Sample records for rating measure determined

  1. Determination of Radioisotope Content by Measurement of Waste Package Dose Rates - 13394

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souza, Daiane Cristini B.; Gimenes Tessaro, Ana Paula; Vicente, Roberto [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute Brazil, Radioactive Waste Management Department IPEN/GRR, Sao Paulo. SP. (Brazil)] [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute Brazil, Radioactive Waste Management Department IPEN/GRR, Sao Paulo. SP. (Brazil)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this communication is to report the observed correlation between the calculated air kerma rates produced by radioactive waste drums containing untreated ion-exchange resin and activated charcoal slurries with the measured radiation field of each package. Air kerma rates at different distances from the drum surface were calculated with the activity concentrations previously determined by gamma spectrometry of waste samples and the estimated mass, volume and geometry of solid and liquid phases of each waste package. The water content of each waste drum varies widely between different packages. Results will allow determining the total activity of wastes and are intended to complete the previous steps taken to characterize the radioisotope content of wastes packages. (authors)

  2. Analytical Improvements in PV Degradation Rate Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic (PV) penetration of the power grid increases, it becomes vital to know how decreased power output may affect cost over time. In order to predict power delivery, the decline or degradation rates must be determined accurately. For non-spectrally corrected data several complete seasonal cycles (typically 3-5 years) are required to obtain reasonably accurate degradation rates. In a rapidly evolving industry such a time span is often unacceptable and the need exists to determine degradation rates accurately in a shorter period of time. Occurrence of outliers and data shifts are two examples of analytical problems leading to greater uncertainty and therefore to longer observation times. In this paper we compare three methodologies of data analysis for robustness in the presence of outliers, data shifts and shorter measurement time periods.

  3. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  4. Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Jos. B.

    primarily of greater metabolic inten- sities of heat-generating tissues. The maximum temperature gradient500 Does Growth Rate Determine the Rate of Metabolism in Shorebird Chicks Living in the Arctic/22/2007; Electronically Published 7/13/2007 ABSTRACT We measured resting and peak metabolic rates (RMR and PMR

  5. Apparatus and method for determining solids circulation rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludlow, J. Christopher (Morgantown, WV); Spenik, James L. (Morgantown, WV)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a method of determining bed velocity and solids circulation rate in a standpipe experiencing a moving packed bed flow, such as the in the standpipe section of a circulating bed fluidized reactor The method utilizes in-situ measurement of differential pressure over known axial lengths of the standpipe in conjunction with in-situ gas velocity measurement for a novel application of Ergun equations allowing determination of standpipe void fraction and moving packed bed velocity. The method takes advantage of the moving packed bed property of constant void fraction in order to integrate measured parameters into simultaneous solution of Ergun-based equations and conservation of mass equations across multiple sections of the standpipe.

  6. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  7. Feed rate measuring method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novak, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiczer, James J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method are provided for establishing the feed rate of a workpiece along a feed path with respect to a machine device. First and second sensors each having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece are positioned above, and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece along a feed path. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of each sensor and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of the contour of the workpiece. First and second image signals representative of the contour of the workpiece along the feed path are developed by an image processor. The time delay between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals are then used to determine the feed rate based upon the separation of the first and second sensors and the amount of time between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals.

  8. December 2002 Issue #10 2002 Determining Biosolid Application Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    December 2002 Issue #10 ­ 2002 Determining Biosolid Application Rates Richard Wolkowski, Extension Chapter NR 204 regulates biosolid (sewage sludge) management in Wisconsin. It requires that University of a crop production pro-gram. Most biosolid application rates are based on the nitrogen (N) need

  9. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, R J; Leibfried, D; Wesenberg, J H; Bollinger, J J; Amini, J M; Blakestad, R B; Britton, J; Home, J P; Itano, W M; Jost, J D; Knill, E; Langer, C; Ozeri, R; Shiga, N; Wineland, D J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi-ion quantum logic gate fidelities. Two simplified techniques were developed for this purpose: one relies on Raman sideband detection implemented with a single laser source, while the second is even simpler and is based on time-resolved fluorescence detection during Doppler recooling. We applied these methods to determine heating rates in a microfrabricated surface-electrode trap made of gold on fused quartz, which traps ions 40 microns above its surface. Heating rates obtained from the two techniques were found to be in reasonable agreement. In addition, the trap gives rise to a heating rate of 300 plus or minus 30 per second for a motional frequency of 5.25 MHz, substantially below the trend observed in other traps.

  10. Integrated loading rate determination for wastewater infiltration system sizing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenssen, P.D. (Norges Landbrukshoegskole, Aas (Norway). Centre for Soil and Environmental Research); Siegrist, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal parameters used in wastewater system design is the hydraulic loading rate. Historically the determination of the loading rate has been a straight forward process involving selection of a rate based on soil texture or water percolation rate. Research and experience over the past decade has provided additional insight into the complex processes occurring within wastewater-amended soil systems and has suggested the fallacy of this approach. A mean grain size vs. sorting (MESO) diagram constitutes a new basis for soil classification for wastewater infiltration system design. Crude characterization of the soil hydraulic properties is possible according to the MESO Diagram and loading rate as well as certain purification aspects can be assessed from the diagram. In this paper, an approach is described based on the MESO Diagram that integrates soil properties and wastewater pretreatment to yield a loading rate. 53 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Rate Determination of the CO2* Chemiluminescence Reaction CO + O + M = CO2* + M

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Madeleine Marissa, 1987-

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    flame characteristics, such as fuel consumption rate, heat release rate, and H-atom concentration. In 2002, Kim et al. [2] made detailed spectral measurements in SI, HCCI, and SCCI engines from various excited state species and determined that CO2...

  12. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  13. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  14. PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  15. Rate of environmental change determines stress response specificity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elowitz, Michael

    as to salt (13), calcium (14), heat, and other stresses (15). Bacteria also contain general stress responseRate of environmental change determines stress response specificity Jonathan W. Younga,1 , James C (received for review August 2, 2012) Cells use general stress response pathways to activate diverse tar- get

  16. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  17. Blazar Flaring Rates Measured with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Dermer; B. L. Dingus

    2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the minimum observing time scales to detect a blazar at a given flux level with the LAT on GLAST in the scanning and pointing modes. Based upon Phase 1 observations with EGRET, we predict the GLAST detection rate of blazar flares at different flux levels. With some uncertainty given the poor statistics of bright blazars, we predict that a blazar flare with integral flux >~ 200e-8 ph(> 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which are the best candidates for Target of Opportunity pointings and extensive temporal and spectral studies, should occur every few days.

  18. Blazar Flaring Rates Measured with GLAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermer, C D

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the minimum observing time scales to detect a blazar at a given flux level with the LAT on GLAST in the scanning and pointing modes. Based upon Phase 1 observations with EGRET, we predict the GLAST detection rate of blazar flares at different flux levels. With some uncertainty given the poor statistics of bright blazars, we predict that a blazar flare with integral flux >~ 200e-8 ph(> 100 MeV) cm^{-2} s^{-1}, which are the best candidates for Target of Opportunity pointings and extensive temporal and spectral studies, should occur every few days.

  19. Cooling rate of some active lavas determined using an orbital imaging spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    Click Here for Full Article Cooling rate of some active lavas determined using an orbital imaging flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing

  20. Determination of glomerular filtration rate by external counting methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartor, Tammy Lee

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparing the DTPA to other accepted methods; the results were very favorable for the use of ggmTC-DTPA. Klopper et al. , sa1d mTc-DTPA ". . . rapidly prepared by a kit method, is a useful addition to the list of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used... points. First, the external counting method is suitable as a true means of determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Second, the method is applicable to cats. To do this, five dogs were injected with ggmTc(Sn)-DTPA. Plasma samples were drawn...

  1. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  2. Determinants of multiple measures of acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Anderson, J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistical analyses of the acceleration capability of gasoline vehicles have focused on zero to 97 km/h acceleration rates and have concluded that peak power per kilogram is an appropriate single surrogate for acceleration capability. In this paper, statistical methods are used with data for 107 vehicles tested and reported by Consumers Union for 1986--1988 model years to estimate the determinants of contemporary gasoline vehicle acceleration capability under various conditions, adding new variables to the statistical tests reported by others. Like previous studies, this analysis determined that power and weight provide the most information about acceleration capability. Using a model formulation unlike other studies, this study found that engine displacement also provides statistically significant improvements in explanation of 0-48, 0-97, and 48-97 km/h acceleration times. The coefficients of the equations imply that the use of smaller displacement engines, holding peak power constant, diminishes start-up and 0-97 km/h acceleration capability. A separate equation is estimated to illustrate the effects of advanced engine technologies on displacement, controlling for power. This equation is used in conjunction with the acceleration equations to illustrate a method of estimating performance-equivalent engine substitutions when engine technologies change. Transmission type was important for start-up acceleration, with automatic-transmission-equipped vehicles being significantly slower than stick-shift-equipped vehicles. Fuel injection was found to significantly improve start-up acceleration. Variables proxying aerodynamic-drag effects tended to be significant determinants of acceleration in the higher-speed equations, but not for start-up acceleration. Estimated aerodynamic drag effects indicated that drag slows down 0-97, 48-97, and 72-105 km/h acceleration of pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles more than passenger cars and vans.

  3. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  4. Solar System impact rates measured from lunar spherule ages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Richard A.

    . The samples were irradiated with fast neutrons for 100 hours at the Oregon State University Reactor. Each measured using a MAP 215-C noble gas mass spectrometer. Spherule ages were determined using the 40 Ar/39 Ar

  5. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Details of the experimental method, results and data analysis are discussed herein and briefly compared to other AP based materials that have been measured in this apparatus.

  6. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  7. ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH' PHEROMONE COMPONENT EMISSION RATES MEASURED AFTER COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emission rates of ( 2 ) 8dodecenyl acetate from 1000, 100, and 10 pg-loaded rubber septa were 219, 12 The corresponding alcohol, (2)-8-dodecenyl alcohol, was emitted from rubber septa ca 3 times faster than the acetate is determination of the quality and quantity of an airborne odor For insect pheromone research using synthetic

  8. Measurement of entropy production rate in compressible turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. M. Bandi; W. I. Goldburg; J. R. Cressman Jr

    2006-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of change of entropy $\\dot S$ is measured for a system of particles floating on the surface of a fluid maintained in a turbulent steady state. The resulting coagulation of the floaters allows one to relate $\\dot S$ to the velocity divergence and to the Lyapunov exponents characterizing the behavior of this system. The quantities measured from experiments and simulations are found to agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  9. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  10. Determination of $\\alpha_{s}$ using Jet Rates at LEP with the OPAL detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic events produced in e+e- collisions by the LEP collider and recorded by the OPAL detector were used to form distributions based on the number of reconstructed jets. The data were collected between 1995 and 2000 and correspond to energies of 91 GeV, 130-136 GeV and 161-209 GeV. The jet rates were determined using four different jet-finding algorithms (Cone, JADE, Durham and Cambridge). The differential two-jet rate and the average jet rate with the Durham and Cambridge algorithms were used to measure alpha(s) in the LEP energy range by fitting an expression in which order alpah_2s calculations were matched to a NLLA prediction and fitted to the data. Combining the measurements at different centre-of-mass energies, the value of alpha_s (Mz) was determined to be alpha(s)(Mz)=0.1177+-0.0006(stat.)+-0.0012$(expt.)+-0.0010(had.)+-0.0032

  11. Determination and optimization of spatial samples for distributed measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Xiaoming (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Tran, Hy D.; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Kim, Heeyong (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are no accepted standards for determining how many measurements to take during part inspection or where to take them, or for assessing confidence in the evaluation of acceptance based on these measurements. The goal of this work was to develop a standard method for determining the number of measurements, together with the spatial distribution of measurements and the associated risks for false acceptance and false rejection. Two paths have been taken to create a standard method for selecting sampling points. A wavelet-based model has been developed to select measurement points and to determine confidence in the measurement after the points are taken. An adaptive sampling strategy has been studied to determine implementation feasibility on commercial measurement equipment. Results using both real and simulated data are presented for each of the paths.

  12. Absolute Measurement Of Laminar Shear Rate Using Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot Jenner; Brian D'Urso

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An absolute measurement of the components of the shear rate tensor $\\mathcal{S}$ in a fluid can be found by measuring the photon correlation function of light scattered from particles in the fluid. Previous methods of measuring $\\mathcal{S}$ involve reading the velocity at various points and extrapolating the shear, which can be time consuming and is limited in its ability to examine small spatial scale or short time events. Previous work in Photon Correlation Spectroscopy has involved only approximate solutions, requiring free parameters to be scaled by a known case, or different cases, such as 2-D flows, but here we present a treatment that provides quantitative results directly and without calibration for full 3-D flow. We demonstrate this treatment experimentally with a cone and plate rheometer.

  13. DOSE TO CURIE DETERMINATION FOR CONTAINERS WITH MEASURABLE CS-137

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RATHBUN LA; ANDERSON JD; SWAN RJ

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Retrieval (NGR) project will retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste containers from Trenches 17 and 27 in the 218-E-12B (12B) burial ground. The trenches were in operation from May 1970 through October 1972. A portion of the retrieved containers that will require shipment to and acceptance at a treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facility and the containers will be either remote-handled (RH) and/or contact-handled (CH). The method discussed in this document will be used for the RH and some of the CH containers to determine the radionuclide inventory. Waste disposition (shipment and TSD acceptance) requires that the radioactive content be characterized for each container. Source-term estimates using high resolution, shielded, gamma-ray scan assay techniques cannot be performed on a number of RH and other containers with high dose rates from {sup 137}Cs-{sup 137m}Ba. This document provides the method to quantify the radioactive inventory of fission product gamma emitters within the containers based on the surface dose rate measurements taken in the field with hand-held survey instruments.

  14. Method and apparatus for simultaneous determination of fluid mass flow rate, mean velocity and density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamel, William R. (Farragut, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required change in power input. The invention provides stable, rapid, and accurate measurements. It does not require bending of the fluid flow.

  15. Reaction rates from pressure-gauge measurements in reacting explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginsberg, M.J.; Anderson, A.B.; Wackerle, J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proper hydrodynamic data and an equation of state are sufficient to describe quantitatively the reaction rates of explosives during the shock-to-detonation transition. Manganin pressure gauges embedded in the reacting explosive have provided these data for the explosives PETN, PBX 9404, TATB, and TNT. Once a pressure-field history has been assembled from individual pressure histories at different depths in the explosive, the conservation equations can be applied in a Lagrangian analysis of the data. The combination of a reactant-product equation of state with this analysis then allows the calculation of the extent of reaction and reaction rate. Successful correlation of the calculated reaction rate values with other thermodynamic variables, such as pressure or temperature, allows formulation of a rate law and the prediction of initiation behavior under circumstances quite different from the experiments that led to the rate law. The best dynamic piezoresistive pressure gauge for most applications would have a substantial output voltage and present negligible disturbance to the flow. In explosives, however, requirements for survival in the extreme temperature and pressure environment encountered by the gauge dictate compromise. Low electrical resistance (approx. 20 m..cap omega..) helps to minimize shunt conductivity failures, but this drastically reduces output and demands that much attention be given to reducingnoise. Although relatively thick insulation perturbs the flow to some extent, survivability requirements dictate its use. Pressure measurements in reactive flow can now be made routinely with gauges that successfully produce data leading to a description of the flow and a powerful predictive capability.

  16. High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

  17. Spectroscopic Determination of the Low Redshift Type Ia Supernova Rate from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krughoff, K. S. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Connolly, Andrew J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Frieman, Joshua [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); SubbaRao, Mark [Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Kilper, Gary [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Davey Laboratory, PA (United States)

    2011-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernova rates are directly coupled to high mass stellar birth and evolution. As such, they are one of the few direct measures of the history of cosmic stellar evolution. In this paper we describe an probabilistic technique for identifying supernovae within spectroscopic samples of galaxies. We present a study of 52 type Ia supernovae ranging in age from -14 days to +40 days extracted from a parent sample of \\simeq 50,000 spectra from the SDSS DR5. We find a Supernova Rate (SNR) of 0.472^{+0.048}_{-0.039}(Systematic)^{+0.081}_{-0.071}(Statistical)SNu at a redshift of = 0.1. This value is higher than other values at low redshift at the 1{\\sigma}, but is consistent at the 3{\\sigma} level. The 52 supernova candidates used in this study comprise the third largest sample of supernovae used in a type Ia rate determination to date. In this paper we demonstrate the potential for the described approach for detecting supernovae in future spectroscopic surveys.

  18. RGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements and in a Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    of the Arctic geophysical environment. The deformation rate of pack ice, determined from the spatial gradientsRGPS/Model Ice Deformation July 3, 2003 1 Sea Ice Deformation Rates From Satellite Measurements The deformation of sea ice is an important element of the Arctic climate system because of its influence

  19. EPR determination of the rate constants of detachment of hydrogen from triethylsilane by metal carbonyl radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasanov, R.G.; Dotdaev, S.Kh.

    1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate constants of detachment of hydrogen triethylsilane by radicals of rhenium and manganese pentacarbonyls, tungsten cyclopentadienyltricarbonyl, and iron cyclopentadienyldicarbonyl were determined, and the order of the reactivity of the metal carbonyls was hypothesized.

  20. Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility’s investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a...

  1. Comparison of bioturbation rates determined by lead-210 and plutonium in abyssal cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stordal, Mary Christine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARISON OF BIOTURBATION RATES DETERMINED BY LEAD-210 AND PLUTONIUM IN ABYSSAI. CORES A Thesis by MARY CHRISTINE STORDAL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Oceanography COMPARISON OF BIOTURBATION RATES DETERMINED BY LEAD-210 AND PLUTONIUM IN ABYSSAL CORES A Thesis MARY CHRISTINE STORDAL Approved as t. o style and content by: (Chairman of Committee...

  2. Chemical resistance determination test scheme and rating system development for industrial glove evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornils, William Joseph

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHEMICAL RESISTANCE DETERMINATION TEST SCHEME AND RATING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL GLOVE EVALUATION A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH CORNILS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene CHEMICAL RESISTANCE DETERMINATION TEST SCHEME AND RATING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL GLOVE EVALUATION A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH CORNILS Approved...

  3. Standard Test Method for Measuring Fast-Neutron Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Niobium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method describes procedures for measuring reaction rates by the activation reaction 93Nb(n,n?)93mNb. 1.2 This activation reaction is useful for monitoring neutrons with energies above approximately 0.5 MeV and for irradiation times up to about 30 years. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fast-neutron reaction rates for neutrons with energy distribution similar to fission neutrons can be determined in fast-neutron fluences above about 1016cm?2. In the presence of high thermal-neutron fluence rates (>1012cm?2·s?1), the transmutation of 93mNb due to neutron capture should be investigated. In the presence of high-energy neutron spectra such as are associated with fusion and spallation sources, the transmutation of 93mNb by reactions such as (n,2n) may occur and should be investigated. 1.4 Procedures for other fast-neutron monitors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 Fast-neutron fluence rates can be determined from the reaction rates provided that the appropriate cross section information ...

  4. Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

  5. A new measure of acceleration of heart rate: dependence on age and comparison with time domain conventional heart rate variability measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cammarota, Camillo

    A new measure of acceleration of heart rate: dependence on age and comparison with time domain conventional heart rate variability measures Giuseppe Germanò, M.D., Gianfranco Piccirillo, M.D., *Camillo We introduce a new index, Acceleration Ratio (AR), in order to investigate the dependence of Heart

  6. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates FY 15 PRR worksheet (PDF - 31K) FY...

  7. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  8. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on...

  9. Determination of iodine to compliment mass spectrometric measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohorst, F.A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose of iodine-129 to facility personnel and the general public as a result of past, present, and future activities at DOE sites is of continuing interest, WINCO received about 160 samples annually in a variety of natural matrices, including snow, milk, thyroid tissue, and sagebrush, in which iodine-129 is determined in order to evaluate this dose, Currently, total iodine and the isotopic ratio of iodine-127 to iodine-129 are determined by mass spectrometry. These two measurements determine the concentration of iodine-129 in each sample, These measurements require at least 16 h of mass spectrometer operator time for each sample. A variety of methods are available which concentrate and determine small quantities of iodine. Although useful, these approaches would increase both time and cost. The objective of this effort was to determine total iodine by an alternative method in order to decrease the load on mass spectrometry by 25 to 50%. The preparation of each sample for mass spectrometric analysis involves a common step--collection of iodide on an ion exchange bed. This was the focal point of the effort since the results would be applicable to all samples.

  10. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  11. How Well do Social Ratings Actually Measure Corporate Social Responsibility?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterji, Aaron K; Levine, David I.; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rater should weigh management quality less heavily when thatif the measure of management quality is extremely noisy. Therater should weigh management quality more heavily when its

  12. Determining the Transpiration Rate of Peach Trees Under Two Trickle Irrigation Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, T. A.; McFarland, M. J.; Reddell, D. L.; Brown, K. W.; Newton, R. J.; Rodriguez, P. B.; Van Bavel, C. H. M.; Reeder, E. L.

    TR- 113 Volume III 1980 Determining the Transportation Rate of Peach Trees Under Two Trickle Irrigation Regimes T.A. Howell M.J. McFarland D.L. Reddell K.W. Brown R.J. Newton P.B. Rodriguez C.H.M. van Bavel E...

  13. Patterns of Proliferative Activity in the Colonic Crypt Determine Crypt Stability and Rates of Somatic Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , United States of America Abstract Epithelial cells in the colon are arranged in cylindrical structures States, accounting for 9% of all cancer deaths [1]. This large incidence can be partially attributedPatterns of Proliferative Activity in the Colonic Crypt Determine Crypt Stability and Rates

  14. Funnel-Like Organization in Sequence Space Determines the Distributions of Protein Stability and Folding Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    determinants of protein folding, we map out the complete organization of thermody- namic and kinetic properties simplified models of protein folding. We obtain a stability map and a folding rate map in sequence space. Proteins 2004;55:107­114. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: protein folding; protein sequence struc- ture

  15. Effects of Shear Rate on Propagation of Blood Clotting Determined Using Microfluidics and Numerical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    Effects of Shear Rate on Propagation of Blood Clotting Determined Using Microfluidics and Numerical-ismagilov@uchicago.edu Abstract: This paper describes microfluidic experiments with human blood plasma and numerical simulations removed. In addition, these results demonstrate the utility of simplified mechanisms and microfluidics

  16. Translation Rate of Human Tyrosinase Determines Its N-Linked Glycosylation Level*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Daniel N.

    Translation Rate of Human Tyrosinase Determines Its N-Linked Glycosylation Level* Received, Connecticut 06520 Tyrosinase is a type I membrane glycoprotein essen- tial for melanin synthesis. Mutations in tyrosinase lead to albinism due, at least in part, to aberrant retention of the protein in the endoplasmic

  17. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  18. Estimation of compact binary coalescense rates from short gamma-ray burst redshift measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Short gamma-ray bursts are believed to originate from the merger of two compact objects. If this scenario is correct, these bursts will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves, detectable by current or planned GW detectors, such as LIGO and Virgo. No detection of a gravitational wave has been made up to date. In this paper I will use a set of observed redshift measurements of short gamma-ray bursts to fit a model in order to determine the rate of such merger events in the nearby universe. Various corrections will be included in that calculation, as the field-of-view of the satellite missions, the beaming factors of gamma-ray bursts and other parameters. The computed rate estimations will be compared to other rate estimations, based on observations on binary neutron stars and population synthesis models. Given the upper limit established by LIGO/Virgo measurements, it is possible to draw conclusions on the beaming angle of gamma-ray bursts.

  19. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1...

  20. Recoil-Implantation Of Multiple Radioisotopes Towards Wear Rate Measurements And Particle Tracing In Prosthetic Joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Jacob A.; Timmers, Heiko [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Smith, Paul N.; Scarvell, Jennifer M. [Trauma and Orthopaedic Research Unit, Canberra Hospital, PO BOX 11, Woden, ACT 2606 (Australia); Gladkis, Laura [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales at ADFA, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Trauma and Orthopaedic Research Unit, Canberra Hospital, PO BOX 11, Woden, ACT 2606 (Australia)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates a new method of radioisotope labeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene inserts in prosthetic joints for wear studies. The radioisotopes {sup 97}Ru, {sup 100}Pd, {sup 100}Rh, and {sup 101m}Rh are produced in fusion evaporation reactions induced by {sup 12}C ions in a {sup 92}Zr target foil. The fusion products recoil-implant into ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene plugs, machined to fit into the surface of the inserts. During laboratory simulations of the joint motion, a wear rate of the labeled polyethylene may be measured and the pathways of wear debris particles can be traced by detecting characteristic gamma-rays. The concentration profiles of the radioisotopes extend effectively uniformly from the polyethylene surface to a depth of about 4 {mu}m. The multiplicity of labeling and the use of several gamma-ray lines aids with avoiding systematic measurement uncertainties. Two polyethylene plugs were labeled and one was fitted into the surface of the tibial insert of a knee prosthesis, which had been worn in. Actuation over close to 100,000 cycles with a 900 N axial load and a 24 deg. flexion angle removed (14{+-}1)% of the gamma-ray activity from the plug. Most of this activity dispersed into the serum lubricant identifying this as the important debris pathway. Less than 1% activity was transferred to the femoral component of the prosthesis and the measured activity on the tibial tray was insignificant. Assuming uniform wear across the superior surface of the insert, a wear rate of (12{+-}3) mm{sup 3}/Megacycle was determined. This is consistent with wear rate measurements under similar conditions using other techniques.

  1. Measurement of the decay B????l?? and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ha, H.; Won, E.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, K.-S.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dungel, W.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joshi, N. J.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, Y.; Limosani, A.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mori, T.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nishimura, K.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Stani?, S.; Stari?, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vossen, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, P.; Zhulanov, V.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the charmless semileptonic decay B????l?? using a data sample containing 657×10? BB¯ events collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider operating near the ?(4S) resonance. We determine the total branching fraction of the decay, B(B????l??) =(1.49±0.04(stat)±0.07(syst))×10??. We also report a new precise measurement of the differential decay rate and extract the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub| using model-independent and model-dependent approaches. From a simultaneous fit to the measured differential decay rate and lattice QCD results, we obtain |Vub|=(3.43±0.33)×10?³, where the error includes both experimental and theoretical uncertainties.

  2. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Scharf; Robert Klanner

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons and holes in high-ohmic silicon on crystal orientation, electric field and temperature. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  3. ACCUMULATION RATE MEASUREMENTS AT TAYLOR DOME, EAST ANTARCTICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, Hans-Peter

    .Weshowthatrobustmassbalancemeas- urementsinthisenvironmentmustrelyonspatialand/ortemporal averaging. Introduction The existence of glaciers, ice caps, and ice sheets depends-term potential to affect sea level through changing ice volume. Except in some coastal areas, it is a polar of these ice bodies present distinct challenges for measur- ing the various components of mass balance. The

  4. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  5. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  6. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and method to measure the functional dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can measure the parametric or functional response of a semiconductor device to exposure to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light. Comparisons of dose-rate response from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. The dependence of these changes on equivalent dose-rate pulse intensity and/or duration can be measured with the apparatus. The synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into the device under test can be used to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure while exposing the device to dose-rate equivalent infrared laser light.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on JET: Michelson Interferometer, New Absolute Calibration and Determination of Electron Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on JET: Michelson Interferometer, New Absolute Calibration and Determination of Electron Temperature

  8. Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Marcia Donna

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination...

  9. Evaluation Of Methods To Measure Hydrogen Generation Rate In A Shielded Cell Environment And A Method Recommendation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M. E.

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the art for determination of hydrogen generation rates of radioactive slurries and solutions to provide a basis for design, fabrication, testing, and implementation of a measurement method for Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) during qualification of waste feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The HGR measurement will be performed on samples of the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) staged waste feeds for the WTP as well as on samples from selected unit operations testing during the qualification program. SRNL has performed a review of techniques utilized to measure HGR of high level radioactive waste slurries, evaluated the Hanford 222-S Laboratory method for measurement of hydrogen, and reviewed the hydrogen generation rate models for Hanford waste.Based on the literature review, method evaluation, and SRNL experience with measuring hydrogen generation rate, SRNL recommends that a continuous flow system with online gas analysis be used as the HGR measurement method during waste qualification.

  10. Qualitative determination of H2S crossover rates in nation membranes using ion-probe techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uribe, Francisco A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are sensitive to impurities that may be present in either the oxidizer or fuel. H2S, even at the ppb level, will have a dramatic and adverse affect on fuel cell performance. The H2S permeability through dry and humidified Nafion PEMFC membranes was studied using ion probe techniques. A sulfide anti-oxidant buffer solution was used to trap and concentrate trace quantities of H2S that permeated through 50 cm2samples of Nafion 117 and 212 membranes using a partial pressure difference up to I030ppm at room temperature. Experiments were conducted for up to 24 hours in order to achieve sulfide ion concentrations high enough to be precisely determined by subsequent titration with Pb(N03)2. The rate of H2S crossover for dry 117 and 212 were identical at 1.2e-7 g/min. Humidification increased the crossover rate to 5.ge-7 glmin and 1.8e-6 glmin for 117 and 212 respectively. Although the data collected in this work show that the rate of H2S crossover increases with water content and reduced membrane thickness, an accurate determination of permeation constants from this work was not possible because the H2S partial pressure was not constant throughout the experiment.

  11. A METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING THE DOSE RATE FOR BOUNDING MASS LIMITS IN A 9977 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that the hazards associated with the shipment of a radioactive material are directly proportional to its mass. This study describes a methodology that estimates the acceptable masses for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a 9977 Package compliant with the Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) external radiation level limits. 10CFR71.33 states that a shipping application identifies the radioactive and fissile materials at their maximum quantity and provides an evaluation demonstrating compliance with the external radiation standards. Since rather small amounts of some isotopes emit sufficiently strong radiation to produce a large external dose rate, quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. A methodology was established for determining the dose rate for bounding mass limits for a set of isotopes in the Model 9977 Shipping Package. Calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per source particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum from one gram of each isotope was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits for dose rate at the surface was determined. For a package containing a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

  12. Comparison of bioturbation rates determined by lead-210 and plutonium in abyssal cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stordal, Mary Christine

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    siliceous clay 0. 15 250 20 120 120 lead-210* silicon-32* lead-210"* carbon-14** 76-G-4-9 17'15'N 23'34 'W 3374 calcareous clay 2. 9 300 580 lead-210m** plutoniume*** 76 ? 0 ? 4-10 20'08'N 26'08'W 76-G-4-11 21'04'N 26'58rW 4660 5032...) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Head of Department) December 1981 1804869 ABSTRACT Comparison of bioturbation rates determined by lead-210 and plutonium in abyssal cores. (December 1981) Mary Christine Stordal, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman...

