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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

A Natural Gas, High Compression Ratio, High Efficiency ICRE ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Natural Gas, High Compression Ratio, High Efficiency ICRE A Natural Gas, High Compression Ratio, High Efficiency ICRE Using natural gas and gasoline modeling, indications are...

2

SEERs vs. EERs : Understanding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditions, recommended per ASHRAE HVAC Applications Handbook for Geothermal Heat Pumps Equipment Ra6ng Standard 10/9/13 #12;#12;What is Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ra6o? AHRI Ra6ng Standard 10/9/13 #12;#12;So how do you compare EER to SEER

3

PNNL:About PNNL:SEER Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Awards and Honors Staff Awards and Honors Science and Engineering External Recognition (SEER) Program SEER logo The SEER Program establishes a proactive, organized approach for nominating PNNL scientists and engineers for individual awards and recognition in major scientific and technical venues. Honors include fellowships, major professional society awards, government awards such as the PECASE and E.O. Lawrence, National Academy honors, and many others. Helping our researchers earn prestigious awards and honors not only supports their professional development, it enhances the reputation of PNNL, and ultimately, supports the Laboratory's business objectives. External Recognition Opportunity Calendar The SEER Program offers a formal, centralized process for recognitions and

4

13 SEER Standard for Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In January 2004, after years of litigation in a case that pitted environmental groups and Attorneys General from 10 states against the U.S. Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reestablished the central air conditioner and heat pump standard originally set in January 200. The Courts ruling, which struck down a May 2002 rollback of the 2001 standard to a 12 Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) mandates that all new central air conditioners and heat pumps meet a 13 SEER standard by January 2006, requiring a 30% increase in efficiency relative to current law. The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 reference case incorporates the 13 SEER standard as mandated by the Courts ruling.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression Ratio High Efficiency ICRE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

performance of a high compression ratio (32:1 to 74:1) high efficiency (50 to 60% BTE) ICRE operating on natural gas and gasoline

6

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

Weston, Ken

7

Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

High-precision optical measurements of 13C/12C isotope ratios in organic compounds at natural abundance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and an isotopic...challenge to the high-cost and...carbon dioxide gas, using...temperature and pressure from which...of carbon gases . Spectrochim...2008 ) High precision...compounds at natural abundance...catalytic combustor, and...

Richard N. Zare; Douglas S. Kuramoto; Christa Haase; Sze M. Tan; Eric R. Crosson; Nabil M. R. Saad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes  

SciTech Connect

Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

11

Effect of Ni/Al atomic ratio of mesoporous Ni–Al2O3 aerogel catalysts on their catalytic activity for hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mesoporous Ni–Al2O3 (XNiAE) aerogel catalysts with different Ni/Al atomic ratio (X) were prepared by a single-step sol-gel method and a subsequent CO2 supercritical drying method. The effect of Ni/Al atomic ratio of mesoporous \\{XNiAE\\} aerogel catalysts on their physicochemical properties and catalytic activity for steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG) was investigated. Textural properties and chemical properties of \\{XNiAE\\} catalysts were strongly influenced by Ni/Al atomic ratio. Nickel species were highly dispersed on the surface of \\{XNiAE\\} catalysts through the formation of surface nickel aluminate phase. In the steam reforming of LNG, both LNG conversion and hydrogen yield showed volcano-shaped curves with respect to Ni/Al atomic ratio. Average nickel diameter of \\{XNiAl\\} catalysts was well correlated with LNG conversion and hydrogen yield over the catalysts. Among the catalysts tested, 0.35NiAE (Ni/Al = 0.35) catalyst with the smallest average nickel diameter showed the best catalytic performance. The highest surface area, the largest pore volume, the largest average pore size, and the highest reducibility of 0.35NiAE catalyst were also partly responsible for its superior catalytic performance.

Jeong Gil Seo; Min Hye Youn; Yongju Bang; In Kyu Song

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

isotopic ratio | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

isotopic ratio isotopic ratio Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

13

Cost-Effectiveness Ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost?effectiveness ratio (CER) is a calculation that summarizes the intervention's net cost and effectiveness. The three types of CER are: the average cost?effectiveness ratio (ACER), the marginal cost?...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

EMSL - isotopic ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

isotopic-ratio en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-def...

15

ARM - Measurement - Isotope ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsIsotope ratio govMeasurementsIsotope ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Isotope ratio Ratio of stable isotope concentrations. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Field Campaign Instruments FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes Datastreams FLASK : Flask Samplers for Carbon Cycle Gases and Isotopes

16

Peak power ratio generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

Moyer, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Energy Profit Ratio Compared  

SciTech Connect

We need more oil energy to take out oil under the ground. Limit resources make us consider other candidates of energy source instead of oil. Electricity shall be the main role more and more like electric vehicles and air conditioners so we should consider electricity generation ways. When we consider what kind of electric power generation is the best or suitable, we should not only power generation plant but whole process from mining to power generation. It is good way to use EPR, Energy Profit Ratio, to analysis which type is more efficient and which part is to do research and development when you see the input breakdown analysis. Electricity by the light water nuclear power plant, the hydrogen power plant and the geothermal power plant are better candidates from EPR analysis. Forecasting the world primly energy supply in 2050, it is said that the demand will be double of the demand in 2000 and the supply will not be able to satisfy the demand in 2050. We should save 30% of the demand and increase nuclear power plants 3.5 times more and recyclable energy like hydropower plants 3 times more. When the nuclear power plants are 3.5 times more then uranium peak will come and we will need breed uranium. I will analysis the EPR of FBR. Conclusion: A) the EPR of NPS in Japan is 17.4 and it is the best of all. B) Many countries will introduce new nuclear power plants rapidly may be 3.5 times in 2050. C) Uranium peak will happen around 2050. (author)

Amano, Osamu [2-11-1, Iwado Kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per...

19

ARM - Measurement - Backscatter depolarization ratio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscatter depolarization ratio govMeasurementsBackscatter depolarization ratio ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscatter depolarization ratio The ratio of cross polarized to co-polarized elastic backscatter. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar RL : Raman Lidar Field Campaign Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai MPL-AIR : Micropulse Lidar- Airborne

20

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Clearing the air with natural gas engines  

SciTech Connect

This article examines the increased popularity of natural gas vehicles which has spurred engine designers to manipulate fuel-air ratios, compression ratios, ignition timing, and catalytic converters in ways to minimize exhaust pollutants. The topics of the article include reducing pollutants, high-octane engineering, diesel to natural gas, and the two-fuel choice.

O'Connor, L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

Envera Variable Compression Ratio Engine  

SciTech Connect

Aggressive engine downsizing, variable compression ratio and use of the Atkinson cycle are being combined to improve fuel economy by up to 40 percent relative to port fuel injected gasoline engines, while maintaining full engine power. Approach Engine downsizing is viewed by US and foreign automobile manufacturers as one of the best options for improving fuel economy. While this strategy has already demonstrated a degree of success, downsizing and fuel economy gains are currently limited. With new variable compression ratio technology however, the degree of engine downsizing and fuel economy improvement can be greatly increased. A small variable compression ratio (VCR) engine has the potential to return significantly higher vehicle fuel economy while also providing high power. Affordability and potential for near term commercialization are key attributes of the Envera VCR engine. VCR Technology To meet torque and power requirements, a smaller engine needs to do more work per stroke. This is typically accomplished by boosting the incoming charge with either a turbo or supercharger so that more energy is present in the cylinder per stroke to do the work. With current production engines the degree of engine boosting (which correlates to downsizing) is limited by detonation (combustion knock) at high boost levels. Additionally, the turbo or supercharger needs to be responsive and efficient while providing the needed boost. VCR technology eliminates the limitation of engine knock at high load levels by reducing compression ratio to {approx}9:1 (or whatever level is appropriate) when high boost pressures are needed. By reducing the compression ratio during high load demand periods there is increased volume in the cylinder at top dead center (TDC) which allows more charge (or energy) to be present in the cylinder without increasing the peak pressure. Cylinder pressure is thus kept below the level at which the engine would begin to knock. When loads on the engine are low the compression ratio can be raised (to as much as 18:1) providing high engine efficiency. It is important to recognize that for a well designed VCR engine cylinder pressure does not need to be higher than found in current production turbocharged engines. As such, there is no need for a stronger crankcase, bearings and other load bearing parts within the VCR engine. The Envera VCR mechanism uses an eccentric carrier approach to adjust engine compression ratio. The crankshaft main bearings are mounted in this eccentric carrier or 'crankshaft cradle' and pivoting the eccentric carrier 30 degrees adjusts compression ratio from 9:1 to 18:1. The eccentric carrier is made up of a casting that provides rigid support for the main bearings, and removable upper bearing caps. Oil feed to the main bearings transits through the bearing cap fastener sockets. The eccentric carrier design was chosen for its low cost and rigid support of the main bearings. A control shaft and connecting links are used to pivot the eccentric carrier. The control shaft mechanism features compression ratio lock-up at minimum and maximum compression ratio settings. The control shaft method of pivoting the eccentric carrier was selected due to its lock-up capability. The control shaft can be rotated by a hydraulic actuator or an electric motor. The engine shown in Figures 3 and 4 has a hydraulic actuator that was developed under the current program. In-line 4-cylinder engines are significantly less expensive than V engines because an entire cylinder head can be eliminated. The cost savings from eliminating cylinders and an entire cylinder head will notably offset the added cost of the VCR and supercharging. Replacing V6 and V8 engines with in-line VCR 4-cylinder engines will provide high fuel economy at low cost. Numerous enabling technologies exist which have the potential to increase engine efficiency. The greatest efficiency gains are realized when the right combination of advanced and new technologies are packaged together to provide the greatest gains at the least cost. Aggressive engine downsiz

Charles Mendler

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio  

SciTech Connect

Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Assessment of uranium exposure from total activity and 234U:238U activity ratios in urine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Excretion Patterns of Naturally Occuring 234U, 238U and Calcium...ratios in urine. | Radiation workers at Atomic Weapons...Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation Humans Isotopes analysis...prevention & control Radiation Monitoring methods Radiation......

T. Nicholas; D. Bingham

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

LITERATURE SURVEY ON ISOTOPIC ABUNDANCE RATIO MEASUREMENTS - 2001-2005  

SciTech Connect

Along with my usual weekly review of the published literature for new nuclear data, I also search for new candidates for best measurements of isotopic abundances from a single source. Most of the published articles, that I previously had found in the Research Library at the Brookhaven Lab, have already been sent to the members of the Atomic Weights Commission, by either Michael Berglund or Thomas Walczyk. In the last few days, I checked the published literature for any other articles in the areas of natural variations in isotopic abundance ratios, measurements of isotopic abundance ratios on samples of extra-terrestrial material and isotopic abundance ratio measurements performed using ICPMS instruments. Hopefully this information will be of interest to members of the Commission, the sub-committee on isotopic abundance measurements (SIAM), members of the former sub-committee on natural isotopic fractionation (SNIF), the sub-committee on extra-terrestrial isotope ratios (SETIR), the RTCE Task Group and the Guidelines Task Group, who are dealing with ICPMS and TIMS comparisons. In the following report, I categorize the publications in one of four areas. Measurements performed using either positive or negative ions with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer, TIMS, instruments; measurements performed on Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer, ICPMS, instruments; measurements of natural variations of the isotopic abundance ratios; and finally measurements on extra-terrestrial samples with instrumentation of either type. There is overlap in these areas. I selected out variations and ET results first and then categorized the rest of the papers by TIMS and ICPMS.

HOLDEN, N.E.

2005-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

28

Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compressio...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression Ratio High Efficiency ICRE Modeling and Analysis of Natural Gas and Gasoline In A High Compression Ratio High...

29

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o°), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Abundance Ratios in Early-Type Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although evidence is accumulating that abundance ratios in galaxies are often non-solar, they are far from understood. I resume the current evidence for non-solar abundance ratios, supplementing the recent review by Worthey (1998) with some new results. It appears that the Mg/Fe abundance ratio only depends on the mass of the galaxy, not on the formation time-scale. For massive galaxies [Mg/Fe] > 0, while small galaxies show solar abundance ratios. Information about abundances of other element is scarce, but new evidence is given that [Ca/Fe] is solar, or slightly lower than solar, contrary to what is expected for an alpha-element.

Reynier Peletier

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

32

Thermal photons to dileptons ratio at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that the ratio of transverse momentum (p_T) distribution of thermal photons to dileptons produced in heavy ion collisions reaches a plateau above p_T=1 GeV. We argue that the value of the ratio in the plateau region can be used to estimate the initial temperature.

Jajati K. Nayak; Jan-e Alam; Sourav Sarkar; Bikash Sinha

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

Determination of Light Water Reactor Fuel Burnup with the Isotope Ratio Method  

SciTech Connect

For the current project to demonstrate that isotope ratio measurements can be extended to zirconium alloys used in LWR fuel assemblies we report new analyses on irradiated samples obtained from a reactor. Zirconium alloys are used for structural elements of fuel assemblies and for the fuel element cladding. This report covers new measurements done on irradiated and unirradiated zirconium alloys, Unirradiated zircaloy samples serve as reference samples and indicate starting values or natural values for the Ti isotope ratio measured. New measurements of irradiated samples include results for 3 samples provided by AREVA. New results indicate: 1. Titanium isotope ratios were measured again in unirradiated samples to obtain reference or starting values at the same time irradiated samples were analyzed. In particular, 49Ti/48Ti ratios were indistinguishably close to values determined several months earlier and to expected natural values. 2. 49Ti/48Ti ratios were measured in 3 irradiated samples thus far, and demonstrate marked departures from natural or initial ratios, well beyond analytical uncertainty, and the ratios vary with reported fluence values. The irradiated samples appear to have significant surface contamination or radiation damage which required more time for SIMS analyses. 3. Other activated impurity elements still limit the sample size for SIMS analysis of irradiated samples. The sub-samples chosen for SIMS analysis, although smaller than optimal, were still analyzed successfully without violating the conditions of the applicable Radiological Work Permit

Gerlach, David C.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

37

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

38

Isotope ratio determination in boron analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, boron (B) isotope ratios have been determined using thermal ionization...+, Cs+, or O-...for analyte ionization. TIMS can be used in negative or positive ion modes with high sensitivity and precisi...

Ram N. Sah; Patrick H. Brown

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fuel Equivalence Ratio Imaging for Methane Jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 2-D fuel/oxygen equivalence ratio imaging system has been developed. The technique exploits the efficient quenching of the fluorescence of organic molecules by molecular oxygen in...

Ni, T Q; Melton, L A

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A Probabilistic Approach to Site-Specific, Hazard-Consistent Vertical-to-Horizontal Spectral Ratio Model Rizzo Associates Presented at U.S. DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21, 2014

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

42

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

43

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

44

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

45

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

46

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

47

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

48

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

49

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

50

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

51

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

52

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

53

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

54

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

55

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

56

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

57

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

58

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

59

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

60

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

62

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

63

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

64

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

65

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

66

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

67

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

68

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

69

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

70

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

71

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

72

Viscosity to entropy ratio at extremality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assuming gauge theory realization at the boundary, we show that the viscosity to entropy ratio is 1/(4 pi) where the bulk is represented by a large class of extremal black holes in anti-de Sitter space. In particular, this class includes multiple R-charged black holes in various dimensions.

Sayan K. Chakrabarti; Sachin Jain; Sudipta Mukherji

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fission Product Ratios as Treaty Monitoring Discriminants  

SciTech Connect

The International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) is currently under construction. The IMS is intended for monitoring of nuclear explosions. The radionuclide branch of the IMS monitors the atmosphere for short-lived radioisotopes indicative of a nuclear weapon test, and includes field collection and measurement stations, as well as laboratories to provide reanalysis of the most important samples and a quality control function. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington hosts the United States IMS laboratory, with the designation “RL16.” Since acute reactor containment failures and chronic reactor leakage may also produce similar isotopes, it is tempting to compute ratios of detected isotopes to determine the relevance of an event to the treaty or agreement in question. In this paper we will note several shortcomings of simple isotopic ratios: (1) fractionation of different chemical species, (2) difficulty in comparing isotopes within a single element, (3) the effect of unknown decay times. While these shortcomings will be shown in the light of an aerosol sample, several of the problems extend to xenon isotopic ratios. The result of the difficulties listed above is that considerable human expertise will be required to convert a simple mathematical ratio into a criterion which will reliably categorize an event as ‘reactor’ or ‘weapon’.

Miley, Harry S.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Arthur, Richard J.

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Blowing Ratio Effects on Film Cooling Effectiveness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The research focuses on testing the film cooling effectiveness on a gas turbine blade suction side surface. The test is performed on a five bladed cascade with a blow down facility. Four different blowing ratios are used in this study, which are 0...

Liu, Kuo-Chun

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

76

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

77

Universal viscosity to entropy density ratio from entanglement  

SciTech Connect

We present evidence that the universal Kovtun-Son-Starinets shear viscosity to entropy density ratio of 1/4{pi} can be associated with a Rindler causal horizon in flat spacetime. Since there is no known holographic (gauge/gravity) duality for this spacetime, a natural microscopic explanation for this viscosity is in the peculiar properties of quantum entanglement. In particular, it is well known that the Minkowski vacuum state is a thermal state and carries an area entanglement entropy density in the Rindler spacetime. Based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we expect a similar notion of viscosity arising from vacuum fluctuations. Therefore, we propose a holographic Kubo formula in terms of a two-point function of the stress tensor of matter fields in the bulk. We calculate this viscosity assuming a minimally coupled scalar field theory and find that the ratio with respect to the entanglement entropy density is exactly 1/4{pi} in four dimensions. The issues that arise in extending this result to nonminimally coupled scalar fields, higher spins, and higher dimensions provide interesting hints about the relationship between entanglement entropy and black hole entropy.

