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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raven corvus corax" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Effects of Site Characterization Activities on the Abundance of Ravens (Corvus corax) in the Yucca Mountain Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed and is implementing the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Raven abundance was measured from August 1991 through August 1995 along treatment and control routes to evaluate whether site characterization activities resulted in increased raven abundance at Yucca Mountain. This study fulfills the requirement set forth in the incidental take provisions of the Biological Opinion that DOE monitor the abundance of ravens at Yucca Mountain. Ravens were more abundant at Yucca Mountain than in the control area, and raven abundance in both areas increased over time. However, the magnitude of differences between Yucca Mountain and control surveys did not change over time, indicating that the increase in raven abundance observed during this study was not related to site characterization activities. Increases over time on both Yucca Mountain and control routes are consistent with increases in raven abundance in the Mojave Desert reported by the annual Breeding Bird Survey of the US. Fish and Wildlife Service. Evidence from the Desert Tortoise Monitoring Program at Yucca Mountain suggests that ravens are not a significant predator of small tortoises in this locale. Carcasses of small tortoises (less than 110 mm in length) collected during the study showed little evidence of raven predation, and 59 radiomarked hatchlings that were monitored on a regular basis were not preyed upon by ravens. Overall, no direct evidence of raven predation on tortoises was observed during this study. Small tortoises are probably encountered so infrequently by ravens that they are rarely exploited as a food source. This is likely due to the relatively low abundance of both desert tortoises and ravens in the Yucca Mountain area.

P.E. Lederle

1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on the Reproductive Success of American Kestrels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lines and towers are beneficial to birds, pro- viding additional sites for perching, hunting of raptors and ravens (Corvus corax) nest- ing on a 500-kV transmission line was similar to or higher than

Dawson, Russell D.

3

Raven Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-aRECRaton, New Mexico: EnergyRaven

4

Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Performing Probabilistic Risk Assessment Through RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENviroment (RAVEN) code is a software tool that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing engine for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. RAVEN is now a multi-purpose Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) software framework that allows dispatching different functionalities: Derive and actuate the control logic required to simulate the plant control system and operator actions (guided procedures), allowing on-line monitoring/controlling in the Phase Space Perform both Monte-Carlo sampling of random distributed events and Dynamic Event Tree based analysis Facilitate the input/output handling through a Graphical User Interface (GUI) and a post-processing data mining module

A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Raven Biofuels International Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus Power Ltd Jump to: navigation,Raven Biofuels

7

RavenBrick LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus Power Ltd Jump to: navigation,Raven

8

RAVEN, a New Software for Dynamic Risk Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN is a generic software driver to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis of code simulating complex systems. Initially developed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the RELAP-7 code [1] is currently being generalized with the addition of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to extend RAVEN capabilities to any software as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or directly via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response probing the input space using Monte Carlo, grid strategies, or Latin Hyper Cube schemes, but its strength is its focus toward system feature discovery like limit surfaces separating regions of the input space leading to system failure using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper will present an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by same application examples.

Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Joshua Cogliati; Diego Mandelli; Robert Kinoshita

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DAKOTA reliability methods applied to RAVEN/RELAP-7.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on the use of reliability methods within the RAVEN and RELAP-7 software framework for assessing failure probabilities as part of probabilistic risk assessment for nuclear power plants. RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermal-Hydraulic code RELAP-7. Dakota is a software tool developed at Sandia National Laboratories containing optimization, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification algorithms. Reliability methods are algorithms which transform the uncertainty problem to an optimization problem to solve for the failure probability, given uncertainty on problem inputs and a failure threshold on an output response. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of reliability methods in Dakota with RAVEN/RELAP-7. These capabilities are demonstrated on a demonstration of a Station Blackout analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR).

Swiler, Laura Painton; Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID; Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID; Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Implementation of Stochastic Polynomials Approach in the RAVEN Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN, under the support of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, has been tasked to provide the necessary software and algorithms to enable the application of the conceptual framework developed by the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [1] path. RISMC is one of the paths defined under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) DOE program.

Cristian Rabiti; Paul Talbot; Andrea Alfonsi; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 [], currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism has been employed by providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response, investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper presents an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by some application examples.

Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita; Antonio Naviglio

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

REACTOR ANALYSIS AND VIRTUAL CONTROL ENVIRONMENT (RAVEN) FY12 REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN is a complex software tool that will have tasks spanning from being the RELAP-7 user interface, to using RELAP-7 to perform Risk Informed Safety Characterization (RISMC), and to controlling RELAP-7 calculation execution. The goal of this document is to: 1. Highlight the functional requirements of the different tasks of RAVEN 2. Identify shared functions that could be aggregate in modules so to obtain a minimal software redundancy and maximize software utilization. RAVEN is in fact a software framework that will allow exploiting the following functionalities: • Derive and actuate the control logic required to: o Simulate the plant control system o Simulate the operator (procedure guided) actions o Perform Monte Carlo sampling of random distributed events o Perform event three based analysis • Provide a GUI to: o Input a plant description to RELAP-7 (component, control variable, control parameters) o Concurrent monitoring of Control Parameters o Concurrent alteration of control parameters • Provide Post Processing data mining capability based on o Dimensionality reduction o Cardinality reduction In this document it will be shown how an appropriate mathematical formulation of the control logic and probabilistic analysis leads to have most of the software infrastructure leveraged between the two main tasks. Further, this document will go through the development accomplished this year, including simulation results, and priorities for the next years development

Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Joshua Cogliati; Diego Mandelli; Robert Kinoshita

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Foraging Decision Rules and Prey Species Preferences of Northwestern Crows (Corvus caurinus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

preferences of northwestern crows (Corvus caurinus) feeding on littleneck clams (Tapes philip- pinarum), and large clams (4.0­4.9 cm) with large whelks. Profitability estimates based on observations of crows-1613/2005/11101­077/$15.00/0 www.blackwell-synergy.com #12;and that serve as reliable indicators of prey quality (Stephens & Krebs

Dawson, Russell D.

15

Raven IITM: Open Platform for Surgical Robotics Research H. Hawkeye King1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cartesian motion and grasping [6]. A unique feature of the tool is a wrist design that eliminates cableRaven IITM: Open Platform for Surgical Robotics Research H. Hawkeye King1 , Lei Cheng1 , Philip In this paper we present a new platform for surgical robotics research: the Raven IITM. The goal of this work

Rosen, Jacob

16

MATHEMATICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE ANALYSIS OF DYNAMC STOCHASTIC SYSTEMS WITH THE RAVEN CODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control Environment) is a software code under development at Idaho National Laboratory aimed at performing probabilistic risk assessment and uncertainty quantification using RELAP-7, for which it acts also as a simulation controller. In this paper we will present the equations characterizing a dynamic stochastic system and we will then discuss the behavior of each stochastic term and how it is accounted for in the RAVEN software design. Moreover we will present preliminary results of the implementation.

C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Paen to Sanguinity (a song) by RavenKelVamp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grey Bard wrote in mdmfans, 2007-02-16 00:12:00 A Paen to Sanguinity (a song) by RavenKelVamp Metanote: Dammit. Not two months in this fandom and I'm writing crackfilk in the persona of a swoony vampire lover. Why is this my life...

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

RAVEN AS A TOOL FOR DYNAMIC PROBABILISTIC RISK ASSESSMENT: SOFTWARE OVERVIEW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RAVEN is a software tool under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that acts as the control logic driver and post-processing tool for the newly developed Thermo-Hydraylic code RELAP- 7. The scope of this paper is to show the software structure of RAVEN and its utilization in connection with RELAP-7. A short overview of the mathematical framework behind the code is presented along with its main capabilities such as on-line controlling/monitoring and Monte-Carlo sampling. A demo of a Station Black Out PRA analysis of a simplified Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) model is shown in order to demonstrate the Monte-Carlo and clustering capabilities.

Alfonsi Andrea; Mandelli Diego; Rabiti Cristian; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

RAVEN: a GUI and an Artificial Intelligence Engine in a Dynamic PRA Framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increases in computational power and pressure for more accurate simulations and estimations of accident scenario consequences are driving the need for Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) [1] of very complex models. While more sophisticated algorithms and computational power address the back end of this challenge, the front end is still handled by engineers that need to extract meaningful information from the large amount of data and build these complex models. Compounding this problem is the difficulty in knowledge transfer and retention, and the increasing speed of software development. The above-described issues would have negatively impacted deployment of the new high fidelity plant simulator RELAP-7 (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program) at Idaho National Laboratory. Therefore, RAVEN that was initially focused to be the plant controller for RELAP-7 will help mitigate future RELAP-7 software engineering risks. In order to accomplish this task, Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment (RAVEN) has been designed to provide an easy to use Graphical User Interface (GUI) for building plant models and to leverage artificial intelligence algorithms in order to reduce computational time, improve results, and help the user to identify the behavioral pattern of the Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). In this paper we will present the GUI implementation and its current capability status. We will also introduce the support vector machine algorithms and show our evaluation of their potentiality in increasing the accuracy and reducing the computational costs of PRA analysis. In this evaluation we will refer to preliminary studies performed under the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) project of the Light Water Reactors Sustainability (LWRS) campaign [3]. RISMC simulation needs and algorithm testing are currently used as a guidance to prioritize RAVEN developments relevant to PRA.