  13. Experimental determination of the elastic cotunneling rate in a hybrid single-electron box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Chia-Heng; Tai, Po-Chen; Chen, Yung-Fu, E-mail: yfuchen@ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Jheng-An; Wu, Cen-Shawn [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of charge configurations and charge transfer dynamics in a hybrid single-electron box composed of aluminum and copper. We used two single-electron transistors (SETs) to simultaneously read out different parts of the box, enabling us to map out stability diagrams of the box and identify various charge transfer processes in the box. We further characterized the elastic cotunneling in the box, which is an important source of error in electron turnstiles consisting of hybrid SETs, and found that the rate was as low as 1?Hz at degeneracy and compatible with theoretical estimates for electron tunneling via virtual states in the central superconducting island of the box.

  14. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  15. Validating the use of qualitative ratings of static wrist postures relative to quantitative measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohac, Melanie Dawn

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VALIDATING THE USE OF QUALITATIVE RATINGS OF STATIC WRIST POSTURES RELATIVE TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by MELANIE DAWN BOHAC Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Major Subject: Safety Engineering VALIDATING THE USE OF QUALITATIVE RATINGS OF STATIC WRIST POSTURES RELATIVE TO QUANTITATIVE MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by MELANIE DAWN BOHAC Submitted to Texas...

  16. Short-term measurements for the determination of envelope retrofit performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subbarao, K.; Mort, D.; Burch, J.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-term monitoring for estimating thermal parameters of a building, along with an analytical technique to (1) determine the long-term performance and (2) calculate the parameters from a building description, has many valuable applications, which include energy ratings, diagnostics, and retrofit analysis. In this paper we address issues relating to reducing uncertainties in estimating thermal parameters with emphasis on retrofit applications. In general, it is necessary to impose a known heat flow with a suitable profile to reliably estimate the parameters. This is demonstrated with test cell measurements taken before and after changes were made to the test cell. The eventual goal of this project is to develop a practical methodology to determine long-term retrofit performance from short-term tests.

  17. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennerly, J.M.; Lindner, G.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1981-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  18. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennerly, John M. (Knoxville, TN); Lindner, Gordon M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rowe, John C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  19. Measurement of low-energy Na^+ -- Na total collision rate in an ion--neutral hybrid trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, D S; Kwolek, J M; Blümel, R; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the total elastic and resonant charge-exchange ion-atom collision rate coefficient $k_\\mathrm{ia}$ of cold sodium (\\ce{Na}) with optically-dark low energy \\ce{Na+} ions in a hybrid ion-neutral trap. To determine $k_\\mathrm{ia}$, we measured the trap loading and loss from both a \\ce{Na} magneto-optical trap (MOT) and a linear radio frequency quadrupole Paul trap. We found the total rate coefficient to be $7.4 \\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{-8}$ cm$^3$/s for the type I \\ce{Na} MOT immersed within an $\\approx 140$ K ion cloud and $1.10 \\pm 0.25 \\times 10^{-7}$ cm$^3$/s for the type II \\ce{Na} MOT within an $\\approx 1070$ K ion cloud. Our measurements show excellent agreement with previously reported theoretical fully quantal \\textit{ab initio} calculations. In the process of determining the total rate coefficient, we demonstrate that a MOT can be used to probe an optically dark ion cloud's spatial distribution within a hybrid trap.

  20. Determination of uncertainty in parameters extracted from single spectroscopic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bechtel, Kate L.

    The ability to quantify uncertainty in information extracted from spectroscopic measurements is important in numerous fields. The traditional approach of repetitive measurements may be impractical or impossible in some ...

  1. ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pin, P. [AREVA NC La Hague - Nuclear Measurement Team, 50444 Beaumont-Hague Cedex (France); Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Normand, S. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Sensors and Electronic Architectures Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

  2. On-line continuous unit heat rate measurement using EPRI`s plant monitoring workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, E.; Sarunac, N. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States); Schnetzler, D. [Potomac Electric Power Company, Newburg, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software for both the Output/Loss and Boiler-Turbine Cycle Efficiency (BTCE) methods for measuring unit heat rate of pulverized coal units is now available with the latest version of EPRI`s Plant Monitoring Workstation (PMW). Both methods are the latest version of EPRI`s Plant Monitoring Workstation (PMW). Both methods are running continuously and on-line at PEPCO`s Morgantown Unit 2. Comparisons have been made between the results generated by the two methods and with measured plant data for parameters such as coal feed rate and stack gas flow rate. This paper reviews the basis of the two measurement methods, explains how they were implemented at Morgantown Unit 2, and gives results showing how the calculated values compare with measurements for a range of unit operating conditions.

  3. A GREEN'S FUNCTION APPROACH FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package in compliance with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. The neutron and photon sources were calculated using both ORIGEN-S and RASTA. The response from a unit source in each neutron and photon group was calculated using MCNP5 with each unshielded and shielded container configuration. Effects of self-shielding on both neutron and photon response were evaluated by including either plutonium oxide or iron in the source region for the case with no shielded container. For the cases of actinides mixed with light elements, beryllium is the bounding light element. The added beryllium (10 to 90 percent of the actinide mass) in the cases studied represents between 9 and 47 percent concentration of the total mixture mass. For beryllium concentrations larger than 50 percent, the increase in the neutron source term and dose rate tend to increase at a much lower rate than at concentrations lower than 50%. The intimately mixed actinide-beryllium form used in these models is very conservative and thus the limits presented in this report are practical bounds on the mass that can be safely shipped. The calculated dose rate from one gram of each isotope was then used to determin the maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped in the Model 9977 Package (or packagings having the same or larger external dimensions as well as similar structural materials) and have the external radiation level within the regulatory dose limits at the surface of the package. The estimates of the mass limits presented would also serve as conservative limits for both the Models 9975 and 9978 packages. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. It should be noted that the SGQ masses presented in this report represent limits that would comply with the external radiation limits under 10CFR Part 71. They do not necessarily bound lower limits that may be required to comply with other factors such as heat load of the package.

  4. PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for each spectral group. For a given isotope, the source spectrum is folded with the response for each group. The summed contribution from all isotopes determines the total dose from the RAM in the container.

  5. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Nonturbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; J. R. Wolf; K. P. Nolan; E. J. Walsh; R. J. Volino

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  6. Direct Measurements of Damping Rates and Stability Limits for Low Frequency MHD Modes and Alfvén Eigenmodes in the JET Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Measurements of Damping Rates and Stability Limits for Low Frequency MHD Modes and Alfvén Eigenmodes in the JET Tokamak

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curtis (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Blotter, Jonathan D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  8. Testing Many-Worlds Quantum Theory By Measuring Pattern Convergence Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank J. Tipler

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Born Interpretation of the wave function gives only the relative frequencies as the number of observations approaches infinity. Using the Many-Worlds Interpretation of quantum mechanics, specifically the fact that there must exist other versions of ourselves in the multiverse, I show that the observed frequencies should approach the Born frequencies as 1/N, where N is the number of observations. In the body of the paper I state this convergence rate precisely as AN EASILY TESTABLE FORMULA. We can therefore test the central claim of the MWI by measuring the convergence rate to the final Born frequency. Conversely, the MWI allows us to calculate this convergence rate.

  9. Peeping at chaos: Nondestructive monitoring of chaotic systems by measuring long-time escape rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Bunimovich; C. P. Dettmann

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more small holes provide non-destructive windows to observe corresponding closed systems, for example by measuring long time escape rates of particles as a function of hole sizes and positions. To leading order the escape rate of chaotic systems is proportional to the hole size and independent of position. Here we give exact formulas for the subsequent terms, as sums of correlation functions; these depend on hole size and position, hence yield information on the closed system dynamics. Conversely, the theory can be readily applied to experimental design, for example to control escape rates.

  10. Perturbing engine performance measurements to determine optimal engine control settings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiang, Li; Lee, Donghoon; Yilmaz, Hakan; Stefanopoulou, Anna

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for optimizing a performance of a vehicle engine are provided. The method includes determining an initial value for a first engine control parameter based on one or more detected operating conditions of the vehicle engine, determining a value of an engine performance variable, and artificially perturbing the determined value of the engine performance variable. The initial value for the first engine control parameter is then adjusted based on the perturbed engine performance variable causing the engine performance variable to approach a target engine performance variable. Operation of the vehicle engine is controlled based on the adjusted initial value for the first engine control parameter. These acts are repeated until the engine performance variable approaches the target engine performance variable.

  11. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hessler, J.P. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  12. Determining Bounds for a Pressure Hazard Rating to Augment the NFPA 704 Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodge, Phillip

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature and 0.01 (1/min) for the gas generation rate. The ratings were found to be comparable to the current NFPA system, but improved upon it by providing a valid rating (group 1) for the chemicals that endothermically generated gas. Detailed plots...

  13. Bernoulli Applications A Venturi meter is used to measure the flow rate through a tube.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    04/03/2014 1 Bernoulli Applications A Venturi meter is used to measure the flow rate through a tube: as the flow is horizontal, we do not have to take into account the gravity term. 2) Continuity equation-1822), an Italian physicist. Look at the construction in figure: - we assume the flow is smooth and effectively

  14. Mineral-specific chemical weathering rates over millennial timescales: Measurements at Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Mineral-specific chemical weathering rates over millennial timescales: Measurements at Rio Icacos 2010 Accepted 26 July 2010 Editor: J.D. Blum Keywords: Chemical weathering Mineral weathering Cosmogenic nuclides Rio Icacos Puerto Rico Mineral weathering plays a prominent role in many biogeochemical

  15. High precision measurements of atmospheric concentrations and plant exchange rates of carbonyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    High precision measurements of atmospheric concentrations and plant exchange rates of carbonyl K I R * *Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot. The results were consistent with those of nononline gas chromatography­mass spectrometry for COS and IR gas

  16. Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

  17. The Effect of Uncertainty on Pollution Abatement Investments: Measuring Hurdle Rates for Swedish Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ex post data. The method is based on a structural option value model where the future price, oil price uncertainty, abatement investment, sulfur emissions, pulp and paper industry, energy in the measurement of costs, heterogeneity in discount rates or, still, market failures (see for example Hausman

  18. Determining biological tissue optical properties via integrating sphere spatial measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baba, Justin S. (Knoxville, TN); Letzen, Brian S. (Coral Springs, FL)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical sample is mounted on a spatial-acquisition apparatus that is placed in or on an enclosure. An incident beam is irradiated on a surface of the sample and the specular reflection is allowed to escape from the enclosure through an opening. The spatial-acquisition apparatus is provided with a light-occluding slider that moves in front of the sample to block portions of diffuse scattering from the sample. As the light-occluding slider moves across the front of the sample, diffuse light scattered into the area of the backside of the light-occluding slider is absorbed by back side surface of the light-occluding slider. By measuring a baseline diffuse reflectance without a light-occluding slider and subtracting measured diffuse reflectance with a light-occluding slider therefrom, diffuse reflectance for the area blocked by the light-occluding slider can be calculated.

  19. Determination of the star tracker-inertial measurement unit misalignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shearer, Milo Edward

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    navigation system should have the following characteristics; l. The instrumentation is desi, ~cd to measure force through the mechanical implemontation of iiewtcn's second law of motion. 2. The system's accuracy is limited by the degree of perf... 36 navigation possible, since the inertial instrumented' otherwise, would. have aocuracy requirements that are (58) 36 Ibidem pe 453 ' 28 now unattainable. The two principal aces'3 eros etcr errors ere the bis. s error, S K? and tbe scale...

  20. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-61 SEDIMENTATION RATES IN PUGET SOUND FROM 210pB MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-61 SEDIMENTATION RATES IN PUGET SOUND FROM 210pB MEASUREMENTS J ················································· 26 iii #12;#12;Sedimentation Rates in Puget Sound from 210Pb Measurements J. W. Lavelle G. J. Massoth of Puget Sound show that bottom sediments are accumulating at rates of 0.26 to 1.20 g/cm2/yr; these along

  1. Measurement and Analysis of Fission Rates in a Spherical Mockup of Uranium and Polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong-Hua, Zhu; Xin-Xin, Lu; Rong, Liu; Zi-Jie, Han; Li, Jiang; Mei, Wang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the reaction rate distribution were carried out using two kinds of Plate Micro Fission Chamber(PMFC). The first is a depleted uranium chamber and the second an enriched uranium chamber. The material in the depleted uranium chamber is strictly the same as the material in the uranium assembly. With the equation solution to conduct the isotope contribution correction, the fission rate of 238U and 235U were obtained from the fission rate of depleted uranium and enriched uranium. And then, the fission count of 238U and 235U in an individual uranium shell was obtained. In this work, MCNP5 and continuous energy cross sections ENDF/BV.0 were used for the analysis of fission rate distribution and fission count. The calculated results were compared with the experimental ones. The calculation of fission rate of DU and EU were found to agree with the measured ones within 10% except at the positions in polyethylene region and the two positions near the outer surface. Beacause the fission chamber was not co...

  2. Direct measurement of activation time and nucleation rate in capillary-condensed water nanomeniscus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Stambaugh, Corey; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jhe, Wonho, E-mail: whjhe@snu.ac.kr [Center for Nano-Liquid, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Nano-Liquid, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate real-time observation of nucleation of the single water nanomeniscus formed via capillary condensation. We directly measure (i) activation time by time-resolved atomic force microscopy and (ii) nucleation rate by statistical analysis of its exponential distribution, which is the experimental evidence that the activation process is stochastic and follows the Poisson statistics. It implies that formation of the water nanomeniscus is triggered by nucleation, which requires activation for producing a nucleus. We also find the dependence of the nucleation rate on the tip-sample distance and temperature.

  3. Solutions to a Reduced PoissonNernstPlanck System and Determination of Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo

    linearized. Others are assumed to be reactive, meaning that their concentrations vanish when in contact to the underlying re- duced PNP system, and calculate the reaction rate for the reactive species. We give a rigorous dependence of the reaction rates of the reactive species on the magnitude of its far field concentration

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Determining the rate of change in a mixed deciduous forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , growth, and mortality rate of the different species. Moreover, the type, frequen- cy, and intensity of the disturbance, e.g., wind, fire, avalanches, or flooding and the sensitivity of the present trees

  5. A thermal method for measuring the rate of water movement in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloodworth, Morris Elkins

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L?BP A 8 V a L ?BPA8B8 op A THERMAL METHOD FOR MEASURING THE RATE OF WATER MOVEMENT IN PLANTS A Dissertation By Morris Elkins Bloodworth Vao Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial... and content by: ???? ???? '? ^p?P? ?? ???^??^? ?ip?^?? ?p?? ?? ??^?????^??????????????????????????????????? ? ??? ?????? ?? P ? ^ ? ? p ^ ? ? ???????????????????? ?? ? ? ???? ???????P?? ???? ?i??i ^i? ??^i?? ?? ?p??? ? ? ? p? ?Bo? ?Bo?A??8 ??? ????A...

  6. Recent advances in the measurement of high temperature bimolecular rate constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, J.V.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in the measurement of high temperature reaction rate constants are discussed. The studies carried out by shock tube methods are particularly considered because these results are important not only in theoretical chemical kinetics but also in practical applications. The work on 5 chemical reactions are reviewed in detail. These are: D + H{sub 2}, Cl + H{sub 2}, H + O{sub 2}, CH{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}, and H + NO{sub 2}.

  7. Precision Measurement of the Ratio of the Charged Kaon Leptonic Decay Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The NA62 collaboration

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K+- --> e nu and K+- --> mu nu with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ~150000 reconstructed K+- --> e nu candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK = (2.488+-0.010)*10^{-5}, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  8. A method for measuring the rate of reaction by molecular microwave absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Allan Neil

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A METHOD FOR MEASURING THE RATE OF REACTION BT MOLECULAR MICROWAVE ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY A Dissertation 9$r Allan Neil Brown Approved as to style and content by: Head of the Departme Chairman of Committee June AM ET LIBRARY A A M COLLEGE... Amplifier ............. ET Figure 8. The Oscilloscope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1H Figure 9. The Voltage Integrator.......................... 17 Figure 10. Diagram of Voltage Inte g r a t o r................... 18 Figure 11. The Recording Unit...

  9. Method and means for dynamic measurement of rates of adsorption from solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, B.J.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for the dynamic measurement of rates of absorption from solutions. The method has the advantage of avoiding the use of solvent normally used to establish a baseline. The method involves pre-evacuating the adsorbent contained in an adsorbent cell and thereafter rapidly contacting the adsorbent with analytical solution, all without prior exposure of adsorbent to pure solvent. The result is a sharp characteristic adsorption line. 5 figs.

  10. Method and means for dynamic measurement of rates of adsorption from solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slomka, Bogdan J. (Ames, IA); Buttermore, William H. (Ames, IA)

    1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for dynamic measurement of rates of absorption from solutions. The method has the advantage of avoiding the use of solvent normally used to establish a baseline. The method involves pre-evacuating the adsorbent contained in an adsorbent cell and thereafter rapidly contacting the adsorbent with analytical solution, all without prior exposure of adsorbent to pure solvent. The result is a sharp characteristic adsorption line.

  11. Storage-ring measurements of hyperfine induced transition rates in berylliumlike ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schippers, Stefan [Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen, Leihgesterner Weg 217, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of the hyperfine induced 2s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}2s{sup 21}S{sub 0} transition rate in Be-like ions is reviewed. Possible reasons, such as external electromagnetic fields and competing E1M1 two-photon transitions, for presently existing significant discrepancies between experiment and theory are discussed. Finally, directions for future research are outlined.

  12. Measurement of positional isotope exchange rates in enzyme catalyzed reactions by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilscher, Larry Wayne

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility in analyzing a wide array of biological compounds. Our laboratory became interested in the potential use of FAB-MS to study PIX in nucleotide . Working with Dr. David H. Russell's group (Dept. of Chemistry, Texas A A M University) we were able...MEASUREMENT OF POSITIONAL ISOTOPE EXCHANGE RATES IN ENZYME CATALYZED REACTIONS BY FAST ATOM BOMBARDMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by LARRY NAYNE HILSCHER Submitted to the Gradu te College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfil" mert...

  13. An analysis of the situational stresses of university students as measured by heart rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Robert Evans

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER 01' SCIENCE May 1972 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering AN ANALYSIS OF THE SITUATIONAL STRESSES OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS AS MEASURED BY HEART RATE A Thesis by ROBERT EVANS THOMAS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: Chairman... Research Aviation Research Automotive Driver Research Miscellaneous III. EXPERIMENTAL METHOD 13 Subjects Apparatus 13 13 Electrocardiocorder 14 Electrocardioscanner 14 Counter-Timer 14 TABLE OF CONTENTS, CONT'D. Page Questionnaire Study...

  14. Determination of astrophysical thermonuclear rates with a bubble chamber: The {sup 12}C(??){sup 16}O reaction case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiovine, B.; Henderson, D.; Holt, R. J.; Rehm, K. E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 (United States); Grames, J.; Meekins, D.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Robinson, A.; Ugalde, C., E-mail: cugalde@uchicago.edu [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sonnenschein, A. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The {sup 12}C(??){sup 16}O reaction rate is considered one of the most important unknown parameters in the physics of structure and evolution of massive stars. While extensive experimental campaigns have been performed trying to improve the quality of the measurements, the rate still holds very large uncertainties. Here we discuss a new experimantal scheme to measure the cross section of this reaction with a bubble chamber and a bremsstrahlung beam. The main advantage of the technique is a gain in the luminosity of several orders of magnitude when compared to other ongoing experiments.

  15. Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Transfer Rate Using a Thin-Skin Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the design and use of a thin metallic calorimeter for measuring heat transfer rate (also called heat flux). Thermocouples are attached to the unexposed surface of the calorimeter. A one-dimensional heat flow analysis is used for calculating the heat transfer rate from the temperature measurements. Applications include aerodynamic heating, laser and radiation power measurements, and fire safety testing. 1.2 Advantages 1.2.1 Simplicity of ConstructionThe calorimeter may be constructed from a number of materials. The size and shape can often be made to match the actual application. Thermocouples may be attached to the metal by spot, electron beam, or laser welding. 1.2.2 Heat transfer rate distributions may be obtained if metals with low thermal conductivity, such as some stainless steels, are used. 1.2.3 The calorimeters can be fabricated with smooth surfaces, without insulators or plugs and the attendant temperature discontinuities, to provide more realistic flow conditions for ...

  16. Determining the Mechanical Constitutive Properties of Metals as Function of Strain Rate and temperature: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian Robertson

    2007-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain-rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions. To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be integrated fully with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experiment is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models. One aspect of the program involves the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an experimental and modeling viewpoint. In addition, our approach will minimize the need to fit model parameters to experimental data to obtain convergence. These are critical steps to reach the primary objective of simulating and modeling material performance under extreme loading conditions. During this project, the following achievements have been obtained: 1. Twins have been observed to act as barriers to dislocation propagation and as sources of and sinks to dislocations. 2. Nucleation of deformation twins in nitrogen strengthened steel is observed to be closely associated with planar slip bands. The appearance of long twins through heavily dislocated microstructures occurs by short twins nucleating at one slip band, propagating through the dislocation-free region, and terminating at the next slip band. This process is repeated throughout the entire grain. 3. A tamped-laser ablation loading technique has been developed to introduce high strain rate, high stress and low strains. 4. Both dislocation slip and twinning are present in high strain-rate deformed zirconium, with the relative contribution of each mode to the deformation depending on the initial texture. 5. In situ IR thermal measurements have been used to show that the majority of plastic work is dissipated as heat even under conditions in which twinning is the dominant deformation mode.

  17. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution conductivity, pH and analytical concentration measured as a function of time decrease exponentially. In some cases nitrate, sulfate, chloride and fluoride ion concentrations increased with time and processing temperature with respect to the reference sample. The increasing concentration of these ions was due to the lack of formation of crystalline phases that can incorporate them in their structures, especially cancrinite. Another plausible explanations for their increase was due to the continuous withdrawal of cations with time, for example sodium to form zeolites, thereby increase their concentrations.

  18. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal, part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Steven Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keY of 65.4{sup +3.1}{sub 3.0} (stat) {sup +2.6}{sub -2.8} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neUlrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 {+-} 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.88 {+-} 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63--67 SNU with an uncertainly of about 5%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the pp neutrino flux produced in the Sun to be {phi}{sup {circle_dot}}{sub pp} = (6.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  19. Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J.V. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, D-193, Bldg. 200, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length {proportional_to}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=(1.90{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1705{+-}56 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=(1.86{+-}0.24) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1513{+-}123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=(2.02{+-}0.19) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1799{+-}96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=(2.55{+-}0.30) x 10{sup -10}exp(-1824{+-}114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane}=1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779}exp(97 K/T)cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane}=3.169 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.679}exp(119 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane}=6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148}exp(536 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane}=2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325}exp(602 K/T)cm{sup 3}molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three reactions in order to provide reliable extrapolations of the rate constants from 250-2000 K. The results of the theoretical predictions for OH + cyclohexane and OH + methylcyclopentane were sufficient to make a theoretical prediction for OH + methylcyclohexane. The present recommended rate expressions for OH with cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane, give rate constants that are 15-25% higher (over the T-range 800-1300 K) than the rate constants utilized in recent modeling efforts aimed at addressing the oxidation of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. The current measurements reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for the primary cycloalkane consumption channel in a high temperature oxidation environment. (author)

  20. Shock tube measurements of high temperature rate constants for OH with cycloalkanes and methylcycloalkanes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature experiments were performed with the reflected shock tube technique using multi-pass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. The present experiments span a wide T-range, 801-1347 K, and represent the first direct measurements of the title rate constants at T>500 K for cyclopentane and cyclohexane and the only high temperature measurements for the corresponding methyl derivatives. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length 4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high [OH] detection sensitivity permitted unambiguous analyses for measuring the title rate constants. The experimental rate constants in units, cm3 molecule-1 s-1, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = (1.90 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1705 {+-} 156 K/T) (813-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = (1.86 {+-} 0.24) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1513 {+-} 123 K/T) (801-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = (2.02 {+-} 0.19) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1799 {+-} 96 K/T) (859-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = (2.55 {+-} 0.30) x 10{sup -10} exp(-1824 {+-} 114 K/T) (836-1273 K). These results and lower-T experimental data were used to obtain three parameter evaluations of the experimental rate constants for the title reactions over an even wider T-range. These experimental three parameter fits to the rate constants in units, cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}, are k{sub OH+Cyclopentane} = 1.390 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.779} exp(97 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (209-1341 K), k{sub OH+Cyclohexane} = 3.169 x 10{sup -16} T{sup 1.679} exp(119 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (225-1347 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclopentane} = 6.903 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.148} exp(536 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1344 K), k{sub OH+Methylcyclohexane} = 2.341 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.325} exp(602 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (296-1273 K). High level electronic structure methods were used to characterize the first three reactions in order to provide reliable extrapolations of the rate constants from 250-2000 K. The results of the theoretical predictions for OH + cyclohexane and OH + methylcyclopentane were sufficient to make a theoretical prediction for OH + methylcyclohexane. The present recommended rate expressions for OH with cyclohexane, and methylcyclohexane, give rate constants that are 15-25% higher (over the T-range 800-1300 K) than the rate constants utilized in recent modeling efforts aimed at addressing the oxidation of cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane. The current measurements reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for the primary cycloalkane consumption channel in a high temperature oxidation environment.

  1. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Using Forage Harvest Efficiency to Determine Stocking Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; White, Larry D.; Holechek, Jerry L.

    2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing pressure determines both animal performance and the long-term health of the rangeland. Moderate grazing ensures that rangeland is properly stocked for the amount of forage available. Knowing how to estimate grazing ...

  2. Determination

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARM MeasurementsDetermination of

  3. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  4. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A.; Sutter, Peter W.

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pdmore »deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.« less

  5. Determination of redox reaction rates and –orders by in-situ liquid cell electron microscopy of Pd and Au solution growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sutter, Eli A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sutter, Peter W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In-situ liquid cell transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) experiments are important as they provide direct insight into processes in liquids, such as solution growth of nanoparticles among others. In liquid cell TEM/STEM redox reaction experiments the hydrated electrons e?aq created by the electron beam are responsible for the reduction of metal-ion complexes. Here we investigate the rate equation of redox reactions involving reduction by e?aq generated by the electron beam during in-situ liquid TEM/STEM. Specifically we consider the growth of Pd on Au seeds in aqueous solutions containing Pd-chloro complexes. From the quantification of the rate of Pd deposition at different electron beam currents and as a function of distance from a stationary, nanometer-sized exciting beam, we determine that the reaction is first order with respect to the concentration of hydrated electrons, [e?aq]. By comparing Pd- and Au-deposition, we further demonstrate that measurements of the local deposition rate on nanoparticles in the solution via real-time imaging can be used to measure not only [e?aq] but also the rate of reduction of a metal-ion complex to zero-valent metal atoms in solution.

  6. Abstract--Heart rate variability (HRV) is frequently used to measure autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. However,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 of 4 Abstract--Heart rate variability (HRV) is frequently used to measure autonomic nervous frequency (HF) ratio with little change in mean heart rate. Results suggest that nicotine affects both components may yield erroneous results. Keywords--Autonomic regulation, heart rate variability, Lomb

  7. In situ growth rate measurements by normal-incidence reflectance during MOVPE growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, H.Q.; Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Chui, H.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an in situ technique for monitoring metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth by normal-incidence reflectance. This technique is used to calibrate the growth rate periodically and to monitor the growth process routinely. It is not only a precise tool to measure the growth rate, but also very useful in identifying unusal problems during a growth run, such as depletion of source material, deterioration of surface morphology, and problems associated with an improper growht procedure. We will also present an excellent reproducibility ({+-}0.3% over a course of more than 100 runs) of the cavity wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structures with periodic calibration by this in situ technique.

  8. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miracoli, R. [ESS Bilbao, Vizcaya (Spain); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Castro, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Universita degli studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F. [CEA-IRFU, Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ciavola, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNAO, Str. Pr. Campeggi, Pavia (Italy)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  9. Exclusive Measurements of b -> s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 429 fb$^{-1}$ of $e^+e^-$ collision data collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of $b\\rightarrow s\\gamma$ with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be $\\mathcal{B}(\\bar B \\rightarrow X_{s}\\gamma)=(3.29\\pm 0.19\\pm 0.48)\\times 10^{-4}$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, $m_{b}$ and $\\mu_{\\pi}^{2}$, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  10. A feasibility study of the determination of mass transfer rates from perturbation gas chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei-Yih

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and be given as ** ? '". , "-- **. * ? '". . "--( ? '". - *, :, ? ". , 'I. i=1, 2, . . . , (n-l) (4) where " indicates steady-state value and ~y-y-y* 1 i i AX = X ? X * 1 1 1 Por the local equilibrium case, if the flowing phase rate is slow.... (6) into Eq. (4), a set of linearized chro- matographic relations for the multicomponent case including the sorption effects will be obtained. This is well de- monstz'ated in Glover and Lau (19$3). For the non-equilibrium case, finite mass...

  11. Effects, Determination, and Correction of Count Rate Nonlinearity in Multi-Channel Analog Electron Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, T J; Waugh, J A; Dessau, D S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detector counting rate nonlinearity, though a known problem, is commonly ignored in the analysis of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy where modern multichannel electron detection schemes using analog intensity scales are used. We focus on a nearly ubiquitous "inverse saturation" nonlinearity that makes the spectra falsely sharp and beautiful. These artificially enhanced spectra limit accurate quantitative analysis of the data, leading to mistaken spectral weights, Fermi energies, and peak widths. We present a method to rapidly detect and correct for this nonlinearity. This algorithm could be applicable for a wide range of nonlinear systems, beyond photoemission spectroscopy.

  12. Determination of rate constants for the reaction between methyldiethanolamine and carbon dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brabson, Charles Meade

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Nz atmosphere in the drums and also to agitate the amine solution. The feed pump was a Teel model 1P988 rated at 3 gpm (11. 5 lit/min) at 500 psia (35 atm). It was constructed of cast iron. The QS Sample Port QT Thermocouple 6 Pressure Gauge..., no welding or soldering was required which may have damaged the disc. A stainless steel plate was then welded onto the bottom of the reactor. This created a boxed enclosure. The feed gas entered this enclosure through 1/4" stainless steel tubing soldered...