Chirco, Goffredo; Eling, Christopher; Liberati, Stefano [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy) and INFN Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Theater SBI cost-effectiveness ratios  

SciTech Connect

To address M missiles spaced at intervals longer than the constillation reconstitution time t, the defense needs at the absentee ratio N{sub a} of SBIs to fill the belt plus the M SBIs needed for the intercepts; the resulting cost effectiveness scales as M/(M + N{sub a}). N{sub a} is large and CER small for small ranges and numbers of missiles. For several-hundred missile threats, CERs are greater than unity for ranges of interest.

Canavan, G.H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Determination of boron isotope ratios by Zeeman effect background correction-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of isotopic ratio of boron using Zeeman effect background correction-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with conventional atomizer and natural-boron hollow cathode source is described. The isotope-shift Zeeman effect at 208.9 nm is utilized for isotopic ratio determination. At a given concentration of total boron, the net absorbance decreases linearly with increasing 10B/11B ratio. The absorbances are recorded at the field strength of 1.0 T. The isotope ratios measured by the proposed method were in good agreement with the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma-quadruple mass spectrometry or thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The present method is fairly fast and less expensive compared to the above techniques and is quite suitable for plant environments.

S. Thangavel; S.V. Rao; K. Dash; J. Arunachalam

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

VIBRATION AMPLITUDE -DEPENDENT NATURAL FREQUENCY AND DAMPING RATIO OF REPAIRED PIER MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by measuring its vibration. Therefore, so far, vibration measurements have been carried out to various bridge of vibration can be verified by this method, in some cases, vibration measurement of existing bridges of vibration measurement methods without the need of vibration devices were founded [8]. The main purpose

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

Association of polyandry and sex-ratio drive prevalence in natural populations of Drosophila neotestacea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...demographic variables, the risk...presence of SR drive [6,26-28...cline in SR frequency, ranging...pseudoobscura, the frequencies of SR in...species with SR drive as well as...demographic variable that differs...demographic variables or aspects...which SR frequencies also range...where SR drive is unsuppressed...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Influence of Syringyl to Guaiacyl Ratio on the Structure of Natural and Synthetic Lignins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid-soluble lignin present in the liquor after the removal of solid Klason lignin was estimated by UV spectrometry at 205 nm (TAPPI useful method UM-250). ... 648 (14), 558 (45), 528 (21), 527 (50), 468 (28), 456 (20), 455 (59), 437 (46), 428 (19), 73 (100) ...

Takao Kishimoto; Wakako Chiba; Kaori Saito; Kazuhiko Fukushima; Yasumitsu Uraki; Makoto Ubukata

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit:...

85

Development of a Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement. Development of a Micropyrolyzer for Enhanced Isotope Ratio Measurement. Abstract: This paper presents design, fabrication and...

86

CO (Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The main function of the CO instrument is to provide continuous accurate measurements of carbon monoxide mixing ratio at the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF) 60-meter tower (36.607 °N, 97.489 °W, 314 meters above sea level). The essential feature of the control and data acquisition system is to record signals from a Thermo Electron 48C and periodically calibrate out zero and span drifts in the instrument using the combination of a CO scrubber and two concentrations of span gas (100 and 300 ppb CO in air). The system was deployed on May 25, 2005.

Biraud, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

87

High aspect ratio, remote controlled pumping assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature dual syringe-type pump assembly which has a high aspect ratio and which is remotely controlled, for use such as in a small diameter penetrometer cone or well packer used in water contamination applications. The pump assembly may be used to supply and remove a reagent to a water contamination sensor, for example, and includes a motor, gearhead and motor encoder assembly for turning a drive screw for an actuator which provides pushing on one syringe and pulling on the other syringe for injecting new reagent and withdrawing used reagent from an associated sensor.

Brown, Steve B. (Livermore, CA); Milanovich, Fred P. (Lafayette, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Meteorological Effects on Air/Fuel Ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. "Temperature Compensat d Air/Fuel Ratio Control on a Recuperated Furnace," by J. L. Ferri. GTE Products Corporation, Towanda, PA, lECTC '83 2. Chemical Engineers Handbook, PerTY and Chilton, 5th ed.., (McGraw Hlln, p. 12-7. 3. "Technology..., E = (100 ... 10) (ill) - 100 = 17.2% excess a . 2 Example 2 A furnace uses recuperators which prehe~t the combustion air to 1200 OF using 30 OF air. WithJlOO OF air, the preheated air temperature will be approxIjrnately 1270 OF, a 70 OF increase...

Ferri, J. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

EIA - AEO2010 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Demand Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural Gas Demand Figure 68. Regional growth in nonhydroelectric renewable electricity capacity including end-use capacity, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Annual average lower 48 wellhead and Henry Hub spot market prices for natural gas, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. Ratio of low-sulfur light crude oil price to Henry Hub natural gas price on an energy equivalent basis, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three technology cases, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 72. Annual average lower 48 wellhead prices for natural gas in three oil price cases, 1990-2035

91

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

92

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

93

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

94

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

95

"Table A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" A8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumsption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(PERCENT)","(percent)","Factors"

96

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

97

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

98

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

99

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Abundance ratios in hierarchical galaxy formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemical enrichment and stellar abundance ratios of galaxies which form in a hierarchical clustering scheme are calculated. For this purpose I adopt the star formation histories (SFH) as they are delivered by semi-analytic models in Kauffmann (1996}. It turns out that the average SFH of cluster ellipticals does not yield globally alpha-enhanced stellar populations. The star burst that occurs when the elliptical forms in the major merger plays therefore a crucial role in producing alpha-enhancement. Only under the assumption that the IMF is significantly flattened with respect to the Salpeter value during the burst, a Mg/Fe overabundant population can be obtained. In particular for the interpretation of radial gradients in metallicity and alpha-enhancement, the mixing of global and burst populations are of great importance. The model predicts bright field galaxies to be less alpha-enhanced than their counterparts in clusters.

D. Thomas

1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Improving Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improving Air-Conditioner Improving Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling Building America Stakeholders Meeting Jon Winkler March 2, 2012 2 * How do you recommend the most cost-effective A/C? Simple Question 3 Solution Whole-House Simulation Tool A/C Information * SEER 13 * SEER 14 * SEER 15 * SEER 16 * SEER 17 * SEER 18 * SEER 21 Annualized Cooling Cost (Energy + Equipment) 4 Background * Power, capacity and SHR vary with: o Outdoor temperature o Entering wetbulb o Air mass flow rate o Part load ratio Power Sensible Capacity Latent Capacity * How to accurately and easily model A/C performance? 5 Background: Model Development * A/C modeling utilizes two types of input o Rated values (capacity, efficiency, etc.) o Performance curves Capacity 1 / Efficiency 6 Background: Manufacturer's Data

102

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

103

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

104

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

105

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

106

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

107

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

108

Energetic and exergetic analyses of a variable compression ratio spark ignition gas engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Considering the significance of obtaining higher efficiencies from internal combustion engines (ICE) along with the growing role of natural gas as a fuel, the present work is set to explore the effects of compression ratio (CR hereafter) and air/fuel equivalence ratio (AFER hereafter) on the energy and exergy potentials in a gas-fueled spark ignition internal combustion engine. Experiments are carried out using a single cylinder, port injection, water cooled, variable compression ratio (VCR hereafter), spark ignition engine at a constant engine speed of 2000 rpm. The study involves \\{CRs\\} of 12, 14 and 16 and 10 \\{AFERs\\} between 0.8 and 1.25. Pure methane is utilized for the analysis. In addition, a natural gas blend with the minimum methane content among Iranian gas sources is also tested in order to investigate the effect of real natural gas on findings. The energy analysis involves input fuel power, indicated power and losses due to high temperature of exhaust gases and their unburned content, blow-by and heat loss. The exergy analysis is carried out for availability input and piston, exhaust, and losses availabilities along with destructed entropy. The analysis indicates an increase in the ratio of thermo-mechanical exhaust availability to fuel availability by CR with a maximum near stoichiometry, whereas it is shown that chemical exhaust exergy is not dependent on CR and reduces with AFER. In addition, it is indicated that the ratio of actual cycle to Otto cycle thermal efficiencies is about constant (about 0.784) with changing CR, AFER and CNG fuel used.

A. Javaheri; V. Esfahanian; A. Salavati-Zadeh; M. Darzi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

MĂĽller, Markus

110

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Uses of chloride/bromide ratios in studies of potable water  

SciTech Connect

In natural ground water systems, both chlorine and bromine occur primarily as monovalent anions, chloride and bromide. Although dissolution or precipitation of halite, biological activity in the root zone, anion sorption, and exchange can affect chloride/bromide ratios in some settings, movement of the ions in potable ground water is most often conservative. Atmospheric precipitation will generally have mass ratios between 50 and 150; shallow ground water, between 100 and 200; domestic sewage, between 300 and 600; water affected by dissolution of halite, between 1,000 and 10,000; and summer runoff from urban streets, between 10 and 100. These, and other distinctive elemental ratios, are useful in the reconstruction of the origin and movement of ground water, as illustrated by case studies investigating sources of salinity in ground water from Alberta, Kansas, and Arizona, and infiltration rates and pathways at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Davis, S.N. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources; Whittemore, D.O. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey; Fabryka-Martin, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Axion Landscape and Natural Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple axions form a landscape in the presence of various shift symmetry breaking terms. Eternal inflation populates the axion landscape, continuously creating new universes by bubble nucleation. Slow-roll inflation naturally takes place after the tunneling event, because a very flat direction with a super-Planckian decay constant arises due to the alignment mechanism. We study the vacuum structure as well as possible inflationary dynamics in the axion landscape scenario, and find that the inflaton dynamics is given by either natural or multi-natural inflation. In the limit of large decay constant, it is approximated by the quadratic chaotic inflation, which however is disfavored if there is a pressure toward shorter duration of inflation. If the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio turn out to be different from the quadratic chaotic inflation, there might be observable traces of the bubble nucleation. Also, the existence of small modulations to the inflaton potential is a common feature in the axion landscape, which generates a sizable and almost constant running of the scalar spectral index over CMB scales.

Tetsutaro Higaki; Fuminobu Takahashi

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Final Report on Isotope Ratio Techniques for Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) is a technique for estimating the energy or plutonium production in a fission reactor by measuring isotope ratios in non-fuel reactor components. The isotope ratios in these components can then be directly related to the cumulative energy production with standard reactor modeling methods.

Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Hurley, David E.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Meriwether, George H.; Reid, Bruce D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

115

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

116

Nature/Culture/Seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

Helmreich, Stefan

117

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

120

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Boston forum is open to the public. Additional information is available at http:www.energy.govnews3197.htm. Natural Gas Rig Count: The number of rigs drilling for natural...

122

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

123

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

FR Cnc Nature Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of FR Cnc reported a tricky nature. We carried out...

M. C. Gálvez; A. Golovin; M. Hernán-Obispo…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Natural Gas: More Gasbuggies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... first US experiment in the use of underground nuclear explosions to increase the recovery of natural ...naturalgas ...

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

129

\\{NOx\\} reduction from a large bore natural gas engine via reformed natural gas prechamber fueling optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lean combustion is a standard approach used to reduce \\{NOx\\} emissions in large bore (35–56 cm) stationary natural gas engines. However, at lean operating points, combustion instabilities and misfires give rise to high total hydrocarbon (THC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. To counteract this effect, precombustion chamber (PCC) technology is employed to allow engine operation at an overall lean equivalence ratio while mitigating the rise of THC and CO caused by combustion instability and misfires. A PCC is a small chamber, typically 1–2% of the clearance volume. A separate fuel line supplies gaseous fuel to the PCC and a standard spark plug ignites the slightly rich mixture (equivalence ratio 1.1–1.2) in the PCC. The ignited PCC mixture enters the main combustion chamber as a high energy flame jet, igniting the lean mixture in the main chamber. Typically, natural gas fuels both the main chamber and the PCC. In the current research, a mixture of reformed natural gas (syngas) and natural gas fuels the PCC. Syngas is a broad term that refers to a synthetic gaseous fuel. In this case, syngas specifically denotes a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, nitrogen, and methane generated in a natural gas reformer. Syngas has a faster flame speed and a wider equivalence ratio range of operation than methane. Fueling the PCC with Syngas reduces combustion instabilities and misfires. This extends the overall engine lean limit, enabling further \\{NOx\\} reductions. Research results presented are aimed at quantifying the benefits of syngas PCC fueling. A model is developed to calculate the equivalence ratio in the PCC for different mixtures and flowrates of fuel. An electronic injection valve is used to supply the PCC with syngas. The delivery pressure, injection timing, and flow rate are varied to optimize PCC equivalence ratio. The experimental results show that supplying the PCC with 100% syngas improves combustion stability by 21% compared to natural gas PCC fueling. A comparison at equivalent combustion stability operating points between 100% syngas and natural gas shows an 87% reduction in \\{NOx\\} emissions for 100% syngas PCC fueling compared to natural gas PCC fueling.

Mathew D. Ruter; Daniel B. Olsen; Mark V. Scotto; Mark A. Perna

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

131

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

132

Production ratio of meta-stable isomer in {sup 180}Ta by neutrino-induced reactions  

SciTech Connect

The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This isomer residual ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

Hayakawa, Takehito [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (Japan); Mathews, Grant [Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Isomer residual ratio of odd-odd isotope {sup 180}Ta in supernova nucleosynthsis  

SciTech Connect

The nucleosynthesis of {sup 180}Ta has remained an unsolved problem and as its origin many nucleosynthesis mechanisms have been proposed. This isotope has the unique feature that the naturally occurring abundance of {sup 180}Ta is actually a meta-stable isomer (half-life of >=10{sup 15} yr), while the ground state is a 1{sup +} unstable state which beta-decays with a half-life of only 8.15 hr. We have made a new time-dependent calculation of {sup 180}Ta meta-stable isomer residual ratio after supernova neutrino-induced reactions. This residual isomer ratio is crucial for understanding the production and survival of this naturally occurring rare isotope. We have constructed a new model under temperature evolution after type II supernova explosion. We include the explicit linking between the isomer and all known excited states and found that the residual ratio is insensitive to astrophysical parameters such as neutrino energy spectrum, explosion energy, decay time constant. We find that the explicit time evolution of the synthesis of {sup 180}Ta avoids the overproduction relative to {sup 138}La for a neutrino process neutrino temperature of 4 MeV.

Hayakawa, Takehito [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Chiba, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-11 (Japan); Mathews, Grant [Enter for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High-resolution, three-dimensional, compressional and shear wave velocity models, derived from microearthquake traveltimes, are used to map the distribution of Poisson's ratio and porosity at Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California. Spatial resolution of the three-dimensional Poisson's ratio and porosity distributions is estimated to be 0.5 km horizontally and 0.8 km vertically. Model uncertainties, + or -1% in the interior and + or -2.3% around the edge of the model, are estimated by a jackknife method. We use perturbations of r = V p /V s ratio and Psi = V p

135

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

136

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

137

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2012 | Release Date: Mar. 8, 7, 2012 | Release Date: Mar. 8, 2012 | Next Release: Mar. 15, 2012 Previous Issues Week: 12/22/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices | Storage In the News: Crude oil-to-natural gas price ratio passes 50 Last week, the crude oil-to-natural gas price ratio (the Brent crude oil price in dollars per barrel divided by the Henry Hub natural gas price in dollars per million British thermal units (MMBtu)) passed 50-reaching 54.36 on March 6, 2012. The ratio, which gauges the fuels' relative market value, averaged only about 9 from 2000 to 2009. The relatively high price of crude oil has led to a decrease in natural gas-directed rigs, as producers have shifted their focus to crude oil and natural gas liquids. At a price ratio of 50, crude oil is roughly eight times more valuable than

138

Chlorine/bromine ratios in fracture-filling aqueous alteration products in Nakhla olivine  

SciTech Connect

The Cl/Br ratios in fracture-filling materials in veins in Nakhla olivine was determined using x-ray microprobe (Br) and EDX (Cl) techniques. The Cl/Br ratio of 55 +/- 13 shows that the secondary altered material is pristine, extraterrestrial and akin to the Martian soil. During the early Martian history, volcanic emanations contributed large excesses of volatiles including halogens, sulfur and water to the Martian crust. These chemically-reactive elements had undergone extensive redistribution over time due to a variety of surface processes on Mars. To understand the nature of the alterations due to aqueous activity in the Martian surface environment, a study of halogens, in particular Cl/Br ratios in secondary mineralization products may provide valuable insights. Dreibus and Waenke arrived at a Cl/Br ratio of {approx}110 for the Martian surface materials by studying glasses and bulk samples of several SNC meteorites using neutron activation. Nakhla probably offers the most diverse suite of aqueous precipitates to be found among the SNC meteorites. Numerous veins of hydrous clay within olivine grains are present in Nakhla. Bridges and Grady and Wentworth and McKay observed massive concentrations of halite of probable Martian evaporitic origin, in association with siderite and anhydrite in interstitial areas in Nakhla. Dreibus et al. reported Cl/Br ratios in 3 Nakhla fragments from 104 to 550 and found that 90% of the Cl and Br was readily leachable from this material. Their Nakhla leachate ratio was 580. Their analysis of an attached salt grain yielded a ratio of 5440, similar to that in table salt. Xirouchakis et al. found 20 ppm Br in glass veins in Los Angeles shergottite based on XRF measurements with the x-ray microprobe (beamline X26A) at the Brookhaven Nat. Lab. We examine in this study whether a Cl/Br ratio similar to that of Dreibus and Waenke is also present in products of secondary mineralization, generated as a result of aqueous alteration in some SNC meteorites. We have studied the Cl/Br ratios in fracture-filling materials in veins in Nakhla olivines (thin sections) by determining Br contents using the X-ray Microprobe facility at GeoSoilEnviroCARS (Advanced Photon Source/University of Chicago) and by determining Cl using SEM-based EDX measurements at the same sites in the veins.