C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; A. Alfonsi; J. Cogliati; R. Kinoshita; D. Gaston; R. Martineau; C. Curtis

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Investigations of the cause of fishkills in fish-rearing facilities in Raven Fork watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of fishkills in trout-rearing facilities located adjacent to Raven Fork Creek within the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina. Approximately 50,000 rainbow trout were lost at the Blankenship trout farm-a commercial facility-following eight storm events between March 31 and December 2, 1981. In addition, 524 trophy-size trout died in three ponds operated by the Cherokee tribe for stocking reservation streams. It was found fishkills in the trout farm could be prevented by adding lime to water from the creek as it was pumped into the facility; this strengthened the assumption acidity (H/sup +/) was responsible for the fishkills. Mortality of trophy trout was stopped by routing water from nearby springs to the ponds during and following rain events. Because of concern that these fishkills might be caused by acid rain, TVA was requested by the Cherokee tribe to assist in determining the cause. Limited studies were conducted during March through August 1982 to test two hypotheses: (1) concentrations of H/sup +/ and soluble aluminum in Raven Fork following storm events were high enough to kill rainbow trout and (2) atmospheric deposition was a greater source of stream H/sup +/ than acid-producing geologic formations or the forest soils.

Jones, H.C.; Noggle, J.C.; Young, R.C.; Kelly, J.M.; Olem, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Pasch, R.W.; Hyfantis, G.J.; Parkhurst, W.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raven corvus corax" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Support and Modeling for the Boiling Water Reactor Station Black Out Case Study Using RELAP and RAVEN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated. In order to evaluate the impact of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) project aims to provide insight to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This report focuses, in particular, on the impact of power uprate on the safety of a boiled water reactor system. The case study considered is a loss of off-site power followed by the loss of diesel generators, i.e., a station black out (SBO) event. Analysis is performed by using a thermo-hydraulic code, i.e. RELAP-5, and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at INL, i.e. RAVEN. Starting from the event tree models contained in SAPHIRE, we built the input file for RELAP-5 that models in great detail system dynamics under SBO conditions. We also interfaced RAVEN with RELAP-5 so that it would be possible to run multiple RELAP-5 simulation runs by changing specific keywords of the input file. We both employed classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. We also employed advanced data analysis and visualization tools that helped us to correlate simulation outcome such as maximum core temperature with a set of input uncertain parameters. Results obtained gave a detailed overview of the issues associated to power uprate for a SBO accident scenario. We were able to quantify how timing of safety related events were impacted by a higher reactor core power. Such insights can provide useful material to the decision makers to perform risk-infomed safety margins management.

Diego Mandelli; Curtis Smith; Thomas Riley; John Schroeder; Cristian Rabiti; Aldrea Alfonsi; Joe Nielsen; Dan Maljovec; Bie Wang; Valerio Pascucci

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Brain Parasite in White-Necked Raven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Austin Paul Smith Journal:  Condor Volume:  10 Issue:  2 (March-April) Section:  From Field and Study Year:  1908 Pages:  92

23

RAVEN as Control Logic and Probabilistic Risk Assessment Driver for RELAP-7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation of System Analysis Code (NGSAC) [1] aims to model and simulate the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) thermo-hydraulic behavior with high level of accuracy. In this respect, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is developing a NGSAC (known as RELAP-7) which will allow to model NPP responses for a set of accident scenarios (e.g., loss of off-site power).

C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. Martineau

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Power Pole Casualties Among Raptors and Ravens an Northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jean-Luc E. Cartron, Gail L. Garber, Carol Finley, Christopher Rustay, Ron Kellermueller, Mary Pat Day, Patricia Manzano-Fisher, Scott H. Stoleson ...

