contaminants released into the surface and underground water systems from oil-shale-related sources. Laboratory assessment activities have focused on the mineralogy, trace element concentrations in solids, and leaching characteristics of raw and spent shales from field operations and laboratory-generated spent shales. This report details the chemical, mineralogic, and solution behavior of major, minor, and trace elements in a variety of shale materials (spent shales from Occidental retort 3E at Logan Wash, raw shale from the Colony mine, and laboratory heat-treated shales generated from Colony mine raw shale). Control technology research activities have focused on the definition of control technology requirements based on assessment activities and the laboratory evaluation of alternative control strategies for mitigation of identified problems. Based on results obtained with Logan Wash materials, it appears that the overall impact of in situ processing on groundwater quality (leaching and aquifer bridging) may be less significant than previously believed. Most elements leached from MIS spent shales are already elevated in most groundwaters. Analysis indicates that solubility controls by major cations and anions will aid in mitigating water quality impacts. The exceptions include the trace elements vanadium, lead, and selenium. With respect to in situ retort leaching, process control and multistaged counterflow leaching are evaluated as alternative control strategies for mitigation of quality impacts. The results of these analyses are presented in this report.

Peterson, E.J.; Henicksman, A.V.; Fox, J.P.; O' Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optimization of Chilled Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chilled water systems are one of the major energy consumers in industrial, commercial, and institutional complexes. The centralization of chilled water systems presents numerous advantages, including simplified controls, reduced installation capacity due to diversity, and consolidated maintenance and operation. Centrally chilled water systems present potential energy and cost savings in the following areas: • Chilled water reset. • Condenser water reset. • Chiller sequencing. • Chilled water storage. • Variable chilled water pumping. The feasibility aspect of the above items will be discussed in this paper.

Gidwani, B. N.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines – Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised "Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines" to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

407

Recent California Water Transfers: Emerging Options in Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN TRANSFERS Recent years have produced increased interest in the transfer of water and waterRecent California Water Transfers: Emerging Options in Water Management by Jay R. Lund Associate for Environmental and Water Resources Engineering DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING University

Lund, Jay R.

408

WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The politics of water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wars have been waged over oil and gold, but it is water that now poses the greatest potential for provoking conflict among nations-and the greatest need for new guarantees of cooperation. Athough water is a renewable resource, it is also a finite one. Nearly 40 percent of the world's population depends on river systems shared by two or more countries, leading to political hot spots, most critically in the middle east. This article describes in detail the water problems in the middle east, starting with the Jordan River basin, the Golan Heights, and the coastal aquifer, partly polluted. On the Sinai Peninsula the Nile River is the water source for nine countries, and the Tigris-Euphrates, although still providing water in relative abundance, is prey to the failure of Iraq, Syria, and Turkey to reach water-sharing agreements. Discussion includes the possibilities of turning the win-lose situations into win-win situations by appropriate water management and the problem of lack of a clear legal framework for settling disputes.

Postel, S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperatures. The overall conclusion of this investigation is that water's hydrogen bond strength is poised centrally within a narrow window of its suitability for life.

Martin Chaplin

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

411

Brookhaven's Drinking-Water Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Quality Water Quality The Lab's finished drinking water is produced with pride by the staff of BNL's Water Treatment Facility Home Groundwater Consumer Confidence Reports Water Treatment Process Resources Tap Water Recommendations Water Cooler Cleaning Additional Resources Brookhaven Lab Drinking Water Brookhaven produces its own drinking water for all employees, facility-users, guests, residents, and visitors on site at its Water Treatment Facility (WTF). BNL's drinking water is pumped from groundwater by five active wells and processed at the WTF which can handle up to 6 million gallons per day. The "finished" water is sent to the Lab's two storage towers and then distributed around the site via 45 miles of pipeline. To ensure that Brookhaven's water meets all applicable local, state, and