  13. Determining the dissolution rates of actinide glasses: A time and temperature Product Consistency Test study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W.E.; Best, D.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vitrification has been identified as one potential option for the e materials such as Americium (Am), Curium (Cm), Neptunium (Np), and Plutonium (Pu). A process is being developed at the Savannah River Site to safely vitrify all of the highly radioactive Am/Cm material and a portion of the fissile (Pu) actinide materials stored on site. Vitrification of the Am/Cm will allow the material to be transported and easily stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The Am/Cm glass has been specifically designed to be (1) highly durable in aqueous environments and (2) selectively attacked by nitric acid to allow recovery of the valuable Am and Cm isotopes. A similar glass composition will allow for safe storage of surplus plutonium. This paper will address the composition, relative durability, and dissolution rate characteristics of the actinide glass, Loeffler Target, that will be used in the Americium/Curium Vitrification Project at Westinghouse Savannah River Company near Aiken, South Carolina. The first part discusses the tests performed on the Loeffler Target Glass concerning instantaneous dissolution rates. The second part presents information concerning pseudo-activation energy for the one week glass dissolution process.

  14. The Astrophysical Journal, in press A Determination of the Coronal Emission Measure Distribution in the Young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guedel, Manuel

    to this temperature regime. We argue that the DEM distribution seen in EK Dra is induced by the propertiesThe Astrophysical Journal, in press A Determination of the Coronal Emission Measure Distribution of a coronal differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the nearby analog of the young Sun, EK Draconis

  15. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods For Determining Energy Efficiency Savings For Specific Measures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides a set of model protocols for determining energy and demand savings that result from specific energy efficiency measures implemented through state and utility efficiency programs. The methods described here are approaches that are?or are among?the most commonly used in the energy efficiency industry for certain measures or programs.

  16. MEASUREMENT BASED DETERMINATION OF AEROSOL FORCINGS AT ARM SITES: PROPOSED JOINT ASP-ARM STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of aerosol forcings. The dimmed forcings would not be determined -- no indirect aerosol effect in cloud free Stephen E. Schwartz For presentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. There are numerous aerosol forcings

  17. In vivo measurements for high dose rate brachytherapy with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Renu; Jursinic, Paul A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, West Michigan Cancer Center, 200 North Park Street, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of clinical implementation of OSLDs for high dose-rate (HDR) in vivo dosimetry for gynecological and breast patients. To discuss how the OSLDs were characterized for an Ir-192 source, taking into account low gamma energy and high dose gradients. To describe differences caused by the dose calculation formalism of treatment planning systems.Methods: OSLD irradiations were made using the GammaMedplus iX Ir-192 HDR, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA. BrachyVision versions 8.9 and 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA, were used for calculations. Version 8.9 used the TG-43 algorithm and version 10.0 used the Acuros algorithm. The OSLDs (InLight Nanodots) were characterized for Ir-192. Various phantoms were created to assess calculated and measured doses and the angular dependence and self-absorption of the Nanodots. Following successful phantom measurements, patient measurements for gynecological patients and breast cancer patients were made and compared to calculated doses.Results: The OSLD sensitivity to Ir-192 compared to 6 MV is between 1.10 and 1.25, is unique to each detector, and changes with accumulated dose. The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment planning system and found to be in agreement for the gynecological patients to within measurement uncertainty. The range of differences between the measured and Acuros calculated doses was -10%-14%. For the breast patients, there was a discrepancy of -4.4% to +6.5% between the measured and calculated doses at the skin surface when the Acuros algorithm was used. These differences were within experimental uncertainty due to (random) error in the location of the detector with respect to the treatment catheter.Conclusions: OSLDs can be successfully used for HDR in vivo dosimetry. However, for the measurements to be meaningful one must account for the angular dependence, volume-averaging, and the greater sensitivity to Ir-192 gamma rays than to 6 MV x-rays if 6 MV x-rays were used for OSLD calibration. The limitations of the treatment planning algorithm must be understood, especially for surface dose measurements. Use of in vivo dosimetry for HDR brachytherapy treatments is feasible and has the potential to detect and prevent gross errors. In vivo HDR brachytherapy should be included as part of the QA for a HDR brachytherapy program.

  18. DETERMINING THE RATIO OF THE H+ YIELDS TV TO H+ YIELDS TB DECAY RATES FOR LARGE TAN BETA AT THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ASSAMAGAN,K.A.GUASCH,J.MORETTI,S.PENARANDA,S.

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results on the determination of the observable ratio R = BR(H{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sup -})/BR(H{sup +} {yields} t{bar b}) of charged Higgs boson decay rates as a discriminant quantity between Supersymmetric and non-Supersymmetric models. Simulation of measurements of this quantity through the analysis of the charged Higgs production process gb {yields} tbH{sup +} and relative backgrounds in the two above decay channels has been performed in the context of ATLAS. A {approx} 12-14% accuracy on R can be achieved for tan {beta} = 50, m{sub H{sup {+-}}} = 300-500 GeV and after an integrated luminosity of 300 fb{sup -1}. With this precision measurement, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) can easily discriminate between models for the two above scenarios, so long as tan {beta} > 20.

  19. Commissioning of the Electron Line of the Linac Coherent Light Source. Dose Rate Measurements and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santana Leitner, M; Bauer, J.M.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; Mao, X.S.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, H.; /SLAC; Sanami, T.; /SLAC /KEK, Tsukuba; Vollaire, J.; /SLAC

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy) is the world's first hard X-ray Free Electron Laser machine. It uses high energy electrons delivered by a linac to create ultrafast and brilliant X-ray pulses that can be used as a 'high-speed' camera to obtain images of atoms and molecules. LCLS is a pioneer machine and, as such, its design has encountered unprecedented challenges, the solutions to which will benefit future facilities of its kind across the globe. This article describes the radiation protection aspects of LCLS electron beamlines. Special emphasis is put on the successful commissioning of the LCLS electron line, where, for all examined loss sources, the measured prompt and residual dose rates are in agreement with or below the values predicted through detailed Monte Carlo simulations, used earlier to design the shielding.

  20. Guidance on Dose Rate Measurements for Use in Dose-to-Curie Conversions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, R.S.

    2000-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dose-to-curie (DTC) methodology used at SRS was developed in early 1994 by Health Physics Technology (HPT) for inclusion in the Site Waste Information Tracking System (WITS). DTC is used to estimate the nuclide activity in a waste container based on the measured dose rate from the container. The DTC method is a simple and easy to apply method that can provide a reasonable estimate of the container activity by nuclide when properly applied. In order to make the method practical, numerous assumptions had to be made and limitations placed on its use. Many of these assumptions and limitations can only be procedurally controlled and must be well understood by these individuals in order to assure proper application numerous the method. These limitations are addressed in this report.

  1. Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Lund Fisker; Wanpeng Tan; Joachim Goerres; Michael Wiescher; Randall L. Cooper

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction, O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19, that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19-reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

  2. channel voltage sensor+ether--go-go K Optical detection of rate-determining ion-modulated conformational changes of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bezanilla, Francisco

    channel voltage sensor+ether-à-go-go K Optical detection of rate-determining ion electrophysiological and optical approach. We find that a fluorescent probe attached near S4 in the voltage sensor.pnas.org/misc/reprints.shtml To order reprints, see: Notes: #12;Optical detection of rate-determining ion-modulated conformational

  3. Rate Schedules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

  4. Laboratory measurements of the drying rates of low-slope roofing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Kyle, D.M.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The service life of a roofing system typically ends when excessive amounts of water have entered the system. Roofing professionals determine whether the existing failed roofing system can be repaired or salvaged by recovering. A key element in this decision is whether the accumulated water will be able to leave the roofing system in a time frame that will prevent irreparable structural damage. There are several combined heat and mass transfer models that can be used to predict drying times for low-slope roofing systems. Very little experimental data exists that can be used to validate the performance of these models. To satisfy these needs, a series of laboratory experiments has been performed. Five test panels, comprised of a plywood deck, four types of roofing insulation, and a single ply membrane were installed in a climate simulator. The test panels were outfitted with temperature sensors and heat flux transducers, and were mounted on load cells. Water was added to the test panels and they were subjected to external diurnal cycles representative of summer and winter conditions for a southern US continental climate. The load cells supplied continuous records of the weights of the test panels; these data were used to compute the drying rates of the test panels. When these experiments were completed, the test panels were ``recovered`` with different thicknesses of insulation and the environmental conditions were reapplied to the test panels. This paper reports on the design and performance of these experiments. The data compiled during these tests supply insight into the effects of meteorological conditions, insulation R-value, insulation water vapor permeance, and roof recover on the rate that water will be removed from low-slope roofing systems.

  5. Precision Measurement of the Decay Rate of 7Be in Host Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Nir-El; G. Haquin; Z. Yungreiss; M. Hass; G. Goldring; S. K. Chamoli; B. S. Nara Singh; S. Lakshmi; U. Koester; N. Champault; A. Dorsival; G. Georgiev; V. N. Fedoseyev; B. A. Marsh; D. Schumann; G. Heidenreich; S. Teichmann

    2006-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A controlled and precise determination of the cross-sections of the fusion reactions 7Be(p,gamma)8B and 3He(4He,gamma)7Be, which play an important role in determining the solar neutrino flux, necessitates the knowledge of a precise value of the electron-capture half-life of 7Be. This half-life may depend on the material hosting the 7Be atoms via small modifications of the electron density around the 7Be nucleus. In this brief communication we report on the measurement of 7Be implanted in four materials: copper, aluminum, sapphire and PVC. The four results are consistent with a null host dependence within two standard deviations and their weighted average of 53.236(39)d agrees very well with the adopted value in the literature, 53.22(6)d. The present results may exhibit a slight (0.22%) increase of the half-life at room temperature for metals compared to insulators that requires further studies.

  6. Sediment profiles of less commonly determined elements measured by Laser Ablation ICP-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Sediment profiles of less commonly determined elements measured by Laser Ablation ICP on a short list of high-abundance trace elements. Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry of this investigation is to harness the analytical power of Laser Ablation ICP-MS to explore the behavior of a large

  7. Determination of delayed neutrons source in the frequency domain based on in-pile oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yedvab, Y. [Nuclear Research Centre - Negev, P O Box 9001, 84190 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Physics Dept., Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, P O Box 653, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Reiss, I. [Nuclear Research Centre - Negev, P O Box 9001, 84190 Beer-Sheva (Israel); Bettan, M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Centre, 81800 Yavne (Israel); Harari, R.; Grober, A.; Ettedgui, H.; Caspi, E. N. [Nuclear Research Centre - Negev, P O Box 9001, 84190 Beer-Sheva (Israel)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining delayed neutrons source in the frequency domain based on measuring power oscillations in a non-critical reactor is presented. This method is unique in the sense that the delayed neutrons source is derived from the dynamic behavior of the reactor, which serves as the measurement system. An algorithm for analyzing power oscillation measurements was formulated, which avoids the need for a multi-parameter non-linear fit process used by other methods. Using this algorithm results of two sets of measurements performed in IRR-I and IRR-II (Israeli Research Reactors I and II) are presented. The agreement between measured values from both reactors and calculated values based on Keepin (and JENDL-3.3) group parameters is very good. (authors)

  8. Measurement of (alpha,n) reaction cross sections of erbium isotopes for testing astrophysical rate predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, G G; Rauscher, T; Török, Zs; Csedreki, L; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\gamma$-process in core-collapse and/or type Ia supernova explosions is thought to explain the origin of the majority of the so-called $p$ nuclei (the 35 proton-rich isotopes between Se and Hg). Reaction rates for $\\gamma$-process reaction network studies have to be predicted using Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations. Recent investigations have shown problems in the prediction of $\\alpha$-widths at astrophysical energies which are an essential input for the statistical model. It has an impact on the reliability of abundance predictions in the upper mass range of the $p$ nuclei. With the measurement of the $^{164,166}$Er($\\alpha$,n)$^{167,169}$Yb reaction cross sections at energies close to the astrophysically relevant energy range we tested the recently suggested low energy modification of the $\\alpha$+nucleus optical potential in a mass region where $\\gamma$-process calculations exhibit an underproduction of the $p$ nuclei. Using the same optical potential for the $\\alpha$-width which was der...

  9. On the information content of the thermal infrared cooling rate profile from satellite instrument measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    On the information content of the thermal infrared cooling rate profile from satellite instrument 2008; accepted 25 February 2008; published 13 June 2008. [1] This work investigates how remote sensing of the quantities required to calculate clear-sky cooling rate profiles propagates into cooling rate profile

  10. 7-111 A Carnot heat engine is used to drive a Carnot refrigerator. The maximum rate of heat removal from the refrigerated space and the total rate of heat rejection to the ambient air are to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-42 7-111 A Carnot heat engine is used to drive a Carnot refrigerator. The maximum rate of heat removal from the refrigerated space and the total rate of heat rejection to the ambient air are to be determined. Assumptions The heat engine and the refrigerator operate steadily. Analysis (a) The highest

  11. Cesium Sorption Rate on Non-Crushed Rock Measured by a New Apparatus Based on a Micro-Channel-Reactor Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keita Okuyama; Akira Sasahira; Kenji Noshita [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd, 7-2-1 Omika, Hitachi-shi, 319- 1221 (Japan); Toshiaki Ohe [Energy Science and Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, 259-1292 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since nuclide migration through rock mediums is an extremely slow process, experimental effort to evaluate the barrier performance of geologic disposal such as the diffusion coefficient (D{sub e}) and the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) requires relatively long testing periods and chemically stable conditions. We have developed a fast method to determine both D{sub e} and K{sub d} by using a non-crushed rock sample. In this method, a fluoro-plastic plate with a micro channel (10- 200-{mu}m depth) is placed just beneath a rock-sample plate, and a radionuclide solution is injected into the channel at constant rate. A part of radionuclide diffuses into the rock matrix and/or adsorbs on the rock surface. The difference between the inlet and outlet radionuclide flux is simply related to the apparent diffusion coefficient (D{sub a}) of the rock sample. In this study, we estimated K{sub d} of Cs for granite by using the equilibrium model, finding that K{sub d} decreased with increasing flow rate. This dependence of K{sub d} on flow rate implies the state of sorption equilibrium. The adsorption and desorption curves of {sup 134}Cs were thus measured, and the rate constants for both processes were obtained by adopting a first-order rate law. The rate constants of sorption (k{sub +}) and desorption (k{sub -}) were obtained as a function of flow velocity; constant values of both were observed. K{sub d} was calculated from k{sub +}/ k{sub -} and then compared with that determined by conventional batch sorption method using a crushed rock sample. The K{sub d} values determined by the present and conventional methods are in good accordance; however, the testing periods for each method are very different; namely, 1 day and 7 days, respectively. (authors)

  12. Determination of H{sub 2} Diffusion Rates through Various Closures on TRU Waste Bag-Out Bags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; E. Larry Callis; Kirsten M. Norman

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of H{sub 2} diffusion through twist and tape (horse-tail), wire tie, plastic tie, and heat sealed closures on transuranic (TRU) waste bag-out bags has been determined. H{sub 2} diffusion through wire and plastic tie closures on TRU waste bag-out bags has not been previously characterized and, as such, TRU waste drums containing bags with these closures cannot be certified and/or shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since wire ties have been used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) from 1980 to 1991 and the plastic ties from 1991 to the present, there are currently thousands of waste drums that cannot be shipped to the WIPP site. Repackaging the waste would be prohibitively expensive. Diffusion experiments performed on the above mentioned closures show that the diffusion rates of plastic tie and horse-tail closures are greater than the accepted value presented in the TRU-PACT 11 Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Diffusion rates for wire tie closures are not statistically different from the SAR value. Thus, drums containing bags with these closures can now potentially be certified which would allow for their consequent shipment to WIPP.

  13. Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures; January 2012 - March 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, T.; Haeri, H.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Uniform Methods Project, DOE is developing a framework and a set of protocols for determining the energy savings from specific energy efficiency measures and programs. The protocols provide a straightforward method for evaluating gross energy savings for common residential and commercial measures offered in ratepayer-funded initiatives in the United States. They represent a refinement of the body of knowledge supporting energy efficiency evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) activities. This document deals with savings from the following measures: commercial and industrial lighting, commercial and industrial lighting controls, small commercial and residential unitary and split system HVAC cooling equipment, residential furnaces and boilers, residential lighting, refrigerator recycling, whole-building retrofit using billing analysis, metering, peak demand and time-differentiated energy savings, sample design, survey design and implementation, and assessing persistence and other evaluation issues.

  14. Comparison of Average Heart Rates Determined by Surface ECG and 24-Hour Ambulatory ECG (Holter) in Dogs with Spontaneous Atrial Fibrillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perea Lugo, Adriana

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare the heart rates of dogs presenting with spontaneous atrial fibrillation (AF) by a surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and a 24 hour ambulatory ECG (Holter recording) in order to determine if there was a...

  15. Probing $f(R)$ cosmology with sterile neutrinos via measurements of scale-dependent growth rate of structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yun-He; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we constrain the dimensionless Compton wavelength parameter $B_0$ of $f(R)$ gravity as well as the mass of sterile neutrino by using the cosmic microwave background observations, the baryon acoustic oscillation surveys, and the linear growth rate measurements. Since both the $f(R)$ model and the sterile neutrino generally predict scale-dependent growth rates, we utilize the growth rate data measured in different wavenumber bins with the theoretical growth rate approximatively scale-independent in each bin. The employed growth rate data come from the peculiar velocity measurements at $z=0$ in five wavenumber bins, and the redshift space distortions measurements at $z=0.25$ and $z=0.37$ in one wavenumber bin. By constraining the $f(R)$ model alone, we get a tight 95% upper bound of $\\log_{10}B_0<-4.1$. This result is slightly weakened to $\\log_{10}B_0<-3.8$ (at 2$\\sigma$ level) once we simultaneously constrain the $f(R)$ model and the sterile neutrino mass, due to the degeneracy between the...

  16. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DAM, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  17. Method for measuring the rate of cell reproduction by analysis of nanoliter cell samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of detecting cancer using a laser biocavity having a semiconductor laser including a microchannel through which cells in fluid traverse, comprising determining the laser wavelength of the laser biocavity with only fluid in the microchannel; determining the wavelength shift of the biocavity when each cell passes through the microchannel; and determining the percentage of cells in G2 phase from the wavelength shift of the cells; wherein an increased percentage of G2 phase cells is an indication of cancer.

  18. Heat Transfer Modeling and Use of Distributed Temperature Measurements to Predict Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashmi, Gibran Mushtaq

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    . .......................................... 53 Figure 21 – Rate simulation for the same case as Fig. 20. ............................................... 54 Figure 22 – Buildup charts for the same case as in Fig. 10. ............................................. 54 Figure 23 – Pareto chart... ................................................................................ 10 CHAPTER III MODEL DEVELOPMENT .................................................................... 12 Introduction .................................................................................................................. 12 Steady...

  19. Irradiators for measuring the biological effects of low dose-rate ionizing radiation fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Matthew Allen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological response to ionizing radiation differs with radiation field. Particle type, energy spectrum, and dose-rate all affect biological response per unit dose. This thesis describes methods of spectral analysis, ...

  20. Supernova progenitors and iron density evolution from SN rate evolution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Blanc; Laura Greggio

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an extensive compilation of literature supernova rate data we study to which extent its evolution constrains the star formation history, the distribution of the type Ia supernova (SNIa) progenitor's lifetime, the mass range of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) progenitors, and the evolution of the iron density in the field. We find that the diagnostic power of the cosmic SNIa rate on their progenitor model is relatively weak. More promising is the use of the evolution of the SNIa rate in galaxy clusters. We find that the CCSN rate is compatible with a Salpeter IMF, with a minimum mass for their progenitors > 10 Msun. We estimate the evolution in the field of the iron density released by SNe and find that in the local universe the iron abundance should be ~ 0.1 solar. We discuss the difference between this value and the iron abundance in clusters.

  1. Transient oxygen consumption rate measurements with the BDT?M? oxygen biosensor system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Clarke Alan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen consumption rate (OCR) is a reliable indicator of tissue health. Recently, the OCR of isolated human islets has been shown to predict transplant outcome in diabetic mice. The Oxygen Biosensor System (OBS) is a ...

  2. Measuring the Social Rate of Return to R&D in the Energy Industry: A Study of the OECD Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    for biomass energy R&D, with clearly demarcated support for both pre-commercial research devoted to innovation for renewable energy and energy efficiency, and has declined for fossil fuel and nuclear technology. The 20051 Measuring the Social Rate of Return to R&D in the Energy Industry: A Study of the OECD Countries

  3. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp pellet production varied between 0.8 pellets ind21 h21 and 3.8 pellets ind21 h21 and was significantly

  4. Overview of existing residential energy-efficiency rating systems and measuring tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three categories of rating systems/tools were identified: prescriptive, calculational, and performance. Prescriptive systems include rating systems that assign points to various conservation features. Most systems that have been implemented to date have been prescriptive systems. The vast majority of these are investor-owned utility programs affiliated with the National Energy Watch program of the Edison Electric Institute. The calculational category includes computational tools that can be used to estimate energy consumption. This estimate could then be transformed, probably by indexing, into a rating. The available computational tools range from very simple to complex tools requiring use of a main-frame computer. Performance systems refer to residential energy-efficiency ratings that are based on past fuel consumption of a home. There are few of these systems. For each identified system/tool, the name, address, and telephone number of the developer is included. In addition, relevant publications discussing the system/tool are cited. The extent of field validation/verification of individual systems and tools is discussed. In general, there has been little validation/verification done. A bibliography of literature relevant to the use and implementation of a home energy rating system is also included.

  5. The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured at Armagh, 18812000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured in atmospheric circulation, are discussed. Citation: Stanhill, G. (2011), The role of water vapor and solar radiation in determining temperature changes and trends measured at Armagh, 1881­2000, J. Geophys. Res., 116

  6. Effect of improved TLD dosimetry on the determination of dose rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, M., E-mail: manuel.rodriguez@rmp.uhn.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To more accurately account for the relative intrinsic energy dependence and relative absorbed-dose energy dependence of TLDs when used to measure dose rate constants (DRCs) for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds, to thereby establish revised “measured values” for all seeds and compare the revised values with Monte Carlo and consensus values. Methods: The relative absorbed-dose energy dependence, f{sup rel}, for TLDs and the phantom correction, P{sub phant}, are calculated for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds using the EGSnrc BrachyDose and DOSXYZnrc codes. The original energy dependence and phantom corrections applied to DRC measurements are replaced by calculated (f{sup rel}){sup ?1} and P{sub phant} values for 24 different seed models. By comparing the modified measured DRCs to the MC values, an appropriate relative intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}{sup rel}, is determined. The new P{sub phant} values and relative absorbed-dose sensitivities, S{sub AD}{sup rel}, calculated as the product of (f{sup rel}){sup ?1} and (k{sub bq}{sup rel}){sup ?1}, are used to individually revise the measured DRCs for comparison with Monte Carlo calculated values and TG-43U1 or TG-43U1S1 consensus values. Results: In general, f{sup rel} is sensitive to the energy spectra and models of the brachytherapy seeds. Values may vary up to 8.4% among {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed models and common TLD shapes. P{sub phant} values depend primarily on the isotope used. Deduced (k{sub bq}{sup rel}){sup ?1} values are 1.074 ± 0.015 and 1.084 ± 0.026 for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively. For (1 mm){sup 3} chips, this implies an overall absorbed-dose sensitivity relative to {sup 60}Co or 6 MV calibrations of 1.51 ± 1% and 1.47 ± 2% for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively, as opposed to the widely used value of 1.41. Values of P{sub phant} calculated here have much lower statistical uncertainties than literature values, but systematic uncertainties from density and composition uncertainties are significant. Using these revised values with the literature’s DRC measurements, the average discrepancies between revised measured values and Monte Carlo values are 1.2% and 0.2% for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively, compared to average discrepancies for the original measured values of 4.8%. On average, the revised measured values are 4.3% and 5.9% lower than the original measured values for {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I seeds, respectively. The average of revised DRCs and Monte Carlo values is 3.8% and 2.8% lower for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively, than the consensus values in TG-43U1 or TG-43U1S1. Conclusions: This work shows that f{sup rel} is TLD shape and seed model dependent suggesting a need to update the generalized energy response dependence, i.e., relative absorbed-dose sensitivity, measured 25 years ago and applied often to DRC measurements of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds. The intrinsic energy dependence for LiF TLDs deduced here is consistent with previous dosimetry studies and emphasizes the need to revise the DRC consensus values reported by TG-43U1 or TG-43U1S1.

  7. Determination of the pressure at the gas-liquid interface using acoustic speed measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heggelund, Dag Gustav

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The density can be expressed with the use of the real gas law. This yields BP = ? (g/gc) *dz*P*M/(144*Z*R*T) BP = ? (g/gc) *dz*P*SG*MAIR/(144*Z*R*T) (26) 21 where: SG MAIR specific gravity of gas. (air= 1. 0), Molecular weight of air, 28. 966...DETERMINATION OF THE PRESSURE AT THE GAS-LIQUID INTERFACE USING ACOUSTIC SPEED MEASUREMENTS A Thesis by DAG GUSTAV HEGGELUND Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  8. Measurement of biodegradation rate constants of a water extract from petroleum-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.Y.; Kane, A.J.; Wang, J.J.; Cawley, W.A. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of biodegradation rate constants of petroleum products in water extract from contaminated soil presents an important component in the evaluation of bioremediation process. In this study, soil samples were gathered from an industrial site which was used for maintenance and storage of heavy equipment used in the oil and gas exploration and production industry. The petroleum contaminants were extracted from the soil using distilled water. This water extract was used as the substrate to acclimate a microbial community and also for the biological kinetic studies. Kinetic studies were carried out in batch reactors, and the biodegradation rates were monitored by a computer-controlled respirometer. The BOD data were analyzed by using the Monod equation. Experimental results give the average value of the maximum rate constant as 0.038 mg BOD/(mg VSS hr) and the average value of the substrate concentration of half rate as 746 mg BOD/l. A GC/MS analysis on the sample of the test solutions before and after 5 days of biological oxidation indicates that the hydrocarbons initially present in the solution were degraded.

  9. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE BULK REACTION RATES I: THEORY AND TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxter, Ethan F.

    and mineral chemistry. The local equilibrium assumption, used in geochronology, geothermobarometry describe in detail the theory and methodology of a technique for extracting bulk reaction rates directly for the exchange process. Forward modeling of the reactive transport process using numerical methods

  10. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  11. Reconciliation of Measured and TRANSP-calculated Neutron Emission Rates in the National Spherical Torus Experiment: Circa 2002-2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.S. Medley; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A change in the response of the neutron detectors on the National Spherical Torus Experiment occurred between the 2002-2003 and 2004 experimental run periods. An analysis of this behavior by investigating the neutron diagnostic operating conditions and comparing measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates is presented. Also a revised procedure for cross calibration of the neutron scintillator detectors with the fission chamber detectors was implemented that delivers good agreement amongst the measured neutron rates for all neutron detectors and all run periods. For L-mode discharges, the measured and TRANSP-calculated neutron rates now match closely for all run years. For H-mode discharges over the entire 2002-2004 period, the 2FG scintillator and fission chamber measurements match each other but imply a neutron deficit of 11.5% relative to the TRANSP-calculated neutron. The results of this report impose a modification on all of the previously used calibration factors for the entire neutron detector suite over the 2002-2004 period. A tabular summary of the new calibration factors is provided including certified calibration factors for the 2005 run.

  12. Measuring Tail Thickness under GARCH and an Application to Extremal Exchange Rate Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Niklas; Marsh, Terry A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relations and Extremes of a GARCH(1,1) Process, Annals ofMeasuring Tail Thickness under GARCH And an Application todistribution functions including GARCH and propose a model-

  13. Ultrafast high strain rate acoustic wave measurements at high static pressure in a diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Reed, E; Zaug, J

    2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used sub-picosecond laser pulses to launch ultra-high strain rate ({approx} 10{sup 9} s{sup -1}) nonlinear acoustic waves into a 4:1 methanol-ethanol pressure medium which has been precompressed in a standard diamond anvil cell. Using ultrafast interferometry, we have characterized acoustic wave propagation into the pressure medium at static compression up to 24 GPa. We find that the velocity is dependent on the incident laser fluence, demonstrating a nonlinear acoustic response which may result in shock wave behavior. We compare our results with low strain, low strain-rate acoustic data. This technique provides controlled access to regions of thermodynamic phase space that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  14. Determination of the relationship between permeation rates and solubility parameter differences for selected protective glove/solvent and boot/solvent combinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janicik, Thomas Joseph

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    differences for each test material/chemical combination were calcula- ted from published values. Permeation rates were experimentally determined for two different test materials versus nine test chemicals. Permeation rates for a particular test material/chemical.... Rod S1mmons for providing assistance in obtaining the equipment and test chemicals. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the financ1al assistance provided by NIOSH for my graduate education. TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT ACKNOWUEDGEMENTS LIST...

  15. Spin transport parameters in metallic multilayers determined by ferromagnetic resonance measurements of spin-pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boone, C. T.; Nembach, Hans T.; Shaw, Justin M.; Silva, T. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured spin-transport in nonferromagnetic (NM) metallic multilayers from the contribution to damping due to spin pumping from a ferromagnetic Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10} thin film. The multilayer stack consisted of NM{sub 1}/NM{sub 2}/Co{sub 90}Fe{sub 10}(2 nm)/NM{sub 2}/NM{sub 3} with varying NM materials and thicknesses. Using conventional theory for one-dimensional diffusive spin transport in metals, we show that the effective damping due to spin pumping can be strongly affected by the spin transport properties of each NM in the multilayer, which permits the use of damping measurements to accurately determine the spin transport properties of the various NM layers in the full five-layer stack. We find that due to its high electrical resistivity, amorphous Ta is a poor spin conductor, in spite of a short spin-diffusion length of 1.0 nm, and that Pt is an excellent spin conductor by virtue of its low electrical resistivity and a spin diffusion length of only 0.5 nm. Spin Hall effect measurements may have underestimated the spin Hall angle in Pt by assuming a much longer spin diffusion length.