25

Scheduling Heterogeneous Wireless Systems for Efficient Spectrum Access  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radio approach for usage of the Virtual Unlicensed Spectrum (CORVUS) system exploits unoccupied licensed

Bao, Lichun; Liao, Shenghui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):224234, Fall 2007 Efficacy of CPTH-treated egg baits for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2004). Ravens often use electrical transmission towers, highway overpasses, and railroad trestles power transmission lines (Knight and Kawashima 1993). Raven abundance has tripled in the past 40 years

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy sma type Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

referred to as RAVENS, for characterizing regional ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

28

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy type iii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

referred to as RAVENS, for characterizing regional ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

29

The synergy of human arm and robotic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IV surgical robot system. . . . . (a) Robot arm. . . . . .coupling between the two robot arms should complement the e?perspectives: • The Raven robot arm has a robotic joints and

Li, Zhi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

--No Title--  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industry project manager. "Upon commercialization, these sensors could have a major economic impact in the weaving, knitting and printing segments." Management at Glen Raven,...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy affecting individuals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy kennedy disease Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy gene interaction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy shoulder function Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - atrophy clinical features Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-dependent thymic atrophy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The RAVENS methodology was tested on images with sim- ... Source: Columbia University, Pediatric Brain Imaging Laboratory; Davatzikos, Christos - Departments of Bioengineering &...

38

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Newsletter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydraulics software RELAP-7 (which is under development in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability LWRS Program). A novel interaction between the probabilistic part (i.e., RAVEN)...

39

SOUTH CARIBOO 2007 Williams Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program Kelly Bryan Raven Bursary Sarah Doucet UNBC Scholars Program Blake Forde UNBC Scholars Program Nations Scholarship, CanWest Global Communications Undergraduate Bursary Ben Vinje Gary Johnson Memorial

Northern British Columbia, University of

40

Ecological Monographs, 71(2), 2001, pp. 187217 2001 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) was extended with a dynamic event tree capability for evaluating failure modes of nuclear power plant systems cross-section libraries (page 5). } The Reactor Analysis and Virtual Control Environment (RAVEN

Nielsen, Karina J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raven corvus corax" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Virus constructed iron phosphate lithium ion batteries in unmanned aircraft systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FePO? lithium ion batteries that have cathodes constructed by viruses are scaled up in size to examine potential for use as an auxiliary battery in the Raven to power the payload equipment. These batteries are assembled ...

Kolesnikov-Lindsey, Rachel

42

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY PPG INDUSTRIES FOR AN...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

share attributed to PPG for waiver purposes. RavenBrick is a small business eligible to elect title to its inventions under the Bayh-Dole Act pursuant to P.L. 96-517, as amended....

43

To enter and lead: renegotiating meanings of leadership and examining leadership theory of social power from the perspectives of African American women leaders in predominantly white organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

leadership theories, such as French and Raven's (1959) theory of social power that have generally represented the perspectives of white, middle class men, are inadequate for explaining the experiences of AAW. On the other hand socio-cultural theories...

Byrd, Marilyn Yvonne

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Scuttlebutt Volume 1, No. 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Awards Contents: 1. From the Bridge. 2. Announcing the 2006, Southern Cross, Chapter Awards 4. From The Raven?s Writing Desk - Editorial 4. Attention All Hands - From the XOs Desk Operations 5. Academy courses and new members 6. Ops news, Change... of Command, Academy 7. Club 360, Star Trek: Legacy Tactical/Security 8. Away Team Report: FirstContact Convention 9. Region 11 Convention Listing Communications 10. The "Re-Mastered" Star Trek Q & A Engineering 12 Star Trek Technology - Well Ahead...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Abstract The grey top-shell, Gibbula cineraria is a common member of temperate to cold water kelp forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract The grey top-shell, Gibbula cineraria is a common member of temperate to cold water kelp and potential paleoenvironmental proxy for kelp forest habitats, its longevity has been significantly) Introduction High-latitude kelp forests, dominated by the brown seaweed, Laminaria sp. (Lu¨ning 1990; Raven et

Schöne, Bernd R.

46

New Phytologist (2002) 155: 373380 www.newphytologist.com 373 Blackwell Science, Ltd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fluxes, ion transport. © New Phytologist (2002) 155: 373­380 Author for correspondence: Herbert J for its transport across leaf cell membranes. Raven & Farquhar (1981) used the NH4 + analogue 14 C-methylammonium in leaf segments of Phaseolus vulgaris to provide evidence that NH4 + transport across the plasma membrane

Britto, Dev T.