412

Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Details Activities (51) Areas (45) Regions (5) NEPA(2) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Water sampling is done to characterize the geothermal system under investigation. A geothermal water typically has a unique chemical signature

413

Wind/Water Nexus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

Finkel, M.P.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Green Systems Solar Hot Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Green Systems Solar Hot Water Heating the Building Co-generation: Heat Recovery System: Solar Thermal Panels (Trex enclosure) Hot Water Storage Tank (TS-5; basement) Hot Water Heaters (HW-1,2; basement) Pre-heats water so water heaters don't need to use as much energy Gas-powered, high efficiency

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

416

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) Burbank Water and Power - Solar Water Heater Rebate Program (California) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1,500 Provider Rebates Burbank Water and Power is providing incentives for the purchase of solar water heaters. Incentives are only available to residential customers with electric water heaters. There is a limit of one solar water heater per year per property. Applicants must provide access to their residence for a pre-inspection to verify the existing use of an electric water heater. Customers must comply with all code and permit requirements. More

417

EA-1523: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1523: Finding of No Significant Impact Modifications at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's West Hackberry Raw Water Intake Structure Site, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana The U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (Attachment A) in response to a proposal to modify the West Hackberry (WH) Raw Water Intake Structure (RWIS) located near Hackberry, Louisiana. Based on the results of the EA and implementation of mitigation activities, the DOE has determined that the proposed action may result in short-term, direct environmental impacts to wetlands, biological and ecological resources, and water resources, with no potential long-term or permanent direct impacts to facility permits.

418

CX-006605: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006605: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackenberry Raw Water Intake Structure Clear Zone CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/29/2011 Location(s): Lake Charles, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, equipment, transportation, and supervision required to cut trees, brush and grass to make a "clear zone" approximately 110 feet around the perimeter of the West Hackenberry Raw Water Intake Structure. Tasks include machine clearing standing vegetation performed with cutting/grinding equipment that minimizes disturbance of the surface of the soil or root system. Trees and brush shall be removed down to approximately ground/water level. Trees and bush

419

Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WA near its municipal water intake (Richland Pump House =Richland Pump House (RPH) water intake (traverse #3, Figure

Christensen, John N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Contextual Discrimination After Nonreinforced Preexposure to the Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by five rest. Average water intake for the days fiveon score sheets. Average water intake per day for five days

Mustaca, Alba E; Pellegrini, Santago

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Control of Rickettsial Infections in White Sea Bass (Atractoscion nobilis)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the lagoon where the water intake for the hatchery isbacterium in hatchery intake water. Final Report on Specific

Hedrick, Ronald P.; Arkush, Kristen D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Water reuse and recycle in the US steam-electric-generating industry - an assessment of current practice and potential for future applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study assesses the current and future potential for wastewater reuse and recycle by the steam-electric-generating industry in the United States. Fifty-three power plants employing one or more of the following reuse/recycle measures were identified by a literature search and interviews with reuse/recycle experts--cascading higher-quality wastewaters to lower-quality uses, recirculating ash sluice water, using cooling tower makeup or sidestream softening, treating and reclaiming wastewaters, using dry-cooling systems, and using municipal effluents as plant-intake water. Detailed case studies were performed on eight of the 53 plants surveyed.

Breitstein, L.; Tucker, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US DOE). Energy Sources: Bioenergy. http://www.energy.gov/comparison of algae to other bioenergy feedstocks. Environ.The water footprint of bioenergy. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems.