  16. Development of equations to determine the increase in pavement condition due to treatment and the rate of decrease in condition after treatment for a local agency pavement network.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Maithilee Mukund.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF EQUATIONS TO DETERMINE THE INCREASE IN PAVEMENT CONDITION DUE TO TREATMENT AND THE RATE OF DECREASE IN CONDITION AFTER TREATMENT FOR A LOCAL AGENCY PAVEMENT NETWORK A Thesis by MAITHILEE MUKUND DESHMUKH Submitted... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2009 Major Subject: Civil Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF EQUATIONS TO DETERMINE THE INCREASE IN PAVEMENT...

  17. The measurement of heat transfer rates in contaminated, high enthalpy flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muniz, Edelmiro

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '"i, ally it, was decided that a spectral absor'pticn techinicue would. bc the simplest nd best way to cietcr- I1ine hcw LIuch a Lurilirrcm c ointa, ciri, ', ti, 0 . ' wBS produced couipled with a Bto'res-i'. CLI od g:, ", e to measure thc pressuri...

  18. Measurement and control of a mechanical oscillator at its thermal decoherence rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Wilson; V. Sudhir; N. Piro; R. Schilling; A. Ghadimi; T. J. Kippenberg

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In real-time quantum feedback protocols, the record of a continuous measurement is used to stabilize a desired quantum state. Recent years have seen highly successful applications in a variety of well-isolated micro-systems, including microwave photons and superconducting qubits. By contrast, the ability to stabilize the quantum state of a tangibly massive object, such as a nanomechanical oscillator, remains a difficult challenge: The main obstacle is environmental decoherence, which places stringent requirements on the timescale in which the state must be measured. Here we describe a position sensor that is capable of resolving the zero-point motion of a solid-state, nanomechanical oscillator in the timescale of its thermal decoherence, a critical requirement for preparing its ground state using feedback. The sensor is based on cavity optomechanical coupling, and realizes a measurement of the oscillator's displacement with an imprecision 40 dB below that at the standard quantum limit, while maintaining an imprecision-back-action product within a factor of 5 of the Heisenberg uncertainty limit. Using the measurement as an error signal and radiation pressure as an actuator, we demonstrate active feedback cooling (cold-damping) of the 4.3 MHz oscillator from a cryogenic bath temperature of 4.4 K to an effective value of 1.1$\\pm$0.1 mK, corresponding to a mean phonon number of 5.3$\\pm$0.6 (i.e., a ground state probability of 16%). Our results set a new benchmark for the performance of a linear position sensor, and signal the emergence of engineered mechanical oscillators as practical subjects for measurement-based quantum control.

  19. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William B. (Bothell, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation.

  20. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, W.B. III

    1997-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity are disclosed. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie`s Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. 7 figs.

  1. Determination of the permeability of carbon aerogels by gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis at 1050{degree}C in nitrogen. Because of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell structure and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications, such as in supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, we calculated the permeability of carbon aerogels from equations based upon Darcy`s law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have apparent permeabilities on the order of 10{sup {minus}12}to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} for densities ranging from 0.44 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}. Like their mechanical properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density and average pore size. Such findings help us to estimate the average pore sizes of carbon aerogels once their densities are known. This paper reveals the relationships among permeability, pore size and density in carbon aerogels.

  2. Determination of the permeability of carbon aerogels by gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis at 1050{degree}C in nitrogen. Because of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell structure and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications, such as in supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, we calculated the permeability of carbon aerogels from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have apparent permeabilities on the order of 10{sup {minus}12}to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} for densities ranging from 0.44 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}. Like their mechanical properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density and average pore size. Such findings help us to estimate the average pore sizes of carbon aerogels once their densities are known. This paper reveals the relationships among permeability, pore size and density in carbon aerogels.

  3. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  4. Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillère, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

  5. 7-106 A reversible heat pump is considered. The temperature of the source and the rate of heat transfer to the sink are to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-39 7-106 A reversible heat pump is considered. The temperature of the source and the rate of heat transfer to the sink are to be determined. Assumptions The heat pump operates steadily. Analysis Combining.5¸ ¹ · ¨ © § ¸ ¸ ¹ · ¨ ¨ © § 1.6 1 1)K300( COP 1 1 maxHP, HL TT Based upon the definition of the heat pump coefficient

  6. 7-46E The COP and the refrigeration rate of an ice machine are given. The power consumption is to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-15 7-46E The COP and the refrigeration rate of an ice machine are given. The power consumption consumption of a refrigerator are given. The time it will take to cool 5 watermelons is to be determined. Assumptions 1 The refrigerator operates steadily. 2 The heat gain of the refrigerator through its walls, door

  7. Determining Fiber and Protein Degradation Rates of Corn Milling (Co)Products and Their Effects on Rumen Bacterial Populations and Lactating Dairy Cow Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Whitney

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to lactating dairy cows (n=44) to evaluate effects on milk production. The Cornell-Penn-Miner Institute (CPM) Dairy model was used to formulate diets and predict milk production. In vitro determined NDR and NDIP rates and were compared to CPM-dairy feed library...

  8. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  9. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldán, É. [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A., E-mail: rul@ugr.es [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Dinis, L. [GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  10. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Osterhoudt, Curtis F. [University of Alaska

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  11. Constraints on the tau neutrino mass and mixing from precise measurements of tau decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Swain; Lucas Taylor

    1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived constraints on the tau neutrino mass and fourth generation mixing from an analysis of the partial widths of tau lepton decays, in particular: tau -> e nu nu_tau, tau -> mu nu nu_tau, tau -> pi nu_tau, tau -> K nu_tau. We present predictions for the tau decay widths, allowing for a non-zero tau neutrino mass, m(nu_tau), and for mixing with a neutrino of mass m(nu_L) > M_Z/2, which is parametrised using a Cabibbo-like mixing angle, theta_L. By comparison of these theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements, we obtain the following bounds at the 90% confidence level: m(nu_tau) < 42 MeV and sin^2(theta_L) < 0.014.

  12. Phonon deformation potentials in wurtzite GaN and ZnO determined by uniaxial pressure dependent Raman measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Phonon deformation potentials in wurtzite GaN and ZnO determined by uniaxial pressure dependent deformation potentials in wurtzite GaN and ZnO determined by uniaxial pressure dependent Raman measurements G online 9 February 2011 We report the phonon deformation potentials of wurtzite GaN and ZnO for all zone

  13. Type Ia supernova rate measurements to redshift 2.5 from CANDELS: Searching for prompt explosions in the early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney, Steven A.; Riess, Adam G.; Graur, Or; Jones, David O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Dahlen, Tomas; Casertano, Stefano; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Garnavich, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Hayden, Brian [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jha, Saurabh W.; McCully, Curtis; Patel, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Kirshner, Robert P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); and others

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) was a multi-cycle treasury program on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that surveyed a total area of ?0.25 deg{sup 2} with ?900 HST orbits spread across five fields over three years. Within these survey images we discovered 65 supernovae (SNe) of all types, out to z ? 2.5. We classify ?24 of these as Type Ia SNe (SNe Ia) based on host galaxy redshifts and SN photometry (supplemented by grism spectroscopy of six SNe). Here we present a measurement of the volumetric SN Ia rate as a function of redshift, reaching for the first time beyond z = 2 and putting new constraints on SN Ia progenitor models. Our highest redshift bin includes detections of SNe that exploded when the universe was only ?3 Gyr old and near the peak of the cosmic star formation history. This gives the CANDELS high redshift sample unique leverage for evaluating the fraction of SNe Ia that explode promptly after formation (<500 Myr). Combining the CANDELS rates with all available SN Ia rate measurements in the literature we find that this prompt SN Ia fraction is f{sub P} = 0.53{sub stat0.10}{sup ±0.09}{sub sys0.26}{sup ±0.10}, consistent with a delay time distribution that follows a simple t {sup –1} power law for all times t > 40 Myr. However, mild tension is apparent between ground-based low-z surveys and space-based high-z surveys. In both CANDELS and the sister HST program CLASH (Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey with Hubble), we find a low rate of SNe Ia at z > 1. This could be a hint that prompt progenitors are in fact relatively rare, accounting for only 20% of all SN Ia explosions—though further analysis and larger samples will be needed to examine that suggestion.

  14. A study of various factors affecting the determination of inhibition efficiencies of organic amines by the corrosion rate method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eccles, John Rabbe

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the length of tine eaplcyed in asking the corrosion rate aeasureaents, b) the physlca1 oondltion of the sstal, and c) the nature of the acid a~loped fcr Che corroslre eolutlcno It vas found that sane sort of heat 'treating process vas necessary to insure... a hoscgenscus scrface on ths natal It vas also found that the corrosica rate vas independent of ties only so long as there vas an even type of corrosion ooeuring mer the entire surface of the natal. It vas found that Che acid used influenced Che c...

  15. Non Intrusive Measures for Determining the Minimum Field of View for User Search Task in 3D Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Non Intrusive Measures for Determining the Minimum Field of View for User Search Task in 3D Virtual on the use of several novel non- intrusive temporal and quantitative measures of visual attention, such as engines. The use of this virtual camera can show interesting results for non-invasive study

  16. Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Marcia Donna

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    feasible decline rate is between 5 percent and 10 percent. Further if a consistent production trend and with more than 2 years of production history are used to forecast, the EUR can be predicted to within plus/minus 10 percent and remaining reserves...

  17. Electronmagnetic induction probe calibration for electrical conductivity measurements and moisture content determination of Hanford high level waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittekind, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Logic of converting EMI measured electrical conductivity to moisture with expected uncertainty. Estimates from present knowledge, assumptions, and measured data. Archie`s Law has been used since the 1940`s to relate electrical conductivity in porous media to liquid volume fraction. Measured electrical conductivity to moisture content uses: Porosity, Interstitial liquid electrical conductivity, Solid particle density,Interstitial liquid density, and interstitial liquid water content. The uncertainty of assumed values is calculated to determine the final moisture wt.% result uncertainty.

  18. Formation resistivity measurements from within a cased well used to quantitatively determine the amount of oil and gas present

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to quantitatively determine the separate amounts of oil and gas in a geological formation adjacent to a cased well using measurements of formation resistivity. The steps include obtaining resistivity measurements from within a cased well of a given formation, obtaining the porosity, obtaining the resistivity of formation water present, computing the combined amounts of oil and gas present using Archie's Equations, determining the relative amounts of oil and gas present from measurements within a cased well, and then quantitatively determining the separate amounts of oil and gas present in the formation. Resistivity measurements are obtained from within the cased well by conducting A.C. current from within the cased well to a remote electrode at a frequency that is within the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 20 Hz.

  19. A measurement technique to determine the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Gallagher, Ian; Masi, Kathryn J.; Lee, Choonik; Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Ritter, Timothy; Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present and characterize a measurement technique to quantify the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter.Methods: This technique was developed as a quality assurance method for electromagnetic tracking systems used in a multi-institutional clinical hypofractionated prostate study. In this technique, the electromagnetic tracking system is calibrated to isocenter with the manufacturers recommended technique, using laser-based alignment. A test patient is created with a transponder at isocenter whose position is measured electromagnetically. Four portal images of the transponder are taken with collimator rotations of 45° 135°, 225°, and 315°, at each of four gantry angles (0°, 90°, 180°, 270°) using a 3 × 6 cm{sup 2} radiation field. In each image, the center of the copper-wrapped iron core of the transponder is determined. All measurements are made relative to this transponder position to remove gantry and imager sag effects. For each of the 16 images, the 50% collimation edges are identified and used to find a ray representing the rotational axis of each collimation edge. The 16 collimator rotation rays from four gantry angles pass through and bound the radiation isocenter volume. The center of the bounded region, relative to the transponder, is calculated and then transformed to tracking system coordinates using the transponder position, allowing the tracking system's calibration offset from radiation isocenter to be found. All image analysis and calculations are automated with inhouse software for user-independent accuracy. Three different tracking systems at two different sites were evaluated for this study.Results: The magnitude of the calibration offset was always less than the manufacturer's stated accuracy of 0.2 cm using their standard clinical calibration procedure, and ranged from 0.014 to 0.175 cm. On three systems in clinical use, the magnitude of the offset was found to be 0.053 ± 0.036, 0.121 ± 0.023, and 0.093 ± 0.013 cm.Conclusions: The method presented here provides an independent technique to verify the calibration of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter. The calibration accuracy of the system was better than the 0.2 cm accuracy stated by the manufacturer. However, it should not be assumed to be zero, especially for stereotactic radiation therapy treatments where planning target volume margins are very small.

  20. Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D{sub {alpha}} emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

  1. A PROPOSED METHOD FOR ESTIMATING FAILURE RATES OF DEGRADED PASSIVE COMPONENTS IN THE NRC SIGNIFICANCE DETERMINATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Ivans, William J.; Lowry, Peter P.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper outlines a methodology for estimation of the incremental core damage frequency associated with the degradation of passive components with a view to its application in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's significance determination process. The method involves use of simplified physics-based models of materials degradation and the probabilistic comparison of transient loads with deteriorating system capacities.

  2. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  3. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  4. In-situ Spectroscopic Reflectometry for Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Etch Rate Determination During Reactive Ion Etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terry, Fred L.

    for low-cost, high-speed film thickness measurement systems. We have used spectroscopic reflectometry (SR features in the fabrication process of microelectronic devices and circuitry. As the integrated circuits industry continues its progress toward higher performance circuitry, circuit designers are pushing

  5. On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

  6. Determining the mechanical constitutive properties of metals as a function of strain rate and temperature: A combined experimental and modeling approach; Progress Report for 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Robertson; A. Beaudoin; J. Lambros

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and validation of constitutive models for polycrystalline materials subjected to high strain rate loading over a range of temperatures are needed to predict the response of engineering materials to in-service type conditions (foreign object damage, high-strain rate forging, high-speed sheet forming, deformation behavior during forming, response to extreme conditions, etc.). To account accurately for the complex effects that can occur during extreme and variable loading conditions, requires significant and detailed computational and modeling efforts. These efforts must be closely coupled with precise and targeted experimental measurements that not only verify the predictions of the models, but also provide input about the fundamental processes responsible for the macroscopic response. Achieving this coupling between modeling and experimentation is the guiding principle of this program. Specifically, this program seeks to bridge the length scale between discrete dislocation interactions with grain boundaries and continuum models for polycrystalline plasticity. Achieving this goal requires incorporating these complex dislocation-interface interactions into the well-defined behavior of single crystals. Despite the widespread study of metal plasticity, this aspect is not well understood for simple loading conditions, let alone extreme ones. Our experimental approach includes determining the high-strain rate response as a function of strain and temperature with post-mortem characterization of the microstructure, quasi-static testing of pre-deformed material, and direct observation of the dislocation behavior during reloading by using the in situ transmission electron microscope deformation technique. These experiments will provide the basis for development and validation of physically-based constitutive models, which will include dislocation-grain boundary interactions for polycrystalline systems. One aspect of the program will involve the direct observation of specific mechanisms of micro-plasticity, as these will indicate the boundary value problem that should be addressed. This focus on the pre-yield region in the quasi-static effort (the elasto-plastic transition) is also a tractable one from an experimental and modeling viewpoint. In addition, our approach will minimize the need to fit model parameters to experimental data to obtain convergence. These are critical steps to reach the primary objective of simulating and modeling material performance under extreme loading conditions. To achieve these goals required assembling a multidisciplinary team, see Table 1, with key collaborators at the National Laboratories. One of the major issues for the team members was to learn about the expertise available and how to communicate across disciplines. The communication issue is a challenging one and is being addressed in part with weekly meetings in which the graduate students present lectures on the fundamentals of their respective areas to the entire group. Breakthroughs in science are presented but these, by necessity, assume a tutorial nature; examples of student led meetings can be found at our website http://hrdg.mse.uiuc.edu/. For example, interpreting electron micrographs and understanding what can be achieved by using electron microscopy is challenging for the modeling expert as is comprehending the input and limitations of crystal plasticity codes for an electron microscopist. Significant progress has been made at dissolving these barriers and the students are able to work across the disciplines.

  7. A study of various factors affecting the determination of inhibition efficiencies of organic amines by the corrosion rate method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eccles, John Rabbe

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sanded with 400 A grads carborundum paper and rinsed with redistilled vater. aration of Acids& a 3' hydrobromic acid solution. The material vas distilled from an all p~x system and the constant boiling acid collectec at 126o C. The distillate... sanded down to a smooth finish with QOOA grade carborundum paper. Naamurements were then made vith a miczometer to determine height, vidth, and length so that the apparent surface area could be calculated. The coupons vere cleaned vith powdered d1...

  8. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14C + n <--> 15C, the 14C(n, gamma)15C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Trache, L. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Banu, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Eremenko, V. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Goldberg, V. Z. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Lui, Y. W. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); McCleskey, E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Roeder, B. T. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Spiridon, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Carstoiu, F. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Burjan, V. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Thompson, I. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The 14C + n <--> 15C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the 15C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on 14C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the 15C SF via its mirror nucleus 15F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  9. Measurement of $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ decay rate and $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ parameters at KEDR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Basok, I Yu; Bedny, I V; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Pospelov, G E; Prisekin, V G; Rezanova, O L; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the inclusive photon spectrum based on a data sample collected at the $J/\\psi$ peak with the KEDR detector at the VEPP-4M $e^+e^-$ collider, we measured the rate of the radiative decay $J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}$ as well as $\\eta_{\\rm c}$ mass and width. Taking into account an asymmetric photon lineshape we obtained: $\\Gamma^0_{\\gamma\\eta_{\\rm c}}=2.98\\pm0.18 \\phantom{|}^{+0.15}_{-0.33}$ keV, $M_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 2983.5 \\pm 1.4 \\phantom{|}^{+1.6}_{-3.6}$ MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma_{\\eta_{\\rm c}} = 27.2 \\pm 3.1 \\phantom{|}^{+5.4}_{-2.6}$ MeV.

  10. Measurement of neutron spectra for determining dose equivalent rates at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanza, Bruce Jerome

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helium-3 Proportional Counter LET Proportional Counter. METHOD. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 14 . 15 17 21 25 Multispheres Helium-3 Proportional Counter LET Proportional Counter 25 . . . 30 32 VI CONCLUSIONS 39 REFERENCES. . 41 SUPPLEMENTAL... for performance of personnel neutron dosimeters is provided by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI76) and supplemented by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commision (NRC77). These requirements are outlined in Table 1. The dosimeters available for use...

  11. Measurement of neutron spectra for determining dose equivalent rates at the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanza, Bruce Jerome

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Modification of an Iterative C d f ~CP 1di N ~SI f ~M M I t I h DD, ~ I h ~ d S ~ f y I 6 y, New York, NY, HASL ? 311. Sc76 R. F. Schu macher, J. D. Randall, K. A. Hardy, JAR h, 1976, D t t f ~Stt I d ~EI Dt tb I I N Pl I h I' A&M N I S I C * R ~E C 11...' hl d, WA. PNL ? 2449 47 Sanna, R. S. , 1976, Modification of an Iterative Code for ~UE ld' N ~8 f ~M ~ 1 1 h D, E ~ 1 h d Safety Laboratory, New York, NY. HASL-311. Schumacher, R. F. , J. D. Rand all, K. A. Hardy, J. A. Bachman, 1976 D t ~ 1 tt...

  12. A Measurement of the Rate of type-Ia Supernovae at Redshift $z\\approx$ 0.1 from the First Season of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Dilday; R. Kessler; J. A. Frieman; J. Holtzman; J. Marriner; G. Miknaitis; R. C. Nichol; R. Romani; M. Sako; B. Bassett; A. Becker; D. Cinabro; F. DeJongh; D. L. Depoy; M. Doi; P. M. Garnavich; C. J. Hogan; S. Jha; K. Konishi; H. Lampeitl; J. L. Marshall; D. McGinnis; J. L. Prieto; A. G. Riess; M. W. Richmond; D. P. Schneider; M. Smith; N. Takanashi; K. Tokita; K. van der Heyden; N. Yasuda; C. Zheng; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; C. Choi; A. Crotts; J. Dembicky; M. Harvanek; M. Im; W. Ketzeback; S. J. Kleinman; J. Krzesi?ski; D. C. Long; E. Malanushenko; V. Malanushenko; R. J. McMillan; A. Nitta; K. Pan; G. Saurage; S. A. Snedden; S. Watters; J. C. Wheeler; D. York

    2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the rate of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the first of three seasons of data from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. For this measurement, we include 17 SNe Ia at redshift $z\\le0.12$. Assuming a flat cosmology with $\\Omega_m = 0.3=1-\\Omega_\\Lambda$, we find a volumetric SN Ia rate of $[2.93^{+0.17}_{-0.04}({\\rm systematic})^{+0.90}_{-0.71}({\\rm statistical})] \\times 10^{-5} {\\rm SNe} {\\rm Mpc}^{-3} h_{70}^3 {\\rm year}^{-1}$, at a volume-weighted mean redshift of 0.09. This result is consistent with previous measurements of the SN Ia rate in a similar redshift range. The systematic errors are well controlled, resulting in the most precise measurement of the SN Ia rate in this redshift range. We use a maximum likelihood method to fit SN rate models to the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data in combination with other rate measurements, thereby constraining models for the redshift-evolution of the SN Ia rate. Fitting the combined data to a simple power-law evolution of the volumetric SN Ia rate, $r_V \\propto (1+z)^{\\beta}$, we obtain a value of $\\beta = 1.5 \\pm 0.6$, i.e. the SN Ia rate is determined to be an increasing function of redshift at the $\\sim 2.5 \\sigma$ level. Fitting the results to a model in which the volumetric SN rate, $r_V=A\\rho(t)+B\\dot \\rho(t)$, where $\\rho(t)$ is the stellar mass density and $\\dot \\rho(t)$ is the star formation rate, we find $A = (2.8 \\pm 1.2) \\times 10^{-14} \\mathrm{SNe} \\mathrm{M}_{\\sun}^{-1} \\mathrm{year}^{-1}$, $B = (9.3^{+3.4}_{-3.1})\\times 10^{-4} \\mathrm{SNe} \\mathrm{M}_{\\sun}^{-1}$.

  13. Measurement of Activation Reaction Rate Distributions in a Lead Assembly Bombarded with 500-MeV Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takada, Hiroshi; Meigo, Shin-ichro; Sasa, Toshinobu; Tsujimoto, Kazufumi; Yasuda, Hideshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reaction rate distributions of various activation detectors such as the {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co, {sup 197}Au(n,2n){sup 196}Au, and {sup 197}Au(n,4n){sup 194}Au reactions were measured to study the production and the transport of spallation neutrons in a lead assembly bombarded with protons of 500 MeV. The measured data were analyzed with the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC/JAERI combined with the MCNP4A code using the nuclide production cross sections based on the JENDL Dosimetry File and those calculated with the ALICE-F code. It was found that the NMTC/JAERI-MCNP4A calculations agreed well with the experiments for the low-energy-threshold reaction of {sup nat}Ni(n,x){sup 58}Co. With the increase of threshold energy, however, the calculation underestimated the experiments, especially above 20 MeV. The reason for the disagreement can be attributed to the underestimation of the neutron yield in the tens of mega-electron-volt regions by the NMTC/JAERI code.

  14. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogler, Laura

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2{nu}{beta}{beta}). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO{sub 2} crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of #24;10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with {sup 130}Te and 2 with {sup 128}Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of #24;350 g {sup 130}Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life was measured to be T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = [9.81{+-} #6;0.96(stat){+-} 0.49(syst)]#2;x10{sup 20} y.

  15. Density Measurement Worksheet. Use this sheet to determine if your formula is consistent with the known densities of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    Density Measurement Worksheet. Use this sheet to determine if your formula is consistent with the known densities of various compounds. Formula : Formula weight : _______________ (FW) Unit Cell Volume :______________ (V) Probable Z value for your Laue symmetry (based on the unit cell: table 1) : ______ (Z) Formula V

  16. Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST): A Pilot Field Experiment for Inter-Calibration of Biogeochemistry and Nucleic Acid Measurements Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronk, Deborah

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geochemical Rate/RNA Integration Study (GRIST) project sought to correlate biogeochemical flux rates with measurements of gene expression and mRNA abundance to demonstrate the application of molecular approaches to estimate the presence and magnitude of a suite of biogeochemical processes. The study was headed by Lee Kerkhoff of Rutgers University. In this component of the GRIST study, we characterized ambient nutrient concentrations and measured uptake rates for dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN, ammonium, nitrate and nitrite) and dissolved organic nitrogen (urea and dissolved free amino acids) during two diel studies at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) on the New Jersey continental shelf.

  17. Automated measurement system employing eddy currents to adjust probe position and determine metal hardness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prince, J.M.; Dodson, M.G.; Lechelt, W.M.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring the hardness of cartridge cases employs an eddy current probe for inducing and sensing eddy currents in each cartridge case. A first component of the sensed signal is utilized in a closed loop system for accurately positioning the probe relative to the cartridge case both in the lift off direction and in the tangential direction, and a second component of the sensed signal is employed as a measure of the hardness. The positioning and measurement are carried out under closed loop microprocessor control facilitating hardness testing on a production line basis. 14 figs.

  18. Automated measurement system employing eddy currents to adjust probe position and determine metal hardness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prince, James M. (Kennewick, WA); Dodson, Michael G. (Richland, WA); Lechelt, Wayne M. (Benton City, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring the hardness of cartridge cases employs an eddy current probe for inducing and sensing eddy currents in each cartridge case. A first component of the sensed signal is utilized in a closed loop system for accurately positioning the probe relative to the cartridge case both in the lift off direction and in the tangential direction, and a second component of the sensed signal is employed as a measure of the hardness. The positioning and measurement are carried out under closed loop microprocessor control facilitating hardness testing on a production line basis.

  19. 2-D straw detectors with high rate capability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchinskiy, N A; Duginov, V N; Zyazyulya, F E; Korenchenko, A S; Kolesnikov, A O; Kravchuk, N P; Movchan, S A; Rudenko, A I; Smirnov, V S; Khomutov, N V; Chekhovsky, V A; Lobko, A S; Misevich, O V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurement of straw axial coordinate (along the anode wire) with accuracy compatible with straw radial coordinate determination by drift time measurement and increase of straw detector rate capability by using straw cathode readout instead of anode readout are presented.

  20. 2-D straw detectors with high rate capability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Kuchinskiy; V. A. Baranov; V. N. Duginov; F. E. Zyazyulya; A. S. Korenchenko; A. O. Kolesnikov; N. P. Kravchuk; S. A. Movchan; A. I. Rudenko; V. S. Smirnov; N. V. Khomutov; V. A. Chekhovsky; A. S. Lobko; O. V. Misevich

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurement of straw axial coordinate (along the anode wire) with accuracy compatible with straw radial coordinate determination by drift time measurement and increase of straw detector rate capability by using straw cathode readout instead of anode readout are presented.

  1. Intrametropolitan firm clustering : measurement, detection and determinants : case study in Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Xiongjiu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I attempt to construct a conceptual and computational framework for studying firm clustering at intrametropolitan level. Specifically, this framework includes methods of measuring general industry clustering, ...

  2. Maximal heart rates of 130140beats min-1 have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) (Brill, 1987;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    , skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154­191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell et

  3. Light transmittance in forest canopies determined using airborne laser altimetry and in-canopy quantum measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Light transmittance in forest canopies determined using airborne laser altimetry and in Abstract The vertical distribution of light transmittance was derived from field and laser altimeter-directed laser light than of direct solar radiation from typical elevation angles. Transects of light

  4. Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential Application to ARMTransesterification:Determining

  5. MEASURING GALAXY STAR FORMATION RATES FROM INTEGRATED PHOTOMETRY: INSIGHTS FROM COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF RESOLVED STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Benjamin D. [Institute d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Weisz, Daniel R.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Gil de Paz, Armando [CEI Campus Moncloa, UCM-UPM, Departamento de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Lee, Janice C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Boquien, Mederic [Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We use empirical star formation histories (SFHs), measured from Hubble-Space-Telescope-based resolved star color-magnitude diagrams, as input into population synthesis codes to model the broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 50 nearby dwarf galaxies (6.5 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 8.5, with metallicities {approx}10% solar). In the presence of realistic SFHs, we compare the modeled and observed SEDs from the ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared and assess the reliability of widely used UV-based star formation rate (SFR) indicators. In the FUV through i bands, we find that the observed and modeled SEDs are in excellent agreement. In the Spitzer 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m bands, we find that modeled SEDs systematically overpredict observed luminosities by up to {approx}0.2 dex, depending on treatment of the TP-AGB stars in the synthesis models. We assess the reliability of UV luminosity as a SFR indicator, in light of independently constrained SFHs. We find that fluctuations in the SFHs alone can cause factor of {approx}2 variations in the UV luminosities relative to the assumption of a constant SFH over the past 100 Myr. These variations are not strongly correlated with UV-optical colors, implying that correcting UV-based SFRs for the effects of realistic SFHs is difficult using only the broadband SED. Additionally, for this diverse sample of galaxies, we find that stars older than 100 Myr can contribute from <5%-100% of the present day UV luminosity, highlighting the challenges in defining a characteristic star formation timescale associated with UV emission. We do find a relationship between UV emission timescale and broadband UV-optical color, though it is different than predictions based on exponentially declining SFH models. Our findings have significant implications for the comparison of UV-based SFRs across low-metallicity populations with diverse SFHs.

  6. Determination of accuracy of measurements by NREL`s Scanning Hartmann Optical Test instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Wendelin, T.; Carasso, M.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL`s Scanning Hartmann Optical Test (SHOT) instrument is routinely used to characterize the surface of candidate dish concentration elements for solar thermal applications. An approach was devised to quantify the accuracy of these measurements. Excellent reproducibility was exhibited and high confidence established. The SHOT instrument was designed to allow the surface figure of large optical test articles to be accurately specified. Such test articles are nominally parabolic with an f/D ratio (in which f=focal length and D=aperture diameter) in the range of 0.5--1.0. Recent modifications of SHOT have extended the characterization range out to about f/D=3.0. A series of experiments was designed to investigate and quantify the uncertainties associated with optical characterization performed by SHOT. This approach involved making a series of measurements with an arbitrary test article positioned at a number of locations transverse to the optical axis of SHOT. 3 refs.

  7. Determination of accuracy of measurements by NREL's Scanning Hartmann Optical Test instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Wendelin, T.; Carasso, M.