47

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RICHARD A. FEELY, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

personal area of research is the study of the oceanic carbon cycle and its impact on marine organisms. I Acidification Due to Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide" (Raven et al., 2005) and the recent U.S. report" (Kleypas et al., 2006). Ocean Acidification Over the past 200 years the release of carbon dioxide (CO2

48

From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in% the%UK% Florian!laggard!to!leader:!Explaining! offshore!wind!developments!in!the!UK! Florian Kern1* , Adrian Smith1 , Chris Shaw1 , Rob Raven2 and Bram for publication in Energy Policy, 19 Feb 2014 Abstract Offshore wind technology has recently undergone rapid

Sussex, University of

49

Kinematic and Dynamic Analysis of a Surgical Robot Positioning Arm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinematic and Dynamic Analysis of a Surgical Robot Positioning Arm Diana C.W. Friedman A thesis Analysis of a Surgical Robot Positioning Arm Diana C.W. Friedman Chair of the Supervisory Committee, a small form-factor surgical robot. To increase the RAVEN's workspace and decrease setup time, the C-Arm

50

Sigma Hulls for Gaussian Belief Space Planning for Imprecise Articulated Robots amid Obstacles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-effective robots such as the Raven surgical robot [23], Baxter manufacturing robot [22], and low-cost manipulators [21]. These robots use inexpensive actuation methods such as cable-driven mechanisms and serial are with the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley, CA, USA

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

51

Collective Intelligence of the Arti cial Life Community on Its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steen Rasmussen Self-Organizing Processes EES-6, MS-T003 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 and Santa Fe Institute 1399 Hyde Park Road Santa Fe, NM 87501 steen@lanl.gov Michael J. Raven Reed College 3203 SE Woodstock Blvd. Portland, OR 97202 and Self-Organizing Processes EES-6, MS-T003 Los Alamos

Rasmussen, Steen

52

Inn vati ns at EECS: Techn l gy f r a gl bal future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Society Invention Lab 141/143 Sutardja Dai Hall Center for Research in Energy Systems Transformation 406 - Peter Bailis, AMPLab (Algorithms, Machines, and People Laboratory) · Raven: An Energy Wireless Research Center) & E3S (Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science) · Occupant Detection

California at Irvine, University of

53

Comparative study of nitrogen assimilation in woodland J. Pearson, E.C.M. Clough J.L. Kershaw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to acid rain a particular tree spe- cies might be. A low capacity for leaf nitro- gen assimilation may, Such pools might repre- sent an important buffering capacity in relation to acid rain inputs (Raven, 1988). #12;Certainly, of the broad leaf trees, it seems that recent reports for acid rain damage are becoming

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2002, 138, 297303. With 1 figure INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Cretaceous (Raven, 1973). The increase of aridity due to climatic change during the Tertiary period reduced a non-mediterranean, tropical climate (Valiente-Banuet et al., 1998) and it is distri- buted at 1700 characters that have been thought to converge under a Mediterranean climate (Barbour & © 2002 The Linnean

Banuet, Alfonso Valiente

55

Water Research The Kiskatinaw River is the only source of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently received gifts from Spectra Energy ($90,200) and EnCana ($50,000). UNBC's New Eyes and Ears Linda Scholars Award Dusty Bruhs Raven Scholarship, Talisman Energy Scholarship for Aboriginal Students Alyssa Award Recipient Elizabeth Weninger MEd Counselling Graduate Tashana Warkentine of Hudson's Hope UNBC

Northern British Columbia, University of

56

MIT and the Aerospace Industry MIT Industry Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is RAVEN (Real-time indoor Autonomous Vehicle test ENviron- ment), a unique experimental facility that uses · Human-vehicle interactions / systems · Space vehicles and robotics · Energy use, environmental impact in combustion systems, supersonic impinging jets, and blade tonals in underwater vehicles; active

Ceder, Gerbrand

57

Ravena, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus Power Ltd Jump to: navigation,RavenRavena, New

58

Ravenna, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus Power Ltd Jump to: navigation,RavenRavena,

59

Nanshoku & Other Tales of the Master and His Apprentice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O NANSHOKU & Other Tales of the Master and His Apprentice M. Fae Glasgow Bene Dictum V O NANSHOKU & Other Tales of the Master and His Apprentice M. Fae Glasgow Bene Dictum V Qui-Gon/Obi-Wan slash rO Note: All publications are slash... Raven, & M. Fae Glasgow) Bene Dictum IV: Heads & Tails by M. FAE GLASGOW (X-Files: Skinner/Mulder) Bene Dictum V: Nanshoku & Other Tales of the Master and His Apprentice an anthology of Qui-Gon/Obi-Wan slash fiction 84,700 words editing...