Matson, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewables » Water Renewables » Water Water EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost-competitive with traditional sources of energy. EERE plays a key role in advancing America's "all of the above" energy strategy, leading a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative technologies that will make renewable electricity generation cost-competitive with traditional sources of energy. Image of a buoy used for creating electricity from waves on the water. An american flag is attached to the top of the yellow buoy. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads the growing global effort to

426

Report on Produced Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2009 Produced Water Volumes and Management Practices Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1 - Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11 1.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................................... 11 1.2 Background ................................................................................................................... 11 1.3 Overview ....................................................................................................................... 11

427

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water from production of crude oil, natural gas, and coaleach gallon (3.79 liters) of crude oil. When combined withto refine each gallon of crude oil, between 3.6 and 7.0

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Solar hot water heater  

SciTech Connect

A solar hot water heater includes an insulated box having one or more hot water storage tanks contained inside and further having a lid which may be opened to permit solar radiation to heat a supply of water contained within the one or more hot water storage tanks. A heat-actuated control unit is mounted on an external portion of the box, such control unit having a single pole double throw thermostat which selectively activates an electric winch gear motor to either open or close the box lid. The control unit operates to open the lid to a predetermined position when exposed to the sun's rays, and further operates to immediately close the lid in response to any sudden drop in temperature, such as might occur during a rainstorm, clouds moving in front of the sun, or the like.

Melvin, H.A.

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

429

Water Treatment Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to see the operation than have us explain it. Basically, most treatment plants remove the solid material and use living organisms and chlorine to clean up the water. Steve Sample...

430

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

past 15 years, nine solar thermal power plants, with a totala) colocating thermal power plants that use seawater forWater used in thermal electric power plants is extracted

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system and an air-suspended bare UV lamp are disclosed. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir. 7 figs.

Gadgil, A.; Garud, V.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

UV water disinfector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A UV disinfector with a gravity driven feed water delivery system, and an air-suspended bare UV lamp. The disinfector is hydrodynamically optimized with a laminerizing, perforated baffle wall, beveled treatment chamber, and outlet weir.

Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA); Garud, Vikas (Bombay, IN)

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

opportunities at U.S. nuclear power plants. U.S. Dep. EnergyAlthough coal and nuclear power plants tend to supply baseis difficult to develop nuclear power plants in water-scarce

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US Dep. Energy, Washington, DC. http://www1.eere.energy.gov/Alliance Save Energy, Washington, DC. http://watergy.org/of Energy and Water. US DOE, Washington, DC. http://

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Storm Water Detention Pond  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allow water to meander through them. * Amend soil on the banks of the drainages with a compost-based soil builder. * Plant or stake the channel with with appropriate vegetation...

436

Contaminating Fresh Waters (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is illegal to discharge any dyestuff, coal tar, oil, sawdust, poison, or deleterious substances into any fresh running waters in Florida in quantities sufficient to injure, stupefy, or kill fish...

437

Makeshift cold water aquarium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Hi- I am a student teacher in the Seattle area. As a hobby, I scuba dive in the icy waters of Puget Sound. I would love to set...

438

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil, natural gas, and coal bed methane. Argonne Natl. Lab. ,gallons of water (31). Coal-bed methane, the availability ofnatural gas production. Coal-bed methane produces large, but

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

440

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Legacy Management Weldon Spring Site Air and Water Monitoring 32008 This fact sheet provides information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Arkansas Water Resources Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alluvial Aquifer, that has resulted from oil and gas operations in the area, particularly in south, discharge from poultry and hog plants, and leaky landfills, among others. Saline water intrusion and near

Soerens, Thomas

442

Water Heater Safety FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from 30 gallons to 80 gallons in a variety of fuel sources (gas, electric, liquid propane). We also offer a wide selection of Rheem gas and electric tankless water heaters....

443

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas Gas Technology Institute (GTI) will develop a membrane separation technology to recover water...

444

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Innovative Water Reuse and Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is being performed in this program area to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water...

445

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities - EPRI The objective of this project is evaluation and development of the use of produced water...

446

Santa Clara Water & Sewer- Solar Water Heating Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 1975, the City of Santa Clara established the nation's first municipal solar utility. Under the Solar Water Heating Program, the Santa Clara Water & Sewer Utilities Department supplies,...