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Scanning Hartmann Optical Test (SHOT) instrument is routinely used to characterize the surface of candidate dish concentration elements for solar thermal applications. An approach was devised to quantify the accuracy of these measurements. Excellent reproducibility was exhibited and high confidence established. The SHOT instrument was designed to allow the surface figure of large optical test articles to be accurately specified. Such test articles are nominally parabolic with an f/D ratio (in which f=focal length and D=aperture diameter) in the range of 0.5--1.0. Recent modifications of SHOT have extended the characterization range out to about f/D=3.0. A series of experiments was designed to investigate and quantify the uncertainties associated with optical characterization performed by SHOT. This approach involved making a series of measurements with an arbitrary test article positioned at a number of locations transverse to the optical axis of SHOT. 3 refs.

  8. Steam quality determination using pressure and temperature measurements in a venturi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Danny Leo

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEM gMZIY DETEBKBlATZCN USZNQ ZBESSURE AND TEMPERATURE NEASOREMENTS ZN A VENEUR DANNY ZZD O'NEIL Submitted to ths Graduate Collage of Texas A&M Vhiversity in partial fulfillment of the raquizaaaIts for the degree of Dacaabsr 1987 Ma...)or Subject: Petroleum Er~iug STEAM ~ DETERMINATION DSING ERESSURE AND TENPERAIURE MEASDRIMENTS IN A ~ DANNy IEO O' NEIL Ap~ as to style and content by: Richard A. Startzman (Chair of Comuttee) ~ R. Hall ~) W. . Von Gonten ( of Departamnt) Decmnber...

  9. The young's modulus of 1018 steel and 67061-T6 aluminum measured from quasi-static to elastic precursor strain-rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rae, Philip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lovato, Manuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption that Young's modulus is strain-rate invariant is tested for 6061-T6 aluminium alloy and 1018 steel over 10 decades of strain-rate. For the same billets of material, 3 quasi-static strain-rates are investigated with foil strain gauges at room temperature. The ultrasonic sound speeds are measured and used to calculate the moduli at approximately 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}. Finally, ID plate impact is used to generate an elastic pre-cursor in the alloys at a strain-rate of approximately 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} from which the longitudinal sound speed may be obtained. It is found that indeed the Young's modulus is strain-rate independent within the experimental accuracy.

  10. Measurement of the Inclusive Electron Spectrum in Charmless Semileptonic B Decays Near the Kinematic Endpoint and Determination of |Vub|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the inclusive electron spectrum in B {yields} X{sub u}e{nu} decays near the kinematic limit for B {yields} X{sub c}e{nu} transitions, using a sample of 88 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Partial branching fraction measurements are performed in five overlapping intervals of the electron momentum; for the interval of 2.0-2.6 GeV/c we obtain {Delta}{Beta}(B {yields} X{sub u}e{nu}) = (0.572 {+-} 0.041{sub stat} {+-} 0.065{sub syst}) x 10{sup -3}. Combining this result with shape function parameters extracted from BABAR measurements of moments of the inclusive photon spectrum in B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays and moments of the hadron mass and lepton energy spectra in B {yields} X{sub c}l{nu} decays we determine |V{sub ub}| = 4.44 {+-} 0.25{sub exp{sub -0.38}{sup +0.42}SF} {+-} 0.22{sub theory} x 10{sup -3}. Here the first error represents the combined statistical and systematic experimental uncertainties of the partial branching fraction measurement, the second error refers to the uncertainty of the determination of the shape function parameters, and the third error is due to theoretical uncertainties in the QCD calculations.

  11. Measurement of the electron attachment rates for SF6 and C7F14 at Te=0.2 eV in a magnetized Q machine plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Measurement of the electron attachment rates for SF6 and C7F14 at Te=0.2 eV in a magnetized Q December 2008 Electron attachment rates for SF6 and C7F14 were measured in a magnetized Q machine plasma for attachment to SF6 and C7F14 were 7.6 2.0 10-8 and 2.2 0.9 10-7 cm3 s-1 , respectively. © 2008 American

  12. Magnetic dipole transition rates from measured lifetimes of levels of Be-like and B-like argon ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Church, David A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calculations of the 2s2p P-3(1)-P-3(2) M1 transition rate of Ar XV, but are in reasonable agreement with calculations for the 2p P-2(1/2)-P-2(3/2) M1 rate of Ar XIV. [S1050-2947(98)07108-X]...

  13. Determination of lithium ion--rare gas potentials from total cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polak-Dingels, P.; Rajan, M.S.; Gislason, E.A.

    1982-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Total cross sections have been measured for Li/sup +/ ions scattered by He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe in the range Etheta/sub R/ = 5--1000 eV deg. Here E is the laboratory energy of the Li/sup +/ beam, and theta/sub R/ is the resolution angle of the apparatus. The cross sections have been inverted to obtain accurate estimates of the potential V(R) over a wide range of R including the attractive well region. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental work on these systems.

  14. Spatially resolved measurements of kinematics and flow-induced birefringence in worm-like micellar solutions undergoing high rate deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ober, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worm-like micellar solutions are model non-Newtonian systems on account of their well understood linear viscoelastic behavior. Their high deformation rate, non-linear rheological response, however, remains inadequately ...

  15. Determination of the weak charge of the proton through parity violating asymmetry measurements in the elastic e+p scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subedi, Adesh [Mississippi State University

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Qweak experiment has taken data to make a 2.5% measurement of parity violating elastic e+p asymmetry in the four momentum transfer region of 0.0250 (GeV/c)^2. This asymmetry is proportional to the weak charge of the proton, which is related to the weak mixing angle, sin^2(theta_W). The final Qweak measurement will provide the most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle below the Z^0 pole to test the Standard Model prediction. A description of the experimental apparatus is provided in this dissertation. The experiment was carried out using a longitudinally polarized electron beam of up to 180 microampere on a 34.5 cm long unpolarized liquid hydrogen target. The Qweak target is not only the world's highest cryogenic target ever built for a parity experiment but also is the least noisy target. This dissertation provides a detailed description of this target and presents a thorough analysis of the target performance. Statistical analysis of Run 1 data, collected between Feb - May 2011, is done to extract a blinded parity violating asymmetry of size -299.7 ± 13.4 (stat.) ± 17.2 (syst.) ± 68 (blinding) parts-per-billion. This resulted in a preliminary proton's weak charge of value 0.0865 ± 0.0085, a 9% measurement. Based on this blinded asymmetry, the weak mixing angle was determined to be sin^2(theta_W) = 0.23429 ± 0.00211.

  16. Serial blood pressure measurements and exogenous creatinine clearance rates in partially nephrectomized dogs: the effect of dietary sodium intake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Deborah Susan

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    13 Arterial Blood Pressure Studies. . . 14 Exogenous Creatinine Clearance. 2g Serum Creatinine and Urea Nitrogen Concentrations. . Urinalysis and Urine Bacteriologic Studies. . . . . . . . . Other Laboratory Tests. 32 36 40 Pathologic Studies.... . 40 IV DISCUSSION. 49 Blood Pressure. 49 Glomerular Filtration Rates. Urinalysis and Urine Bacteriologic Studies. . Serum Urea Nitrogen and Serum Creatinine. . . . 60 62 65 Hematologic Studies. . . Necropsy 66 66 vi I Chapter V...

  17. Magnetic dipole transition rates from measured lifetimes of levels of Be-like and B-like argon ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehs, D. P.; Church, David A.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    level is rapidly depopulated by E1 transitions to the ground level. The 2s2p 3P2 level also decays to the lower 3P levels by E2 transi- tions, but at negligible rates for Ar XV, and by an M2 transition to the 2s2 1S0 ground level with a calculated...

  18. A EX: Data and Sensitivity Analysis Title: The relationship between alternative measures of social spending and poverty rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galis, Frietson

    of social spending and poverty rates Koen Caminada & Kees Goudswaard DATA Our research hypothesis is that the level of public social expenditure and poverty across countries are negatively correlated, while private social expenditure may have a non-negative anti-poverty effect. To analyze this hypothesis we include

  19. Direct measurement of isothermal flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and high strain rates with application to Ta and Ta-W alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.; Isaacs, J.B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is developed for measuring the flow stress of metals over a broad range of strains, strain rates, and temperatures, in uniaxial compression. It utilizes a recent, enhanced version of the classical (Kolsky) compression split Hopkinson bar, in which a sample is subjected to a single stress pulse of a predefined profile, and then recovered without being subjected to any other additional loading. For the present application, the UCSD`s split Hopkinson bar is further enhanced by the addition of a new mechanism by means of which the incident and transmission bars of the split Hopkinson construction are moved into a constant-temperature furnace containing the sample, and gently brought into contact with the sample, as the elastic stress pulse reaches and loads the sample. Using several samples of the same material and testing them at the same strain rate and temperature, but different incremental strains, an accurate estimate of the material`s isothermal flow stress can be obtained. Additionally, the modified Hopkinson technique allows the direct measurement of the change in the (high strain-rate) flow stress with a change of the strain rate, while the strain and temperature are kept constant, i.e., the strain rate can be increased or decreased during the high strain-rate test. The technique is applied to obtain both quasi-isothermal and adiabatic flow stresses of tantalum (Ta) and a tantalum-tungsten (Ta-W) alloy at elevated temperatures. These experimental results show the flow stress of these materials to be controlled by a simple long-range plastic-strain-dependent barrier, and a short-range thermally activated Peierls mechanism. For tantalum, a model which fits the experimental data over strains from a few to over 100%, strain rates from quasi-static to 40,000/s, and temperatures from {minus}200 to 1,000 C, is presented and discussed.

  20. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  1. The Relationship Between Principal Ethnicity and Other Chosen Demographics and Student Achievement as Measured by the Texas Education Agency's Accountability Rating System in Predominantly Hispanic Public High Schools in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tresslar, Christopher A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and student achievement as measured by the Texas Education Agency?s (TEA?s) accountability rating system in predominantly Hispanic public high schools in Texas. The study sought to identify causal factors in relation to campus accountability rating...

  2. Rates & Repayment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and...

  3. Measurement of the production rate of the charm jet recoiling against the W boson using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate of associated production of the W boson with the charm jet in the proton and anti-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement has direct sensitivity to the strange quark content inside the proton. A direct measurement of the momentum distribution of the strange quark inside the proton is essential for a reliable calculation of new physics signal as well as the background processes at the collider experiments. The identification of events containing a W boson and a charm jet is based on the leptonic decays of the W boson together with a tagging technique for the charm jet identification based on the semileptonic decay of the charm quark into the muon. The charm jet recoiling against the W boson must have a minimum transverse momentum of 20 GeV and an absolute value of pseudorapidity less than 2.5. This measurement utilizes the data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Collider. The measured rate of the charm jet production in association with the W boson in the inclusive jet production with the W boson is 0.074 {+-} 0.023, which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at the leading order in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  4. Inspection and Gamma-Ray Dose Rate Measurements of the Annulus of the VSC-17 Concrete Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. L. Winston

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The air cooling annulus of the Ventilated Storage Cask (VSC)-17 spent fuel storage cask was inspected using a Toshiba 7 mm (1/4”) CCD video camera. The dose rates observed in the annular space were measured to provide a reference for the activity to which the camera(s) being tested were being exposed. No gross degradation, pitting, or general corrosion was observed.

  5. Direct Determination of Equilibrium Potentials for Hydrogen Oxidation/Production by Open Circuit Potential Measurements in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined include triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, together with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as ?0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium is shown to form homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials are used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. This method requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor an estimate for the SHE potential and thus allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media.

  6. Determination of Prognostic Factors for Vaginal Mucosal Toxicity Associated With Intravaginal High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy in Patients With Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahng, Agnes Y.; Dagan, Avner [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, Lilie L., E-mail: lin@xrt.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the patient- and treatment-related prognostic factors associated with vaginal toxicity in patients who received intravaginal high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy alone as adjuvant treatment for endometrial cancer. Secondary goals of this study included a quantitative assessment of optimal dilator use frequency and a crude assessment of clinical predictors for compliant dilator use. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 100 patients with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer who underwent total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymph node dissection and adjuvant intravaginal brachytherapy between 1995 and 2009 at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania. The most common treatment regimen used was 21 Gy in three fractions (71 patients). Symptoms of vaginal mucosal toxicity were taken from the history and physical exams noted in the patients' charts and were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v. 4.02. Results: The incidence of Grade 1 or asymptomatic vaginal toxicity was 33% and Grade 2-3 or symptomatic vaginal toxicity was 14%. Multivariate analysis of age, active length, and dilator use two to three times a week revealed odds ratios of 0.93 (p = 0.013), 3.96 (p = 0.008), and 0.17 (p = 0.032) respectively. Conclusion: Increasing age, vaginal dilator use of at least two to three times a week, and shorter active length were found to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of vaginal stenosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to validate our findings.

  7. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

  8. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III. Results for the 2002-2007 data-taking period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdurashitov, J. N.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gorbachev, V. V.; Gurkina, P. P.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Khairnasov, N. G.; Knodel, T. V.; Mirmov, I. N.; Shikhin, A. A.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Yants, V. E.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Bowles, T. J.; Elliott, S. R.; Teasdale, W. A.; Nico, J. S.; Cleveland, B. T.; Wilkerson, J. F. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, RU-117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Stop 8461, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4{sub -3.0}{sup +3.1} (stat) {sub -2.8}{sup +2.6} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1{+-}3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87{+-}0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63 SNU to 66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be {phi}{sub pp}{sup {center_dot}}=(6.0{+-}0.8)x10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  9. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III: Results for the 2002--2007 data-taking period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAGE Collaboration; J. N. Abdurashitov; V. N. Gavrin; V. V. Gorbachev; P. P. Gurkina; T. V. Ibragimova; A. V. Kalikhov; N. G. Khairnasov; T. V. Knodel; I. N. Mirmov; A. A. Shikhin; E. P. Veretenkin; V. E. Yants; G. T. Zatsepin; T. J. Bowles; S. R. Elliott; W. A. Teasdale; J. S. Nico; B. T. Cleveland; J. F. Wilkerson

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in Dec. 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. We give here the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in Dec. 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through Dec. 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4 (+3.1)(-3.0) (stat) (+2.6)(-2.8) (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 +/- 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced 37Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior 51Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87 +/- 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63-66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be (6.0 +/- 0.8) x 10^(10)/(cm^2 s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  10. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  11. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  12. Conservation of Mass 25 on the flow rates? b) Determine the amounts of the solutes in each of the tanks as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chicone, Carmen

    to the tank at a variable flow rate, and there is also a drain pipe with a computer controlled variable flow to let water drain from the tank at a rate proportional to the volume of the tank. The program allows a proportional controller. It is a feed-back controller where the feed-back is proportional to the volume

  13. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Stevenson, Andrew W. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton, Victoria 3169 (Australia); Hall, Christopher J. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Lye, Jessica E. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Nordstroem, Terese [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm SE-100 44 (Sweden); Midgley, Stewart M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lewis, Robert A. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation curve on the IMBL using a simple experimental method, namely, HVL measurements. The HVL measurements strongly supports the x-ray beam spectrum, which in turn has a profound effect on x-ray dosimetry.

  14. Measurement Versus Predictions of Rotordynamic Coefficients and Leakage Rates for a Hole-Pattern Gas Seal with Negative Preswirl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Philip David

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) (rpm) (-) 0.5 70 70 70 0.6 70 70 70 0.7 70 70 70 0.5 70 70 70 0.6 70 70 70 0.7 70 70 70 0.5 70 70 70 0.6 70 70 70 0.7 70 70 70 Inlet Pressure (bar) 0.2 10200 15350 20200 Negative High 0.125 in Hole Diameter 0.130 in Hole Depth.... At the inlet to the test seals, the circumferential velocity of the air is measured and used to calculate fluid pre-swirl. The motor used to control the speed of the rotor is a 93 kW (125 hp) AC electric motor. The AC motor is coupled to a Lufkin 6...

  15. Method Evaluation And Field Sample Measurements For The Rate Of Movement Of The Oxidation Front In Saltstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Kaplan, D. I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Langton, C. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Stefanko, D. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Spencer, W. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Hatfield, A. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Arai, Y. [Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to develop and evaluate a series of methods and validate their capability to measure differences in oxidized versus reduced saltstone. Validated methods were then applied to samples cured under field conditions to simulate Performance Assessment (PA) needs for the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). Four analytical approaches were evaluated using laboratory-cured saltstone samples. These methods were X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), chemical redox indicators, and thin-section leaching methods. XAS and thin-section leaching methods were validated as viable methods for studying oxidation movement in saltstone. Each method used samples that were spiked with chromium (Cr) as a tracer for oxidation of the saltstone. The two methods were subsequently applied to field-cured samples containing chromium to characterize the oxidation state of chromium as a function of distance from the exposed air/cementitious material surface.

  16. Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simplified motional heating rate measurements of trapped ions R. J. Epstein,* S. Seidelin, D. Leibfried, J. H. Wesenberg, J. J. Bollinger, J. M. Amini, R. B. Blakestad, J. Britton, J. P. Home, W. M have measured motional heating rates of trapped atomic ions, a factor that can influence multi

  17. False negative rate and other performance measures of a sponge-wipe surface sampling method for low contaminant concentrations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einfeld, Wayne; Krauter, Paula A.; Boucher, Raymond M.; Tezak, Mathew; Amidan, Brett G. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA); Piepel, Greg F. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces is known to vary due to sampling methodology, techniques, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. A series of tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge-wipe method. Specific factors evaluated were the effects of contaminant concentrations and surface materials on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD) - and the uncertainties of these quantities. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show a roughly linear dependence of surface roughness on RE, where the smoothest surfaces have the highest mean RE values. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3 x 10{sup -3} to 1.86 CFU/cm{sup 2}). The FNR data were consistent with RE data, showing a trend of smoother surfaces resulting in higher REs and lower FNRs. Stainless steel generally had the lowest mean FNR (0.123) and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD{sub 90} varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm{sup 2} on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. Selecting sampling locations on the basis of surface roughness and using roughness to interpret spore recovery data can improve sampling. Further, FNR values, calculated as a function of concentration and surface material, can be used pre-sampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance, and post-sampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions.

  18. Direct estimation of decoherence rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimír Bužek; Peter Rapcan; Jochen Rau; Mario Ziman

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The decoherence rate is a nonlinear channel parameter that describes quantitatively the decay of the off-diagonal elements of a density operator in the decoherence basis. We address the question of how to experimentally access such a nonlinear parameter directly without the need of complete process tomography. In particular, we design a simple experiment working with two copies of the channel, in which the registered mean value of a two-valued measurement directly determines the value of the average decoherence rate. No prior knowledge of the decoherence basis is required.

  19. Determination and distribution of left ventricular size as measured by noncontrast CT in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Bild DE, Bluemke DA,filtration rate and computed tomography based leftof 4 th quartile of computed tomography derived left

  20. A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building industry determine the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides a single, consistent source of current data for DOE and private-sector energy audit and simulation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures to the database by uploading retrofit project and measure cost data. It is routinely updated to add new measures

  1. ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARM Data Discovery

  2. Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance and economic on system performance, reliability, and overall considerations (rate of return on investment economics have impeded widespread development and [ROI]), six organic fluids were identified to deployment of organic Rankine-cycle power... included with the GC unit inte grates the peaks and produc s a report consisting of retention time, peak area, and area percent. The detector's analog output is connected via an A/D converter to a Perkin Elmer (PE) Sigma 15 chromatography data station...

  3. Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    carry-over between consecutive extractions with the same stir21 bar. Pesticide quantification in water1 Title :1 Stir bar sorptive extraction coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the2 determination of pesticides in water samples: method validation and measurement uncertainty3

  4. An electrical analog method for the compensation of indicator passage effects in pressure measurement and the determination of its limitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, David Oi

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterist'cs of Dynamic Ppessure Measure- r:ants ir. an Internal Combustion Engine, and a Method of Com- pen ation for the Errors in the Measuring System, " M. S. Thesis, The A6 M Col!ege of Texas, August, 1963. Ktnsler, L. E. , and Frey, A, R...

  5. Determining neutrino mass hierarchy by precise measurements of two delta m**2 in electron-neutrino and muon-neutrino disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minakata, H.; /Tokyo Metropolitan U.; Nunokawa, H.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, the authors discuss the possibility of determining the neutrino mass hierarchy by comparing the two effective atmospheric neutrino mass squared differences measured, respectively, in electron, and in muon neutrino disappearance oscillation experiments. if the former, is larger (smaller) than the latter, the mass hierarchy is of normal (inverted) type. They consider two very high precision (a few per mil) measurements of such mass squared differences by the phase II of the T2K (Tokai-to-Kamioka) experiment and by the novel Moessbauer enhanced resonant {bar {nu}}{sub e} absorption technique. Under optimistic assumptions for the systematic errors of both measurements, they determine the region of sensitivities where the mass hierarchy can be distinguished. Due to the tight space limitation, they present only the general idea and show a few most important plots.

  6. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. (New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to above-average'' radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject's presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  7. A technique for determining the diffusion patterns of 1, 2-dibromo-3-chloropropane under field conditions and the resulting isodose contours of two different application rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walla, Walter J

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SCIViCE May 1970 i~fajor Suhj eo+?H. ant Patholo~ A TECHNIQUE FOR DET&i~L~&lZ'lG TPIE DIFFUSION PATTERNS OF 1, 2-DI&HOMO-3-CYIOROPROPA'lE V'ADER FIELD CONDITIOllS AND THE PZ&ULTINQ ISODOSE CORI'OURS OF Zl'0 D~&UT APPLICATION RATES A Thesis... By MALTER U. NALLA Approved as to style and content by: Chafrman oF Committee ~Ed f D part t Member n Member May 1970 Member AfrSTPMT A Technique. for Deteriiring the Dif izion ', at'terna 0" 1, 2-Di'oro;co-3-o2J oropropano Unc. cr Fle'ci Condit...

  8. NCAR's contribution to Improved tropospheric delay measurement and precision orbit determination for satellite ocean altimetry. 1 NCAR's contribution to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurement techniques strongly relay on Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. GPS receivers are used, Oklahoma. Lamont is in the middle of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed (CART) of the Atmospheric Radiative

  9. Uncertainty Analysis for Photovoltaic Degradation Rates (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Hansen, C.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dependable and predictable energy production is the key to the long-term success of the PV industry. PV systems show over the lifetime of their exposure a gradual decline that depends on many different factors such as module technology, module type, mounting configuration, climate etc. When degradation rates are determined from continuous data the statistical uncertainty is easily calculated from the regression coefficients. However, total uncertainty that includes measurement uncertainty and instrumentation drift is far more difficult to determine. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was chosen to investigate a comprehensive uncertainty analysis. The most important effect for degradation rates is to avoid instrumentation that changes over time in the field. For instance, a drifting irradiance sensor, which can be achieved through regular calibration, can lead to a substantially erroneous degradation rates. However, the accuracy of the irradiance sensor has negligible impact on degradation rate uncertainty emphasizing that precision (relative accuracy) is more important than absolute accuracy.

  10. An ASAE/CSAE Meeting Presentation Paper Number: 044177 Comparison of Direct vs. Indirect Ventilation Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    Ventilation Rate Determination for Manure Belt Laying Hen Houses Hong Li Hongwei Xin Yi Liang Graduate. Direct measurement of ventilation rate in livestock housing can be a formidable task due a potentially viable, more flexible alternative to estimating ventilation rate. The reliability of CO2 balance

  11. FINAL REPORT DETERMINATION OF THE PROCESSING RATE OF RPP WTP HLW SIMULANTS USING A DURAMELTER J 1000 VITRIFICATION SYSTEM VSL-00R2590-2 REV 0 8/21/00

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; PEREZ-CARDENAS F; PEGG IL

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides data, analysis, and conclusions from a series of tests that were conducted at the Vitreous State Laboratory of The Catholic University of America (VSL) to determine the melter processing rates that are achievable with RPP-WTP HLW simulants. The principal findings were presented earlier in a summary report (VSL-00R2S90-l) but the present report provides additional details. One of the most critical pieces of information in determining the required size of the RPP-WTP HLW melter is the specific glass production rate in terms of the mass of glass that can be produced per unit area of melt surface per unit time. The specific glass production rate together with the waste loading (essentially, the ratio of waste-in to glass-out, which is determined from glass formulation activities) determines the melt area that is needed to achieve a given waste processing rate with due allowance for system availability. As a consequence of the limited amount of relevant information, there exists, for good reasons, a significant disparity between design-base specific glass production rates for the RPP-WTP LAW and HLW conceptual designs (1.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d and 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d, respectively); furthermore, small-scale melter tests with HLW simulants that were conducted during Part A indicated typical processing rates with bubbling of around 2.0 MT/m{sup 2}/d. This range translates into more than a factor of five variation in the resultant surface area of the HLW melter, which is clearly not without significant consequence. It is clear that an undersized melter is undesirable in that it will not be able to support the required waste processing rates. It is less obvious that there are potential disadvantages associated with an oversized melter, over and above the increased capital costs. A melt surface that is consistently underutilized will have poor cold cap coverage, which will result in increased volatilization from the melt (which is generally undesirable) and increased plenum temperatures due to increased thermal radiation from the melt surface (which mayor may not be desirable but the flexibility to choose may be lost). Increased volatilization is an issue both in terms of the increased challenge to the off-gas system as well as for the ability to effectively close the recycle loops for volatile species that must be immobilized in the glass product, most notably technetium and cesium. For these reasons, improved information is needed on the specific glass production rates of RPP-WTP HLW streams in DuraMelterJ systems over a range of operating conditions. Unlike the RPP-WTP LAW program, for which a pilot melter system to provide large-scale throughout information is already in operation, there is no comparable HLW activity; the results of the present study are therefore especially important. This information will reduce project risk by reducing the uncertainty associated with the amount of conservatism that mayor may not be associated with the baseline RPP-WTP HLW melter sizing decision. After the submission of the first Test Plan for this work, the RPP-WTP requested revisions to include tests to determine the processing rates that are achievable without bubbling, which was driven by the potential advantages of omitting bubblers from the HLW melter design in terms of reduced maintenance. A further objective of this effort became the determination of whether the basis of design processing rate could be achieved without bubbling. Ideally, processing rate tests would be conducted on a full-scale RPP-WTP melter system with actual HLW materials, but that is clearly unrealistic during Part B1. As a practical compromise the processing rate determinations were made with HL W simulants on a DuraMelter J system at as close to full scale as possible and the DM 1000 system at VSL was selected for that purpose. That system has a melt surface area of 1.2 m{sup 2}, which corresponds to about one-third scale based on the specific glass processing rate of 0.4 MT/m{sup 2}/d assumed in the RPP-WTP HLW conceptual design, but would correspon

  12. A Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas and Determination of the Proton's Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling gP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Thomas Ira

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the hydrogen gas of Z > 1 impurities COMET COMpressor forhydrogen gas using a model 75-32 Whatman Figure 5.11: CHUPS schematic diagram, including the compressors,

  13. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors for Measuring Transient Detonation/Shock Behavior;Time-of-Arrival Detection and Waveform Determination.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Marcus Alexander; Willis, Michael David; Covert, Timothy T.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The miniaturization of explosive components has driven the need for a corresponding miniaturization of the current diagnostic techniques available to measure the explosive phenomena. Laser interferometry and the use of spectrally coated optical windows have proven to be an essential interrogation technique to acquire particle velocity time history data in one- dimensional gas gun and relatively large-scale explosive experiments. A new diagnostic technique described herein allows for experimental measurement of apparent particle velocity time histories in microscale explosive configurations and can be applied to shocks/non-shocks in inert materials. The diagnostic, Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors (EFOS), has been tested in challenging microscopic experimental configurations that give confidence in the technique's ability to measure the apparent particle velocity time histories of an explosive with pressure outputs in the tenths of kilobars to several kilobars. Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors also allow for several measurements to be acquired in a single experiment because they are microscopic, thus reducing the number of experiments necessary. The future of EFOS technology will focus on further miniaturization, material selection appropriate for the operating pressure regime, and extensive hydrocode and optical analysis to transform apparent particle velocity time histories into true particle velocity time histories as well as the more meaningful pressure time histories.

  14. Development of a measurement system able to determine the ow velocity eld on models of hydraulic turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diggavi, Suhas

    . Antoine Bombenger Probing strategy in a Kaplan Turbine Such a probe typically has a spherical head with 5 turbines Christian Landry Motivations & Objectives The project was driven by the need to improve the measurement of velocity elds and pressures in a hydraulic turbine. The development of a new probing system

  15. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at ?s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as of its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. Included in the combinations are the results of the decay modes H ? ??, ZZ?, WW?, Z?, bb ?, ?? and ??, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb?1 at ?s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb?1 at ?s = 8 ??TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18 ± 0.10 ± 0.07±0.08, where the first error reflects the statistical uncertainty and 0.07 the second and third errors reflect respectively the experimental and theoretical systematic uncertainties. Strong evidence is found for the vector boson fusion process with a signifi...

  16. Measurement Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Catch Composition - Pelagic codes M Male F Female I Indeterminate U Unknown (not inspected) #12;Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Photos Comment Length 1 Version 1.2 6/2011 HookNo. Species name

  17. Determination of the Strange-Quark Density of the Proton from ATLAS Measurements of the W ? ? ? and Z ? ? ? Cross Sections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A QCD analysis is reported of ATLAS data on inclusive W± and Z boson production in pp collisions at the LHC, jointly with ep deep-inelastic scattering data from HERA. The ATLAS data exhibit sensitivity to the light quark sea composition and magnitude at Bjorken x~0.01. Specifically, the data support the hypothesis of a symmetric composition of the light quark sea at low x. The ratio of the strange-to-down sea quark distributions is determined to be 1.00+0.25-0.28 at absolute four-momentum transfer squared Q²=1.9 GeV² and x=0.023.

  18. Relating Aerosol Absorption due to Soot, Organic Carbon, and Dust to Emission Sources Determined from In-situ Chemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazorla, Alberto; Bahadur, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cahill, John F.; Chand, Duli; Schmid, Beat; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies, and using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such an estimation. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) are used to develop a new methodology for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns are combined in order to validate the methodology for the estimation of aerosol composition using spectral optical properties. Results indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear. On the other hand, the knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  19. FORMALISM FOR INCLUSION OF MEASURED REACTION CROSS SECTIONS IN STELLAR RATES INCLUDING UNCERTAINTIES AND ITS APPLICATION TO NEUTRON CAPTURE IN THE s-PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauscher, Thomas [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A general formalism to include experimental reaction cross sections into calculations of stellar rates is presented. It also allows us to assess the maximally possible reduction of uncertainties in the stellar rates by experiments. As an example for the application of the procedure, stellar neutron capture reactivities from KADoNiS v0.3 are revised and the remaining uncertainties shown. Many of the uncertainties in the stellar rates are larger than those obtained experimentally. This has important consequences for s-process models and the interpretation of meteoritic data because it allows the rates of some reactions to vary within a larger range than previously assumed.