Glasgow, M.F.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Quapaw Vocabulary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ITQhi football (AG). apple tree (CS). crov!, raven.kkaxe kkattapp:i 133 Il'li sun mikka raccoon (BS). (stress?) ~sanegro (neologism). lit. black coon. v. also istaxe sa star (MR, CS) • a, an, one. female (AG). wa]in.i rot white woman Il'litcihi (?) sun...). waxeka (JOD) nislke whiskey (OM). lit . bad l·rater cloud (CS). nitte buttocks (OM,CS). country, land (MS). N n ear(s) (CS). nitte gaZi (OM) . nitte cx:ll.si nitte. (OM) (?) toilet paper V. nitte trousers. v. also nittyujisi n~ttastette mule (BS). lit...

Rankin, Robert L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "raven corvus corax" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RawSolar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-aRECRaton, New Mexico: EnergyRavenRawSolar

62

Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization Methods Development Work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research activity developed during the Fiscal year 2014 within the Risk Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) campaign. This research activity is complementary to the one presented in the INL/EXT-??? report which shows advances Probabilistic Risk Assessment Analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-7 in conjunction to novel flooding simulation tools. Here we present several analyses that prove the values of the RISMC approach in order to assess risk associated to nuclear power plants (NPPs). We focus on simulation based PRA which, in contrast to classical PRA, heavily employs system simulator codes. Firstly we compare, these two types of analyses, classical and RISMC, for a Boiling water reactor (BWR) station black out (SBO) initiating event. Secondly we present an extended BWR SBO analysis using RAVEN and RELAP-5 which address the comments and suggestions received about he original analysis presented in INL/EXT-???. This time we focus more on the stochastic analysis such probability of core damage and on the determination of the most risk-relevant factors. We also show some preliminary results regarding the comparison between RELAP5-3D and the new code RELAP-7 for a simplified Pressurized Water Reactors system. Lastly we present some conceptual ideas regarding the possibility to extended the RISMC capabilities from an off-line tool (i.e., as PRA analysis tool) to an online-tool. In this new configuration, RISMC capabilities can be used to assist and inform reactor operator during real accident scenarios.

Smith, Curtis L; Ma, Zhegang; Tom Riley; Mandelli, Diego; Nielsen, Joseph W; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Elevated manganese and cognitive performance in school-aged children and their mothers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Growing evidence suggests that excess manganese (Mn) in children is associated with neurobehavioral impairments. In Brazil, elevated hair Mn concentrations were reported in children living near a ferro-manganese alloy plant. Objectives: We investigated these children's and caregivers' cognitive function in relation to bioindicators of Mn exposure. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the WISC-III was administered to 83 children aged between 6 and 12 years; the Raven Progressive Matrix was administered to the primary caregivers (94% mothers), who likewise responded to a questionnaire on socio demographics and birth history. Mn in hair (MnH) and blood (MnB) and blood lead (PbB) were measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Results: Children's mean MnB and MnH were 8.2 {mu}g/L (2.7-23.4) and 5.83 {mu}g/g (0.1-86.68), respectively. Mean maternal MnH was 3.50 {mu}g/g (0.10-77.45) and correlated to children's MnH (rho=0.294, p=0.010). Children's MnH was negatively related to Full-Scale Intelligence Quotient (IQ) and Verbal IQ; {beta} coefficients for MnH were -5.78 (95% CI -10.71 to -0.21) and -6.72 (-11.81 to -0.63), adjusted for maternal education and nutritional status. Maternal MnH was negatively associated with performance on the Raven's ({beta}=-2.69, 95% CI -5.43 to 0.05), adjusted for education years, family income and age. Conclusions: These findings confirm that high MnH in children is associated with poorer cognitive performance, especially in the verbal domain. Primary caregiver's IQ is likewise associated to Mn exposure, suggesting that, in this situation, children's cognition may be affected directly and indirectly by Mn exposure.