Sutton, S.R.; Rao, M.N.; Dreibus, G.; McKay, D.S.; Wanke, H.; Wentworth, S.; Newville, M.; Trainor, T.; Flynn, G.J. (Max-Plank Inst); (SUNY Plattsburgh); (UofC); (Lockheed Martin); (NASA)

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

140

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

142

GUM Analysis for TIMS and SIMS Isotopic Ratios in Graphite  

SciTech Connect

This report describes GUM calculations for TIMS and SIMS isotopic ratio measurements of reactor graphite samples. These isotopic ratios are used to estimate reactor burn-up, and currently consist of various ratios of U, Pu, and Boron impurities in the graphite samples. The GUM calculation is a propagation of error methodology that assigns uncertainties (in the form of standard error and confidence bound) to the final estimates.

Heasler, Patrick G.; Gerlach, David C.; Cliff, John B.; Petersen, Steven L.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

144

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

145

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

146

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

147

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

148

Dual equilibrium in a finite aspect ratio tokamak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achievable in conventional tokamaks. Previous research hasin a ?nite aspect ratio tokamak P. -A. Gourdain a , b ,? ,fusion reactor is the tokamak concept, a closed magnetic

Gourdain, P A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

13-Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Window Air Conditioner 13-Energy Efficiency Ratio Window Air Conditioner Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: General Electric - Fairfield, CT...

150

Natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An efficient method of producing hydrogen by high temperature steam electrolysis that will lower the electricity consumption to an estimated 65 percent lower than has been achievable with previous steam electrolyzer systems. This is accomplished with a natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer, which significantly reduces the electricity consumption. Since this natural gas-assisted steam electrolyzer replaces one unit of electrical energy by one unit of energy content in natural gas at one-quarter the cost, the hydrogen production cost will be significantly reduced. Also, it is possible to vary the ratio between the electricity and the natural gas supplied to the system in response to fluctuations in relative prices for these two energy sources. In one approach an appropriate catalyst on the anode side of the electrolyzer will promote the partial oxidation of natural gas to CO and hydrogen, called Syn-Gas, and the CO can also be shifted to CO.sub.2 to give additional hydrogen. In another approach the natural gas is used in the anode side of the electrolyzer to burn out the oxygen resulting from electrolysis, thus reducing or eliminating the potential difference across the electrolyzer membrane.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Wallman, P. Henrik (Berkeley, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

153

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

154

Natural Gas Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of a power plant is to generate electric power. Therefore, the key performance metric of an electric power generator is the net thermal efficiency, which is the ratio of the electric power measured...

Raub W. Smith; Dr. S. Can Gülen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

156

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

157

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

158

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

159

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

160

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

162

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

163

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

164

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

165

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

166

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

167

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

168

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

169

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

170

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

171

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

172

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

173

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

174

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

175

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2013,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

176

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

177

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

178

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

179

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

180

Natural Resources Specialist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

(See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working ? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessment in natural sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research study focusses on assessment in the Natural Sciences learning area in grades 8 and 9. The aspect under focus is the extent to… (more)

Singh, Suresh Kamar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) Anthony Zammerilli General Engineer Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Robert C. Murray, Thomas Davis, and James...

183

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

185

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

186

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

187

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imbalances. Northern Natural Gas Company declared a force majeure after an unplanned repair issue at the Spearman Compressor Station in Ochiltree County, Texas, on Friday,...

188

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Gwinville, Mississippi. The pipeline company has isolated the affected section of pipeline and taken it out of service. Southern Natural intends to prepare a plan for...

189

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the most important design considerations for any method of Natural Cool ing is the chil led water temperature range selected for use during Natural Cool ing. Figure VI shows that for a hypo thetical Chicago plant, the hours of operation for a Natural..." system on the Natural Cool ing cycle. As the pressures and flow rates of the condenser and chil led water systems are seldom the same, the designer must pay careful attention to the cross over system design to ensure harmonious operations on both...

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

MIMICKING NATURAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MIMICKING NATURAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS ... O2 Evolution from the Manganese?Oxo Cubane Core Mn4O46+:? A Molecular Mimic of the Photosynthetic Water Oxidation Enzyme? ...

MICHAEL FREEMANTLE

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

IEA Workshop 59 Shape and Aspect Ratio Optimization for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Workshop 59 Shape and Aspect Ratio Optimization for High Beta, Steady-State Tokamak SCOPE tokamak DEMO reactor. Many present tokamaks are addressing such operation for ITER and DEMO. Shape and aspect ratio is particularly important for achieving high beta and also for the optimization of edge

192

Warner College of Natural Resources Warner College of Natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and scientific investigation of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. Programs include the study of everyWarner College of Natural Resources Warner College of Natural Resources Office in Natural Resources, and Conservation Biology Forestry Geology Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism Natural Resources Management

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

193

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

194

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S3","N3050KS3","N3010KS3","N3020KS3","N3035KS3","NA1570SKS3","N3045KS3" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline...

195

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050WY3","N3010WY3","N3020WY3","N3035WY3","NA1570SWY3","N3045WY3" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Natural Gas...

196

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MT3","N3010MT3","N3020MT3","N3035MT3","NA1570SMT3","N3045MT3" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports...

197

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","NA1570SOK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Natural Gas...

198

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","NA1570SMI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas...

199

,"Vermont Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","NA1480SVT3","N3050VT3","N3010VT3","N3020VT3","N3035VT3","N3045VT3" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline...

200

,"Arizona Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050AZ3","N3010AZ3","N3020AZ3","N3035AZ3","NA1570SAZ3","N3045AZ3" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Arizona Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050FL3","N3010FL3","N3020FL3","N3035FL3","NA1570SFL3","N3045FL3" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Florida Natural Gas...

202

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","NA1570SKY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Natural Gas...

203

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SOH3","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","NA1570SOH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline...

204

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUT3","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","NA1570SUT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Natural Gas Pipeline...

205

Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In order to help modernize the nation’s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions through common-sense standards, smart investments, and innovative research to advance the state of the art in natural gas system performance, the Department of Energy has launched several new initiatives and enhanced existing programs.

206

VALUING FLARED NATURAL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LAST YEAR , enough natural gas to supply 27% of U.S. needs was burned off as waste around the world, according to a new report by the World Bank. Flared natural gas is a by-product of petroleum production and is not generally considered worth capture and ...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

208

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

209

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

210

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

211

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

212

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

213

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

214

Prominence seismology using the period ratio of transverse thread oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ratio of the period of the fundamental mode to that of the first overtone of kink oscillations, from here on the "period ratio", is a seismology tool that can be used to infer information about the spatial variation of density along solar magnetic flux tubes. The period ratio is 2 in longitudinally homogeneous thin tubes, but it differs from 2 due to longitudinal inhomogeneity. In this paper we investigate the period ratio in longitudinally inhomogeneous prominence threads and explore its implications for prominence seismology. We numerically solve the two-dimensional eigenvalue problem of kink oscillations in a model of a prominence thread. We take into account three nonuniform density profiles along the thread. In agreement with previous works that used simple piecewise constant density profiles, we find that the period ratio is larger than 2 in prominence threads. When the ratio of the central density to that at the footpoints is fixed, the period ratio depends strongly on the form of the density profi...

Soler, R; Ballester, J L

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

216

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

217

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios were measured for hydrothermal minerals (silica, clay and calcite) from fractures and vugs in altered rhyolite, located between 28 and 129 m below surface (in situ temperatures ranging from 81 to 199°C) in Yellowstone drill holes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of formation of these minerals. The Δ18O values of the thirty-two analyzed silica samples (quartz, chalcedony, α-cristobalite, and β-cristobalite) range from -7.5 to +2.8‰. About one

219

The Ne/O abundance ratio in the quiet Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: To determine the neon-to-oxygen abundance in the quiet Sun, a proxy for the photospheric abundance ratio. Method: An emission measure method applied to extreme ultraviolet emission lines of Ne IV-VI and O III-V ions observed by the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer on the SOHO satellite. Results: The average Ne/O abundance ratio in supergranule cell centre regions is 0.18 +/- 0.05, while in supergranule network regions is 0.16 +/- 0.04. A photospheric Ne/O ratio of 0.17 +/- 0.05 is suggested, in good agreement with the most recent compilation of solar photospheric abundances, but discrepant with a recent Ne/O ratio derived from stellar X-ray spectra and revised neon abundances suggested from solar interior models.

P. R. Young

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of High Expansion Ratio Helium Turbo Expander  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors developed a high expansion ratio radial inflow turbine for a helium liquefier of 100 L/h capacity for use with a 70 MW superconductive generator. The following results were obtained from this devel...

N. Ino; A. Machida; K. Ttsugawa; Y. Arai; M. Matsuki…

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GA­A23168 TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO by C.P.C. WONG and R.D. STAMBAUGH or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;GA­A23168 TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS JULY 1999 #12;C.P.C. WONG AND R.D. STAMBAUGH TOKAMAK REACTOR DESIGNS AS A FUNCTION OF ASPECT RATIO

California at Los Angeles, University of

222

The E2/M1 ratio in {Delta} photoproduction  

SciTech Connect

New high-precision measurements of p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}) and p({rvec {gamma}}, {gamma}) cross sections and beam asymmetries have been combined with other polarization ratios in a simultaneous analysis of both reactions. The E2/M1 mixing ratio for the n {r_arrow} {Delta} transition extracted from this analysis is EMR = {minus}3.0% {+-} 0.3 (stat+sys) {+-} 0.2 (model).

Hoblit, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.]|[Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Blanpied, G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Blecher, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Physics Dept.] [and others; LEGS Collaboration

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

224

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

225

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

226

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

227

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

228

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

229

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

230

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

231

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

232

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

233

Renewable Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

234

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 2, 2010) Since Wednesday, May 26, natural gas spot prices increased across the lower 48 States, with gains of up to $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu), at most market locations. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, averaging $4.32 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.42 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.25 or about 6 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,357 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May

235

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

236

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

237

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

238

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

239

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

240

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

242

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

243

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

244

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Kentucky (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Price...

245

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CO3","N3010CO3","N3020CO3","N3035CO3","N3045CO3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Colorado (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Colorado Price...

246

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050IL3","N3010IL3","N3020IL3","N3035IL3","N3045IL3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Illinois (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Illinois Price...

247

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CA3","N3010CA3","N3020CA3","N3035CA3","N3045CA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in California (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","California...

248

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MD3","N3010MD3","N3020MD3","N3035MD3","N3045MD3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Maryland (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Maryland Price...

249

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050AR3","N3010AR3","N3020AR3","N3035AR3","N3045AR3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Arkansas (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Arkansas Price...

250

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050VA3","N3010VA3","N3020VA3","N3035VA3","N3045VA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Virginia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Virginia Price...

251

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Oklahoma (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Price...

252

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050NE3","N3010NE3","N3020NE3","N3035NE3","N3045NE3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Nebraska (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Nebraska Price...

253

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050WA3","N3010WA3","N3020WA3","N3035WA3","N3045WA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Washington (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Washington...

254

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TN3","N3010TN3","N3020TN3","N3035TN3","N3045TN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Tennessee (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Tennessee...

255

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050LA3","N3010LA3","N3020LA3","N3035LA3","N3045LA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Louisiana (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Louisiana...

256

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MN3","N3010MN3","N3020MN3","N3035MN3","N3045MN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Minnesota...

257

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Michigan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Price...

258

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3","N3010PA3","N3020PA3","N3035PA3","N3045PA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

259

Natural Gas Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

issues Go CorrectionUpdate February 22, 2013 Two Year-To-Date values, for 2010 NGL Composite Spot Price and Natural Gas Spot Price, were incorrectly displayed in Table 3. These...

260

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for hydrate synthesis mainly include methane gas of purity 99.9% (produced by Nanjing Special Gases Factory Co., Ltd.), natural sea sand of grain sizes 0.063?0.09,...

Qingguo Meng; Changling Liu; Qiang Chen; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Oklo natural nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the possibility of natural was considered in the 1950s, this prediction was not confirmed until 1972, when a routine analysis of a uranium ore standard at the nuclear-fuel processing plant in Pierre...

Mark J. Rigali; Bartholomew Nagy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for natural gas in the electric power sector soared during the week in order to meet heating needs from the current cold spell. The operator for the electric power grid in Texas...

265

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in waters up to 9000 feet deep. Southern Natural Gas Company has scheduled a shut-in test at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi for April 5 through April 11. Under the...

266

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

267

Photoreceptors: Improving on Nature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... while it becomes too great a strain for molecular biologists to maintain their posture of humble seekers after truth, and they give way to the impulse to jolly nature along ...

Our Molecular Biology Correspondent

1970-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

268

Natural Gas for Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a time when the Government is exhorting the gas and other major industries concerned with ... and other major industries concerned with natural fuel resources to give a forward boost to coal mining by contracting an annual intake ...

1965-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Natural lighting and skylights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

Evans, Benjamin Hampton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Increasing the transformer ratio at the Argonne wakefield accelerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transformer ratio is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss experienced by the drive bunch (or a bunch within a multidrive bunch train). This plays an important role in the collinear wakefield acceleration scheme. A high transformer ratio is desirable since it leads to a higher overall efficiency under similar conditions (e.g. the same beam loading, the same structure, etc.). One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 is to use a ramped bunch train. The first experimental demonstration observed a transformer ratio only marginally above 2 due to the mismatch between the drive microbunch length and the frequency of the accelerating structure [C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, J. Power, M. Conde, Z. Yusof, P. Schoessow, and W. Gai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 144801 (2007)]. Recently, we revisited this experiment with an optimized microbunch length using a UV laser stacking technique at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and measured a transformer ratio of 3.4. Measurements and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

C. Jing, J. G. Power, M. Conde, W. Liu, Z. Yusof, A. Kanareykin, and W. Gai

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio.

272

DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming March 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC --Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy

273

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 26, 2009 March 26, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming Researchers Seek Patent for Isotopic Ratio to Evaluate Water in Coalbeds Washington, DC -Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana. In a recently completed project, researchers at the University of Wyoming used the isotopic carbon-13 to carbon-12 ratio to address environmental issues associated with water co-produced with coalbed natural gas. The research resulted in a patent application for this unique use of the ratio. An added benefit of the project, which was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, was the creation of 27 jobs over the project's 2+ years.

274

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

275

Reduction on Synthesis Gas Costs by Decrease of Steam/Carbon and Oxygen/Carbon Ratios in the Feedstock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The costs for syngas production at low steam/carbon and oxygen/carbon ratios have been analyzed for simplified process schemes of the main syngas production technologies (steam?CO2 reforming, autothermal reforming, and combined reforming) and different synthesis gas compositions. ... The process scheme is shown in Figure 2. Natural gas, saturated steam, and CO2 are preheated to 300?500 °C and mixed in the reactor burner at a pressure of 30 kg/cm2. ...

L. Basini; L. Piovesan

1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evidence of Self-correction of Child Sex Ratios in India: A District-Level Analysis of Child Sex Ratios From 1981 to 2011  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sex ratios in India have become increasingly imbalanced over the past decades. We hypothesize that when sex ratios become very uneven, the shortage of girls will increase girls’ future value, leading sex ratio...

Nadia Diamond-Smith; David Bishai

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmasa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new deuterium-tritium (D-T)fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [3H(d ?)5He/3H(d n)4He] value of (4.2?±?2.0)?×?10?5 was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion(ICF)plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov ?-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICFD-T ?-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-3He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [3He(d ??)5Li/3He(d p)4He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ ?-ray detectorcalibration using neutron-induced ?-rays. Also by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2–9?keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the 5He and 5Li systems resulting from D-T and D-3He fusion respectively and result in improved ICF ?-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition Facility.

Y. Kim; J. M. Mack; H. W. Herrmann; C. S. Young; G. M. Hale; S. Caldwell; N. M. Hoffman; S. C. Evans; T. J. Sedillo; A. McEvoy; J. Langenbrunner; H. H. Hsu; M. A. Huff; S. Batha; C. J. Horsfield; M. S. Rubery; W. J. Garbett; W. Stoeffl; E. Grafil; L. Bernstein; J. A. Church; D. B. Sayre; M. J. Rosenberg; C. Waugh; H. G. Rinderknecht; M. Gatu Johnson; A. B. Zylstra; J. A. Frenje; D. T. Casey; R. D. Petrasso; E. Kirk Miller; V. Yu Glebov; C. Stoeckl; T. C. Sangster

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Many heavy-duty fleets depend on diesel fuel. But an increasing number of trucking companies are transitioning their vehicles to run on liquefied natural...

279

correspondence NATURE|VOL424|17JULY2003|www.nature.com/nature 251  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

correspondence NATURE|VOL424|17JULY2003|www.nature.com/nature 251 Looking into the safety of AAV vectors Sir -- The News story "Harmful potential of viral vectors fuels doubts over gene therapy" (Nature (H. Nakai et al. Nature Genet. 34, 297­302; 2003), we would like to emphasize

Kay, Mark A.

280

THE INFLUENCE OF THE MASS RATIO ON THE ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES BY FILAMENTATION INSTABILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Almost all sources of high-energy particles and photons are associated with jet phenomena. Prominent sources of such highly relativistic outflows are pulsar winds, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and gamma-ray bursts. The current understanding of these jets assumes diluted plasmas which are best described as kinetic phenomena. In this kinetic description, particle acceleration to ultrarelativistic speeds can occur in completely unmagnetized and neutral plasmas through insetting effects of instabilities. Even though the morphology and nature of particle spectra are understood to a certain extent, the composition of the jets is not known yet. While Poynting-flux-dominated jets (e.g., occurring in pulsar winds) are certainly composed of electron-positron plasmas, the understanding of the governing physics in AGN jets is mostly unclear. In this paper, we investigate how the constituting elements of an electron-positron-proton plasma behave differently under the variation of the fundamental mass ratio m{sub p} /m{sub e}. We initially studied unmagnetized counterstreaming plasmas using fully relativistic three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the influence of the mass ratio on particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in electron-positron-proton plasmas. We covered a range of mass ratios m{sub p}/m{sub e} between 1 and 100 with a particle number composition of n{sub p}{sup +}/ n{sub e}{sup +} of 1 in one stream, therefore called the pair-proton stream. Protons are injected in the other one, therefore from now on called the proton stream, whereas electrons are present in both to guarantee charge neutrality in the simulation box. We find that with increasing proton mass the instability takes longer to develop and for mass ratios >20 the particles seem to be accelerated in two phases which can be accounted for by the individual instabilities of the different species. This means that for high mass ratios the coupling between electrons/positrons and the heavier protons, which occurs in low mass ratios, disappears.