447

The Relationship between Water and Energy: Optimizing Water and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an effort to conserve water, drought-proof operating plants and control costs, the critical relationship of water and energy is clearly exposed. Five years of effort has transpired into countless studies, more than 100 projects and a clear understanding that the highest value opportunities for water conservation usually exist where there is the strongest interaction of water and energy. Steam management systems, process cooling, high quality water production and waste water treatment represent high probability areas for water conservation and value capture. These are not the only areas to reduce water management infrastructure and environmental footprint but they represent areas with the high potential for efforts to return bottom line value.

Finley, T.; Fennessey, K.; Light, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thornton@tess-inc.com ABSTRACT In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. Bias...

449

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

450

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

451

Water softening process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention involves an improved process for softening hard water which comprises selectively precipitaing CaCO.sub.3 to form a thin layer thereof, increasing the pH of said water to precipitate magnesium as magnesium hydroxide and then filtering the resultant slurry through said layer. The CaCO.sub.3 layer serves as a thin permeable layer which has particularly useful application in cross-flow filtration applications.

Sheppard, John D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thomas, David G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Water Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling: Cooling: Water cooling is commonly defined as a method of using water as a heat conduction to remove heat from an object, machine, or other substance by passing cold water over or through it. In energy generation, water cooling is typically used to cool steam back into water so it can be used again in the generation process. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Water Cooling Typical water cooled condenser used for condensing steam Water or liquid cooling is the most efficient cooling method and requires the smallest footprint when cold water is readily available. When used in power generation the steam/vapor that exits the turbine is condensed back into water and reused by means of a heat exchanger. Water cooling requires a water resource that is cold enough to bring steam, typically

453

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

need to know about saving money on water heating costs Read more Selecting a New Water Heater Tankless? Storage? Solar? Save money on your water heating bill by choosing the right...

454

FEMP-Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet details solar water heating and how to use the sun to heat domestic water in any climate. Document explains how solar water heating helps to save energy, reduce utility costs, and preserve the environment.

455

Clean Water Legacy Act (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides authority, direction, and resources to achieve and maintain water quality standards for groundwater and surface waters by implementing the federal Clean Water Act as well as...

456

Potential benefits of oxygen-enriched intake air in a vehicle powered by a spark-ignition engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A production vehicle powered by a spark-ignition engine (3.1-L Chevrolet Lumina, model year 1990) was tested. The test used oxygen-enriched intake air containing 25 and 28% oxygen by volume to determine (1) if the vehicle would run without difficulties and (2) if emissions benefits would result. Standard Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emissions test cycles were run satisfactorily. Test results of catalytic converter-out emissions (emissions out of the converter) showed that both carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons were reduced significantly in all three phases of the emissions test cycle. Test results of engine-out emissions (emissions straight out of the engine, with the converter removed) showed that carbon monoxide was significantly reduced in the cold phase. All emission test results were compared with those for normal air (21% oxygen). The catalytic converter also had an improved carbon monoxide conversion efficiency under the oxygen-enriched-air conditions. Detailed results of hydrocarbon speciation indicated large reductions in 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and benzene from the engine with the oxygen-enriched air. Catalytic converter-out ozone was reduced by 60% with 25%-oxygen-content air. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased significantly, both for engine-out and catalytic converter-out emissions, we anticipate that they can be ameliorated in the near future with new control technologies. The automotive industry currently is developing exhaust-gas control technologies for an oxidizing environment; these technologies should reduce NO{sub x} emissions more efficiently in vehicles that use oxygen-enriched intake air. On the basis of estimates made from current data, several production vehicles that had low NO{sub x} emissions could meet the 2004 Tier II emissions standards with 25%-oxygen-content air.