Menezes-Filho, Jose A., E-mail: antomen@ufba.br [College of Pharmacy, Federal University of Bahia (Brazil); Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil); Novaes, Cristiane de O.; Moreira, Josino C.; Sarcinelli, Paula N. [Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil)] [Public and Environmental Health Program, National School of Public Health, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Brazil); Mergler, Donna [Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur la Biologie, la Sante, la Societe et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada)] [Centre de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur la Biologie, la Sante, la Societe et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), Universite du Quebec a Montreal (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

ANALYSIS OF PWR SBO CAUSED BY EXTERNAL FLOODING USING THE RISMC TOOLKIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Baseline avian use and behavior at the CARES wind plant site, Klickitat County, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a literature review on avian-wind turbine interactions and the results of a one-year avian baseline study conducted in 1998 at the proposed Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) wind development site in Klickitat County, Washington. Avian use of the site ranged from 1.11/survey in the winter to 5.69/survey in the spring. Average use by passerines in the study plots ranged from 1.15 minutes/survey in the winter to 40.98 minutes/survey in the spring. Raptors spent much less time within plots than other groups, ranging from 0.05 minutes/survey in the winter to 0.77 minutes/survey during the fall. Thirteen percent of all flying birds were within the rotor-swept height (25 to 75 m); 41.6% of all raptors were flying at this height. Raptors with the greatest potential turbine exposure are red-tailed hawks and golden eagles. Passerines with the highest turbine exposure are common ravens, American robins, and horned larks. Spatial use data for the site indicate that avian use tends to be concentrated near the rim, indicating that placing turbines away from the rim may reduce risk. Avian use data at the CARES site indicate that if a wind plant is constructed in the future, avian mortality would likely be relatively low.

Erickson, W.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Strickland, M.D.; Kronner, K.; Becker, P.S.; Orloff, S.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

The jet-disk symbiosis. I. Radio to X-ray emission models for quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from the assumption that radio jets and accretion disks are symbiotic features present in radio loud and radio quiet quasars we scale the bulk power of radio jets with the accretion power by adding mass- and energy conservation of the whole jet-disk system to the standard Blandford \\& K\\"onigl theory for compact radio cores. The model depends on only few parameters and can be constrained by observations. Thus we are able to show that radio and X-ray fluxes (SSC emission) of cores and lobes and typical dimensions of radio loud quasars are consistent with a jet being produced in the central engine. We present a synthetic broadband spectrum from radio to X-ray for a jet-disk system. The only way to explain the high efficiency of radio loud objects is to postulate that these objects consist of `maximal jets' with `total equipartition' where the magnetic energy flow of the jet is comparable to the kinetic jet power and the total jet power is a large fraction of the disk power. As the number of electrons is limited by the accretion flow, this is only possible when the minimum Lorentz factor of the electron distribution is $\\gamma_{\\rm e,min}\\ga100$ ($E\\ga 50 {\\rm MeV}$) or/and a large number of pairs are present. Such an electron/positron population would be a necessary consequence of hadronic interactions and may lead to some interesting effects in the low frequency self-absorbed spectrum. Emission from radio weak quasars can be explained with an initially identical jet. The difference between radio loud and radio weak could be due to a different efficiency in accelerating relativistic electrons on the sub-parsec scale. Finally we demonstrate that in order to appease the ravenous hunger of radio loud jets its production must be somehow linked to the dissipation process in the inner part of the disk.

Heino Falcke; Peter L. Biermann

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

67

Overview of New Tools to Perform Safety Analysis: BWR Station Black Out Test Case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA) methodologies couple system simulator codes (e.g., RELAP, MELCOR) with simulation controller codes (e.g., RAVEN, ADAPT). While system simulator codes accurately model system dynamics deterministically, simulation controller codes introduce both deterministic (e.g., system control logic, operating procedures) and stochastic (e.g., component failures, parameter uncertainties) elements into the simulation. Typically, a DPRA is performed by: 1) sampling values of a set of parameters from the uncertainty space of interest (using the simulation controller codes), and 2) simulating the system behavior for that specific set of parameter values (using the system simulator codes). For complex systems, one of the major challenges in using DPRA methodologies is to analyze the large amount of information (i.e., large number of scenarios ) generated, where clustering techniques are typically employed to allow users to better organize and interpret the data. In this paper, we focus on the analysis of a nuclear simulation dataset that is part of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) station blackout (SBO) case study. We apply a software tool that provides the domain experts with an interactive analysis and visualization environment for understanding the structures of such high-dimensional nuclear simulation datasets. Our tool encodes traditional and topology-based clustering techniques, where the latter partitions the data points into clusters based on their uniform gradient flow behavior. We demonstrate through our case study that both types of clustering techniques complement each other in bringing enhanced structural understanding of the data.