Burkart, Thomas; Elbracht, Oliver; Ganse, Urs; Spanier, Felix, E-mail: fspanier@astro.uni-wuerzburg.d [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

C/O RATIO AS A DIMENSION FOR CHARACTERIZING EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, infrared observations of exoplanetary atmospheres have typically been interpreted using models that assumed solar elemental abundances. With the chemical composition fixed, attempts have been made to classify hot Jupiter atmospheres on the basis of stellar irradiation. However, recent observations have revealed deviations from predictions based on such classification schemes, and chemical compositions retrieved from some data sets have also indicated non-solar abundances. The data require a two-dimensional (2D) characterization scheme with dependence on both irradiation and chemistry. In this work, we suggest the carbon-to-oxygen (C/O) ratio as an important second dimension for characterizing exoplanetary atmospheres. In hot-hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, the C/O ratio critically influences the relative concentrations of several spectroscopically dominant species. Between a C/O of 0.5 (solar value) and 2, the H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} abundances can vary by several orders of magnitude in the observable atmosphere, and new hydrocarbon species such as HCN and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} become prominent for C/O {>=} 1, while the CO abundance remains almost unchanged. Furthermore, a C/O {>=} 1 can preclude a strong thermal inversion due to TiO and VO in a hot Jupiter atmosphere, since TiO and VO are naturally underabundant for C/O {>=} 1. We, therefore, suggest a new 2D classification scheme for hydrogen-dominated exoplanetary atmospheres with irradiation (or temperature) and C/O ratio as the two dimensions. We define four classes in this 2D space (O1, O2, C1, and C2) with distinct chemical, thermal, and spectral properties. Based on the most recent observations, we characterize the thermal structure and C/O ratios of six hot Jupiters (XO-1b, CoRoT-2b, WASP-14b, WASP-19b, WASP-33b, and WASP-12b) in the framework of our proposed 2D classification scheme. While the data for several systems in our sample are consistent with C-rich atmospheres, new observations are required to conclusively constrain their C/O ratios in the day side as well as the terminator regions of their atmospheres. We discuss how observations using existing and forthcoming facilities can constrain C/O ratios in exoplanetary atmospheres.

Madhusudhan, Nikku, E-mail: Nikku.Madhusudhan@yale.edu [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

283

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

284

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

285

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: July 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 15, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose during the week in all trading locations. Price increases ranged between 6 cents and 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the biggest increases occurring in the Rocky Mountain region. During the report week, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 15 cents or 5 percent to $3.37 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas near-month contract (August 2009) decreased 7 cents to $3.283 per MMBtu from $3.353 the previous week. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the August 2009 contract has lost 66 cents. As of Friday, July 10, 2009, working gas in storage rose to 2,886

286

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: August 21, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 6, to Wednesday, August 13) Since Wednesday, August 6, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling between $0.20 and 0.77 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $0.59 per MMBtu or about 7 percent, to $8.11 per MMBtu—its lowest level since February 8, 2008. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (August 12) at $8.456 per MMBtu, declining $0.31 or about 4 percent since Wednesday, August 6. Natural gas in storage was 2,567 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 31, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell almost across the board, as mild weather moved into most areas in the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub price fell by 9 cents, from $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 24, to $3.93 per MMBtu yesterday (March 31). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2010 contract expired on Monday, March 29, at $3.842 per MMBtu. The May 2010 contract ended trading yesterday at $3.869 per MMBtu, a decline of about 29 cents from its closing price of $4.154 per MMBtu on March 24. Inventories of working natural gas in storage rose to 1,638 billion

289

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 29, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down slightly for the week on light weather load despite an end-week rally anticipating warmer weather for the approaching July 4th holiday weekend. The Henry Hub price decreased 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (0.5 percent) to close at $4.40 per MMBtu on June 29. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,432 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 24, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 78 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

292

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 10, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with decreases of as much as 11 percent. Prices at the Henry Hub declined $0.32, or about 7 percent, to $4.44 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 10, at $4.56 per MMBtu, falling by $0.20 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,626 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 5, about 1 percent above the 5-year average (2005-2009). The implied

293

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

294

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: October 23, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For week ending Wednesday, October 15) Since Wednesday, October 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the California, West Texas, and Arizona/Nevada regions, with prices rising as much as 76 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose 6 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent, to $6.64 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (October 15) at $6.592 per MMBtu, declining 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent since last Wednesday, October 8. Natural gas in storage was 3,277 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

295

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 26, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 18, 2011) The threat of shut-in production arising from lower Mississippi River flooding likely sent prices up temporarily at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week but the gains failed to stick. The Henry Hub price lost a modest 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.9 percent) to close at $4.15 per MMBtu on May 18. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,919 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 13, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 92 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

296

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

297

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

298

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 6, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 29, 2009) Since Wednesday, July 22, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases of as much as 19 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 8 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.41 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday, July 29, at $3.379 per MMBtu, decreasing by 41 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 24, which is about 19 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

299

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: December 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, December 3, 2008) Since Wednesday, November 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, although selected markets posted relatively modest gains on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 5 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or less than 0.5 percent, to $6.48 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 3) at $6.347 per MMBtu, falling 53 cents per MMBtu or about 8 percent since last Wednesday, November 26. Natural gas in storage was 3,358 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

300

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier weekÂ’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: July 31, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, July 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per MMBtu at most locations during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 11 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $9.788 per MMBtu, declining $1.61 or about 14 percent since Wednesday, July 16. Natural gas in storage was 2,396 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 18, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 84 Bcf.

302

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 17, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points, likely because expectations for colder weather were slow in materializing and storage levels rose again. The Henry Hub price fell 23 cents (about 6 percent) for the week ending November 17, to $3.77 per million Btu (MMBtu). The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $80.43 per barrel ($13.87 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, November 17. This represents a decrease of $7.34 per barrel, or $1.27 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage set another new all-time record

303

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 30, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 22, 2010) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States, with declines of less than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, selected markets in the Rocky Mountains and at the Florida citygate posted considerably larger declines, falling by as much as $0.51 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.04 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $4.02 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, September 22. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.966 per

304

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

305

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

306

Natural Gas Annual, 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1998 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1998. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1994 to 1998. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1998 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1998, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

307

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 6, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down overall for the week, some by more than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub price decreased 6 cents per MMBtu over the week (1.4 percent) to close at $4.34 per MMBtu on July 6. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,527 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 1, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 95 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 224 Bcf under year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural

308

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: July 10, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 25, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising up to 5 percent during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub increased 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 4 percent, to $13.31 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterdayat $13.389 per MMBtu, rising 52 cents or about 4 percent since Wednesday, June 25. Natural gas in storage was 2,118 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 27, which is about 3 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 85 Bcf.

309

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 25, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 17, 2010) Natural gas prices continued their decline across much of the country for the week ended February 17. Even prices in the Northeast, which registered large increases during the previous week, fell as of yesterday. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered net decreases at almost all locations in the lower 48 States. The significant price increases for the week ended February 10 in the Northeast occurred in response to the two major snow storms that slammed the Mid-Atlantic and parts of the Northeast. However, with average temperatures this report week resembling historical normals, prices in the

310

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 13, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their $4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of generally unsupportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed down 25 cents for the week to $3.63 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 5. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract dropped nearly 23 cents per MMBtu to close at $3.570 per MMBtu over the week. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,409 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 30, according to the U.S. Energy

311

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 9, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased at all trading locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, December 2. The Henry Hub price rose by 60 cents, or almost 13 percent, to $5.27 per million Btu (MMBtu) on the week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the January 2010 natural gas contract rose about 37 cents to $4.898 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price was higher than price of the near-month contract during 3 days of the report week. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil contract fell by $5.95, or 8 percent, to $70.67 per barrel or $12.18 per MMBtu.

312

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 27, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 19, 2010) Since last Wednesday, May 12, natural gas spot prices generally rose at market locations across the lower 48 States, with only a few exceptions. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price increased about 2 percent since last Wednesday, from $4.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.28 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the June 2010 futures contract fell about 3 percent, from $4.284 per MMBtu to $4.158 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price dropped about 8 percent, from $75.65 per barrel ($13.05 per MMBtu) to $69.91 per barrel

313

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 24, 2010) Natural gas prices declined across the board, continuing a downward trend from the previous week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price closed at $4.91 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 24, a decline of about 10 percent from $5.47 per MMBtu on February 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March 2010 delivery, which expired yesterday, fell 11 percent on the week, from $5.386 per MMBtu to $4.816 per MMBtu. With an implied net withdrawal of 172 billion cubic feet (Bcf), working gas in storage decreased to 1,853 Bcf as of Friday, February 19,

314

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: June 18, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 10, 2009) Since Wednesday, June 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the Henry Hub spot price falling to $3.56 per million Btu (MMBtu), about a 7 percent decline from the previous WednesdayÂ’s level of $3.81 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the July contract fell from $3.766 to $3.708 over the week, about a 2 percent decline. Prices for contracts beyond the near month and August 2009, however, increased. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 5, which is 21.8 percent above the 5-year (2004-2008) average, after an

315

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Next Release: September 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 26, 2009) Since Wednesday, August 19, natural gas spot prices fell at all market locations, with decreases ranging between 10 and 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 26 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $2.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, August 26, at $2.91 per MMBtu, decreasing by 21 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,258 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 21, which is about 18 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

316

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: September 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 27, to Wednesday, September 3) Since Wednesday, August 27, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.29 per MMBtu or about 15 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 3) at $7.264 per MMBtu, declining $1.344 or about 16 percent in its first week as the near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,847 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 29, which is about 4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007),

317

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: March 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 11, 2009) Since Wednesday, March 4, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 59 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $3.92 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 11, at $3.80 per MMBtu, declining 54 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,681 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 6, which is about 13 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

318

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

319

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 6, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell at most pricing point locations across the board in the lower 48 States as demand fell. The price at the Henry Hub fell 25 cents, or about 7 percent, since last Wednesday, September 29, from $3.81 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.56 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $83.21 per barrel, or $14.35 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, October 6. This represents an increase of $5.36 per barrel, or $0.92 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,499 billion cubic feet

320

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 30, 2010) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices decreased across the lower 48 States, with declines of as much as $0.68 per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.37, or about 7 percent, averaging $4.53 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 30. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.616 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.24 or about 5 percent since the previous Wednesday. The futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired in trading on Monday, June 28, at $4.717 per MMBtu, climbing $0.39 per MMBtu during its

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2008 2, 2008 Next Release: May 29, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, May 14, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. However, a price rally yesterday (May 21) contributed to price increases at some market locations since last Wednesday, May 14. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 11 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 1 percent, to $11.40 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $11.64 per MMBtu, rising 4 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, May 14. Natural gas in storage was 1,614 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 16, which is slightly below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an

322

Natural Gas Annual, 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Historical The Natural Gas Annual, 1997 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 1997. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1993 to 1997. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 1997 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 1997, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

323

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: January 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 7, 2009) Since Wednesday, December 31, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States except in the Northeast region. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 26 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or about 5 percent, to $5.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 7) at $5.872 per MMBtu, climbing 22 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since last Wednesday, December 31. Natural gas in storage was 2,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 2, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

324

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: April 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 8, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 1, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell by 6 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.50. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 8, at $3.63 per MMBtu, declining by 7 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 3, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

325

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 14, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 6, 2010) Since Wednesday, December 30, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of more than 10 percent on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.68 per MMBtu, or about 12 percent, to $6.47 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, January 6, at $6.01 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract increased by 30 cents or about 5 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,123 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

326

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 2, 2009) Natural gas spot prices soared this week, following significant, albeit smaller decreases in trading the prior week. Spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States by more than a dollar per million Btu (MMBtu). The only exception occurred at the Leidy location in the Northeast, which rose by 84 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week at $4.67 per MMBtu, $1.35 per MMBtu higher than last Wednesday. Trading at the Henry Hub ended yesterdayÂ’s session 14 cents higher than the January 2010 contract. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

327

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous weekÂ’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

328

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: April 30, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 22, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 15, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. Prices traded yesterday at or below $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) at all market locations. The Henry Hub spot market price fell by 12 cents, or 3 percent, over the week to $3.48 per MMBtu yesterday. The price for the May contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) fell by 4 percent to $3.532 per MMBtu, from $3.693. Natural gas in storage was 1,741 Bcf as of Friday, April 17, following a 46 Bcf injection. Inventories are now 23 percent higher than the 5-year average and 36 percent higher than the level 1 year ago.

329

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 29, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 21, 2009) Since Wednesday, October 14, natural gas spot prices increased at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes generally ranging between $0.31 and $1.14 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed 98 cents per MMBtu, or about 26 percent, to $4.80 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, October 21, at $5.10 per MMBtu, increasing by 66 cents or about 15 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,734 billion cubic feet

330

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 3, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, November 11, natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of up to 55 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to $3.74 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, November 18, at $4.254 per MMBtu. The price of the near-month contract decreased by 25 cents or about 6 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was a record-setting 3,833 billion cubic feet

331

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 9, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 1, 2011) The past week was marked by two distinct trading markets — “before” and “after” the Memorial Day holiday. Cash markets were listless going into the holiday weekend but escalated Tuesday following an early heat wave that drifted into the East. The Henry Hub price advanced 27 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.2 percent) to close at $4.63 per MMBtu on June 1. Just prior to the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,107 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 27, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas

332

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010) Natural gas spot prices posted gains at most markets across the lower 48 States since Wednesday, October 6, accompanied by double-digit increases in trading since the holiday weekend. Price increases on the week ranged up to 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the Henry Hub natural gas spot price increasing $0.02 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.58 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, October 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.696 per MMBtu, falling by $0.169, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday.

333

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 at 2:00 P.M. 0 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Tuesday, November 9, 2010) Since Wednesday, November 3, natural gas spot prices rose across the lower 48 States, increasing between $0.25 and $1.12 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose $0.41 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.76 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.21 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.37, or about 10 percent, since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage totaled 3,840 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of November 5, about 10 percent above the 5-year (2005-2009) average, and

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 25, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 18, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States. Although a majority of markets posted declines of as much as $1.36 per million Btu (MMBtu), selected western market locations posted relatively narrow gains on the week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.36 per MMBtu, or about 8 percent, averaging $3.99 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, August 25, falling below $4 per MMBtu for the first time since May 7. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.871 per

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 20, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 19, 2011) Natural gas prices posted modest net gains at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price increased from $3.54 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 12, to $3.58 per MMBtu yesterday, October 19. Intra-week trading showed strong rallies followed by quick retreats. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) gained about 10 cents on the week from $3.489 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.586 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,624 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, October 14, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

336

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2009 16, 2009 Next Release: April 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 15, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 8, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with some exceptions including those in the Northeast, Midwest, and Midcontinent. Despite this weekÂ’s upticks at most locations, natural gas spot prices remain at relatively low levels and have continued to trade within a limited range for the past 4 weeks. The Henry Hub spot market prices gained about 10 cents or 2.9 percent per million Btu (MMBtu), ending trading yesterday at $3.60 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 15) at $3.693

337

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: October 2, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 17, to Wednesday, September 24) Since Wednesday, September 17, natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices rising as much as $2.02 per MMBtu but climbing less than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 33 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent, to $8.15 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 24) at $7.679 per MMBtu, declining 23 cents per MMBtu or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, September 17. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

338

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 16, 2011) With imports (particularly from outside North America) becoming less significant to U.S. natural gas markets, spot natural gas prices this report week appeared largely unaffected by international events that have had large impacts on other energy commodities. As weather turned spring-like in many parts of the country and storage withdrawals continued to slow dramatically, the Henry Hub spot price increased just $0.04 to $3.85 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased slightly for delivery in the near-term. The futures contract for

339

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

340

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased since Wednesday, October 10, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.32 per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub rose 45 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $7.458 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 12, was 3,375 Bcf, which is 6.7 percent above the 5-year average. Despite the seemingly favorable supply conditions and little weather-related natural gas demand, natural gas prices continued their upward movement of the past 6 weeks. The Henry Hub spot price exceeded the $7-per MMBtu mark in this week's trading for the first time in 2 months. One factor in the recent run-up in prices may be the relatively low imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) to the Lower 48 States. LNG imports have averaged less than 1 Bcf per day during the first half of October, based on the sendout data published on companies' websites. LNG cargoes instead are heading to Europe and Asia, where buyers continue to purchase LNG at much higher prices than have prevailed in U.S. markets. A likely influence on natural gas prices is the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which reached yet another record high on Tuesday, but decreased slightly during yesterday's trading to $87.19 per barrel or $15.03 per MMBtu. On the week, however, the WTI increased $5.89 per barrel or about 7 percent.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) 14, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices decreased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 6-13) as weather-related demand was limited amid close-to-normal temperatures for this time of year. Easing prices also likely resulted in part from reduced supply uncertainty in response to the amount of natural gas in underground storage (mostly for use during the winter heating season but also available for periods of hot weather in the summer). Supplies from international sources have grown considerably this spring, as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly even as natural gas supplies from Canada (transported by pipeline) likely have decreased. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 23 cents per MMBtu, or 2.9 percent, to $7.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for July delivery decreased 47.2 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.608 yesterday (June 13). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,255 Bcf as of Friday, June 8, reflecting an implied net injection of 92 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 19.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.20 per barrel on the week to $66.17 per barrel, or $11.41 per MMBtu.