Ng, H.K.; Sekar, R.R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Demands Using Alternative Water Supplies: Power Demand Options in Regions of Water Stress and Future Carbon Management Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting a regional modeling assessment of non-traditional water sources for use in thermoelectric power plants. The assessment includes the development of a model to characterize water quantity and quality from several sources of non-traditional water, initially focused within the Southeastern United States. The project includes four primary tasks: (1) identify water sources, needs, and treatment options; (2) assess and model non-traditional water quantity and quality; (3) identify and characterize water treatment options including an assessment of cost; and (4) develop a framework of metrics, processes, and modeling aspects that can be applied to other regions of the United States.

458

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants Internet-Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at Coal-Fired Power Plants GIS Catalog Graphic Arthur Langhus Layne, LLC will create an internet-based, geographic information system (GIS) catalog of non-traditional sources of cooling water for coal-fired power plants. The project will develop data to identify the availability of oil and gas produced water, abandoned coal mine water, industrial waste water, and low-quality ground water. By pairing non-traditional water sources to power plant water needs, the research will allow power plants that are affected by water shortages to continue to operate at full-capacity without adversely affecting local communities or the environment. The nationwide catalog will identify the location, water withdrawal, and

459

Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UrbanLab is Sarah Dunn + Martin Felsen, with Lee Greenberg,Growing Water Martin Felsen and Sarah Dunn The Growing Water

Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Reading Comprehension - The Water Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

three phases that water can be found in are atom, molecule, compound solids, liquids, and gas . During condensation precipitation evaporation , water turns...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

How Water Molecules are Connected  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science (Dec. 17, 2004) * *Online subscription needed. How Water Molecules are Connected Water may be the most important molecule on Earth, but our understanding of its properties...

462

Conservation of Water Resources (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The State Water Control Board is responsible for formulating and implementing a comprehensive water use policy for the Commonwealth of Virginia. Implemented by the Department of Environmental...

463

Disinfecting Water after a Disaster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication explains how to disinfect water after a flood, as well as where to find water in an emergency when supplies are limited.

Dozier, Monty; Schoessow, Courtney

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

NREL: Water Power Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects NREL's water power R&D projects support industry efforts to develop and deploy cost-effective water power...

465

Columbia Water & Light- Solar Rebates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Columbia Water & Light (CWL) offers rebates to its commercial and residential customers for the purchase of solar water heaters and solar photovoltaic systems. These rebates are available for...

466

Water Heaters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heaters Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Water Heaters Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterHeaters&oldid267202...

467

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

468

System for treating produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow. Water Flow Calibrations 18020C. ... NIST provides calibration services for water flow meters. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

470

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines - Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of...

472

Colorado Ground Water Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Commission Jump to: navigation, search Name Colorado Ground Water Commission Place Colorado Website http:water.state.co.usgroun References Colorado Ground Water Commission...

473

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

474

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for water withdrawal and diversion from the Department of Natural Resources. Additionally, no major

475

Preparation and combustion of coal-water fuel from the Sin Pun coal deposit, southern Thailand  

SciTech Connect

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a program to assess the responsiveness of Sin Pun lignite to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying. The results indicate that drying made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 27 wt% for the raw coal to about 15 wt% for the hot-water-dried (HWD) coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel (CWF) indicates an increase from 4500 to 6100 Btu/lb by hot-water drying. Approximately 650 lb of HWD Sin Pun CWF were fired in the EERC`s combustion test facility. The fuel burned extremely well, with no feed problems noted during the course of the test. Fouling and slagging deposits each indicated a very low rate of ash deposition, with only a dusty layer formed on the cooled metal surfaces. The combustor was operated at between 20% and 25% excess air, resulting in a flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration averaging approximately 6500 parts per million.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Water Transport Exploratory Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploratory Studies Exploratory Studies Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies 2007 kickoff meeting February 13-14, 2007 DOE Forrestal Building Rod Borup Mukundan Rangachary, Bryan Pivovar, Yu Seung Kim, John Davey, David Wood, Tom Springer, Muhammad Arif , Ken Chen, Simon Cleghorn, Will Johnson, Karren More, Peter Wilde, Tom Zawodzinski Los Alamos National Lab This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Objectives * Develop understanding of water transport in PEM Fuel Cells (non-design-specific) * Evaluate structural and surface properties of materials affecting water transport and performance * Develop (enable) new components and operating methods * Accurately model water transport within the fuel cell * Develop a better understanding of the effects of