  20. 7, 29612989, 2007 Predicting arene rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    software or computing power. Measured gas-phase rate coefficients for the reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons

  1. Determination of the spherically symmetric potential components for Li sup + --N sub 2 and Li sup + --CO from total cross section measurements (USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gislason, E.A.; Polak-Dingels, P.; Rajan, M.S. (Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Box 4348, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Total cross sections have been measured for Li{sup +} ions scattered by N{sub 2} and CO in the range {ital E}{Theta}{sub {ital R}}=5--1000 eV deg. Here {ital E} is the lab energy of the Li{sup +} beam, and {Theta}{sub {ital R}} is the resolution angle of the apparatus. From the data the spherically symmetric parts of the intermolecular potentials have been determined over a wide range of Li{sup +}-molecule distances including the attractive well region. The results are compared with other theoretical and experimental work on these systems.

  2. Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

  3. Measurement of the Decay B to Omega L Nu with the BaBar Detector and Determination of V_Ub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, Martin; /Colorado U.; ,

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the branching fraction of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decay B {yields} {omega}{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where {ell} is either an electron or a muon, with the charged B meson recoiling against a tag B meson decaying in the charmed semileptonic modes B {yields} D{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}} or B {yields} D*{ell}{nu}{sub {nu}}. The measurement is based on a dataset of 426.1 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at a CM energy of 10.58 GeV recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We also calculate the relevant B {yields} {omega} hadronic form factors to determine the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub ub}|.

  4. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (CPV-7), 4-6 April 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada. The CPV community has agreed to have both indoor and outdoor power ratings at the module level. The indoor rating provides a repeatable measure of module performance as it leaves the factory line while the outdoor rating provides a measure of true performance under real world conditions. The challenge with an outdoor rating is that the spectrum, temperature, wind speed, etc are constantly in flux and therefore the resulting power rating varies from day to day and month to month. This work examines different methodologies for determining the outdoor power rating with the goal of minimizing variation even if data are collected under changing meteorological conditions.

  5. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing by generating constant current flow in portion of casing and using at least two voltage measurement electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from within the cased well are described. The multiple electrode apparatus has a minimum of two spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage a first portion of the interior of the cased well and that provide at least first voltage information. Current control means are used to control the magnitude of any selected current that flows along a second portion of the interior of the casing to be equal to a predetermined selected constant. The first portion of the interior of the cased well is spaced apart from the second portion of the interior of the cased well. The first voltage information and the predetermined selected constant value of any selected current flowing along the casing are used in part to determine a magnitude related to the formation resistivity adjacent to the first portion of the interior of the cased well. Methods and apparatus having a plurality of voltage measurement electrodes are disclosed that provide voltage related information in the presence of constant currents flowing along the casing which is used to provide formation resistivity.

  6. Evaluation of two-stage system for neutron measurement aiming at increase in count rate at Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Fusion Neutronics Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinohara, K., E-mail: shinohara.koji@jaea.go.jp; Ochiai, K.; Sukegawa, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Ishii, K.; Kitajima, S. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Baba, M. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Sasao, M. [Organization for Research Initiatives and Development, Doshisha University, Kyoto 602-8580 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to increase the count rate capability of a neutron detection system as a whole, we propose a multi-stage neutron detection system. Experiments to test the effectiveness of this concept were carried out on Fusion Neutronics Source. Comparing four configurations of alignment, it was found that the influence of an anterior stage on a posterior stage was negligible for the pulse height distribution. The two-stage system using 25 mm thickness scintillator was about 1.65 times the count rate capability of a single detector system for d-D neutrons and was about 1.8 times the count rate capability for d-T neutrons. The results suggested that the concept of a multi-stage detection system will work in practice.

  7. Intercombination and forbidden transition rates in C-and N-like ions ,,O2 measured at a heavy-ion storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantler, Christopher T.

    ¿ ... measured at a heavy-ion storage ring E. Tra¨bert,1, * A. G. Calamai,2 J. D. Gillaspy,3 G. Gwinner,4 X-dipole forbidden transitions between the levels of the ground complex in C-like ions of O and F and in N-like ions of S have been measured optically at a heavy-ion storage ring. The lifetime results, 1.250 13 ms for the 2s2

  8. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates and Rate Schedules **Effective October 1, 2014** FY 2014 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2013 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2012 Rates and Rate Schedules FY...

  9. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component for 2011 Firm Power Rates 2015 Rates and Rate Schedule - Current * 2010 Rates and Rate Schedule 2009 Rates and...

  10. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2015 Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2014 Rates BCP Annual Rate Process Central Arizona Project Transmission Rate Process...

  11. Analysis of Beta-Decay Rates for Ag108, Ba133, Eu152, Eu154, Kr85, Ra226 And Sr90, Measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt from 1990 to 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Sturrock; Ephraim Fischbach; Jere Jenkins

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of measurements of the beta-decay rates of Ag108, Ba133, Eu152, Eu154, Kr85, Ra226, and Sr90 acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt from 1990 through 1995. Although the decay rates vary over a range of 165 to 1 and the measured detector current varies over a range of 19 to 1, the detrended and normalized current measurements exhibit a sinusoidal annual variation with amplitude in the small range 0.068% to 0.088% (mean 0.081%, standard deviation 0.0072%, an 11{\\sigma} rejection of the zero-amplitude hypothesis) and phase-of-maximum in the small range 0.062 to 0.083 (January 23 to January 30). In comparing these results with those of other related experiments that yield different results, it may be significant that this experiment, at a standards laboratory, seems to be unique in using a 4{\\pi} detector. These results are compatible with a solar influence, and appear not to be compatible with an experimental or environmental influence. It is possible that Ba133 measurements are subject also to a non-solar (possibly cosmic) influence.

  12. Fusion integral experiments and analysis and the determination of design safety factors - II: Application to the prediction uncertainty of tritium production rate from the U.S. DOE/JAERI collaborative program on fusion blanket neutronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z.; Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many fusion integral experiments were performed during the last decade within a well-established collaboration between the United States and Japan on fusion breeder neutronics. The tritium production rate (TPR) has the prime focus among other reactions. The experimental and calculational data sets of local TPR in each experiment were interpolated to give an estimate of the prediction uncertainty, and the standard deviation, of the line-integrated TPR, a quantity that is closely related to the total breeding ratio (TBR) in the test assembly. A novel methodology developed during the collaboration was applied to arrive at estimates to design safety factors that fusion blanket designers can use to ensure that the achievable TBR in a blanket does not fall below a minimum required value. Associated with each safety factor is a confidence level, designers may choose to have, that calculated TPR will not exceed the actual measured value. Higher confidence levels require larger safety factors. Tabular and graphical forms for these factors are given, as derived independently for TPR from Li-6(T{sub 6}), Li-7 (T{sub 7}), and natural lithium (T{sub n}). Furthermore, distinction was made between safety factors based on the technique applied, discrete ordinates methods, and Monte Carlo methods in the U.S. calculations, JAERI`s calculations, and in both calculations considered simultaneously. The derived factors are applicable to TPR in Li{sub 2}O breeding material, 48 refs., 51 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. SU-E-T-223: Investigation of the Accuracy of Two-Dimensional Dose Distributions Measurement From High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Ir-192 Source Using Multiple-Diode-Array Detector (MapCheck2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taguenang, J; De La Fuente, T Herman; Ahmad, S; Ali, I [Oklahoma Univ. Health Science Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric accuracy of multiple-diode-array detector (Mapcheck2) for high-dose-rate brachytherapy Ir-192 source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 were validated with EBT2 Gafchromic film measurement and AAPM task-group- 43 (TG-43) modeling. Methods: 2D-dose distributions from Ir-192 source were measured with MapCheck2 and EBT2-films. MapCheck2 response was corrected for effects: directional dependence, diode and phantom heterogeneity. Optical density growth of the film was controlled by synchronized scanning of the film exposed to Ir-192 and calibration films exposed to 6 MV linac beams. Similarly, MapCheck2 response was calibrated to dose using 6 MV beams. An empirical model was developed for the dose distributions measured with Mapcheck2 that considered directional, diode and phantom heterogeneity corrections. The dose deposited in solid-state-detectors was modeled using a cavity theory model for the diode. This model was then validated with measurements using EBT2-films and calculations with TG-43. Results: The response of MapCheck2 has been corrected for different effects including: (a) directional dependence of 0–20% over angular range 0o–90o, (b) phantom heterogeneity (3%) and (c) diode heterogeneity (9%). The corrected dose distributions measured with MapCheck2 agreed well with the measured dose distributions from EBT2-film and with calculations using TG-43 within 5% over a wide range of dose levels and rates. The advantages of MapCheck2 include less noisy, linear and stable response compared with film. The response of MapCheck2 exposed to 192Ir-source showed no energy dependence similar to its response to MV energy beam. Detection spatial-resolution of individual diodes was 0.8×0.8 mm2, however, 2DMapCheck2 resolution is limited by distance between diodes (7.07 mm). Conclusion: The dose distribution measured with MapCheck2 agreed well within 5% with that measured using EBT2-films; and calculations with TG- 43. Considering correction of artifacts, MapCheck2 provides a compact, practical and accurate dosimetric tool for measurement of 2D-dose distributions for brachytherapy Ir-192.

  14. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  15. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Rates Loveland Area Projects Firm Power Rates Open Access Transmission Tariff Rates Chart of Loveland Area Projects Historical Transmission Rates...

  16. Asset Prices and Exchange Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops a simple two-country, two-good model, in which the real exchange rate, stock and bond prices are jointly determined. The model predicts that ...

  17. Asset Prices and Exchange Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper develops a simple two-country, two-good model, in which the real exchange rate, stock and bond prices are jointly determined. The model predicts that stock market prices are correlated ...

  18. Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, J.C.

    climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

  19. Evaluation of beta partical densitometry for determination of self-absorption factors in gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity measurements on air particulate filter samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breida, Margaret A

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha and beta particles emitted from radioactive material collected on an air filter may be significantly attenuated by the mass (thickness) of collected dust. In this study, we determined the mass or thickness of the simulated dust deposit...

  20. Evaluation of beta partical densitometry for determination of self-absorption factors in gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity measurements on air particulate filter samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breida, Margaret A

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alpha and beta particles emitted from radioactive material collected on an air filter may be significantly attenuated by the mass (thickness) of collected dust. In this study, we determined the mass or thickness of the simulated dust deposit...

  1. 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

  2. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study. Final report, 1 March, 1990--May 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. [New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo, NY (United States). Dept. of Environmental Medicine; Stark, A.; Ju, C. [New York State Dept. of Health, Albany, NY (United States). Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of estimating cumulative exposure of individuals to low concentrations of radon by measuring the amount of Pb-A-10 in their skeletons. This report presents progress to date establishing the validity of an vivo technique to measure skeletal burdens of Pb-210, accumulated from exposure to radon and radon progeny. With the skeletal content of Pb--210 and a model for Pb metabolism, cumulative exposure to radon and its short-lived daughters (radon/daughters) may be calculated for use in deriving a dose-response relationship between lung cancer and exposure to radon/daughters. Data are presented for 29 subjects exposed to ``above-average`` radon concentrations in their homes, showing the correlation between measured Pb--210 burdens, and measured pCi/l and WLM exposure estimates. Their results are compared to measurements of a population of 24 subject`s presumed exposed to average concentrations. Measurements of a Pennsylvania family exposed for a year in a home with an extremely high radon content are also presented. Update of results of an ongoing study of the biological half-time of Pb--210 in man involving measurements, of a retired radiation worker with a 40 year old skeletal burden of Pb-210.

  3. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  4. Efficient determination of vehicle emission factors by fuel use category using on-road measurements: downward trends on Los Angeles freight corridor I-710

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudda, N.; Fruin, S.; Delfino, R. J; Sioutas, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turnover on Drayage Truck Emissions at the Port of Oakland.heavy duty diesel trucks emissions were measured either at aexpected NO x emission from trucks may affect attainability

  5. ASHRAE's Guideline 14-2002 for Measurement of Energy and Demand Savings: How to Determine What Was Really Saved by the Retrofit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed standards for the laboratory measurement of temperature, pressure, airflow, liquid flow, power, thermal energy, and the testing standards for chillers, fans, pumps, motors, boilers, and furnaces. Guideline 14 also relied on the previous work... Guideline 14-2002 to fill a need for a standard set of energy (and demand) savings calculation procedures. Guideline 14-2002 is intended to be a guideline that provides a minimum acceptable level of performance in the measurement of energy and demand...

  6. Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius parameters and comparison of predicted and measured migration data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    Migration of antimony from PET trays into food simulant and food: determination of Arrhenius) Migration experiments with small sheets cut out from ovenable PET trays were performed in two-sided contact) was estimated to be 62% in the PET sample under study. Apparent diffusion coefficients of Sb in PET trays were

  7. Radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, John (Livermore, CA); Collins, Leland F. (Pleasanton, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Ripon, CA); Micali, James V. (Dublin, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation beam calorimetric power measurement system for measuring the average power of a beam such as a laser beam, including a calorimeter configured to operate over a wide range of coolant flow rates and being cooled by continuously flowing coolant for absorbing light from a laser beam to convert the laser beam energy into heat. The system further includes a flow meter for measuring the coolant flow in the calorimeter and a pair of thermistors for measuring the temperature difference between the coolant inputs and outputs to the calorimeter. The system also includes a microprocessor for processing the measured coolant flow rate and the measured temperature difference to determine the average power of the laser beam.

  8. LONG-TERM GOAL The long-term goal of this research project is to determine if energy reflectance measurements can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voss, Susan E.

    presented here is to characterize the energy reflectance of normal- hearing, healthy newborn babies. Keefe month past the age of two years. Other work focuses on energy reflectance in NICU babies (e.g. Shahnaz al. 2008). Here, we present measurements of energy reflectance on normal-hearing, healthy newborn

  9. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield for extending by 103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions. Sci. Instrum. 85, 063502 (2014); 10.1063/1.4880203 D 3 He -proton emission imaging for inertial

  10. DOE Guidance on the Statutory Definition of Energy/Water Conservation Measures (ECMs), and Determining Life-Cycle Cost-Effectiveness for ESPCs with Multiple or Single ECMs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides guidance on the statutory definition of "energy conservation measure" (ECM) for the purpose of an energy savings performance contract (ESPC), including clarification that multiple ECMs under the same ESPC may be "bundled" when evaluating life-cycle cost-effectiveness. It also clarifies that an ESPC may include, or be limited to, a single ECM applied across multiple federal buildings and facilities.

  11. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and ?R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J., E-mail: mrosenbe@mit.edu; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Hohenberger, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Yeamans, C. B.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ?1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120?keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF.

  12. New determination of double-beta-decay properties in 48Ca: high-precision Q-value measurement and improved nuclear matrix element calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Kwiatkowski; T. Brunner; J. D. Holt; A. Chaudhuri; U. Chowdhury; M. Eibach; J. Engel; A. T. Gallant; A. Grossheim; M. Horoi; A. Lennarz; T. D. Macdonald; M. R. Pearson; B. E. Schultz; M. C. Simon; R. A. Senkov; V. V. Simon; K. Zuber; J. Dilling

    2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a direct measurement of the Q-value of the neutrinoless double-beta-decay candidate 48Ca at the TITAN Penning-trap mass spectrometer, with the result that Q = 4267.98(32) keV. We measured the masses of both the mother and daughter nuclides, and in the latter case found a 1 keV deviation from the literature value. In addition to the Q-value, we also present results of a new calculation of the neutrinoless double-beta-decay nuclear matrix element of 48Ca. Using diagrammatic many-body perturbation theory to second order to account for physics outside the valence space, we constructed an effective shell-model double-beta-decay operator, which increased the nuclear matrix element by about 75% compared with that produced by the bare operator. The new Q-value and matrix element strengthen the case for a 48Ca double-beta-decay experiment.

  13. The Interest Rate Conundrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flows and US Interest Rates,” NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

  14. Thermodynamic Development of Corrosion Rate Modeling in Iron Phosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesinger, Mark; Vienna, John; Bresee, Jim; Brow, Richard

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A two year research program investigated links between the thermodynamic properties of phosphate glasses and their corrosion rates in different solutions. Glasses in the Na{sub 2}O-CaO-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Na{sub 2}O-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-PO{sub 5} systems were prepared and characterized. These glasses and then exposed in bulk and powder form to acid (0.1M HCl), basic (0.1M KOH) and neutral (deionized water) solutions at varying exposure times and temperatures. Analysis of the solution and the glass after exposure determined the rate and type of corrosion that occurred. Simultaneously, efforts were made to determine the thermodynamic properties of solid iron phosphate compounds. This included measurement of low Â?temperature (5Â?300 K) heat capacities, measured at Brigham Young University; the attempted use of a Parr calorimeter to measure ambient Â?temperature enthalpies of formation; and attempted measurement of Â?temperature heat capacities. Only the first of the three tasks was successfully accomplished. In lieu of experimental measurement of enthalpies of formation, first-principles calculation of enthalpies of formation was performed at Missouri S&T; these results will be used in subsequent modeling efforts.

  15. Development of Methodology for Determination of Energy efficient and Cost effective Measures in Existing Single-family Residential Buildings using Easy-to-use Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.H; Haberl, J.S.

    by estimating the 1 Corresponding author. Tel.: +82-10-4642-6290; Email address: keehankim@outlook.com (K.H. Kim) ESL-PA-14-07-02 2 energy savings and cost effectiveness of each measure [2... of the potential ECMs, which includes a calculation of annual energy savings and pay-back period of the potential ECMs. At first, in order to model a standard house that is compliant with the 2009 IECC using the DDP, the performance path alternative provided...

  16. Precision measurement of the electric quadrupole moment of 31Al and determination of the effective proton charge in the sd-shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. De Rydt; G. Neyens; K. Asahi; D. L. Balabanski; J. M. Daugas; M. Depuydt; L. Gaudefroy; S. Grevy; Y. Hasama; Y. Ichikawa; P. Morel; T. Nagatomo; T. Otsuka; L. Perrot; K. Shimada; C. Stodel; J. C. Thomas; H. Ueno; Y. Utsuno; W. Vanderheijden; . Vermeulen; P. Vingerhoets; A. Yoshimi

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    he electric quadrupole coupling constant of the 31Al ground state is measured to be nu_Q = |eQV_{zz}/h| = 2196(21)kHz using two different beta-NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) techniques. For the first time, a direct comparison is made between the continuous rf technique and the adiabatic fast passage method. The obtained coupling constants of both methods are in excellent agreement with each other and a precise value for the quadrupole moment of 31Al has been deduced: |Q(31Al)| = 134.0(16) mb. Comparison of this value with large-scale shell-model calculations in the sd and sdpf valence spaces suggests that the 31Al ground state is dominated by normal sd-shell configurations with a possible small contribution of intruder states. The obtained value for |Q(31Al)| and a compilation of measured quadrupole moments of odd-Z even-N isotopes in comparison with shell-model calculations shows that the proton effective charge e_p=1.1 e provides a much better description of the nuclear properties in the sd-shell than the adopted value e_p=1.3 e.

  17. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  18. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and volume flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining volume flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the volume flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  19. A study of the rate of dissolution of rock salt in drilling mud flowing under down hole conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Jackie Lee

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , at this and higher temperatures, the flow rate was determined from the total volume displaced and the total run time, and the salt dissolution rate was determined primarily from the weight loss measurements. MATERIALS The mud used in the tests was supplied..., the transfer of a full reservoir of mud was timed to estimate the flowrate for some of the tests at 375 F [191 Cj. Again, the polymer was tested only at room temperature. 16 DATA The rate of salt dissolution per unit area of salt surface (R...

  20. A study of the volatile matter of coal as a function of the heating rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanes, E.; Wilhite, D.; Riley, J.M. Jr. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the volatile matter yields as a function of the heating rate was conducted. A suite of 21 coal and coke samples varying in rank from anthracitic to lignitic and heating rates from 10{degrees}C/min to about 450{degrees}C/min were used in the study. Heating rates up to 60{degrees}C per minute, which are typically used in ASTM Test Method 5142 (instrumental Proximate Analysis), were achieved in a macro thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) system. Heating rates of 50-200{degrees}C/min were obtained in a micro TGA system. All measurements were made in a nitrogen atmosphere. The results of the study illustrate the dependence of the volatile matter yield on the heating rate. For most coals and cokes the optimum heating rate for determining volatile matter values that agree with those obtained by ASTM Method D 3175 appears to be in the 100-150{degrees}C range.

  1. On the Effect of Ramp Rate in Damage Accumulation of the CPV Die-Attach: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosco, N. S.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is commonly understood that thermal cycling at high temperature ramp rates may activate unrepresentative failure mechanisms. Increasing the temperature ramp rate of thermal cycling, however, could dramatically reduce the test time required to achieve an equivalent amount of thermal fatigue damage, thereby reducing overall test time. Therefore, the effect of temperature ramp rate on physical damage in the CPV die-attach is investigated. Finite Element Model (FEM) simulations of thermal fatigue and thermal cycling experiments are made to determine if the amount of damage calculated results in a corresponding amount of physical damage measured to the die-attach for a variety of fast temperature ramp rates. Preliminary experimental results are in good agreement with simulations and reinforce the potential of increasing temperature ramp rates. Characterization of the microstructure and resulting fatigue crack in the die-attach suggest a similar failure mechanism across all ramp rates tested.

  2. Measurement of the B????l?? and B???(')l?? branching fractions, the B????l?? and B???l?? form-factor shapes, and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Lynch, H. L.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a study of the exclusive charmless semileptonic decays, B???(')l?? and B????l??, undertaken with approximately 464×10? BB¯¯ pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. The analysis uses events in which the signal B decays are reconstructed with a loose neutrino reconstruction technique. We obtain partial branching fractions for B???l?? and B????l?? decays in three and 12 bins of q², respectively, from which we extract the f+(q²) form-factor shapes and the total branching fractions B(B???l??)=(0.36±0.05stat±0.04syst)×10?? and B(B????l??)=(1.42±0.05stat±0.07syst)×10??. We also measure B(B+??'l??)=(0.24±0.08stat±0.03syst)×10??. We obtain values for the magnitude of the CKM matrix element |Vub| using three different QCD calculations.

  3. A Robust Determination of the Time Delay in 0957+561A,B and a Measurement of the Global Value of Hubble's Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundic, T; Colley, W N; Gott, J R; Rhoads, J E; Wang, Y; Bergeron, L E; Gloria, K A; Long, D C; Malhotra, S; Wambsganss, J; Kundic, Tomislav; Turner, Edwin L.; Colley, Wesley N.; Rhoads, James E.; Wang, Yun; Bergeron, Louis E.; Gloria, Karen A.; Long, Daniel C.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Wambsganss, Joachim

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometric monitoring of the gravitational lens system 0957+561A,B in the g and r bands with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope during 1996 shows a sharp g band event in the trailing (B) image light curve at the precise time predicted from the observation of an event during 1995 in the leading (A) image with a delay of 415 days. This success confirms the "short delay," and the lack of any feature at a delay near 540 days rejects the "long delay" for this system, resolving a long-standing controversy. A series of statistical analyses of our light curve data yield a best fit delay of 417 +/- 3 days (95% confidence interval). Recent improvements in the modeling of the lens system (consisting of a galaxy and cluster) allow us to derive a value of the global (at z = 0.36) value of Hubble's constant H_0 using Refsdal's method, a simple and direct distance determination based on securely understood physics and geometry. The result is H_0 = 63 +/- 12 km/s/Mpc (for Omega = 1) where this 95% confidence...

  4. A Robust Determination of the Time Delay in 0957+561A,B and a Measurement of the Global Value of Hubble's Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomislav Kundic; Edwin L. Turner; Wesley N. Colley; J. Richard Gott, III; James E. Rhoads; Yun Wang; Louis E. Bergeron; Karen A. Gloria; Daniel C. Long; Sangeeta Malhotra; Joachim Wambsganss

    1997-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometric monitoring of the gravitational lens system 0957+561A,B in the g and r bands with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope during 1996 shows a sharp g band event in the trailing (B) image light curve at the precise time predicted from the observation of an event during 1995 in the leading (A) image with a delay of 415 days. This success confirms the "short delay," and the lack of any feature at a delay near 540 days rejects the "long delay" for this system, resolving a long-standing controversy. A series of statistical analyses of our light curve data yield a best fit delay of 417 +/- 3 days (95% confidence interval). Recent improvements in the modeling of the lens system (consisting of a galaxy and cluster) allow us to derive a value of the global (at z = 0.36) value of Hubble's constant H_0 using Refsdal's method, a simple and direct distance determination based on securely understood physics and geometry. The result is H_0 = 63 +/- 12 km/s/Mpc (for Omega = 1) where this 95% confidence interval is dominated by remaining lens model uncertainties.

  5. Remote sensing of tropical tropopause layer radiation balance using A-train measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    the relevant horizontal and vertical information for assessing TTL solar heating and infrared cooling rates; accepted 8 August 2008; published 12 November 2008. [1] Determining the level of zero net radiative heating the distribution of cloud properties relevant to heating rate analysis. The ability of CloudSat measurements

  6. BCP Annual Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 BCP Annual Rate Process (FY 2016 Base Charge & Rate) Informal Process Rate Activity Schedule (doc) Informal Customer Meeting Thursday March 11, 2015 at 10:30 A.M. Conf Rms 3&4...

  7. CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-012114: Categorical Exclusion Determination Test Procedures for Measuring Energy Efficiency of Consumer Products and Industrial Equipment...

  8. Research Rate Liaison Rate for outside academic &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    as of 12/9/13 External Rate Spark Plasma Sintering ) Spark Plasma Sintering > 24 hrs 2 8 Vacuum Hot Press

  9. 2012 Transmission Rate Schedules

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014 Transmission, Ancillary, and Control Area Service Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions (FY 2014-2015) October 2013 United States Department of Energy...

  10. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10012014 - 03312015 Mid-Year Change (if applicable) 10012014 - 09302015 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 70,091,227 CV-F13...

  11. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

  12. 2004 Rate Adjustments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Transmission and Ancillary Services Federal Register Notice -- Rate Order WAPA-141: Notice of Extension of Formula Rates for Transmission and Ancillary Services If you have any...

  13. WAPA-169 Rate Order

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    69 Rate Order Western is proposing adjustments to the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects firm power rate and the Colorado River Storage Project Transmission and ancillary...

  14. Multiple System Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DSW Multiple System Transmission Rate Process Federal Register Notice Withdrawing Rate Proposal (PDF) Formal Process Extension Federal Register Notice (PDF) Customer Savisngs Under...

  15. CX-010776: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Primary Coolant Leak Rate Determination System Equipment Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.2 Date: 07/24/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Nuclear Energy

  16. Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and an improved determination of light parton distribution functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive pp to WX production at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. With a sample of more than twenty million W to mu nu events, the statistical precision is greatly improved in comparison to previous measurements. These new results provide additional constraints on the parton distribution functions of the proton in the range of the Bjorken scaling variable x from 10E-3 to 10E-1. These measurements and the recent CMS measurement of associated W + charm production are used together with the cross sections for inclusive deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA in a next-to-leading-order QCD analysis. The determination of the valence quark distributions is improved, and the strange-quark distribution is probed directly through the leading-order process g + s to W + c in proton-proton collisions at the LHC.

  17. DOE Issues Final Rule for Alternative Efficiency Determination...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Rating Methods DOE Issues Final Rule for Alternative Efficiency Determination Methods and Alternative Rating Methods December 26, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Department of Energy...

  18. Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emery, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

  19. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  20. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  1. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  2. Rapid and Precise Determination of Cellular Amino Acid Flux Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    ," max speed, 8x. 10. Inject. 11. Wait 0.1 min. 12. Valve bypass. · G1314A Variable Wavelength Detector, manually. Some immediate drawbacks to offline derivatization are sources of error due to operator skill-derivatization using injector pro- gramming of the HPLC's autosampler, and short, highly effi- cient columns generate

  3. Quantifying the flux of CaCO3 and organic carbon from the surface ocean using in situ measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantifying the flux of CaCO3 and organic carbon from the surface ocean using in situ measurements attention on the importance of understanding the rates and mechanisms of CaCO3 formation so that changes can be monitored and feedbacks predicted. We present a method for determining the rate of CaCO3 production using

  4. The Escape Rate of a Molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Knauf; Markus Krapf

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show existence and give an implicit formula for the escape rate of the n-centre problem of celestial mechanics for high energies. Furthermore we give precise computable estimates of this rate. This exponential decay rate plays an important role especially in semiclassical scattering theory of n-atomic molecules. Our result shows that the diameter of a molecule is measurable in a (classical) high-energy scattering experiment.

  5. It’s not just What you say; it’s How you say it. But is it what you Rate, or how you Act? A Behavioural Measure of Feeling of Another’s Knowing. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Louise

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the paralinguistic features of speech are consciously processed, as measured by which company the listener invest their play money in, or if they are only brought to consciousness by reflection, measured by a short likert-scale. Due to lack of power and insufficient...

  6. Measuring the CKM Angle $\\gamma$ with $B^{\\pm} \\to DK^{\\pm}$ Decays at LHCb and a Determination of the $D \\to K\\pi\\pi\\pi$ Coherence Factor at CLEO-c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, A; Wilkinson, G

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an uncertainty of $\\sim 30^{\\circ}$ from current direct measurements, the CKM angle $\\gamma$ is the least experimentally constrained CP-violating parameter of the Standard Model. Consequently, a precision determination of this phase is one of the most crucial goals of flavour physics in the coming decade. A series of highly promising strategies have been proposed that exploit the interference effects present within $B^{\\pm} \\to DK^{\\pm}$ decays. Since the LHCb experiment at CERN is set to become the most copious source of $B$ hadrons in the world, it is in a unique position to utilise such strategies. This thesis investigates LHCb's capabilities to make a precision measurement of $\\gamma$ with the exclusive decays $B^{\\pm} \\to D(KK\\pi\\pi)K^{\\pm}$ and $B^{\\pm} \\to D(K\\pi\\pi\\pi)K^{\\pm}$.\\\\ LHCb simulation studies have been performed in order to develop efficient reconstruction algorithms for the above two modes. Signal and background yields are estimated for a nominal year of LHCb data (equivalent to an in...