342

Hall viscosity to entropy ratio in higher derivative theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper based on the basic principles of gauge/gravity duality we compute the hall viscosity to entropy ratio in the presence of various higher derivative corrections to the dual gravitational description embedded in an asymptotically $ AdS_{4} $ space time. As the first step of our analysis, considering the back reaction we impose higher derivative corrections to the abelian gauge sector of the theory where we notice that the ratio indeed gets corrected at the leading order in the coupling. Considering the probe limit as a special case we compute this leading order correction over the fixed background of the charged black brane solution. Finally we consider higher derivative ($ R^{2} $) correction to the gravity sector of the theory where we notice that the above ratio might get corrected at the sixth derivative level.

Dibakar Roychowdhury

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

344

The muon charge ratio in cosmic ray air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The muon charge ratio of the lateral muon density distributions in single EAS is studied by simulations, in context of recent proposals to measure this observable in coincidence with EAS observations. While effects of the hadronic interaction do not lead to significant differences of the total muon plus and muon minus content, the differences of the azimuthal variation of the muon densities of opposite charges and the azimuthal variation of the muon charge ratio appear to be very much pronounced, dependent on the direction of EAS incidence. This is due to the influence of the geomagnetic field which induces related effects in radio emission from extended air showers.

H. Rebel; O. Sima; A. Haungs; C. Manailescu; B. Mitrica; C. Morariu

2008-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

345

Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating M. Sankar online 20 December 2010 Keywords: Natural convection Annulus Discrete heating Porous medium Radii ratio to discrete heating. The outer wall is maintained iso- thermally at a lower temperature, while the top

Lopez, John M.

346

Natural Gas - CNG & LNG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas pump Natural gas, a fossil fuel comprised mostly of methane, is one of the cleanest burning alternative fuels. It can be used in the form of compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG) to fuel cars and trucks. Dedicated natural gas vehicles are designed to run on natural gas only, while dual-fuel or bi-fuel vehicles can also run on gasoline or diesel. Dual-fuel vehicles allow users to take advantage of the wide-spread availability of gasoline or diesel but use a cleaner, more economical alternative when natural gas is available. Since natural gas is stored in high-pressure fuel tanks, dual-fuel vehicles require two separate fueling systems, which take up passenger/cargo space. Natural gas vehicles are not available on a large scale in the U.S.-only

347

Effective fracture geometry obtained with large water sand ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas formation exhibits some unusual reservoir characteristics: nano-darcy matrix permeability, presence of natural fractures and gas storage on the matrix surface that makes it unique in many ways. It’s difficult to design an optimum fracture...

Kumar, Amrendra

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Natural Gas Applications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Welcome to EIA's Natural Gas Applications. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Home Page Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Applications What's New Publications Applications Survey Forms Sign Up for Email Updates Contact Experts Applications EIA-176 Query System The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer.

349

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 6, 2011) Continuing last weekÂ’s net decline, the Henry Hub price this week fell 8 cents from $4.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 30, to $4.17 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 6. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (May 2011) contract fell from $4.355 per MMBtu to $4.146 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,579 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 1, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes Incorporated, rose by 11 to 891. A new study released by EIA estimated technically recoverable shale

350

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased during this holiday-shortened report week (Thursday-Wednesday, July 5-11) as weather-related demand emerged in response to the hottest temperatures to date this year in the Northeast and Midwest. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 36 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the story was slightly different with the contract price for August delivery decreasing to $6.600 per MMBtu, which was 1.8 cents lower than last Thursday's (July 5) closing price. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,627 Bcf as of Friday, July 7. This level of working gas in underground storage is 16.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.77 per barrel on the week to $72.58 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now nearly double the price of natural gas at $12.51 per MMBtu. The relative difference in pricing can have a large effect on demand (mostly in the industrial sector and power plants).

351

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Utah (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Price of...

352

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Ohio (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Price of...

353

,"Iowa Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050IA3","N3010IA3","N3020IA3","N3035IA3","N3045IA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Iowa (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Iowa Price of...

354

Natural Gas Purchasing Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

Watkins, G.

355

Natural Sciences Research Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Big Lottery Fund) European Commission· Other overseas organisations including World HealthEpARTmENT oF phySICS 14 CENTRE FoR ENVIRoNmENTAL poLICy 15 RESEARCh INSTITUTES ANd CENTRES 16 ENERGy ANd ENVIRo to the benefit of humanity Faculty of Natural Sciences statistics: Financial data are for the year ending 31 July

356

Natural England Forestry Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Briefing Natural England Forestry Commission Environment Agency Slowing the Flow in Pickering - Flood Storage Option Background Following work by the Environment Agency, investigating the feasibility) reservoir, however, as the design progressed the Reservoir Panel Engineer assessed the design as being high

357

Geoff Brumfiel NATURE | NEWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geoff Brumfiel NATURE | NEWS Laser lab shifts focus to warheads US ignition facility will devote at the US National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been working flat out to focus 192 laser beams on a gold name: `ignition', in which the fusion reaction generates as much energy as the lasers supply. Success

358

The relation of fO?, ferric-ferrous ratio (R), and physical properties of four natural clinoamphiboles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) as an internal standard, except in the case of arfvedsonite, for wh1ch synthetic spinel (NgA1204) was used to avoid overlap of standard and mineral peaks. Centers of peaks were located at 2/3 peak height. Reflections were indexed by comparison of the patterns... expired lo hematite (M) butter expired to magnetite A amphibole H - hematite M - magnetite O - quartz LCRIB low cnstohasle OL olivine PYX pyroxene SP spinel AC semite 14 from the single crystal. This phenomenon was observed in other hydro...

Clowe, Celia Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related sets of genes (e.g. energy production in PseudomonasProteins involved in energy production (function C) tend toan excess of high-S:F energy production genes (Figure 3B).

Shapiro, B. Jesse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Limits on the Boron Isotopic Ratio in HD 76932  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data in the 2090 A B region of HD 76932 have been obtained at high S/N using the HST GHRS echelle at a resolution of 90,000. This wavelength region has been previously identified as a likely candidate for observing the B11/B10 isotopic splitting. The observations do not match a calculated line profile extremely well at any abundance for any isotopic ratio. If the B abundance previously determined from observations at 2500 A is assumed, the calculated line profile is too weak, indicating a possible blending line. Assuming that the absorption at 2090 A is entirely due to boron, the best-fit total B abundance is higher than but consistent with that obtained at 2500 A, and the best-fit isotopic ratio (B11/B10) is in the range ~10:1 to ~4:1. If the absorption is not entirely due to B and there is an unknown blend, the best-fit isotopic ratio may be closer to 1:1. Future observations of a similar metal-poor star known to have unusually low B should allow us to distinguish between these two possibilities. The constraints that can be placed on the isotopic ratio based on comparisons with similar observations of HD 102870 and HD 61421 (Procyon) are also discussed.

L. M. Rebull; D. K. Duncan; S. Johansson; J. Thorburn; B. Fields

1998-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Branching ratios for the beta decay of Na-21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the beta-decay branching ratio for the transition from Na-21 to the first excited state of Ne-21. A recently published test of the standard model, which was based on a measurement of the beta-nu correlation in the decay of Na-21...

Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, John C.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Goodwin, J.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Tabacaru, G.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.; Zhai, Y.; Towner, I. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A genetically encoded fluorescent reporter of ATP:ADP ratio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A genetically encoded fluorescent reporter of ATP:ADP ratio Jim Berg1,2, Yin Pun Hung1 & Gary's affinity for Mg-ATP was o100 nM, as seen for other members of the bacterial PII regulator family, a surprisingly high affinity given that normal intracellular ATP concentration is in the millimolar range. ADP

Yellen, Gary

363

Application of Resource-Ratio Theory to Hydrocarbon Biodegradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Application of Resource-Ratio Theory to Hydrocarbon Biodegradation ... We suggest that the procedures outlined here can be used to help guide practical decisions about the nutrients that are most likely to be growth-limiting and help define the subsequent nutrient application rates. ...

Val H. Smith; David W. Graham; Dale D. Cleland

1998-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Magnesium Isotope Ratios in omega Centauri Red Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used high resolution observations obtained at the AAT with UHRF (R ~ 100,000) and at Gemini-S with b-HROS (R ~ 150,000) to determine magnesium isotope ratios for seven omega Centauri red giants that cover a range in iron abundance from [Fe/H] = --1.78 to --0.78 dex, and for two red giants in M4 (NGC 6121). The omega Centauri stars sample both the "primordial" (i.e., O-rich, Na and Al-poor) and the "extreme" (O-depleted, Na and Al-rich) populations in the cluster. The primordial population stars in both omega Centauri and M4 show (25Mg, 26Mg)/24 Mg isotopic ratios that are consistent with those found for the primordial population in other globular clusters with similar [Fe/H] values. The isotopic ratios for the omega Centauri extreme stars are also consistent with those for extreme population stars in other clusters. The results for the extreme population stars studied indicate that the 26Mg/24Mg ratio is highest at intermediate metallicities ([Fe/H] < --1.4 dex), and for the highest [Al/Fe] values....

Da Costa, G S; Yong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Design studies of low aspect ratio quasi-omnigenous stellarators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimization principles for the design of a more attractive reactor. These are 3 and 4 field period low aspect ratio quasi-omnigenous stellarators based on an optimization method that aims at improved confinement stability boundaries. 1. Configuration optimization The development of increasingly sophisticated

Martín-Solís, José Ramón

366

Holographic study of conventional and negative Poisson's ratio metallic foams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Inhomogeneous, non-affine deformation was observed holographically in both foam materials. Introduction in this series were determined from displacement measurements of high magnification video tapes of the tensile a very useful and reliable tool to determine the Poisson's ratio of orthotropic FRP (Fiber Reinforced

Lakes, Roderic

367

Measurement of Branching Ratio for K+?e+?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a 2?-sr magnetic spectrometer, the branching ratio for K+?e+? relative to that for K+??+? has been measured to be (2.42 ± 0.42) × 10-5, in good agreement with the predictions of the V-A theory.

A. R. Clark, Bruce Cork, T. Elioff, L. T. Kerth, J. F. McReynolds, David Newton, and W. A. Wenzel

1972-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Proton Form Factor Ratio Measurements at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect

The ratio of the proton form factors, G{sub Ep}/G{sub Mp}, has been measured from Q{sup 2} of 0.5 GeV{sup 2} to 8.5 GeV{sup 2}, at the Jefferson Laboratory, using the polarization transfer method. This ratio is extracted directly from the measured ratio of the transverse and longitudinal polarization components of the recoiling proton in elastic electron-proton scattering. The discovery that the proton form factor ratio measured in these experiments decreases approximately linearly with four-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2}, for values above #25;~1 GeV{sup 2}, is one of the most significant results to come out of JLab. These results have had a large impact on progress in hadronic physics; and have required a significant rethinking of nucleon structure. The increasingly common use of the double-polarization technique to measure the nucleon form factors, in the last 15 years, has resulted in a dramatic improvement of the quality of all four nucleon electromagnetic form factors, G{sub Ep}, G{sub Mp}, G{sub En} and G{sub Mn}. There is an approved experiment at JLab, GEP(V), to continue the ratio measurements to 12 GeV{sup 2}. A dedicated experimental setup, the Super Bigbite Spectrometer (SBS), will be built for this purpose. It will be equipped with a focal plane polarimeter to measure the polarization of the recoil protons. The scattered electrons will be detected in an electromagnetic calorimeter. In this presentation, I will review the status of the proton elastic electromagnetic form factors and discuss a number of theoretical approaches to describe nucleon form factors.

Punjabi, Vina A. [Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Perdrisat, Charles F. [William and Mary College, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Appendix C Selected Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Recurring Recurring Natural Gas Reports * Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130. Published monthly. Other Reports Covering Natural Gas, Natural Gas Liquids, and Other Energy Sources * Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035. Published monthly. Provides national aggregate data for natural gas, natural gas liquids, and other energy sources. * Short-Term Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0202. Published quarterly. Provides forecasts for next six quarters for natural gas and other energy sources. * Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends, DOE/EIA- 0560(96), December 1996. * U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves -1996 Annual Report, DOE/EIA-0216(96)/Ad- vance Summary, September 1997. * Annual Energy Review 1996, DOE/ EIA-0384(96), July 1997. Published annually. * State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960- 1994, DOE/EIA-0214(94), October 1996. * Annual

370

Gas Natural - CNG y GNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Natural Dispensador de Gas Natural Gas Natural Dispensador de Gas Natural El gas natural, un combustible fósil compuesto básicamente de metano, es uno de los combustibles alternativos menos contaminantes. Puede ser usado como gas natural comprimido (GNC) o como gas natural licuado (GNL) para autos y camiones. Existen vehículos diseñados para funcionar exclusivamente con gas natural. Por otra parte hay vehículos de doble combustible o bi-combustibles que también puede funcionar con gasolina o diesel. Los vehículos de doble combustible permiten que el usuario aproveche la gran disponibilidad de gasolina o diesel, pero use la alternativa menos contaminante y más económica cuando el gas natural esté disponible. Ya que el gas natural es almacenado en depósitos de combustible de alta

371

Natural Ventilation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation Natural Ventilation May 30, 2012 - 7:56pm Addthis Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion Opening a window is a simple natural ventilation strategy. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/Simotion What does this mean for me? If you live in a part of the country with cool nights and breezes, you may be able to cool your house with natural ventilation. If you're building a new home, design it to take advantage of natural ventilation. Natural ventilation relies on the wind and the "chimney effect" to keep a home cool. Natural ventilation works best in climates with cool nights and regular breezes. The wind will naturally ventilate your home by entering or leaving windows, depending on their orientation to the wind. When wind blows against your

372

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Intrastate Natural Gas Pipeline Segment Overview Intrastate natural gas pipelines operate within State borders and link natural gas producers to local markets and to the interstate pipeline network. Approximately 29 percent of the total miles of natural gas pipeline in the U.S. are intrastate pipelines. Although an intrastate pipeline system is defined as one that operates totally within a State, an intrastate pipeline company may have operations in more than one State. As long as these operations are separate, that is, they do not physically interconnect, they are considered intrastate, and are not jurisdictional to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). More than 90 intrastate natural gas pipelines operate in the lower-48 States.

373

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 3, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 26, 2010) Current production during this report week remained relatively high, adding to a perception of a strong supply outlook. Natural gas prices drifted lower at markets across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, May 26, at $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.09 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $4.16 per MMBtu yesterday, which was its last day of trading as the near-month contract. This price

374

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 11, 2009) With little impact on production in the Gulf of Mexico from Hurricane Ida and moderate temperatures in many parts of the country, natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this report week (November 4-11). The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.90 to $3.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also moved lower as the threat of an interruption in supplies from the hurricane passed. The futures contract for December delivery decreased by $0.22 on the report week to $4.503 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (November 6) is

375

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2001 9, 2001 Prices headed up the middle of last week despite seasonal or cooler temperatures everywhere but California (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) and the July 4th holiday, regarded as one of the lowest natural gas consumption days. As expected, the resulting 10-cent-per-MMBtu gain at the Henry Hub on Thursday compared with the previous Friday was undone the following day. The futures price for August delivery was able to stay ahead of the previous week by 12.2 cents to settle at $3.218 on Friday. Spot natural gas prices for large packages in southern California increased as much as $2.71 per MMBtu as temperatures soared and gas-fired power plants endeavored to meet air conditioning demand. Prices started to recede as temperatures abated by the end of the week. Strong gas supplies across the country supported another hefty net addition to storage of 105 Bcf.

376

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 21, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell during the week at locations across the country, with declines ranging from 12 to 62 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 19 cents, or about 5 percent, averaging $3.96 per MMBtu yesterday, April 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the value of the futures contract for May 2010 delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 6 percent, from $4.199 per MMBtu on April 14 to $3.955 per MMBtu on April 21. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell 3 percent since last Wednesday to $82.98 per barrel, or $14.31 per MMBtu.

377

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 13, 2011) As the story of abundant natural gas supply continued to provide headlines for the market this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 6-13), spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased. Moderate temperatures also likely contributed to the price declines by limiting end-use demand and allowing for replenishment of storage supplies. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent, to $4.14 per MMBtu. Other market prices also decreased by up to 10 cents per MMBtu, with a few exceptions in the U.S. Northeast.

378

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 to Wednesday, December 19) 12 to Wednesday, December 19) Released: December 20 Next release: January 4, 2008 · Since Wednesday, December 12, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 4 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent to $7.18 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 19) at $7.179 per MMBtu, falling 23 cents or 3 percent since Wednesday, December 12. · Natural gas in storage was 3,173 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of December 14, which is 9 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.30 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $91.11 per barrel or $15.71 per MMBtu.