477

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

478

Energy and Water Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Acquisition Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Acquisition Letter 2004-02 - FY 2004 Le2islation Provisions (dated March 1.2004) Energy and Water Act AL-2004-02 provides guidance regarding the implementation of Section 30 I. 304. 307. 501,502, and Legislative Direction as provided in the Energy and Water Development Appropriation:) Act Pub. L, 108-137, also known as the E&W Act. RFP's for unfunded programs, UseJ' facilities, lobbying restrictions, and purchase of American made products are carried ovc:r from the FY 2003 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act Pub, L, 108-7 {Division D), However, while the provision regarding competition still exists in the F'" 2004 legislation, the direction provided by Congress regarding the extend/compete process for 5 Management and Operating (M&O)contracts is

479

Biological denitrification of water  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss research regarding the denitrification of drinking water. Most work has been done in Europe. As a consequence there may be a gap in the understanding of the international state of the art with regard to drinking-water denitrification. Numerous substrates have been evaluated including methanol, ethanol, acetic acid, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and various sulfur compounds. Various unit processes have been utilized including biofilters, fluidized-bed and packed-bed reactors, packed towers containing cells immobilized in polymer gels, and completely mixed reactors with cells attached to bouyant porous carriers. There are several commercial facilities currently providing drinking water to European communities. Most include post-treatment with flocculation, filtration, and disinfection. A common concern in denitrification operations is the minimization of nitrite accumulation.

Gayle, B.P. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA)); Boardman, G.D.; Sherrard, J.H. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Benoit, R.E. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Biology)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Water, law, science  

SciTech Connect

In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

Narasimhan, T.N.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raw water intake" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment  

SciTech Connect

Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Water drives peptide conformational transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transitions between metastable conformations of a dipeptide are investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulation with explicit water molecules. The distribution of the surrounding water at different moments before the transitions and the dynamical correlations of water with the peptide's configurational motions indicate that water is the main driving force of the conformational changes.

Nerukh, Dmitry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Brief No. 9 WATER SECURITY,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brief No. 9 WATER SECURITY, RISK & SOCIETY 1 of 4 Water Security and Federal Rivers March 2012 Australian National University Key messages · Water security in a hydroclimatic risk society. Climate risks interact with rapidly changing social, demographic and economic forces to position water security

New, Mark

484

National Smart Water Grid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States repeatedly experiences floods along the Midwest's large rivers and droughts in the arid Western States that cause traumatic environmental conditions with huge economic impact. With an integrated approach and solution these problems can be alleviated. Tapping into the Mississippi River and its tributaries, the world's third largest fresh water river system, during flood events will mitigate the damage of flooding and provide a new source of fresh water to the Western States. The trend of increased flooding on the Midwest's large rivers is supported by a growing body of scientific literature. The Colorado River Basin and the western states are experiencing a protracted multi-year drought. Fresh water can be pumped via pipelines from areas of overabundance/flood to areas of drought or high demand. Calculations document 10 to 60 million acre-feet (maf) of fresh water per flood event can be captured from the Midwest's Rivers and pumped via pipelines to the Colorado River and introduced upstream of Lake Powell, Utah, to destinations near Denver, Colorado, and used in areas along the pipelines. Water users of the Colorado River include the cities in southern Nevada, southern California, northern Arizona, Colorado, Utah, Indian Tribes, and Mexico. The proposed start and end points, and routes of the pipelines are documented, including information on right-of-ways necessary for state and federal permits. A National Smart Water Grid{trademark} (NSWG) Project will create thousands of new jobs for construction, operation, and maintenance and save billions in drought and flood damage reparations tax dollars. The socio-economic benefits of NWSG include decreased flooding in the Midwest; increased agriculture, and recreation and tourism; improved national security, transportation, and fishery and wildlife habitats; mitigated regional climate change and global warming such as increased carbon capture; decreased salinity in Colorado River water crossing the US-Mexico border; and decreased eutrophication (excessive plant growth and decay) in the Gulf of Mexico to name a few. The National Smart Water Grid{trademark} will pay for itself in a single major flood event.