D. Mandelli; C. Smith; T. Riley; J. Nielsen; J. Schroeder; C. Rabiti; A. Alfonsi; Cogliati; R. Kinoshita; V. Pasucci; B. Wang; D. Maljovec

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Human Memory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Training a person in a new knowledge base or skill set is extremely time consuming and costly, particularly in highly specialized domains such as the military and the intelligence community. Recent research in cognitive neuroscience has suggested that a technique called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has the potential to revolutionize training by enabling learners to acquire new skills faster, more efficiently, and more robustly (Bullard et al., 2011). In this project, we tested the effects of tDCS on two types of memory performance that are critical for learning new skills: associative memory and working memory. Associative memory is memory for the relationship between two items or events. It forms the foundation of all episodic memories, so enhancing associative memory could provide substantial benefits to the speed and robustness of learning new information. We tested the effects of tDCS on associative memory, using a real-world associative memory task: remembering the links between faces and names. Working memory refers to the amount of information that can be held in mind and processed at one time, and it forms the basis for all higher-level cognitive processing. We investigated the degree of transfer between various working memory tasks (the N-back task as a measure of verbal working memory, the rotation-span task as a measure of visuospatial working memory, and Raven's progressive matrices as a measure of fluid intelligence) in order to determine if tDCS-induced facilitation of performance is task-specific or general.

Matzen, Laura E.; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Medium Truck Duty Cycle Data from Real-World Driving Environments: Project Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early part of the 20th century, the US trucking industry has provided a safe and economical means of moving commodities across the country. At the present time, nearly 80% of the US domestic freight movement involves the use of trucks. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is spearheading a number of research efforts to improve heavy vehicle fuel efficiencies. This includes research in engine technologies (including hybrid and fuel cell technologies), lightweight materials, advanced fuels, and parasitic loss reductions. In addition, DOE is developing advanced tools and models to support heavy vehicle truck research, and is leading the 21st Century Truck Partnership whose stretch goals involve a reduction by 50% of the fuel consumption of heavy vehicles on a ton-mile basis. This Medium Truck Duty Cycle (MTDC) Project is a critical element in DOE s vision for improved heavy vehicle energy efficiency and is unique in that there is no other national database of characteristic duty cycles for medium trucks. It involves the collection of real-world data for various situational characteristics (rural/urban, freeway/arterial, congested/free-flowing, good/bad weather, etc.) and looks at the unique nature of medium trucks drive cycles (stop-and-go delivery, power takeoff, idle time, short-radius trips), to provide a rich source of data that can contribute to the development of new tools for fuel efficiency and modeling, provide DOE a sound basis upon which to make technology investment decisions, and provide a national archive of real-world-based medium-truck operational data to support heavy vehicle energy efficiency research. The MTDC project involves a two-part field operational test (FOT). For the Part-1 FOT, three vehicles, each from two vocations (urban transit and dry-box delivery) were instrumented for one year of data collection. The Part-2 FOT will involve the towing/recovery and utility vocations. The vehicles participating in the MTDC project are doing so through gratis partnerships in return for early access to the results of this study. Partnerships such as these are critical to FOTs in which real-world data is being collected. In Part 1 of the project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL) established partnerships with the H.T. Hackney Company, one of the largest wholesale distributors in the country, distributing products to 21 states; and with the Knoxville Area Transit (KAT), the City of Knoxville s transit system, operating services across the city of Knoxville and parts of Knox co. These partnerships and agreements provided ORNL access to three Class-7 2005/2007 International day-cab tractors, model 8600, which regularly haul 28 ft pup trailers (H.T. Hackney Co) and three Class-7 2005 Optima LF-34 buses (KAT), for collection of duty cycle data. In addition, ORNL has collaborated with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to determine if there were possible synergies between this duty cycle data collection effort and FMCSA s need to learn more about the operation and duty cycles of the second-largest fuel consuming commercial vehicle category in the US. FMCSA s primary interest was in collecting safety data relative to the driver, carrier, and vehicle. In order to collect the duty cycle and safety-related data, ORNL developed a data acquisition and wireless communication system that was placed on each test vehicle. Each signal recorded in this FOT was collected by means of one of the instruments incorporated into each data acquisition system (DAS). Native signals were obtained directly from the vehicle s J1939 and J1708 data buses. A VBOX II Lite collected Global Positioning System related information including speed, acceleration, and spatial location information at a rate of 5 Hz, and communicated this data via the CAN (J1939) protocol. The Air-Weigh LoadMaxx, a self-weighing system which determines the vehicle s gross weight by means of pressure transducers and posts the weight to the vehicle s J1939 data bus, was used to collect vehicle payload information. A cellular modem, the Raven X

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z