379

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 19, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 11, 2010) Summer heat and increased demand this week were insufficient to sustain the natural gas price level, as prices at trading locations across the lower 48 States posted decreases. Overall, spot price at most locations in the lower 48 States fell between 30 and 45 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a number of locations posted price decreases of as much as 52 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, August 11, 39 cents lower than the preceding week, at $4.38 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract

380

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: December 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, December 3, to Wednesday, December 10, 2008) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, with all trading regions registering losses with the exception of the Rocky Mountains. On the week, the spot prices at each market location outside the Rockies fell between 2 and 93 cents per MMBtu, with the Henry Hub registering a decrease of 80 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract declined each day for the first 3 days of the report and increased on Tuesday and Wednesday (December 9-10), resulting in a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 13, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 12, 2011) Natural gas prices posted net losses at most market locations across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price fell from $3.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, October 5, to $3.54 per MMBtu yesterday, October 12. Despite overall decreases, intraweek trading showed some rallies, particularly near the end of the report week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (November 2011) fell about 8 cents on the week from $3.570 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.489 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,521 billion cubic feet

382

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: June 12, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Spot gas at most market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) traded above $10 per million Btu (MMBtu) this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday), with many points registering prices in excess of $12 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub moved higher by 38 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday (June 4) at $12.379 MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 1,806 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 30, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

383

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 13, 2010) Significant price increases occurred through Friday, January 8, apparently as a result of extreme temperatures and continued wellhead freeze-offs in some parts of the country during the first half of the report week. However, with temperatures across much of the lower 48 States returning to normal, spot prices receded significantly between Monday, January 11, and Wednesday, January 13. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered significant net decreases at all locations in the lower 48 States since January 6. The largest weekly price drops occurred in Florida and the

384

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 14, 2010) While natural gas spot prices inched lower at a number of market locations, prices at the majority of points in the lower 48 States increased since last Wednesday, April 7. Overall, spot prices in the lower 48 States varied between a 3-percent increase and a 3-percent decrease on the week. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, April 14, 7 cents higher than the preceding week, at $4.15 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.199 per

385

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: July 3, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, June 18-25), with price decreases generally occurring in producing areas in the Gulf of Mexico region and price increases at trading locations in the Rockies, the Midcontinent, and the Northeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.76. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After trading at $13.20 per MMBtu on Monday, the futures contract for July delivery decreased by 45 cents in value over the next 2 days and ended the

386

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 23, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 15, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 8–15), likely supported by demand in the electric power sector from late-season heat and associated air-conditioning demand in much of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.06 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the October futures contract increased in 4 out of 5 trading days for a total gain during the report week of about $0.18 per MMBtu. The price of the

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States decreased from Wednesday to Wednesday, October 22-29, with relatively large declines of more than 10 percent occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and more modest price movements in the eastern half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.36 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week. The futures contract for November delivery, for which the final day of trading was yesterday (October 29), decreased by

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

389

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: July 30, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 22, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose this report week, as prices for energy products generally increased and the economic outlook improved. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased significantly. The price of the futures contract for August delivery closed yesterday, July 22, at $3.793 per MMBtu, more than 50 cents higher than the closing price the previous Wednesday. Working gas in underground storage as of Friday, July 17, is estimated to have been 2,952 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 18.4

390

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 13) January 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 13) Since Wednesday, December 29, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 34 cents, or about 6 percent, to $5.84 per MMBtu. Yesterday (January 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.833 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 57 cents since last Wednesday (December 29). Natural gas in storage was 2,698 Bcf as of December 31, which is about 12 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.28 per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week to $43.41 per barrel or $7.484 per MMBtu.

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) 16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) Released: January 24, 2008 Next release: January 31, 2008 · Since Wednesday, January 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of the Northeast and Florida, and a few scattered points in Louisiana, Alabama/Mississippi, and the Rocky Mountains. · Prices at the Henry Hub declined 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $7.84 per MMBtu. · The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 23) at $7.621 per MMBtu, falling 51 cents or 6.3 percent since Wednesday, January 16. · Natural gas in storage was 2,536 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 18, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007).

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 23, 2010) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 16, completely reversing the previous weekÂ’s gains. However, spot prices remain significantly higher than they were 3 weeks ago. Prices at most market locations fell between 10 and 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) this week, with most locations ending the week below $5 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.804 per MMBtu, decreasing by 17 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. In

393

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 12, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 4, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at market locations in the lower 48 States moved higher this week as cold weather persisted in some consuming regions. Prices also increased at the beginning of the report week as the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data (on April 28) showing the refill of storage inventories following last winter has proceeded slower than in recent years. During the report week (April 27-May 4), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.24 to $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 7, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 16, 2009) Changes in natural gas spot prices this report week (December 9-16) reflected extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country. In response to varying levels of demand for space heating, spot prices increased east of the Mississippi River but declined in the West. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.30 to $5.57 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also rose with expectations of higher demand in response to this monthÂ’s trend of colder-than-normal temperatures. The futures contract for

395

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

396

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: August 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, July 30, to Wednesday, August 6) Natural gas spot prices decreased this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 30-August 6), marking a fifth consecutive week of declines at many trading locations after the unprecedented run-up in prices earlier this year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.31 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.70. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were also lower relative to last week. After reaching a daily settlement high price for the week of $9.389 per MMBtu on Friday, August 1, the price of the near-month contract (September 2008) on Monday decreased

397

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 4, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 27, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (May 20-27), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand. The futures contract for June delivery expired yesterday, May 27, at a price of $3.538 per MMBtu, which is the second-lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract in more than 6 years. Meanwhile, the price

398

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: February 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 11, 2009) Natural gas prices decreased this week as space-heating demand slackened with a break from the bitter cold of prior weeks. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract for February 2009 delivery decreased by 6.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to

399

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 27, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 19, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (August 12-19), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.34 to $3.02 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as supplies continued to be viewed as more than adequate to address near-term demand, including heating-related demand increases this winter. The futures contract for September delivery decreased by $0.36 on the week to $3.12 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday is estimated to

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 20, to Wednesday, August 27) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, August 20-27), as tropical storm Gustav appeared to be heading into the Gulf of Mexico and industry initiated precautionary safety measures likely to result in the evacuation of offshore Gulf of Mexico platforms. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.53 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of declining prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. Early in the report week, the price of the near-term contract (September 2008) had

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 6, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 28, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, April 21 – Wednesday, April, 28), as a late-season chill temporarily increased demand. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month futures contract bounced above $4 per MMBtu in the final days of trading before its monthly expiration. The May contract expired yesterday at $4.271 per MMBtu, which is $0.429 more than the April contract’s expiration price of $3.842 per MMBtu. As a result, the May contract is the

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 8, 2010) Price changes during the week were mixed, but in most areas, these changes were moderate. The Henry Hub price rose slightly from $3.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, September 1, to $3.81 per MMBtu yesterday. The report week was shortened due to the Labor Day holiday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the October 2010 futures contract rose about 5 cents, from $3.762 per MMBtu on September 1 to $3.814 per MMBtu on September 8. Working natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 3, was 3,164 Bcf, following an implied net injection of 58 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 25, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 10, to Wednesday, September 17) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 10-17), even as disruptions in offshore Gulf of Mexico production continue in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. However, price movements were not uniform, and prices increased at some trading locations directly supplied by offshore Gulf of Mexico production, which was almost entirely shut-in for most of the week. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 20, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 12, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at most market locations east of the Mississippi River moved higher this week as a bitter cold moved into the eastern half of the country. West of the Mississippi River, a gradual warming trend resulted in lower prices. During the report week (January 5-12), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 to $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased during the report week, likely in part due to forecasts of continuing cold weather and improving economic conditions. The futures

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 11, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 3, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down modestly for the week following passage of the heat wave that had earlier gripped most of the country. The Henry Hub price decreased 20 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (down 4.5 percent) to close at $4.26 per MMBtu on August 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the downward price response was somewhat more pronounced (down 5.3 percent) with the September 2011 natural gas contract losing ground over the week, closing at $4.090 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,758 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 29, according to the U.S. Energy Information

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 13, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were up somewhat for the week on a heat wave that affected nearly half the countryÂ’s population according to national news reports. Despite the record heat, the Henry Hub price increased a modest 9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (2.0 percent) to close at $4.43 per MMBtu on July 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price response was more robust (up 4.4 percent) with the August 2011 natural gas contract price gaining ground over the week, closing at $4.403 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,611 billion cubic

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 28, 2011) Natural gas spot prices at most market locations across the country this past week initially declined and then began to creep upwards as natural gas use for power generation increased. The upward trend was halted yesterday, as prices at nearly all points retreated, possibly due to forecasts for considerably colder weather. After declining from $3.78 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $3.72 per MMbtu on Thursday, the Henry Hub spot price increased to $3.92 per MMBtu on Tuesday and closed at $3.88 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 24, 2010) The natural gas market is transitioning to spring, a “shoulder” season of lower demand between the relatively high-demand periods of winter and summer. As space-heating demand ebbed during the report week, prices declined across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, March 24, at $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.25 compared with the previous Wednesday, March 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices continued to decline as storage inventories appeared more than adequate and domestic production remained strong. The futures contract for April

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: November 20, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, November 5, to Thursday, November 13) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday (November 5), failing to respond to the increase in heating load that occurred across much of the country, particularly in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains. Since last Wednesday, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.31 after the intraweek run-up to more than $7 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in five of the six trading sessions covered by this report, resulting in a weekly net decrease of $0.931 per MMBtu. The

411

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2008 3, 2008 Next Release: October 30, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 22) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week increased as a result of cold weather in some major gas consuming areas of the country, several ongoing pipeline maintenance projects, and the continuing production shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico region. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month contract (November 2008) increased on the week to $6.777 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) as of yesterday (October 22). The net weekly increase occurred during a week in which the price increased in three trading sessions. As of Friday, October 17, working gas in underground storage totaled

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 2, 2011) The previous report week's increasing prices gave way to relatively consistent declines across a large part of the country over this report week. The Henry Hub spot price showed a slight increase over the weekend, but closed down 26 cents for the week to $3.39 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on November 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the higher valued December 2011 natural gas contract moved into position as the near-month contract and declined by 2.6 cents per MMBtu to close the week at $3.749 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3794 billion cubic

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: September 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 3, to Wednesday, September 10) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 3-10), as the fifth hurricane of the season moving through the Gulf of Mexico has prompted mandatory evacuation orders in some areas as well as evacuation of personnel from offshore platforms. Mandatory evacuation orders in Louisiana have led to the shutdown of at least two processing plants, with a total of 700 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day of processing capacity. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.65.

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: October 16, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, October 1 to Wednesday, October 8) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week declined to their lowest levels this year even as disruptions in offshore Gulf of Mexico production continue in the aftermath of Hurricanes Ike and Gustav. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-term contract (November 2008) decreased to its lowest price since September 2007, closing at $6.742 per MMBtu yesterday (October 8). The net change during a week in which the price decreased each trading day was

417

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Wednesday, November 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 3, 2010) Price changes were mixed this week, with much regional variation across the country. At the Henry Hub in Erath, Louisiana, prices posted a net decline on the week of 2 cents, falling from $3.37 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, October 27, to $3.35 per MMBtu on Wednesday, November 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2010 futures contract (which became the near-month contract on October 28) rose $0.073 from $3.763 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.836 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage increased to 3,821 billion cubic feet

418

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. , 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 8, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 30, 2009) Since Wednesday, September 23, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases generally ranging between 10 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 19 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $3.24 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, September 30, at $4.84 per MMBtu, increasing by 9 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. The contract for October delivery expired on September 28 at $3.73 per MMBtu, increasing nearly 70 cents per MMBtu or 21 percent during its

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: August 28, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 13, to Wednesday, August 20) During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 13-20), natural gas prices continued their overall declines in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 1 and 58 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu). However, there were a few exceptions in the Rocky Mountains, where the only average regional price increase on the week was recorded. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for the September delivery contract decreased 38 cents per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $8.077. On Monday and Tuesday, the September contract price dipped below $8 per MMBtu, reaching this level for the first time since

420

From: Nature Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewal White Paper Renewal White Paper Winner of AAAS Science Education Prize Visits Argonne SESAME and the APS: Opening Doors Helps the Light Shine In Taking the FaST Track to Synchrotron X-ray Science A Vote of Thanks! APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed From: Nature Research Highlights Physical Chemistry: "Electrons with a Twist" DECEMBER 1, 2008 Bookmark and Share Nature Magazine The direction of an electron's spin is sufficient to determine the decomposition rate of the two mirror-image forms of a molecule. Richard Rosenberg of Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois and his colleagues drew this conclusion after firing X-rays at a magnetic iron-nickel alloy coated with thin layers of 2-butanol. This freed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 26, 2011) The weathermanÂ’s promise for chillier temperatures later this week and mention of the word "snow" in some forecasts was the likely catalyst propelling prices upwards this week. In an environment of generally supportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed up 7 cents for the week to $3.65 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 26. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract rose just under half a cent per MMBtu for the week to close at $3.590 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,716 billion cubic

422

Coalbed Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory Observations on a Montana Water Quality Proposal argonne_comments.pdf 585 KB Comments from James A. Slutz Deputy Assistant Secretary Oil and Natural Gas To the Secretary, Board of Environmental Review Montana Department of Environmental Quality BER_Comments_letter.pdf 308 KB ALL Consulting Coalbed Methane Primer: New Source of Natural Gas–Environmental Implications Background and Development in the Rocky Mountain West CBMPrimerFinal.pdf 18,223 KB ALL Consulting Montana Board of Oil & Gas Conservation Handbook on Best Management Practices and Mitigation Strategies for Coal Bed Methane in the Montana Portion of the Powder River Basin April 2002 CBM.pdf 107,140 KB ALL Consulting Montana Board of Oil & Gas Conservation

423

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, to Wednesday, February 13) 6, to Wednesday, February 13) Released: February 14, 2008 Next release: February 21, 2008 · Since Wednesday, February 6, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 41 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $8.35 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 13) at $8.388 per MMBtu, climbing 39 cents or about 5 percent since Wednesday, February 6. · Natural gas in storage was 1,942 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 8, which is 5.9 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $6.12 per barrel on the week to $93.28 per barrel or $16.08 per MMBtu.

424

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) November 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) Since Wednesday, October 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 86 cents, or about 11 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. Yesterday (November 3), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $8.752 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 2 cents since last Wednesday (October 27). Natural gas in storage was 3,293 Bcf as of October 29, which is 7.8 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.62 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $50.90 per barrel or $8.776 per MMBtu.

425

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 7, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, June 30–Wednesday, July 7), as much of the East Coast experienced the hottest regional temperatures of the year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed yesterday, July 7, at $4.565 per MMBtu, which is $0.05 lower than the previous Wednesday. Although the near-month contract increased $0.24 per MMBtu at the beginning of the report week, on Thursday, July 1, likely in response

426

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices increased at all markets in the Lower 48 States except one, despite the lack of weather-related demand in much of the country. The restoration of production at the Independence Hub to the level prevailing prior to the April 8 shut-in had limited effect on prices. For the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 44 cents to $12.93 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased on the week, with the weekly increase of the near-month contract exceeding those observed at spot market locations in the eastern half of the country.

427

Natural Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is now well accepted that both Dark Matter and Dark Energy are required in any successful cosmological model. Although there is ample evidence that both Dark components are necessary, the conventional theories make no prediction for the contributions from each of them. Moreover, there is usually no intrinsic relationship between the two components, and no understanding of the nature of the mysteries of the Dark Sector. Here we suggest that if the Dark Side is so seductive then we should not be restricted to just 2 components. We further suggest that the most natural model has 5 distinct forms of Dark Energy in addition to the usual Dark Matter, each contributing precisely equally to the cosmic energy density budget.

Douglas Scott; Ali Frolop

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: April 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 25, 2009) Spot prices increased at all trading locations this week, with the biggest increases occurring in the Northeast. Many market locations ended the week with spot prices above $4 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.38 to $4.13 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased, climbing by $0.65 to $4.329 for the April 2009 contract. Prices for the April 2009 contract reached their highest levels since February 13, 2009, on March 24. Natural gas in storage was 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2006 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 19, 2006) 2 2006 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 19, 2006) Warmer-than-normal temperatures throughout the country led to lower natural gas spot prices at many trading locations in the Lower 48 States, while some markets exhibited modest increases since last Wednesday. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 4-11), the price for next-day delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 70 cents per MMBtu, or 7.6 percent to $8.55 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 11) at $9.238 per MMBtu, which was 96 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,621 Bcf as of January 6, leaving the inventories at 11.8 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up $0.50 per barrel or about 1 percent since last Wednesday to $63.91 per barrel or $11.02 per MMBtu. As natural gas prices have declined while crude oil prices remain above $60 per barrel, the relative position of these prices has returned to a more typical pattern, where the price of natural gas is below that of crude oil on a Btu basis. The Henry Hub spot price was 24 percent below the WTI crude oil price from the beginning of 2005 up to the point that Hurricane Katrina made landfall in late August. For the remainder of 2005, the Henry Hub spot price exceeded the WTI price by 15 percent. However, that unusual pattern of relative prices was changing by the end of 2005, and the Henry Hub spot price has been 17 percent below the WTI price on average so far in January.

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 16 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $7.62. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the contract for June delivery increased 17.0 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.890 yesterday (May 16). EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 1,842 Bcf as of Friday, May 11, reflecting an implied net injection of 95 Bcf. This level of working gas in underground storage is 20.6 percent above the 5-year average inventory for this time of year. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.03 per barrel on the week to $62.57 per barrel, or $10.79 per MMBtu.

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007 contract increased in price by $0.29 per MMBtu on the week to $6.352. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,840 Bcf as of Friday, July 27. This level of working gas in underground storage exceeds the maximum level of the previous 5 years. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.75 per barrel on the week to $76.49 per barrel. On a Btu basis, the crude oil price is now more than double the price of natural gas at $13.19 per MMBtu.

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview Overview Lower prices and a report of another considerable net injection to stocks were featured in last week's gas markets. As of Friday, May 11, 2001, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.24 from the previous Friday to $4.25 per MMBtu. The NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.212 for the week to $4.278 per MMBtu. A record-setting 108 Bcf was added to natural gas stocks for the week ended May 4, 2001. The demand for cooling is still somewhat limited as mild temperatures prevailed around most of the country. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Prices Mid-week prices were at the lowest level since early August. Even with an end-of-the-week influence from the futures market that caused a slight upturn, spot prices at the major supply hubs were $0.25 to $0.65 cents per MMBtu lower on a week-to-week basis with Katy, Texas ending at $4.23; the Henry Hub, Louisiana at $4.25; Midcon, Oklahoma at $4.11; and Opal, Wyoming at $3.30. Prices at the Chicago and New York citygates were lower as well, registering $4.35 and $4.65 at week's end, off a respective $0.27 and $0.20 per MMBtu for the week. SoCal provided the only exception to the generally lower trend as demand increased because of warmer temperatures. Natural gas prices receded before temperatures did, though. The effect of unscheduled maintenance on the PG&E Gas Transmission system was imperceptible to PG&E's large-volume purchasers. By Friday, the PG&E customers were paying $3.51 less at $4.18 while SoCal's citygate price was only $0.47 lower at $11.92.