Beaulieu, R A

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

485

Impact of Climate Change on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirements and Soil Salinity in the SJV, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Irrigation Water Availability, Crop Water Requirementsreduced surface water availability can be managed byrequirement and water availability (surface water and

Hopmans, Jan W; Maurer, Edwin P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Optimization of Chilled Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chilled water systems are one of the major energy consumers in industrial, commercial, and institutional complexes. The centralization of chilled water systems has considerable advantages, namely: simplified controls, the installed capacity is reduced due to diversity, consolidated maintenance and operation, etc. With chilled water systems, the following areas present potential energy and cost savings: Chilled Water Reset Condenser Water Reset Sequencing of the Chillers Chilled Water Storage Variable Chilled Water Pumping In this paper the feasibility aspect of each of the above items will be discussed.

Gidwani, B. N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

NREL: Learning - Solar Hot Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hot Water Hot Water Photo of solar collectors on a roof for a solar hot water system. For solar hot water systems, flat-plate solar collectors are typically installed facing south on a rooftop. The shallow water of a lake is usually warmer than the deep water. That's because the sunlight can heat the lake bottom in the shallow areas, which in turn, heats the water. It's nature's way of solar water heating. The sun can be used in basically the same way to heat water used in buildings and swimming pools. Most solar water heating systems for buildings have two main parts: a solar collector and a storage tank. The most common collector is called a flat-plate collector. Mounted on the roof, it consists of a thin, flat, rectangular box with a transparent cover that faces the sun. Small tubes

488

An Educational Resource Based on Water and Health as a Teaching Aid in French Primary Schools Part I: Identification of Needs and Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: It is a commonplace that water is essential for life, but to what extent is the general public, and children in particular, aware of how water affects health? The aim of this review was to consider the relationship between water and health under three main headings: the importance of hydration for children, dietary intake of water, and water as an essential factor in hygiene contributing to good health. The literature was reviewed to provide a rationale for the implementation of teaching about water and health in French primary schools under three main areas: (i) the importance of hydration for school children and water promotion in primary schools; (ii) the problem of overweight/obesity and the need to adopt healthy drinking habits as defined in French nutritional policy; (iii) the survey of the quality of drinking water in France and its relationship with good hygiene practices. There are currently few educational resources in France on water and health that teachers can use in the classroom. This review gives reasons why a “Water and Health ” learning resource is a useful tool and shows how it can be developed within the constraints imposed by the school syllabus and in accordance with French nutritional and environmental policy. Educ. Sci. 2013, 3 301

Chantal Savanovitch; Marie-pierre Sauvant-rochat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

490

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Kyle Gluesenkamp Building Equipment Group, ETSD gluesenkampk@ornl.gov 865-241-2952 April 3, 2013 CRADA - GE Development of High Performance Residential Gas Water Heater Image courtesy John Wilkes 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Absorption technology could greatly boost water heater efficiency, but faces barriers of high first cost and working fluid challenges. Impact of Project: Energy factor of gas storage water

491

Energy-efficient water heating  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how to reduce the amount of hot water used in faucets and showers, automatic dishwashers, and washing machines; how to increase water-heating system efficiency by lowering the water heater thermostat, installing a timer and heat traps, and insulating hot water pipes and the storage tank; and how to use off-peak power to heat water. A resource list for further information is included.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