  7. Measurements of inclusive $W+$jets production rates as a function of jet transverse momentum in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$~TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter describes measurements of inclusive W({yields} e{nu}) + n jet cross sections (n = 1-4), presented as total inclusive cross sections and differentially in the n{sup th} jet transverse momentum. The measurements are made using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, and achieve considerably smaller uncertainties on W+jets production cross sections than previous measurements. The measurements are compared to next-to-leading order perturbative QCD (pQCD) calculations in the n = 1-3 jet multiplicity bins and to leading order pQCD calculations in the 4-jet bin. The measurements are generally in agreement with pQCD predictions, although certain regions of phase space are identified where the calculations could be improved.

  8. Measurement of the B0 to pi l nu and B+ to pi0 l nu Branching Fractions and Determination of |Vub| in Upsilon(4S) to BBbar Events Tagged by a Fully Reconstructed B Meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report preliminary measurements of the charmless exclusive semileptonic branching fractions of the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu} decays, based on 211 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the BABAR detector. In events in which the decay of one B meson to a hadronic final state is fully reconstructed, the semileptonic decay of the second B meson is identified by the detection of a charged lepton and a pion. They measure the partial branching fractions for B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu} and B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu} in three regions of the invariant mass squared of the lepton pair, and they obtain the total branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.14 {+-} 0.27{sub stat} {+-} 0.17{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.86 {+-} 0.22{sub stat} {+-} 0.11{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}. Using isospin symmetry, they measure the combined total branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}) = (1.28 {+-} 0.23{sub stat} {+-} 0.16{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4}. Theoretical predictions of the form-factor are used to determine the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub ub}| = (3.7 {+-} 0.3{sub stat} {+-} 0.2{sub syst{sub -0.5FF}{sup +0.8}}) x 10{sup -3}, where the last uncertainty is due to the form-factor normalization.

  9. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, W Brent

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

  10. Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 FLARE GAS FLOW RATE MEASUREMENT "Accurate measurement of the very low flow rates which are normally present is very difficult" 0, p 15-8). "It is generally considered too...-04-91 Proceedings from the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 to calibration conditions. Turndown is 40:1 and pressure loss is negligible. APPLICATION FLOW RATE The mass flow meter described has been applied to a wide...

  11. Measurement-Measurement-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jaehoon "Paul"

    Internet Measurement- System A Measurement- System B Control System GPS Satellite GPS Satellite GPS Receiver GPS Receiver 2) measurement 3) data1) command Methodology for One-way IP Performance Measurement This paper proposes a methodology for measurement of one-way IP performance metrics such as one-way delay

  12. Rate Schedule CPP-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CPP-2 (Supersedes Schedule CPP-1) UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION CENTRAL VALLEY PROJECT SCHEDULE OF RATES FOR CUSTOM PRODUCT POWER Effective:...

  13. LCC Guidance Rates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

  14. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  15. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

  16. A Precise Calculation of Delayed Coincidence Selection Efficiency and Accidental Coincidence Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jingyi Yu; Zhe Wang; Shaomin Chen

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is proposed to address issues on the precise background evaluation due to the complex data structure defined by the delayed coincidence method, which is widely used in reactor electron-antineutrino oscillation experiments. In this model, the effects from the muon veto, uncorrelated random background, coincident signal and background are all studied with the analytical solutions, simplifying the estimation of the systematic uncertainties of signal efficiency and accidental background rate determined by the unstable single rate. The result of calculation is validated numerically with a number of simulation studies and is also applied and validated in the recent Daya Bay hydrogen-capture based oscillation measurement.

  17. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  18. Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loughry, Jim

    Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate Measure your pulse in each of the following conditions (in in the class. You may use Table 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this, if you wish. Once you have all of the class averages for each measurement. You may use Graph 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this

  19. Heart rate variability in mice with coronary heart disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapanta, Laurence (Laurence F.)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the beat-to-beat fluctuation of the heart rate, is a non-invasive test that measures the autonomic regulation of the heart. Assessment of HRV has been shown to predict the risk of mortality ...

  20. How predictable : modeling rates of change in individuals and populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumme, Katherine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methodologies to measure rates of change in individual human behavior, and to capture statistical regularities in change at the population level, in three pieces: i) a model of individual rate of change ...

  1. Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPowerRates

  2. Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project OfficePower Electronics Power Electronics PowerPowerRates

  3. The 23Na(?,p) 26Mg reaction rate at astrophysically relevant energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Howard; M. Munch; H. O. U. Fynbo; O. S. Kirsebom; K. L. Laursen; C. Aa. Diget; N. J. Hubbard

    2015-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of 26 Al in massive stars is sensitive to the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg cross section. Recent experimental data suggest the currently recommended cross sections are underestimated by a factor of 40. We present here differential cross sections for the 23 Na(a,p) 26 Mg reaction measured in the energy range E c.m. = 1.7 - 2.5 MeV. Concurrent measurements of Rutherford scattering provide absolute normalisations which are independent of variations in target properties. Angular distributions were measured for both p 0 and p 1 permitting the determination of total cross sections. The results show no significant deviation from the statistical model calculations upon which the recommended rates are based. We therefore retain the previous recommendation without the increase in cross section and resulting stellar reaction rates of a factor of 40, impacting on the 26 Al yield from massive stars by more than a factor of three.

  4. Luminosity Measurement at COMPASS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Höppner for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of absolutely normalized cross sections for high-energy scattering processes is an important reference for theoretical models. This paper discusses the first determination of the luminosity for data of the COMPASS experiment, which is the basis for such measurements. The resulting normalization is validated via the determination of the structure function $F_2$ from COMPASS data, which is compared to literature.

  5. Experimental Determination of ETS Particle Deposition in a Low Ventilation Room

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, M.; Nematollahi, M.; Sextro, R.G.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism for tobacco smoke particles. We report measurements of deposition rates of environmental tobacco smoke particles in a room-size chamber. The deposition rates were determined from the changes in measured concentrations by correcting for the effects of coagulation and ventilation. The air flow turbulent intensity parameter was determined independently by measuring the air velocities in the chamber. Particles with diameters smaller than 0.25 {micro}m coagulate to form larger particles of sizes between 0.25-0.5 {micro}m. The effect of coagulation on the particles larger than 0.5 {micro}m was found to be negligible. Comparison between our measurements and calculations using Crump and Seinfeld's theory showed smaller measured deposition rates for particles from 0.1 to 0.3 {micro}m in diameter and greater measured deposition rates for particles larger than 0.6 {micro}m at three mixing intensities. Comparison of Nazaroff and Cass model for natural convection flow showed good agreement with the measurements for particles larger than 0.1 {micro}m in diameter, however, measured deposition rates exceeded model prediction by a factor of approximately four for particles in size range 0.05-0.1 {micro}m diameter. These results were used to predict deposition of sidestream smoke particles on interior surfaces. Calculations predict that in 10 hours after smoking one cigarette, 22% of total sidestream particles by mass will deposit on interior surfaces at 0.03 air change per hour (ACH), 6% will deposit at 0.5 ACH, and 3% will deposit at 1 ACH.

  6. 2010FirmRateAdj

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 Firm Power Rates & Rate Schedules The Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin Program--Eastern Division: Firm Electric Service Pick Sloan Missouri River -Eastern Division Rates Effective...

  7. First observation of the Bs->K+K- decay mode, and measurement of the B0 and Bs mesons decay-rates into two-body charmless final states at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonelli, Diego; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors searched for decays of the type B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} (where h, h{prime} = K or {pi}) in a sample corresponding to 180 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. A total signal of approximately 900 events was reconstructed, and the relative branching fractions ({Beta}) of each decay mode were determined with a likelihood fit.

  8. Convergence of speech rate in conversation predicts cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    refer to this measure as positive person perception (PPP).results incorporating PPP, separate analyses using warmthPerson Perception Higher PPP ratings were marginally

  9. alters heart rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares, skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154-191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell...

  10. abnormal heart rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares, skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154-191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell...

  11. ambulatory heart rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares, skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154-191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell...

  12. angiography heart rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have been measured in yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares, skipjack tuna (Katsuwonus pelamis) have maximum heart rates of 154-191 beats min-1 (Brill, 1987; Farrell...

  13. <RatesMiscInfo>

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates & Repayment Services Power Reporting MISCELLANEOUS REPORTING Power Supply Report October 2014 (59kb pdf) September 2014 (58kb pdf) August 2014 (47kb pdf) July 2014 (57kb pdf)...

  14. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulation and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 4.56 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  15. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Frequency Response DollarsKW-month 3.98 4.17 CV-RFS4 Spinning Reserve The formula rate for spinning reserve service is the price consistent with the California...

  16. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study Documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Documentation for Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) shows the details of the calculation of the proposed rates. It contains the source data, the calculation, and the results. Section 1 contains an overview of the information used and developed in the various models used in the rate development process. Section 2 contains the documentation of the Rate Analysis Model (RAM2007). The RAM2007 is a group of computer applications that performs most of the computations that determine BPA's proposed rates. The output tables of RAM2007 show the source data, calculations (in sequence), and the results (rate charges) of the rate development process. Section 3 provides documentation of revenue forecasts for the 3-year rate test period FY 2007 through FY 2009 at both current and proposed rates and at current rates for the period immediately preceding the rate test period. Section 4 includes supporting data for rate calculations not performed in RAM2007 or revenue analyses. Each section draws data from difference sources and thus tables and/or charts are not always numbered in sequence. For purposes of this document, omitted tables will be listed as such in the Table of Contents.

  17. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study Documentation, Volume 2.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Documentation for Wholesale Power Rate Development Study shows the details of the calculation of the proposed rates. It contains the source data, the calculation, and the results. There are 2 Volumes, the first containing Sections 1, 2, and 3; the second containing Section 4 and 3 appendices. Section 1 contains an overview of the information used and developed in the various models used in the rate development process. Section 2 contains the documentation of the Rate Analysis Model (RAM2007). The RAM2007 is a group of computer applications that performs most of the computations that determine BPA's proposed rates. The output tables of RAM2007 show the source data, calculations (in sequence), and the results (rate charges) of the rate development process. Section 3 provides documentation of revenue forecasts for the three-year rate test period FY 2007 through FY 2009 at both current and proposed rates and at current rates for the period immediately preceding the rate test period. Section 4 includes supporting data for rate calculations not performed in RAM2007 or revenue analyses.

  18. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  19. High-energy threshold reaction rates on 0.8 GeV proton-irradiated thick Pb-target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. E. Titarenko; V. F. Batyaev; A. Yu. Titarenko; M. A. Butko; K. V. Pavlov; R. S. Tikhonov; S. N. Florya; S. G. Mashnik; W. Gudowski

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This works presents results of activation-aided determination of threshold reaction rates in 92 209Bi, natPb, 197Au, 181Ta, 169Tm, natIn, 93Nb, 64Zn, 65Cu, 63Cu, 59Co, 19F, and 12C samples and in 121 27Al samples. All the samples were aligned with the proton beam axis inside and outside the demountable 92-cm thick Pb target of 15-cm diameter assembled of 23 4-cm thick discs. The samples were placed on 12 target disks to reproduce the long axis distribution of protons and neutrons. In June 2006, the target was exposed for 18 hours to a 800-MeV proton beam extracted from the ITEP U-10 accelerator. The proton fluence and the proton beam shape were determined using the 27Al(p,x)7Be monitor reaction. The reaction rates were determined by the direct gamma-spectrometry techniques. In total, 1196 gamma-spectra have been measured, and about 1500 reaction rates determined. The measured reaction rates were simulated by the MCNPX code using the following databases: ENDF/B6 for neutrons below 20 MeV, MENDL2 for 20-100 MeV neutrons, and MENDL2P for proton cross sections up to 200 MeV. An acceptable agreement of simulations with experimental data has been found.

  20. Neutron Screening Measurements of 110 gallon drums at T Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Hilliard, James R.; Berg, Randal K.

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Nondestructive Assay (NDA) Service Center was contracted to develop and demonstrate a simple and inexpensive method of assaying 110 gallon drums at the Hanford Site’s T-Plant. The drums contained pucks of crushed old drums used for storage of transuranic (TRU) waste. The drums were to be assayed to determine if they meet the criteria for TRU or Low Level Waste (LLW). Because of the dense matrix (crushed steel drums) gamma measurement techniques were excluded and a mobile, configurable neutron system, consisting of four sequentially connected slab detectors was chosen to be used for this application. An optimum measurement configuration was determined through multiple test measurements with californium source. Based on these measurements the initial calibration of the system was performed applying the isotopic composition for aged weapon-grade plutonium. A series of background and blank puck drum measurements allowed estimating detection limits for both total (singles) and coincidence (doubles) counting techniques. It was found that even conservative estimates for minimum detection concentration using singles count rate were lower than the essential threshold of 100 nCi/g. Whereas the detection limit of coincidence counting appeared to be about as twice as high of the threshold. A series of measurements intended to verify the technique and revise the initial calibration obtained were performed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility with plutonium standards. Standards with a total mass of 0.3 g of plutonium (which is estimated to be equivalent of 100 nCi/g for net waste weight of 300 kg) loaded in the test puck drum were clearly detected. The following measurements of higher plutonium loadings verified the calibration factors obtained in the initial exercise. The revised and established calibration factors were also confirmed within established uncertainties by additional measurements of plutonium standards in various locations in the test drum. Due to necessity to dispense the blank test drum an alternative method of baseline determination was established during field measurements. Count rates of ambient background were corrected by the differences between observed background and blank test drum count rates which were previously determined over a series of measurements. Only 31 drums out of 352 counted during the intensive measurement campaign at T-Plant were determined to be Suspect TRU. 25 of these drums were re-measured at the WRAP facility using the SuperHENC. Of the 25 drums measured, 21 were confirmed to be TRU and the remaining four LLW.

  1. Relation Between Heart Rate and Problem Behaviors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Rachel L.; Horner, Robert H.; Reichle, Joe

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    American Journal on Mental Retardation, 1999, Vol. 104, No. 4, 330-345 Relation Between Heart Rate and Problem Behaviors Rachel L. Freeman and Robert H. Horner University of Oregon Joe Reichle University of Minnesota A new... methodological approach for understanding self-injury, aggression, and property destruction exhibited by individuals with severe developmental disabilities was evaluated in this descriptive study. Measures of heart-rate changes before, during, and after...

  2. GM Project G.6 October 20008 -1 8. FATAL CRASH RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GM Project G.6 October 20008 - 1 8. FATAL CRASH RATES 8.1 MODELING FATALITY RATES FOR OLDER DRIVERS crash rate concepts we call "driver risk,"or the driver fatality rate. It is the fatality rate, per mile driver. The driver fatality risk rate is measured by dividing the number of older drivers in a given age

  3. CX-000882: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the purpose of measurements, Gamma Sample Preparation and analysis, Gross Alpha Beta Determination and Analysis by liquid scintillation, distillation of environmental...

  4. CX-005504: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for the purpose of measurements, Gamma Sample Preparation and analysis, Gross Alpha Beta Determination and Analysis by liquid scintillation, distillation of environmental...

  5. Interpreting impedance spectra of organic photovoltaic cells—Extracting charge transit and recombination rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullenbach, Tyler K.; Zou, Yunlong; Holmes, Russell J., E-mail: rholmes@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Holst, James [New Products R and D, Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, 6000 N. Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53209 (United States)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Impedance spectroscopy has been widely used to extract the electron-hole recombination rate constant in organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). This technique is typically performed on OPVs held at open-circuit. Under these conditions, the analysis is simplified with recombination as the only pathway for the decay of excess charge carriers; transit provides no net change in the charge density. In this work, we generalize the application and interpretation of impedance spectroscopy for bulk heterojunction OPVs at any operating voltage. This, in conjunction with reverse bias external quantum efficiency measurements, permits the extraction of both recombination and transit rate constants. Using this approach, the transit and recombination rate constants are determined for OPVs with a variety of electron donor-acceptor pairings and compositions. It is found that neither rate constant individually is sufficient to characterize the efficiency of charge collection in an OPV. It is demonstrated that a large recombination rate constant can be accompanied by a large transit rate constant, thus fast recombination is not necessarily detrimental to OPV performance. Extracting the transit and recombination rate constants permits a detailed understanding of how OPV architecture and processing conditions impact the transient behavior of charge carriers, elucidating the origin of optimum device configurations.

  6. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 7(b)(2) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), 16 U.S.C. {section} 839e(b)(2), directs the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to conduct, after July 1, 1985, a comparison of the projected rates to be charged its preference and Federal agency customers for their firm power requirements, over the rate test period plus the ensuing four years, with the costs of power (hereafter called rates) to those customers for the same time period if certain assumptions are made. The effect of this rate test is to protect BPA's preference and Federal agency customers wholesale firm power rates from certain specified costs resulting from provisions of the Northwest Power Act. The rate test can result in a reallocation of costs from the general requirements loads of preference and Federal agency customers to other BPA loads. The rate test involves the projection and comparison of two sets of wholesale power rates for the general requirements loads of BPA's public body, cooperative, and Federal agency customers (7(b)(2) Customers). The two sets of rates are: (1) a set for the test period and the ensuing four years assuming that section 7(b)(2) is not in effect (known as Program Case rates); and (2) a set for the same period taking into account the five assumptions listed in section 7(b)(2), (known as 7(b)(2) Case rates). Certain specified costs allocated pursuant to section 7(g) of the Northwest Power Act are subtracted from the Program Case rates. Next, each nominal rate is discounted to the beginning of the test period of the relevant rate case. The discounted Program Case rates are averaged, as are the 7(b)(2) Case rates. Both averages are rounded to the nearest tenth of a mill for comparison. If the average Program Case rate is greater than the average 7(b)(2) Case rate, the rate test triggers. The difference between the average Program Case rate and the average 7(b)(2) Case rate determines the amount to be reallocated from the 7(b)(2) Customers to other BPA loads in the rate proposal test period.

  7. Minimizing Variation in Outdoor CPV Power Ratings (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Module data from NREL's CPV test bed is used to examine methods for calculating outdoor CPV power ratings. IEC 62670 and ASTM E2527 are used as a starting point for determining a module power rating on a monthly basis. Monthly power ratings vary by more than desired using existing methods. The presentation examines modifications to existing methods as well as spectral corrections to reduce variation in monthly module power ratings.

  8. Enhanced reaction rates in NDP analysis with neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, R. Gregory, E-mail: gregory.downing@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Chemical Sciences Division, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron depth profiling (NDP) makes accessible quantitative information on a few isotopic concentration profiles ranging from the surface into the sample a few micrometers. Because the candidate analytes for NDP are few, there is little interference encountered. Furthermore, neutrons have no charge so mixed chemical states in the sample are of no direct concern. There are a few nuclides that exhibit large probabilities for neutron scattering. The effect of neutron scattering on NDP measurements has not previously been evaluated as a basis for either enhancing the reaction rates or as a source of measurement error. Hydrogen is a common element exhibiting large neutron scattering probability found in or around sample volumes being analyzed by NDP. A systematic study was conducted to determine the degree of signal change when neutron scattering occurs during analysis. The relative signal perturbation was evaluated for materials of varied neutron scattering probability, concentration, total mass, and geometry. Signal enhancements up to 50% are observed when the hydrogen density is high and in close proximity to the region of analysis with neutron beams of sub thermal energies. Greater signal enhancements for the same neutron number density are reported for thermal neutron beams. Even adhesive tape used to position the sample produces a measureable signal enhancement. Because of the shallow volume, negligible distortion of the NDP measured profile shape is encountered from neutron scattering.

  9. Method for Determining Performance of Sulfur Oxide Adsorbents...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for Determining Performance of Sulfur Oxide Adsorbents for Diesel Emission Control Using Online Measurement of SO2 and Method for Determining Performance of Sulfur Oxide...

  10. Methods for threshold determination in multiplexed assays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tammero, Lance F. Bentley; Dzenitis, John M; Hindson, Benjamin J

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for determination of threshold values of signatures comprised in an assay are described. Each signature enables detection of a target. The methods determine a probability density function of negative samples and a corresponding false positive rate curve. A false positive criterion is established and a threshold for that signature is determined as a point at which the false positive rate curve intersects the false positive criterion. A method for quantitative analysis and interpretation of assay results together with a method for determination of a desired limit of detection of a signature in an assay are also described.

  11. The Effect of Heat Treatments and Coatings on the Outgassing Rate of Stainless Steel Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamum, Md Abdullah A. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A, [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Stutzman, Marcy L. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Adderley, Philip A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Poelker, Matthew [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outgassing rates of four nominally identical 304L stainless steel vacuum chambers were measured to determine the effect of chamber coatings and heat treatments. One chamber was coated with titanium nitride (TiN) and one with amorphous silicon (a-Si) immediately following fabrication. One chamber remained uncoated throughout, and the last chamber was first tested without any coating, and then coated with a-Si following a series of heat treatments. The outgassing rate of each chamber was measured at room temperatures between 15 and 30 deg C following bakes at temperatures between 90 and 400 deg C. Measurements for bare steel showed a significant reduction in the outgassing rate by more than a factor of 20 after a 400 deg C heat treatment (3.5 x 10{sup 12} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} prior to heat treatment, reduced to 1.7 x 10{ sup -13} TorrL s{sup -1}cm{sup -2} following heat treatment). The chambers that were coated with a-Si showed minimal change in outgassing rates with heat treatment, though an outgassing rate reduced by heat treatments prior to a-Si coating was successfully preserved throughout a series of bakes. The TiN coated chamber exhibited remarkably low outgassing rates, up to four orders of magnitude lower than the uncoated stainless steel. An evaluation of coating composition suggests the presence of elemental titanium which could provide pumping and lead to an artificially low outgassing rate. The outgassing results are discussed in terms of diffusion-limited versus recombination-limited processes.

  12. Ozone determination in different copying centers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Chen-Fu

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photocopying machines have been in existence for forty years: however, few people recognize their potential to create a human health hazard by ozone emission. This study was designed to determine the photocopier's emission rate and evaluate tile...

  13. Non-Invasive Diagnostics for Measuring Physical Properties and Processes in High Level Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Powell; David Pfund

    2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This research demonstrated the usefulness of tomographic techniques for determining the physical properties of slurry suspensions. Of particular interest was the measurement of the viscosity of suspensions in complex liquids and modeling these. We undertook a long rage program that used two techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonic pulsed Doppler velocimetry. Our laboratory originally developed both of these for the measurement of viscosity of complex liquids and suspensions. We have shown that the relationship between shear viscosity and shear rate can be determined over a wide range of shear rates from a single measurement. We have also demonstrated these techniques for many non-Newtonian fluids which demonstrate highly shear thinning behavior. This technique was extended to determine the yield stress with systems of interacting particles. To model complex slurries that may be found in wastes applications, we have also used complex slurries that are found in industrial applications

  14. Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10 Be, 26 Al, and 21 Ne concentrations Antarctica production rate calibration We estimated the production rate of 21 Ne in quartz using a set production rate. As the erosion rate can be determined from 10 Be and 26 Al concentrations, this allows

  15. Real-time variable rate Pix® application system using a plant height sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Andy Dwayne

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application system, the actual carrier flow rate lagged the desired rates. It was later determined that instead of using a 1-second update rate, a 3-second update rate would allow the control system to reach the setpoint before a new desired rate was received...

  16. Draft Tiered Rate Methodology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agreement. 3) New Load: BPA will not consider a new consumer load that did not consume energy during the entire year an anomaly and will consider only the Measured 2010 Load of...

  17. Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1995-1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rien, Thomas A.; Beiningen, Kirk T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state, and tribal fisheries entities to determine (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Colombia and Snake rivers.

  18. Transcriptional profiling and flux measurements of polyhydroxybutyrate production in Synechocystis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Saliya Sudharshana, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) to determine the CO? uptake rates and PHB production rates of strains engineered for enhanced CO? fixation and PHB production respectively.

  19. Rotational rate sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Steven L. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rate sensor for angular/rotational acceleration includes a housing defining a fluid cavity essentially completely filled with an electrolyte fluid. Within the housing, such as a toroid, ions in the fluid are swept during movement from an excitation electrode toward one of two output electrodes to provide a signal for directional rotation. One or more ground electrodes within the housing serve to neutralize ions, thus preventing any effect at the other output electrode.

  20. Previous Power Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergyEnergy InnovationRecentPreviouspower-rates

  1. Previous Transmission Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergyEnergytransmission-rates Sign In About |

  2. Strategic Rate Design: The Role of Industrial Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, J. I.; House, R.

    STRA TEGIC RA TE DESIGN: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL TARIFFS Jeffrey 1. Rosenblum Rate Design Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Strategic rate design refers to the use of deliberate pricing strategies... occurred in cogeneration capacity in Texas. The utilities use their rate tariffs strategically to influence the growth of self-generation. This paper will discuss several aspects of strategic rate design to influence industrial energy sales (measured...

  3. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study and Documentation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section 7(b)(2) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), 16 U.S.C. {section} 839e(b)(2), directs the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to conduct, after July 1, 1985, a comparison of the projected rates to be charged its preference and Federal agency customers for their firm power requirements, over the rate test period plus the ensuing 4 years, with the costs of power (hereafter called rates) to those customers for the same time period if certain assumptions are made. The effect of this rate test is to protect BPA's preference and Federal agency customers wholesale firm power rates from certain specified costs resulting from certain provisions of the Northwest Power Act. The rate test can result in a reallocation of costs from the general requirements loads of preference and Federal agency customers to other BPA loads. The rate test involves the projection and comparison of two sets of wholesale power rates for the general requirement loads of BPA's public body, cooperative, and Federal agency customers (collectively, the 7(b)(2) Customers). The two sets of rates are: (1) a set for the test period and the ensuing four years assuming that Section 7(b)(2) is not in effect (known as Program Case rates); and (2) a set for the same period taking into account the five assumptions listed in section 7(b)(2) (known as 7(b)(2) Case rates). Certain specified costs allocated pursuant to section 7(g) of the Northwest Power Act are subtracted from the Program Case rates. Next, each nominal rate is discounted to the beginning of the test period of the relevant rate case. The discounted Program Case rates are averaged, as are the 7(b)(2) Case rates. Both averages are rounded to the nearest tenth of a mill for comparison. If the average of the Program Case rates is greater than the average of the 7(b)(2) Case rates, the rate test triggers. The difference between the average of the Program Case rates and the average of the 7(b)(2) Case rates determines the amount to be reallocated from the 7(b)(2) Customers to other BPA loads in the rate test period. The purpose of this Study is to describe the application of the ''Section 7(b)(2) Implementation Methodology (Implementation Methodology)'' and the results of such application. The accompanying Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study Documentation, WP-07-FS-BPA-06A, contains the documentation of the computer models and data used to perform the 7(b)(2) rate test. This Study is organized into three major sections. The first section provides an introduction to the study, as well as a summary of the section ''7(b)(2) Legal Interpretation and Implementation Methodology''. The second section describes the methodology used in conducting the rate test. It provides a discussion of the calculations performed to project the two sets of power rates that are compared in the rate test. The third section presents a summary of the results of the rate test for the WP-07 Final Rate Proposal.

  4. Energy levels, radiative rates and electron impact excitation rates for transitions in C III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, K M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report energy levels, radiative rates (A-values) and lifetimes for the astrophysically-important Be-like ion C III. For the calculations, 166 levels belonging to the $n \\le$ 5 configurations are considered and the {\\sc grasp} (General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Package) is adopted. Einstein A-coefficients are provided for all E1, E2, M1 and M2 transitions, while lifetimes are compared with available measurements as well as theoretical results, and no large discrepancies noted. Our energy levels are assessed to be accurate to better than 1\\% for a majority of levels, and A-values to better than 20\\% for most transitions. Collision strengths are also calculated, for which the Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code ({\\sc darc}) is used. A wide energy range, up to 21 Ryd, is considered and resonances resolved in a fine energy mesh in the thresholds region. The collision strengths are subsequently averaged over a Maxwellian velocity distribution to determine effective collision strengths up to a temperature of 8...

  5. Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Western Area PowerAdministratio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center October 26, 2009 CX-005544: Categorical Exclusion Determination Power Rate Formula for the Provo River Project of the Western Area Power Administration CX(s) Applied:...

  6. Current Power Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department ofDepartmentPower-Rates Sign In About |

  7. Current Transmission Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department ofDepartmentPower-Rates Sign

  8. [FIXED RATE GUARANTEED OBLIGATIONS]

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @JoinEnergy ZEROFIXED RATE GUARANTEED

  9. Settlement PF Exchange Rates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9 SeptemberSetting the Stage for the Next SolarRate

  10. A novel technique for measurement of thermal rate constants and temperature dependences of dissociative recombination: CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, N{sub 2}O{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 8}{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 4}{sup +}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Viggiano, Albert A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

    2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel technique using a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe apparatus for measurement of temperature dependences of rate constants for dissociative recombination (DR) is presented. Low ({approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) concentrations of a neutral precursor are added to a noble gas/electron afterglow plasma thermalized at 300-500 K. Charge exchange yields one or many cation species, each of which may undergo DR. Relative ion concentrations are monitored at a fixed reaction time while the initial plasma density is varied between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. Modeling of the decrease in concentration of each cation relative to the non-recombining noble gas cation yields the rate constant for DR. The technique is applied to several species (O{sub 2}{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, N{sub 2}O{sup +}) with previously determined 300 K values, showing excellent agreement. The measurements of those species are extended to 500 K, with good agreement to literature values where they exist. Measurements are also made for a range of C{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} (C{sub 7}H{sub 7}{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 8}{sup +}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 4}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}) derived from benzene and toluene neutral precursors. C{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} DR rate constants vary from 8-12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 300 K with temperature dependences of approximately T{sup -0.7}. Where prior measurements exist these results are in agreement, with the exception of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} where the present results disagree with a previously reported flat temperature dependence.