434

Texas' Natural Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.? The Nature Conservancy?s Sustainable Waters program, designed to protect river ecosystems downstream of dams, has sponsored two workshops within the last year to determine the research needed to develop ecologically based environmental flow... recommendations for Caddo Lake. Environmental flows is the amount of water that needs to flow down the river to maintain the ecological system in the lake, river and flood plain. Dan Weber, the Conservancy?s northwest Louisiana program manager, said, ?We...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

11 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) 11 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 18) Natural gas spot prices exhibited increases in most locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, August 3 - 10) as demand responded to above average temperatures, high crude oil prices, and reduced coal deliveries, which added to demand for natural gas-fired power generation. The Henry Hub spot price increased 6 cents this week, or less than 1 percent, to $8.81 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery increased 72 cents since last Wednesday (August 3) to settle yesterday at $9.071 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 5, was 2,463 Bcf, which is 6.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil hit a record high yesterday of $64.80 per barrel ($11.17 per MMBtu) after increasing $4.04 per barrel (70 cents per MMBtu), or about 7 percent, on the week.

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and slightly lower prices for crude oil led to an easing of natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 3. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 3-10), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1.0 percent, to $6.50. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains. The NYMEX contract for June delivery increased 29.4 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.900 yesterday (May 10). Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,989 Bcf as of Friday, May 5, which is 56.0 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.11 per barrel on the week to $72.15 per barrel, or $12.44 per MMBtu.

437

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) As the bitter cold has evolved to more moderate temperatures, natural gas spot prices have eased through most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined 4 cents per MMBtu to $6.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were slightly higher, as increases Tuesday and yesterday (March 20 and 21) more than offset decreases that occurred in the 3 previous trading days. The futures contract for April delivery, which is the first contract following the current heating season, increased 7.7 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.160. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and decreasing prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas spot prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, March 16, was 1,533 Bcf, which is 18.5 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.17 per barrel on the week to $56.98, or $9.82 per MMBtu.

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) 12 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 19) Spot and futures natural gas prices this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 4-11) partly recovered from the prior week's sharp decline, owing to warmer temperatures moving into parts of the South and cool temperatures in the Rockies. The Henry Hub spot price increased 14 cents per MMBtu to $6.63. The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 5 cents per MMBtu, closing yesterday (May 11) at $6.683. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May 6, increased to 1,509 Bcf, which is 22.3 percent above the 5-year average. Before declining sharply yesterday, crude oil spot prices appeared to be supporting higher natural gas prices, with the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price increasing more than $1.50 per barrel since Wednesday (May 4) to over $52. The net change in the WTI price on the week was 17 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent, as the price dropped $1.37 per barrel yesterday to $50.39 per barrel, or $8.69 per MMBtu.

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 11) 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 11) Since Wednesday, August 27, natural gas spot prices have declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 44 cents or 9 percent to $4.68 per MMBtu. Lighter cooling demand for natural gas owing to the Labor Day holiday weekend and milder temperatures east of the Rockies likely contributed to the declines. Yesterday (Wednesday, September 3), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub was almost 19 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,389 Bcf as of August 29, which is 7 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $1.75 per barrel or about 6 percent since last Wednesday to $29.43 per barrel or $5.07 per MMBtu.

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) 31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased significantly in the Lower 48 States this week as Tropical Storm Ernesto moved north along the east coast, easing the threat to Gulf of Mexico natural gas supplies. The spot price at the Henry Hub dropped 79 cents, or about 11 percent this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 23 to 30) to $6.40 per MMBtu. In its first day of trading as the near month contract, the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for October delivery settled at $6.29 per MMBtu yesterday (August 30), which is 72 cents, or about 10 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. As of Friday, August 25, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,905 Bcf or 12.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.25 this week to $70.20 per barrel or $12.10 per MMBtu yesterday.

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441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 13, 2007) 6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 13, 2007) Since Wednesday, August 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with a few exceptions in Florida and the Rocky Mountain region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub rose 17 cents, or about 3 percent, to $5.81 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.805 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 22 cents or about 4 percent since last Wednesday (August 29). Natural gas in storage was 3,005 Bcf as of August 30, leaving natural gas inventories at 10.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased in all but one trading session during the week, rising $2.22 per barrel, or 3 percent, on the week to $75.74 per barrel or $13.06 per MMBtu.

442

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 23, 2006) Winter-like conditions in much of the East this past weekend transitioned to above-normal temperatures, contributing to a further decline in natural gas spot prices this week (Wednesday, February 8 - Wednesday, February 15). On the week the Henry Hub spot price declined 57 cents per MMBtu to $7.31. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant declines. The futures contract for March delivery, which is the last contract for the current heating season, declined 66.9 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.066. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and falling prices for competing fuels likely contributed to falling natural gas prices this week. Working gas in storage as of Friday, February 10, was 2,266 Bcf, which is 43.9 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.90 per barrel on the week to $57.61, or $9.93 per MMBtu.

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 21) The emergence of more spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country, ample natural gas storage supplies, and lower oil prices resulted in natural gas spot prices easing 7 to 43 cents per MMBtu in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 6. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 6-13), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.07. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery fell 58 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.978 yesterday (April 13), the first close below $7 for a near-month contract since March 28. A second week of net injections brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,293 Bcf as of Friday, April 8, which is 26.3 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $5.67 per barrel on the week to $50.21 per barrel, or $8.66 per MMBtu.

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest and Gulf Coast contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 9 to 35 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, July 21. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 21-28), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 14 cents per MMBtu to $5.77. In contrast to the decrease in spot prices, natural gas futures prices increased this week owing at least in part to higher crude oil and petroleum product prices. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.048 per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 28, after increasing 11.7 cents in its last week of trading. The September contract takes over as the near-month contract at nearly a dime premium to the August contract, closing yesterday (July 28) at $6.142 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, July 23, increased to 2,297 Bcf, which is 3.1 percent above the 5-year average. Crude oil prices rose this week to recent historical highs, in part owing to concerns over supply from Russia. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.18 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $42.81 per barrel, or $7.38 per MMBtu.

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States have declined for three consecutive trading days from Friday peaks as key market areas in the Midwest and the Eastern seaboard have experienced unseasonably cool weather. Although prices remain elevated, the slackened demand for natural gas for electric generation has contributed to prices generally softening across the board. For the week, the spot price at the Henry Hub dropped about 6 percent to $6.06 per MMBtu, while other pricing points on the Gulf Coast showed slightly greater declines and fell below the $6-mark. The overall easing of prices may reflect also the slightly improving storage picture as injections in 7 of the past 8 weeks have exceeded the 5-year average with a record net addition reported last Thursday. Although the storage refill season started slowly, injections have increased considerably, with at least one major interstate pipeline serving the Northeast, Tennessee Gas Pipeline, announcing restrictions to shippers due to injection nominations exceeding capacity. The spot price at Tennessee Gas Pipeline's Zone 6, which serves major citygates in New York and other Northeastern states, this week fell 47 cents per MMBtu to $6.30. In contrast to the East, prices in the West moved higher early in the week, as maintenance on El Paso Natural Gas in the San Juan Basin restricted deliveries from the region and a heat wave sparked buying at pricing locations in California and New Mexico. The spot price at the Southern California border surged 61 cents per MMBtu on Monday to $5.78, but has since dropped to $5.51, which is a net decline of 51 cents since Wednesday, June 4.

446

EIA - All Natural Gas Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

All Natural Gas Analysis All Natural Gas Analysis 2010 Peaks, Plans and (Persnickety) Prices This presentation provides information about EIA's estimates of working gas peak storage capacity, and the development of the natural gas storage industry. Natural gas shale and the need for high deliverability storage are identified as key drivers in natural gas storage capacity development. The presentation also provides estimates of planned storage facilities through 2012. Categories: Prices, Storage (Released, 10/28/2010, ppt format) U.S Natural Gas Imports and Exports: 2009 This report provides an overview of U.S. international natural gas trade in 2009. Natural gas import and export data, including liquefied natural gas (LNG) data, are provided through the year 2009 in Tables SR1-SR9. Categories: Imports & Exports/Pipelines (Released, 9/28/2010, Html format)

447

Limits on the Boron Isotopic Ratio in HD 76932  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data in the 2090 A B region of HD 76932 have been obtained at high S/N using the HST GHRS echelle at a resolution of 90,000. This wavelength region has been previously identified as a likely candidate for observing the B11/B10 isotopic splitting. The observations do not match a calculated line profile extremely well at any abundance for any isotopic ratio. If the B abundance previously determined from observations at 2500 A is assumed, the calculated line profile is too weak, indicating a possible blending line. Assuming that the absorption at 2090 A is entirely due to boron, the best-fit total B abundance is higher than but consistent with that obtained at 2500 A, and the best-fit isotopic ratio (B11/B10) is in the range ~10:1 to ~4:1. If the absorption is not entirely due to B and there is an unknown blend, the best-fit isotopic ratio may be closer to 1:1. Future observations of a similar metal-poor star known to have unusually low B should allow us to distinguish between these two possibilities. The constr...

Rebull, L M; Johansson, S; Thorburn, J; Fields, B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The E2/M1 ratio in {Delta} photoproduction  

SciTech Connect

The properties of the transition from the nucleon to the {Delta}(1232) serve as a benchmark for models of nucleon structure. To first order, N {r_arrow} {Delta} photo-excitation is dominated by a simple M1 quark spin-flip transition. At higher order, small L = 2 components in the N and {Delta} wavefunctions allow this excitation to proceed via an electric quadrupole transition. Since Nucleon models differ greatly on the mechanisms used to generate these L = 2 components,, the ratio of E2/M1 transitions (EMR) provides a sensitive test for structure models. Here, new high-precision measurements of p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}) and p({rvec {gamma}}, {gamma}) cross sections and beam asymmetries have been combined with other polarization ratios in a simultaneous analysis of both reactions. Compton scattering has provided two important new constraints on the photo-pion amplitude. The E2/M1 mixing ratio for the N {r_arrow} {Delta} transition extracted from this analysis is EMR = {minus}3.0% {+-} 0.3 (stat+sys) {+-} 0.2 (model).

Sandorfi, A.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.; Blanpied, G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Physics; Blecher, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Physics Dept.] [and others; LEGS Collaboration

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Storage Storage About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Underground Natural Gas Storage Overview | Regional Breakdowns Overview Underground natural gas storage provides pipelines, local distribution companies, producers, and pipeline shippers with an inventory management tool, seasonal supply backup, and access to natural gas needed to avoid imbalances between receipts and deliveries on a pipeline network. There are three principal types of underground storage sites used in the United States today. They are: · depleted natural gas or oil fields (326), · aquifers (43), or · salt caverns (31). In a few cases mine caverns have been used. Most underground storage facilities, 82 percent at the beginning of 2008, were created from reservoirs located in depleted natural gas production fields that were relatively easy to convert to storage service, and that were often close to consumption centers and existing natural gas pipeline systems.

450

Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Elba Island, GA Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 5,780...

451

Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Freeport, TX Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,969 -...

452

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Underground Natural Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LNG Peak Shaving and Import Facilities Map About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. LNG Peaking...

453

Artificial nature : water infrastructure and its experience as natural space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is about water infrastructure and its experience as urban and natural space. It deals with the concepts of nature/geography, technology, and the integral experiential space by analyzing water dams and reservoirs ...

Demirta?, Fatma Asl?han, 1970-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) 10, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 17, 2007) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and lack of any significant cooling or heating load through much of the Lower 48 States led to an easing of natural gas spot prices since Wednesday, May 2. Furthermore, the formation of the first tropical storm of the 2007 Atlantic Hurricane Season 3 weeks prior to the beginning of the traditional hurricane season appeared to have no impact on the spot markets in the Lower 48 States. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 2-9), the Henry Hub spot price declined 18 cents per MMBtu, or 2.4 percent, to $7.46. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains for all contracts with the exception of the near-month contract, possibly reflecting an expected tightness in supply over the summer months. While the NYMEX contract for June delivery decreased 1 cent per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.720 yesterday (May 9), contracts through the end of the injection season all increased, albeit only by an average of 0.3 percent. Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to 1,747 Bcf as of Friday, May 4, which is 20.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.24 per barrel on the week to $61.54 per barrel, or $10.61 per MMBtu.

455

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 26, 2007) Since Wednesday, July 11, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 41 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent, since Wednesday, July 11, to $6.24 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (July 18) at $6.528 per MMBtu, falling 7 cents per MMBtu, or 1 percent since last Wednesday, July 11. Natural gas in storage was 2,692 Bcf as of July 13, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.45 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $75.03 per barrel or $12.94 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas prices fell at virtually all market locations since last Wednesday, July 11, with declines of 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu or about 4 to 12 percent. Moderating temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States likely accounted for the widespread declines, as cooler temperatures mitigated cooling demand for natural gas. On a regional basis, price declines averaged between 18 and 58 cents per MMBtu, or 3 and 13 percent, since last Wednesday, July 11. The largest price decreases since last Wednesday, July 11, occurred principally in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices fell by more than 57 cents per MMBtu, or 13 percent on average. By far, the smallest decreases occurred in the Arizona/Nevada and Florida regions, where prices fell by 18 and 24 cents per MMBtu on average, respectively, with the Florida citygate posting the highest price in the Lower 48 States at $8.00 per MMBtu. Elsewhere, average price decreases by region ranged between 30 and 43 cents per MMBtu. Despite these declines and lower electric generation demand relative to last year, prices generally exceeded levels reported last year at this time, with prices at the Henry Hub $0.22 per MMBtu or 4 percent above last year's level. The principal exception to the year-over-year price increases occurred in the Rocky Mountain region, where prices at selected markets were between $1.87 and $2.28 per MMBtu or about 35 and 43 percent below last year's level.

456

Mixing Ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and Isotope Ratios of Associated 13C, 18O,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Samples, Niwot Ridge, Colorado Air Samples, Niwot Ridge, Colorado Mixing Ratios of CO, CO2, CH4, and Isotope Ratios of Associated 13C, 18O, and 2H in Air Samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, and Montaña de Oro, California, USA (January 2004) image Abstract graphics Graphics data Data Investigator Stanley C. Tyler Department of Earth System Science University of California Irvine, CA DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.db1022 Description and Methods Air samples from Niwot Ridge, Colorado (41°N, 105°W) and Montaña de Oro, CA (35°N, 121°W) have been collected at approximately semi-monthly to monthly intervals since the mid 1990s. The beginning dates for each gas and isotope analyzed are as follows: GASLAB Flask Sampling Network Data Available (April 2003) Gas or isotope Niwot Ridge Montaña de Oro

457

Impacts of Raindrop Fall Velocity and Axis Ratio Errors on Dual-Polarization Radar Rainfall Estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Motivated by the field observations of fall velocity and axis ratio deviations from predicted terminal velocity and equilibrium axis ratio values, the combined effects of raindrop fall velocity and axis ratio deviations on dual-polarization radar ...

Bin Pei; Firat Y. Testik; Mekonnen Gebremichael

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Preparation of natural brucite nanofibers by the dispersion method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The preparation of natural brucite nanofibers through dispersion by the wet process is described. The test results indicate that brucite fibers can be well dispersed by using sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (OT) as the dispersant at a dispersant/fiber mass ratio of 0.15:1, dispersing for 30 min at a water/solid mass ratio of 20:1. The prepared nanofibers were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It is shown that the prepared single brucite nanofiber is around 30 nm in diameter and the talus of the nonsingle brucite nanofibers is about 50-150 nm in diameter. Natural brucite mineral fibers were treated by the dispersion method to obtain nanomaterials. These fibers have significant advantages over artificial nanofibers both in yield and in cost.

Li Xu; Wen Ni; Wenping Li; Xingde Liu; Hailong Yang; Xiaoguang Yang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Concentrations and activity ratios of uranium isotopes in groundwater from Donana National Park, South of Spain  

SciTech Connect

The levels and distribution of natural radionuclides in groundwaters from the unconfined Almonte-Marismas aquifer, upon which Donana National Park is located, have been analysed. Most sampled points were multiple piezometers trying to study the vertical distribution of the hydrogeochemical characteristics in the aquifer. Temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen and redox potential were determined in the field. A large number of parameters, physico-chemical properties, major and minor ions, trace elements and natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, Ra-isotopes and {sup 210}Po), were also analysed. In the southern zone, where aeolian sands crop out, water composition is of the sodium chloride type, and the lower U-isotopes concentrations have been obtained. As water circulates through the aquifer, bicarbonate and calcium concentrations increase slightly, and higher radionuclides concentrations were measured. Finally, we have demonstrated that {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios can be used as markers of the type of groundwater and bedrock, as it has been the case for old waters with marine origin confined by a marsh in the south-east part of aquifer.

Bolivar, J. P.; Olias, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, F. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Huelva, Campus de El Carmen, 21071-Huelva (Spain); Garcia-Tenorio, R. [Department of Applied Physics II, University of Sevilla, ETSA Arquitectura, 41012-Sevilla (Spain)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

460

Natural ventilation generates building form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural ventilation is an efficient design strategy for thermal comfort in hot and humid climates. The building forms can generate different pressures and temperatures to induce natural ventilation. This thesis develops a ...

Chen, Shaw-Bing

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Natural Gas Exports from Iran  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 30) 23 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 30) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the effects of Hurricane Ivan. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 43 cents, or about 8 percent, to $5.59 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 22), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.629 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 81 cents or about 17 percent since last Wednesday (September 15). Natural gas in storage was 2,942 Bcf as of September 17, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.58 per barrel, or about 10 percent, on the week to $48.41 per barrel or $8.347 per MMBtu.

463

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with increases ranging from just over 40 cents to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 3,092 Bcf as of Friday, October 1, which is 6.9 percent greater than the previous 5-year average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose $2.45 per barrel (42 cents per MMBtu) on the week, or about 5 percent, to yesterday's record-high price of $51.98 per barrel ($8.96 per MMBtu).