The effects of sulfate fertilization and high levels of sulfate and salt drinking water on the growth and mineral status of ruminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of sulfate (SO?²?) in forage and drinking water on the performance and mineral status of cattle and sheep. In Experiment 1, forty-eight late gestation crossbred cows were grazed on twelve 10-acre oat pastures for 112 days (Jan 6 to Apr 28) to determine the effects of oat forage fertilized with ammonium sulfate ((NH?)?SO?) on serum Ca, Mg and P status of cows. Pastures were assigned to either an (NH?)?SO? (400 kg/ha) or ammonium nitrate (NH?NO?, 247 kg\\ha) fertilizer treatment. The forage sulfur (S) concentrations were higher (P water on the performance and mineral status of growing cattle. Twelve crossbred growing cattle were grazed on twelve 1.4-hectare native pastures for 56 d (from Jun 16 to Aug 11). The cattle were given a single source of water: tap water (n=4), SO?²? water (1139 mg SO?²?/L, n=4) and SO?²?/NaCl water (1546mg SO?²?/L and 3489 mg Na/L, n=4). The average daily gain (ADG) of cattle provided with tap water and SO?²? water was greater than that of cattle drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater sources (P>.05). There was no difference in serum Ca, P, Mg, K and Cu of the cattle due to source of water (P> .05). ne water intake of cattle with different treatments was associated with climatic factors differently. In Experiment 3, nine growing wethers were randomly assigned to an individual pen in the metallic laboratory to determine mineral balance in sheep provided with tap water, SO?²? watwe or SO?²?/NaCl water. The periods of the feeding and metabolic trial were 28 d and 12 d, respectively. There were no significant differences for ADG and feed efficiency of animals provided the treatments (P>.05). There was no difference for serum Na, Ca, P, Mg and Zn in sheep among the treatments (P> .05). But serum Cu of the sheep drinking tap water was Feater than that of the sheep drinking SO?²?/NaCl water (Pwater and SO?²?/NaCl water did not affect the OM intake, digestibility of OM and NDF, and ADG of sheep during the trial (P>.05).

Xie, Kehe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

BOILING WATER REACTOR WITH FEED WATER INJECTION NOZZLES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers the use of injection nozzles for pumping water into the lower ends of reactor fuel tubes in which water is converted directly to steam. Pumping water through fuel tubes of this type of boiling water reactor increases its power. The injection nozzles decrease the size of pump needed, because the pump handles only the water going through the nozzles, additional water being sucked into the tubes by the nozzles independently of the pump from the exterior body of water in which the fuel tubes are immersed. The resulting movement of exterior water along the tubes holds down steam formation, and thus maintains the moderator effectiveness, of the exterior body of water. (AEC)

Treshow, M.

1963-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

494

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

496

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111 Massive Rock Well Fractured Basalt WT Soil of fractured basalt. Fractures and layer-junctions important for seepage. Note seepage face. Soil layers lined, and is typically pebbles. The water collects in the main column and is fed up through the delivery pipe

Sohoni, Milind

497

Hot water supply system  

SciTech Connect

A hot water supply system is described which consists of: a boiler having an exhaust; solar panels; and a frame supporting the solar panels and including a compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler exhaust termining in the compartment beneath the solar panels, the boiler being within the compartment.

Piper, J.R.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

498

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~$3/GJ can be achieved with small-size SWPO gasifiers. · Demonstrate a 5-tpd reduced-scale gasifier at a small municipal POTW. · Construct a 40-tpd commercial biomass gasifier at a large municipal POTW. M-246 into hydrogen ­ SCW quickly gasifies all organics with minimum char ­ Water-gas shift contributes significantly

499

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower performance. To understand the importance of the optimization techniques, cooling tower theory will be discussed first.

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Water Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...coil. Usually, two pumps are provided, one as a standby with an automatic switchover, because it is extremely important to circulate water through the coil continuously to prevent it from being damaged. To protect induction furnace equipment during momentary power interruptions or prolonged power...