464

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) 14 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 21, 2006) Softening natural gas market conditions led to spot price decreases at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, December 6, with decreases ranging between $0.02 and $1.22 per MMBtu. The few price increases on the week were mostly confined to market locations west of the Rocky Mountains. On Wednesday, December 13, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.21 per MMBtu, decreasing $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The prices of futures contracts through December 2007 changed only slightly since December 6. The price for the January delivery contract decreased about 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $7.673 per MMBtu yesterday (December 13). Natural gas in storage was 3,238 Bcf as of December 8, which is 7.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 86 cents per barrel, or about 1 percent on the week to $61.34 per barrel or $10.58 per MMBtu.

465

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 12, 2007) 5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 12, 2007) Since Wednesday, March 28, natural gas spot prices generally increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining at selected markets. Prices at the Henry Hub declined a penny since Wednesday, March 28, to $7.46 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub declined 16 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent since Wednesday, March 28, to settle at $7.515 per MMBtu yesterday (Wednesday, April 4). Natural gas in storage was 1,569 Bcf as of March 30, which is 27 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 29 cents per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $64.40 per barrel or $11.10 per MMBtu.

466

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2006) Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 1-8) as temperatures varied across the Lower 48 States. Spot prices at some market locations climbed 2 to 49 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday, primarily in areas that experienced colder-than-normal temperatures during the week, while price declines in the East, Midwest, and Louisiana averaged 34 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 14 cents per MMBtu, or 2 percent, to $6.48. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell by 9 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.648 on Wednesday, March 8. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 3, decreased to 1,887 Bcf, which is 54 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil traded at $60.06 per barrel, decreasing $1.95, or $0.34 per MMBtu on the week.

467

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) Increased natural gas demand owing to falling temperatures this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 13-20) combined with higher petroleum prices to lift spot and futures gas prices dramatically. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of $1.86 per MMBtu, or 35 percent, to $7.25. After gaining value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub ended the week at $7.623 per MMBtu, a net increase of 77.2 cents. Natural gas in storage continues to build at a rate that could result in the highest inventories in years by the start of the traditional heating season (November 1). As of Friday, October 15, inventories were 3,223 Bcf, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.07 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 20) closing price of $54.93 per barrel, or $9.47 per MMBtu.

468

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 6) 30, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 6) Since Wednesday, January 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased at nearly all locations in the Lower 48 States, falling up to $3.18 per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 6 cents or roughly 1 percent to $5.62 per MMBtu. However, prices hit $6.56 on Thursday, January 23, which is its highest level since late January 2001. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub increased roughly 1 cent per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.660 per MMBtu yesterday (January 29) in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1, 729 Bcf for the week ended Friday, January 24, which is roughly 10 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 84 cents per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $33.54 per barrel or $5.78 per MMBtu.

469

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) June 27, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 5) Since Wednesday, June 19, natural gas spot prices increased at most locations, despite declines ranging between 5 and 14 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, June 26. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub increased 19 cents to $3.42 per MMBtu, which is an increase of almost 6 percent. High temperatures and rising crude oil prices contributed to increased cooling demand for gas, which spurred the price hikes. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 26) at $3.278 per MMBtu, falling over 17 cents in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,184 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by more 20 than percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.10 per barrel or over 4 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $26.67 per barrel or $4.60 per MMBtu.

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) 10, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 17) Unlikely wintry weather in key market areas this week boosted aggregate demand, lifting natural gas spot prices $0.20 per MMBtu or more at most trading location in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday, April 2-Wednesday, April 9), the Henry Hub spot price increased 22 cents per MMBtu, while spot price gains in the still-frigid Northeast were generally between $0.70 and $1.00. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or 2.6 percent, to settle at $5.195 yesterday (April 9). Natural gas in storage decreased to 671 Bcf as of Friday, April 4, which is about 44 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 38 cents per barrel or 1.3 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $28.93 per barrel or $4.99 per MMBtu.

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) Monday, December 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 8) A trend of increasing natural gas spot prices since mid-November abruptly halted late in the week before Christmas, owing to mild temperatures across the country during the first week of the holiday season. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 17-24), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.06 per MMBtu to $5.50, while declines in Midwest and Northeast market centers were even greater at between $1.10-$1.40. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery fell slightly more than $0.61 per MMBtu to $6.379. As of December 19, natural gas in storage had decreased to 2,699 Bcf, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average. Although the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased slightly in trading before the holiday, the spot price fell $1.33 on the week to $32.03, or $5.52 per MMBtu.

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this week despite significant drops in prices at many locations early in the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub was one of the few to decrease for the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, July 5 to 12), declining 6 cents, or about 1 percent, to $5.65 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery settled at $5.782 per MMBtu yesterday (July 12), which is 2 cents, or less than 1 percent, above last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, July 7, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,704 Bcf or 27.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $74.99 per barrel or $12.93 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is 21 cents per barrel less than the price last week, a decrease of less than 1 percent.

473

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) 15, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22) Since Wednesday, January 7, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States outside of the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 89 cents or about 13 percent to $5.74 per MMBtu. Despite widespread declines elsewhere, prices in the Northeast region surged to more than seven times last week's levels at some market locations as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region. Yesterday (January 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.387 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 49 cents or 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,414 Bcf as of January 9, which is 8.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.05 per barrel or about 3 percent since last Wednesday, climbing to $34.62 per barrel or $5.969 per MMBtu.

474

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) July 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 29-July 6), as two tropical storms have disrupted production in the Gulf of Mexico and power generation demand to meet air-conditioning load has remained strong. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.61 per MMBtu to $7.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately 60 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, July 6) at $7.688. Natural gas in storage was 2,186 Bcf as of Friday, July 1, which is 12.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.01 per barrel or about 7 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at an all-time high of $61.24 per barrel or $10.56 per MMBtu.

475

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

12, to Wednesday, March 19) 12, to Wednesday, March 19) Released: March 20, 2008 Next release: March 27, 2008 Since Wednesday, March 12, natural gas spot prices eased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 58 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 6 percent, to $9.11 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (March 19) at $9.024 per MMBtu, falling nearly 99 cents or about 10 percent since Wednesday, March 12. Natural gas in storage was 1,313 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 14, which is 2.3 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net withdrawal of 85 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $6.61 per barrel on the week to $103.25 per barrel or $17.80 per MMBtu.

476

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 23) 16 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 23) Summer-like heat across much of the country and shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico owing to the first tropical storm of this year's hurricane season continued to put upward pressure on natural gas prices this week (June 8 - June 15). The Henry Hub spot price increased 17 cents per MMBtu or 2.4 percent on the week to $7.39 in trading yesterday (June 15). The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub gained 44 cents since last Wednesday, closing yesterday at $7.441 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 10, totaled an estimated 1,963 Bcf, which is 17.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.02 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week to $55.53 per barrel, or $9.57 per MMBtu.

477

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) Continuing moderate temperatures across much of the Lower 48 States, particularly in the eastern half of the country, helped lower natural gas spot and futures prices during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 31 - June 7). The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 2.5 percent, for the week, to $5.82 in yesterday's (Wednesday, June 7) trading. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery moved lower by 41 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday at $5.974 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were an estimated 2,320 Bcf as of Friday, June 2, which is 41.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased by $0.52 per barrel, or less than 1 percent on the week, bringing the WTI spot price in yesterday's trading to $70.90 per barrel, or $12.22 per MMBtu.

478

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, to Wednesday, April 9) 2, to Wednesday, April 9) Released: April 10, 2008 Next release: April 17, 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 2, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 3 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 9) at $10.056 per MMBtu, rising nearly 22 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday, April 2. · Natural gas in storage was 1,234 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 4, which is nearly 2 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net withdrawal of 14 Bcf. · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $6.06 per barrel on the week to $110.89 per barrel or $19.119 per MMBtu.

479

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 17) 0, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 17) Since Wednesday, October 2, natural gas spot prices at most Gulf Coast markets have dropped $0.20 to $0.80 per MMBtu with the passing of Hurricane Lili. Although offshore producers and pipeline companies are still working to return supply operations to normal, infrastructure damage appears minimal. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents or slightly less than 8 percent to $3.91 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub decreased slightly more than 24 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $3.918 per MMBtu yesterday (October 9). Natural gas in storage as of October 4 increased to 3,080 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 9 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $1.28 per barrel or more than 4 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $29.31 per barrel or $5.05 per MMBtu.

480

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 4, 2006) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 4, 2006) Since Wednesday, April 19, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases exceeding $0.30 per MMBtu at most markets. On Wednesday, April 26, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.18 per MMBtu, decreasing 54 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.198 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, April 26, declining about 99 cents or 12 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,851 Bcf as of April 21, which is about 62 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 36 cents per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $71.71 per barrel or $12.36 per MMBtu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ratio seer natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 26, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) February 26, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) In contrast to last year's late February price spikes, spot and futures prices this week continued drifting lower as temperatures were seasonably cool across most of the country. Since Wednesday, February 18, natural gas spot prices have decreased between 10 and 30 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 23 cents per MMBtu or 4 percent to $5.10. Yesterday (Wednesday, February 25), the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $5.15 per MMBtu, which was 21 cents less than last Wednesday's price and 59 cents less than its debut as the near-month contract at $5.74. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,267 Bcf as of February 20, which is about 11.4 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up $1.86 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday to $37.28 per barrel or $6.43 per MMBtu.

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) 17 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) Since Wednesday, March 9, natural gas spot prices have risen at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $7.08 per MMBtu. Yesterday (March 16), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.192 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 31 cents, or about 5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,379 Bcf as of March 11, which is about 24 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $56.50 per barrel or $8.741 per MMBtu.

483

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) Natural gas spot prices increased 10 to 60 cents per MMBtu at nearly all major trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. However, elevated prices of $40 per MMBtu and more in the Northeast eased closer to historical norms over the course of the week following at least a temporary reprieve from the extreme cold in the region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.53 per MMBtu, or 9 percent, to $6.27. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 24 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, January 21) at $6.150. Natural gas in storage was 2,258 Bcf as of Friday, January 16, which is 9.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $0.91 per barrel or about 2.6 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $35.53 per barrel or $6.13 per MMBtu.

485

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 7, 2006) November 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, November 22, 2006, with some Midcontinent and Western regions showing increases of more than $2 per MMBtu. With only 3 trading days included in the report week owing to the Thanksgiving holiday, the spot price at the Henry Hub increased by 34 cents, or about 5 percent, to $7.75 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery settled at $8.871 per MMBtu yesterday (November 29), which is 77 cents, or about 10 percent, more than last Wednesday, and the December 2006 contract expired Tuesday at $8.318 per MMBtu. As of Friday, November 24, 2006, natural gas in storage was 3,417 Bcf or 7.2 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose to $62.45 per barrel or $10.77 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is $5.17 per barrel, or 9 percent, more than the price last week and is the highest price since late September.

486

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 15) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 15) Natural gas spot prices decreased sharply since Wednesday, August 31, as milder temperatures moved in through the Lower 48 States and some shut-in Gulf production returned to market in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub decreased $1.65 per MMBtu, or about 13 percent, to $11.05 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub declined about 27 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $11.201 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 2, was 2,669 Bcf, which is 3.7 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.25 per barrel, or about 6 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $64.38 per barrel or $11.10 per MMBtu.

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 05, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 12) September 05, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 12) Since Wednesday, August 28, natural gas spot prices have declined at most locations in the Lower 48 States, generally falling between 1 and 22 cents with steeper declines at some market locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 21 cents or roughly 6 percent to $3.12 per MMBtu. Price drops at most locations were driven principally by moderating temperatures since late last week. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 21 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $3.193 per MMBtu yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,781 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by nearly 13 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 3 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $28.28 per barrel or $4.88 per MMBtu.

488

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 18) 1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 18) Since Wednesday, July 3, natural gas spot prices have declined at most locations east of the Rocky Mountains, while climbing at most markets in the West. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 6 cents or 2 percent to $3.04 per MMBtu. High temperatures contributed to increased cooling demand for gas, which spurred the price hikes in the West, while smaller demand owing to the Fourth of July holiday weekend likely contributed to the declines in the East.(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub fell 20 cents yesterday (July 10) to settle at $2.864 per MMBtu, almost 28 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,353 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by more than 19 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 9 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday, trading at $26.73 per barrel or $4.61 per MMBtu.

489

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) 14, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) Natural gas spot prices climbed 25 to 55 cents across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, August 6-Wednesday, August 13). Increases were highest in sun-drenched California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest as this summer's hottest weather to date occurred in parts of the two regions. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 43 cents or roughly 9 percent to $5.17 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining just over 43 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.179 per MMBtu yesterday (August 13). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,188 Bcf as of Friday, August 8, which is about 8.5 percent below the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.92 per barrel or 2.9 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $30.85 per barrel, or $5.32 per MMBtu.

490

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 29) 22 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 29) Since Wednesday, September 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the approaching Hurricane Rita. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $3.45, or about 32 percent, to $14.25 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $12.594 per MMBtu, increasing roughly $1.43 or about 13 percent since last Wednesday (September 14). Natural gas in storage was 2,832 Bcf as of September 16, which is 3.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $66.96 per barrel or $11.54 per MMBtu.

491

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

November 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 13) November 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 13) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States except in the Gulf of Mexico producing region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 5 cents or about 1 percent to $4.45 per MMBtu. Prices climbed in most areas despite moderate temperatures in the Lower 48 States in apparent anticipation of a return to cold temperatures. Yesterday (Wednesday, November 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub was nearly 4 cents more than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 3,155 Bcf as of October 31, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $1.34 per barrel or about 5 percent since last Wednesday to $30.29 per barrel or $5.222 per MMBtu.

492

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 10, 2007) 3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 10, 2007) Since Wednesday, April 25, natural gas spot price movements were mixed in the Lower 48 States, with decreases principally occurring west of the Rocky Mountains and increases predominant to the east of the Rockies. Prices at the Henry Hub increased a nickel since Wednesday, April 25, to $7.64 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined about 5 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, April 25, to settle at $7.730 per MMBtu yesterday (Wednesday, May 2). Natural gas in storage was 1,651 Bcf as of April 27, which is 19 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.55 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $63.78 per barrel or $11.00 per MMBtu.

493

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 8, 2007) 1, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 8, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased at almost all market locations this week in spite of continuing cold weather through most of the country and increasing crude oil prices. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub declined 27 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to trade at $7.24 per MMBtu yesterday (February 28). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 42 cents, or about 5 percent, this week, closing yesterday at $7.300 per MMBtu, while the March contract expired at $7.547 per MMBtu on Tuesday, February 27. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 23, decreased to 1,733 Bcf, which is 11.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil gained $2.38 per barrel since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $61.78 per barrel or $10.65 per MMBtu, which is the highest price since late December.

494

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) August 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 26 - August 2), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.94 per MMBtu, or about 29 percent, to $8.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August contract expired last Thursday, July 27, at $7.042 per MMBtu, about $1.16 more than the previous month's settlement. The price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 83 cents per MMBtu higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 2) at $7.799. Natural gas in storage was 2,775 Bcf as of Friday, July 28, which is 19.2 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.34 per barrel or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday (July 26) to trade yesterday at $76.16 per barrel or $13.13 per MMBtu.

495

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 25) 18, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 25) Natural gas spot prices have increased since Wednesday, March 10, at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 28 cents or about 5 percent to $5.61 per MMBtu. Yesterday (Wednesday, March 17), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.722 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 33 cents or 6 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,097 Bcf as of March 12, which is less than 6 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $2.00 per barrel or about 6 percent since last Wednesday, to $38.21 per barrel or $6.588 per MMBtu.

496

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 16) Downward pressure on prices during August carried over to the first week of September as mostly moderate temperatures during the holiday-shortened trading week resulted in net price declines. Since Wednesday, September 1, natural gas spot prices have declined between 11 and 43 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, September 1-8), the spot price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana fell 34 cents or roughly 7 percent to $4.69 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 33.4 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $4.631 yesterday (September 8). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,775 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.1 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $1.12 per barrel or about 2.6 percent since last Wednesday, to a price of $42.77 per barrel or $7.37 per MMBtu.

497

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at $28.10 per barrel or $4.84 per million Btu, an increase of almost 2 percent above the previous Friday.

498

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 22) 15 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 22) Since Wednesday, September 7, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing at least partially to the aftermath of storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) however, prices at the Henry Hub decreased 25 cents, or about 2 percent, to $10.80 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $11.166 per MMBtu, decreasing by only 3.5 cents or about 0.3 percent since last Wednesday (September 7). Natural gas in storage was 2,758 Bcf as of September 9, which is 3.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 82 cents per barrel, or 1.3 percent, since last Wednesday, trading yesterday at $65.20 per barrel or $11.24 per MMBtu.

499

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) December 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) Since Wednesday, December 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased sharply at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 87 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent to $6.18. Prices declined in each of the last three days of trading (December 27-29) as temperatures moderated following the coldest weather to date of the 2004-2005 heating season, which occurred during the holiday weekend. On Tuesday, December 28, the January futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) ended its tenure as the near-month contract, settling at $6.213 per MMBtu. On its first day of trading as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery closed yesterday (Wednesday, December 29) at $6.402 per MMBtu, which was down roughly 45 cents or 6.5 percent lower than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,849 Bcf as of December 24, which is 14.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $0.55 per barrel or about 1.2 percent since last Wednesday, falling to $43.69 per barrel or $7.53 per MMBtu.

500

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were mixed this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 11-18), as colder weather boosted demand for space-heating in the eastern half of the country and moderate temperatures in part led to continued price declines in the West. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased 30 cents, or about 3.5 percent, to $8.85 per MMBtu, as colder weather returned to the East. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery dropped 47 cents per MMBtu yesterday (January 18) to $8.694, a 6-month low for the February 2006 contract, on expectations of moderate temperatures for the rest of the heating season. The near-month contract decreased roughly 54 cents since last Wednesday (January 11), and is now also trading at a 5-month low for a near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,575 Bcf as of January 13, which is 16.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.85 per barrel, or nearly 3 percent, on the week to $65.76 per barrel or $11.34 per MMBtu.