  11. Electrochemical Corrosion Rate Sensors for Waste Incineration Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Matthes, S.A.; Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Eden, D.A. (Honeywell Intercorr)

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical corrosion rate sensors work in high temperature waste incineration applications where ash is deposited. The ash serves as the electrolyte for electrochemical measurements, such as liner polarization resistance, electrochemical noise, and harmonic distortion analyses. Results to date have shown that these types of sensors respond qualitatively to changes in temperature, gas composition, alloy composition, and type of ash. Several years of research have shown that high temperature corrosion rate probes need to be better understood before corrosion rate can be used as a process variable by power plant operators. More recent research has shown that electrochemical corrosion probes typically measure lower corrosion rates than those measured by standard mass loss techniques. While still useful for monitoring changes in corrosion rates, absolute probe corrosion rates will need a calibration factor to be useful. Ideas for research that may help resolve these issues are presented.

  12. The impact of lead time on truckload transportation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Erik R. (Erik Russell)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis was to analyze truckload shipment transactions in order to determine if rates are impacted by tender lead time, which is the amount of time between when a carrier is offered a load to when the ...

  13. Optimization of time-based rates in forward energy markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.

    This paper presents a new two-step design approach of Time-Based Rate (TBR) programs for markets with a high penetration of variable energy sources such as wind power. First, an optimal market time horizon must be determined ...

  14. Energy Management Through Innovative Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

  15. How Well do Social Ratings Actually Measure Corporate Social Responsibility?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterji, Aaron K; Levine, David I.; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    denials or shut-ins Probit Regulatory problems Ozone depleting chemicals Substantial emissions Agricultural chemicals Climate change

  16. Beware of These Errors when Measuring Intake Rates in Waders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John D. Goss-Custard, Ralph T. Clarke, Selwyn Mcgrorty, Rajarathinavelu Nagarajan, Humphrey P. Sitters, Andy D. West ...

  17. How Well do Social Ratings Actually Measure Corporate Social Responsibility?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterji, Aaron K; Levine, David I.; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the quality of environmental management systems. We hopethe quality of companies’ environmental management systems.

  18. How Well do Social Ratings Actually Measure Corporate Social Responsibility?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterji, Aaron K; Levine, David I.; Toffel, Michael W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytics (KLD) dropped Coca-Cola Co. , from its Broadthan 50 million shares of Coca-Cola Co. stock. 3 Critics ofcomplaints against Coca-Cola Co. 4 Despite their increasing

  19. Experiments for the Measurement of LNG Mass Burning Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera Gomez, Lady Carolina

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a commonly used flammable fuel that has safety concerns associated with vapor dispersion and radiation emitted from pool fires. The main objective of this effort is to advance the knowledge of pool fires and to expand...

  20. Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY2012, SSRL is now scheduling three to four three-day periods each year dedicated to running SPEAR3 in hybrid low-alpha operation. In this mode the SPEAR3 ring has 1-4 camshaft...

  1. Sandia Energy - CRF Researchers Measure Reaction Rates of Second Key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome

  2. Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum ReservesThrust Areas Physics161

  3. Measurement of the thermal neutron capture cross section of {sup 180}W

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, W. G.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, J. I.; Hahn, I. S.; Kim, A. R.; Kim, H. J. [Department of Physics, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Science Education, Ewha Woman's University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Physics Department, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the thermal neutron capture cross section for the {sup 180}W nucleus. There is only one previous measurement with regard to this cross section, and it yielded a value of 30 -100%+300% b. To determine whether {sup 181}W is an appropriate low energy neutrino source, the thermal neutron capture cross section should be measured more precisely to estimate the production rate of {sup 181}W inside a nuclear reactor. We measured the cross section of {sup 180}W using a natural tungsten foil and obtained a value of 22.6{+-}1.7 b.

  4. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  5. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Patrick Ian (Plano, TX)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  6. Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  7. Achievable Qubit Rates for Quantum Information Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulya Yadsan-Appleby; Tobias J. Osborne

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppose Alice and Bob have access to two separated regions, respectively, of a system of electrons moving in the presence of a regular one-dimensional lattice of binding atoms. We consider the problem of communicating as much quantum information, as measured by the qubit rate, through this quantum information wire as possible. We describe a protocol whereby Alice and Bob can achieve a qubit rate for these systems which is proportional to N^(-1/3) qubits per unit time, where N is the number of lattice sites. Our protocol also functions equally in the presence of interactions modelled via the t-J and Hubbard models.

  8. MINNESOTA ROAD FEE TEST MILEAGE BASED USER FEE RATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Policy Center Oregon Road User Fee Pilot Program Other Interest: Nevada, Texas, Ohio, Idaho, etc. May Cellular Tower Data Warehouse May 24, 2012 6 #12;Determination of Mileage Fees · MBUF Rate StructureMINNESOTA ROAD FEE TEST MILEAGE BASED USER FEE RATE STRUCTURE CONCEPT 23rd Annual Transportation

  9. Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive $pp \\rightarrow W + X$ production at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV at CMS and an improved determination of light parton distribution functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Saranya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive $pp \\rightarrow WX$ production at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 $\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$ recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. With a sample of more than twenty million $W \\rightarrow \\mu\

  10. Measurement of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive $pp \\rightarrow W + X$ production at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV at CMS and an improved determination of light parton distribution functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saranya Ghosh; for the CMS Collaboration

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the muon charge asymmetry in inclusive $pp \\rightarrow WX$ production at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV are presented. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 $\\mathrm{fb^{-1}}$ recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. With a sample of more than twenty million $W \\rightarrow \\mu\

  11. Magnitude and determinants of change in objectively-measured physical activity, sedentary time and sleep duration from ages 15 to 17.5y in UK adolescents: the ROOTS study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collings, Paul J.; Wijndaele, Katrien; Corder, Kirsten; Westgate, Kate; Ridgway, Charlotte L.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Dunn, Valerie; Goodyer, Ian; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , Faith MS, Allison DB, Gallagher D, Chiumello G, Heymsfield SB. Body mass index as a measure of adiposity among children and adolescents: a validation study. J Pediatr. 1998;132:204–10. 53. Foster BJ, Platt RW, Zemel BS. Development and validation of a...

  12. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  13. Heat-rate improvements obtained by retubing condensers with new, enhanced tube types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabas, T.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Taborek, J. [Consulting Services, Virginia Beach, VA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant fuel savings can be achieved at power plants by retubing the condensers with enhanced tubes. Because of the higher overall heat-transfer coefficient, the exhaust steam is condensed at a lower pressure and the plant efficiency is therefore increased or plant heat rate is reduced. Only the spirally indented type of enhanced tube is currently being used in the U.S. and most other countries; however, different types of enhanced tubes have been proposed for power-plant condensers, each with their own set of attributes. This paper determines what attributes and their magnitudes of enhanced tubes lead to the most energy savings as measured by reduction of the plant heat rate. The particular attributes considered are the inside and outside enhancement levels, the inside efficiency index (inside enhancement level divided by pressure-drop increase), and the enhanced-tube fouling-rate multiplier. Two particular condensers were selected because all necessary information were known from previous heat-rate studies such as the condenser geometry, the circulating-water pump and system information, and the low-pressure turbine characteristics. These are {open_quotes}real-world{close_quotes} condensers and therefore the finding will be representative for many other condenser-retubing applications. However, the authors strongly recommend that an economic evaluation be performed at each site to determine the energy savings and payback time. This generic investigation showed that the outside enhancement level is the most important attribute, and a value of about 1.5 can lead to heat-rate savings of about 20 to 40 Btu/kW-hr. Increasing the inside enhancement is less effective because of the increased pressure drop that leads to a reduction of the coolant flow rate and velocity.

  14. Measurement uncertainty in surface flatness measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. L. Thang

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Flatness of a plate is a parameter has been put under consideration for long time. Factors influencing the accuracy of this parameter have been recognized and examined carefully but placed scatterringly. Beside that those reports have not been always in harmonization with Guide for expression of uncertainty measurement (GUM). Furthermore, mathematical equations describing clearly the flatness measurement have not been seen in those reports also. We have collected those influencing factors for systematic reference purpose, re-written the equation describing the profile measurement of the plate topography, and proposed an equation for flatness determination. An illustrative numerical example will be also shown.

  15. Upper Great Plains Rates information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancillary Services Rate Data (2.4mb pdf) Transmission and Ancillary Services 2011 Rate True-up Calculation (3.4mb pdf) Power Reporting Miscellaneous Information If you have any...

  16. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Waugh, C. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in themore »filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±« less

  17. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and pR are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Zylstra, A. B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Rinderknecht, H. G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Waugh, C. J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Sio, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Sinenian, N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Hohenberger, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics; Yeamans, C. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Talison, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, step range filter proton spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum, from which yield and areal density (?R) are inferred for deuterium-filled thin-shell inertial confinement fusion implosions. This spectrometer, which is based on tantalum step-range filters, is sensitive to protons in the energy range 1-9 MeV and can be used to measure proton spectra at mean energies of ~1-3 MeV. It has been developed and implemented using a linear accelerator and applied to experiments at the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Modeling of the proton slowing in the filters is necessary to construct the spectrum, and the yield and energy uncertainties are ±<10% in yield and ±120 keV, respectively. This spectrometer can be used for in situ calibration of DD-neutron yield diagnostics at the NIF

  18. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  19. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD atmore »next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).« less

  20. Measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and determination of the strong coupling constant in the TeV range

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a measurement of the inclusive 3-jet production differential cross section at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector. The analysis is based on the three jets with the highest transverse momenta. The cross section is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the three jets in a range of 445-3270 GeV and in two bins of the maximum rapidity of the jets up to a value of 2. A comparison between the measurement and the prediction from perturbative QCD at next-to-leading order is performed. Within uncertainties, data and theory are in agreement. The sensitivity of the observable to parameters of the theory such as the parton distribution functions of the proton and the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_S$ is studied. A fit to all data points with 3-jet masses larger than 664 GeV gives a value of the strong coupling constant of $\\alpha_S(M_\\mathrm{Z})$ = 0.1171 $\\pm$ 0.0013 (exp) $^{+0.0073}_{-0.0047}$ (theo).

  1. An LED pulser for measuring photomultiplier linearity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friend, M; Quinn, B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A light-emitting diode (LED) pulser for testing the low-rate response of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to scintillator-like pulses has been designed, developed, and implemented. This pulser is intended to simulate 80 ns full width at half maximum photon pulses over the dynamic range of the PMT, in order to precisely determine PMT linearity. This particular design has the advantage that, unlike many LED test rigs, it does not require the use of multiple calibrated LEDs, making it insensitive to LED gain drifts. Instead, a finite-difference measurement is made using two LEDs which need not be calibrated with respect to one another. These measurements give a better than 1% mapping of the response function, allowing for the testing and development of particularly linear PMT bases.

  2. Decoherence rates for Galilean covariant dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Clark

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a measure of decoherence for a class of density operators. For Gaussian density operators in dimension one it coincides with an index used by Morikawa (1990). Spatial decoherence rates are derived for three large classes of the Galilean covariant quantum semigroups introduced by Holevo. We also characterize the relaxation to a Gaussian state for these dynamics and give a theorem for the convergence of the Wigner function to the probability distribution of the classical analog of the process.

  3. Longshore sediment transport rate calculated incorporating wave orbital velocity fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ernest Ray

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  4. Characteristics of spot-market rate indexes for truckload transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bignell, Andrew (Andrew Souglas)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the truckload transportation industry in the United States, a number of indexes are published that attempt to measure changes in rates, but no single index has emerged as an industry standard. Industry participants, ...

  5. DEFORMATION OF SUPERPLASTIC ALLOYS AT RELATIVELY LOW STRAIN RATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grivas, Dionysios

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    load change test during a creep test or a strain rate changethe desired microstructures. Creep tests were performed on a5. The strains in the creep test were Because the measured

  6. Rate Analysis or a Possible Interpretation of Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miklos Kiss

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy elements are formed in nucleosynthesis processes. Abundances of these elements can be classified as elemental abundance, isotopic abundance, and abundance of nuclei. In this work we propose to change nucleon identification from the usual (Z,A) to (Z,N), which allows reading out new information from the measured abundances. We are interested in the neutron density required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. This is only possible when two stable nuclei are separated by an unstable nucleus. At these places we investigated the neutron density required for equilibrium nucleosynthesis both isotopically and isotonically at temperatures of AGB interpulse and thermal pulse phases. We obtained an estimate for equilibrium nucleosynthesis neutron density in most of the cases. Next we investigated the possibility of partial formation of nuclei. We analyzed the meaning of the branching factor. We found a mathematical definition for the unified interpretation of a branching point closed at isotonic case and open at isotopic case. We introduce a more expressive variant of branching ratio called partial formation rate. With these we are capable of determining the characteristic neutron density values.

  7. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  8. The instantaneous radial growth rate of stellar discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzulli, Gabriele; Boissier, Samuel; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new and simple method to measure the instantaneous mass and radial growth rates of the stellar discs of spiral galaxies, based on their star formation rate surface density (SFRD) profiles. Under the hypothesis that discs are exponential with time-varying scalelengths, we derive a universal theoretical profile for the SFRD, with a linear dependence on two parameters: the specific mass growth rate $\

  9. The thermonuclear rate for the 19F(a,p)22Ne reaction at stellar temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Ugalde; Richard Azuma; Aaron Couture; Joachim Görres; Hye-Young Lee; Edward Stech; Elizabeth Strandberg; Wanpeng Tan; Michael Wiescher

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{19}$F($\\alpha$,p)$^{22}$Ne reaction is considered to be one of the main sources of fluorine depletion in AGB and Wolf-Rayet stars. The reaction rate still retains large uncertainties due to the lack of experimental studies available. In this work the yields for both exit channels to the ground state and first excited state of $^{22}$Ne have been measured and several previously unobserved resonances have been found in the energy range E$_{lab}$=792-1993 keV. The level parameters have been determined through a detailed R-matrix analysis of the reaction data and a new reaction rate is provided on the basis of the available experimental information.

  10. Probing the cosmic gamma-ray burst rate with trigger simulations of the swift burst alert telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lien, Amy; Cannizzo, John K. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sakamoto, Takanori [Department of Physics and Mathematics, College of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Gehrels, Neil; Barthelmy, Scott D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Palmer, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, B244, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Graziani, Carlo [Astronomy Department, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae, and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and an additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest that bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid overproducing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4568{sub ?1429}{sup +825} GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe.

  11. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  12. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, Bernard P. (McMurray, PA); Becse, Imre (Washington, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  13. Laser-based irradiation apparatus and methods for monitoring the dose-rate response of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanned, pulsed, focused laser irradiation apparatus can measure and image the photocurrent collection resulting from a dose-rate equivalent exposure to infrared laser light across an entire silicon die. Comparisons of dose-rate response images or time-delay images from before, during, and after accelerated aging of a device, or from periodic sampling of devices from fielded operational systems allows precise identification of those specific age-affected circuit structures within a device that merit further quantitative analysis with targeted materials or electrical testing techniques. Another embodiment of the invention comprises a broad-beam, dose rate-equivalent exposure apparatus. The broad-beam laser irradiation apparatus can determine if aging has affected the device's overall functionality. This embodiment can be combined with the synchronized introduction of external electrical transients into a device under test to simulate the electrical effects of the surrounding circuitry's response to a radiation exposure.

  14. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  15. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ([sup 238]Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  16. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ({sup 238}Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  17. Measurement of Branching Fractions of B decays to K1(1270)pi and K1(1400)pi and Determination of the CKM angle alpha from B0 --> a1(1260) /- pi-/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of the branching fractions of neutral and charged B meson decays to final states containing a K{sub 1}(1270) or K{sub 1}(1400) meson and a charged pion. The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, correspond to 454 million B{bar B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = 3.1{sub 0.7}{sup +0.8} x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){sup 0}{pi}{sup +} + K{sub 1}(1400){sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = 2.9{sub -1.7}{sup +2.9} x 10{sup -5} (< 8.2 x 10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level), where the errors are statistical and systematic combined. The B{sup 0} decay mode is observed with a significance of 7.5{sigma}, while a significance of 3.2{sigma} is obtained for the B{sup +} decay mode. Based on these results, we estimate the weak phase {alpha} = (79 {+-} 7 {+-} 11){sup o} from the time dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decays.

  18. Background-independent measurement of $?_{13}$ in Double Chooz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadón; K. Crum; A. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Göger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; T. Konno; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. López-Castaño; J. M. LoSecco; B. K. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; K. Nakajima; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; M. Obolensky; L. Oberauer; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Röhling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; F. Sato; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schönert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stüken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The oscillation results published by the Double Chooz collaboration in 2011 and 2012 rely on background models substantiated by reactor-on data. In this analysis, we present a background-model-independent measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by including 7.53 days of reactor-off data. A global fit of the observed neutrino rates for different reactor power conditions is performed, yielding a measurement of both $\\theta_{13}$ and the total background rate. The results on the mixing angle are improved significantly by including the reactor-off data in the fit, as it provides a direct measurement of the total background rate. This reactor rate modulation analysis considers antineutrino candidates with neutron captures on both Gd and H, whose combination yields $\\sin^2(2\\theta_{13})=$ 0.102 $\\pm$ 0.028(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.033(syst.). The results presented in this study are fully consistent with the ones already published by Double Chooz, achieving a competitive precision. They provide, for the first time, a determination of $\\theta_{13}$ that does not depend on a background model.

  19. Experimental investigation of burning rates of pure ethanol and ethanol blended fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parag, Shintre; Raghavan, Vasudevan [Thermodynamics and Combustion Engineering Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, Tamilnadu, 600036 (India)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental experimental study to determine the burning rates of ethanol and ethanol-blended fossil fuels is presented. Pure liquid ethanol or its blends with liquid fossil fuels such as gasoline or diesel, has been transpired to the surface a porous sphere using an infusion pump. Burning of the fuel takes place on the surface of the porous sphere, which is placed in an air stream blowing upwards with a uniform velocity at atmospheric pressure and temperature under normal gravity conditions. At low air velocities, when ignited, a flame envelopes the sphere. For each sphere size, air stream velocity and fuel type, the fuel feed rate will vary and the same is recorded as the burning rate for that configuration. The flame stand-off distances from the sphere surface are measured by post-processing the digital image of the flame photograph using suitable imaging software. The transition velocity at which the flame moves and establishes itself at the wake region of the sphere has been determined for different diameters and fuel types. Correlations of these parameters are also presented. (author)

  20. Determining boiler-water makeup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beecher, J.; Herman, K. [Ashland Chemical Co., Boonton, NJ (United States). Drew Industrial Div.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In boiler operations, it is desirable to determine blowdown--and, thus, the feedwater`s concentration cycles--because it enables operators to calculate the theoretical concentrations of iron, copper or dispersant in the system. These calculations are important for maintaining boiler cleanliness. In practice, however, it isn`t always feasible to determine blowdown. For example, if the steam, feedwater and blowdown flows are not measured in a system, or if the measurements are not accurate, the blowdown and feedwater concentration cycles cannot be accurately determined. Also, if demineralized makeup water with very-low silica concentrations is mixed with essentially silica-free condensate, the ratio of silica in the boiler water to the silica in the feedwater may not yield accurate values for the concentration cycle. This method for calculating concentration cycles is accurate to within 5%, when the accuracy of the parameters measured are within the following limits: steam flow (2%); phosphate, residual (5%); micro calcium (50%); micro iron (25%); and phosphate, feed (10%).

  1. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Draggoo, Vaughn G. (Livermore, CA); Morton, Richard G. (San Diego, CA); Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Bissinger, Horst D. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  2. Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRSP Transmission 9162013 WAPA-161 FRN, CRSP transmission and ancillary services rates extension Letter announcing two-year extension to CRSP transmission and ancillary...

  3. Sustainable Building Rating Systems Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to offer information that could be used to compare and contrast sustainable building rating systems.

  4. The underwater coincidence counter for plutonium measurements in mixed-oxide fuel assemblies manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. W. Eccleston; H. O. Menlove; M. Abhold; M. Baker; J. Pecos

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes the Underwater Coincidence Counter (UWCC) that has been designed for the measurement of plutonium in mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to irradiation. The UWCC uses high-efficiency {sup 3}He neutron detectors to measure the spontaneous-fission and induced-fission rates in the fuel assembly. Measurements can be made on MOX fuel assemblies in air or underwater. The neutron counting rate is analyzed for singles, doubles, and triples time correlations to determine the {sup 240}Pu effective mass per unit length of the fuel assembly. The system can verify the plutonium loading per unit length to a precision of less than 1% in a measurement time of 2 to 3 minutes. System design, components, performance tests, and operational characteristics are described in this manual.

  5. Statistical Methods for Thermonuclear Reaction Rates and Nucleosynthesis Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliadis, Christian; Coc, Alain; Timmes, F X; Champagne, Art E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rigorous statistical methods for estimating thermonuclear reaction rates and nucleosynthesis are becoming increasingly established in nuclear astrophysics. The main challenge being faced is that experimental reaction rates are highly complex quantities derived from a multitude of different measured nuclear parameters (e.g., astrophysical S-factors, resonance energies and strengths, particle and gamma-ray partial widths). We discuss the application of the Monte Carlo method to two distinct, but related, questions. First, given a set of measured nuclear parameters, how can one best estimate the resulting thermonuclear reaction rates and associated uncertainties? Second, given a set of appropriate reaction rates, how can one best estimate the abundances from nucleosynthesis (i.e., reaction network) calculations? The techniques described here provide probability density functions that can be used to derive statistically meaningful reaction rates and final abundances for any desired coverage probability. Examples ...

  6. Tunneling decay rate in quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mithani, Audrey T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In canonical quantum cosmology, the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence. However, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. In this paper, we apply this approach to an oscillating universe model recently introduced by Graham et al. By extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock", we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe.

  7. Tunneling decay rate in quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audrey T. Mithani; Alexander Vilenkin

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In canonical quantum cosmology, the wave function of the universe lacks explicit time dependence. However, time evolution may be present implicitly through the semiclassical superspace variables, which themselves depend on time in classical dynamics. In this paper, we apply this approach to an oscillating universe model recently introduced by Graham et al. By extending the model to include a massless, minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ which has little effect on the dynamics but can play the role of a "clock", we determine the decay rate of the oscillating universe.

  8. Binary Capture Rates for Massive Protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickolas Moeckel; John Bally

    2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The high multiplicity of massive stars in dense, young clusters is established early in their evolution. The mechanism behind this remains unresolved. Recent results suggest that massive protostars may capture companions through disk interactions with much higher efficiency than their solar mass counterparts. However, this conclusion is based on analytic determinations of capture rates and estimates of the robustness of the resulting binaries. We present the results of coupled n-body and SPH simulations of star-disk encounters to further test the idea that disk-captured binaries contribute to the observed multiplicity of massive stars.

  9. Rates and Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Michael Wood-Vasey

    2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, SNe Ia exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in SNe Ia. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) has been designed to discover hundreds of SNe Ia in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of SNe Ia. This dissertation presents a new method for analyzing the true sensitivity of a multi-epoch supernova search and finds a SN Ia rate from $z\\sim0.01$--0.1 of $r_V = 4.26 (+1.39 -1.93) (+0.10 - 0.10)$ SNe Ia/yr/Mpc$^3$ from a preliminary analysis of a subsample of the SNfactory prototype search. Several unusual supernovae were found in the course of the SNfactory prototype search. One in particular, SN 2002ic, was the first SN Ia to exhibit convincing evidence for a circumstellar medium and offers valuable insight into the progenitors of SNe Ia.

  10. Method for resonant measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, G.W.; Migliori, A.; Dixon, R.D.

    1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measurement of objects to determine object flaws, Poisson`s ratio ({sigma}) and shear modulus ({mu}) is shown and described. First, the frequency for expected degenerate responses is determined for one or more input frequencies and then splitting of degenerate resonant modes are observed to identify the presence of flaws in the object. Poisson`s ratio and the shear modulus can be determined by identification of resonances dependent only on the shear modulus, and then using that shear modulus to find Poisson`s ratio using other modes dependent on both the shear modulus and Poisson`s ratio. 1 fig.

  11. Aerial Measurement of Radioxenon Concentration off the West Coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima Reactor Accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, L E; Fortin, R; Carson, J M; Saull, P R B; Coyle, M J; Van Brabant, R A; Buckle, J L; Desjardins, S M; Hall, R M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dose-rate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to Xe-133 was observed. Methods to extract Xe-133 count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding Xe-133 volumetric concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that Xe-133 concentrations on average lie in the range of 30 to 70 Bq/m3.

  12. Aerial Measurement of Radioxenon Concentration off the West Coast of Vancouver Island following the Fukushima Reactor Accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. E. Sinclair; H. C. J. Seywerd; R. Fortin; J. M. Carson; P. R. B. Saull; M. J. Coyle; R. A. Van Brabant; J. L. Buckle; S. M. Desjardins; R. M. Hall

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident, on March 20th, 2011, Natural Resources Canada conducted aerial radiation surveys over water just off of the west coast of Vancouver Island. Dose-rate levels were found to be consistent with background radiation, however a clear signal due to Xe-133 was observed. Methods to extract Xe-133 count rates from the measured spectra, and to determine the corresponding Xe-133 volumetric concentration, were developed. The measurements indicate that Xe-133 concentrations on average lie in the range of 30 to 70 Bq/m3.

  13. Solar Influence on Nuclear Decay Rates: Constraints from the MESSENGER Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ephraim Fischbach; K. Joseph Chen; Robert E. Gold; John O. Goldsten; David J. Lawrence; Ralph J. McNutt Jr.; Edgar A. Rhodes; Jere H. Jenkins; James M. Longuski

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have analyzed Cs-137 decay data, obtained from a small sample onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft en route to Mercury, with the aim of setting limits on a possible correlation between nuclear decay rates and solar activity. Such a correlation has been suggested recently on the basis of data from Mn-54 decay during the solar flare of 13 December 2006, and by indications of an annual and other periodic variations in the decay rates of Si-32, Cl-36, and Ra-226. Data from five measurements of the Cs-137 count rate over a period of approximately 5.4 years have been fit to a formula which accounts for the usual exponential decrease in count rate over time, along with the addition of a theoretical solar contribution varying with MESSENGER-Sun separation. The indication of solar influence is then characterized by a non-zero value of the calculated parameter \\xi, and we find \\xi=(2.8+/-8.1)x10^{-3} for Cs-137. A simulation of the increased data that can hypothetically be expected following Mercury orbit insertion on 18 March 2011 suggests that the anticipated improvement in the determination of \\xi could reveal a non-zero value of \\xi if present at a level consistent with other data.

  14. Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniilidis, N.

    We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with a trapping height of approximately 240 ?m. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates ...

  15. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from condensation of vaporized material and subsequent rapid formation of aggregates. Particles of larger size, resulting from ejection of melted material or fragments from the cutting zone, were also observed. This study presents data regarding the metal cutting rate, particle size distribution, and their generation rate, while using different cutting tools and metals. The study shows that respirable particles constitute only a small fraction of the released kerf.

  16. Strain rate sensitive constitutive equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Charles Edward

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Computed Constants For Far'ous . Baterials 47 LIST OF FIGURFS Pace Figure I Comparison of Rate Data For Commercially Pure Aluminum Figure 2 Dynamic Loading Regimes 17 Figure 3 Yield Criteria 32 Figure 4 Uni-axial Stress-Strain Rate...

  17. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  18. Weathering rates of marble in laboratory and outdoor conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yerrapragada, S.S.; Chirra, S.R.; Jaynes, J.H.; Bandyopadhyay, J.K.; Gauri, K.L. [Univ of Louisville, KY (United States); Li, S. [Metro Services Lab., Louisville, KY (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the modern urban atmosphere SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} attack calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) in marble exposed at rain-sheltered surfaces creating largely gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O) crusts that eventually exfoliate. In combination with CO{sub 2} these gases erode the marble at unsheltered surfaces. the authors report the development of mathematical models to predict the rate of growth of crust and the rate of surface recession. To determine the rate of growth of crust the kinetic rate constant, diffusion rate, and the order of reaction were determined by the application of the shrinking-core model applied to data generated in laboratory experiments. Based on these parameters /and average ambient levels of 10 parts per billion (ppb) SO{sub 2} and 25 ppb NO{sub 2} in Louisville, Ky., the rate of crust formation for this metro area was calculated to be 1.8 {micro}m in the first year. However, the rate of recession was modeled from data obtained by exposing marble slabs to rainfalls. A surface recession of 15 {micro}m/yr was calculated. The models predicted well the rate of growth of crust observed at several sites in Louisville and the predicted surface recession compared well with values reported in the literature.

  19. Innovative Rates Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

  20. WP-07 Power Rate Case (rates/ratecases)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRates > Rate Cases > Rates

  1. Determining Outdoor CPV Cell Temperature: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, M.; Deline, C.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S.; Bosco, N.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate method is needed for determining cell temperature when measuring CPV modules outdoors. It has been suggested that cell temperature can be calculated though a procedure that shutters sunlight to the cells while measuring the transients in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and heat sink temperature. This paper documents application of this shutter procedure to multiple CPV modules at NREL. The challenges and limitations are presented along with an alternate approach to measuring CPV cell operating temperature.

  2. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part I. Estimation of the rate constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Technological Center

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ironmaking concept using iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets has been proposed, which involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) and an iron bath smelter. This part of the research focuses on studying the two primary chemical kinetic steps. Efforts have been made to experimentally measure the kinetics of the carbon gasification by CO{sub 2} and wustite reduction by CO by isolating them from the influence of heat- and mass-transport steps. A combined reaction model was used to interpret the experimental data and determine the rate constants. Results showed that the reduction is likely to be influenced by the chemical kinetics of both carbon oxidation and wustite reduction at the temperatures of interest. Devolatilized wood-charcoal was observed to be a far more reactive form of carbon in comparison to coal-char. Sintering of the iron-oxide at the high temperatures of interest was found to exert a considerable influence on the reactivity of wustite by virtue of altering the internal pore surface area available for the reaction. Sintering was found to be predominant for highly porous oxides and less of an influence on the denser ores. It was found using an indirect measurement technique that the rate constants for wustite reduction were higher for the porous iron-oxide than dense hematite ore at higher temperatures (> 1423 K). Such an indirect mode of measurement was used to minimize the influence of sintering of the porous oxide at these temperatures.

  3. Bottom and Charm Mass Determinations with a Convergence Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehnadi, Bahman; Mateu, Vicent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new determinations of the MS-bar charm quark mass using relativistic QCD sum rules at O(alpha_s^3) from the moments of the vector and the pseudoscalar current correlators. We use available experimental measurements from e+e- collisions and lattice simulation results, respectively. Our analysis of the theoretical uncertainties is based on different implementations of the perturbative series and on independent variations of the renormalization scales for the mass and the strong coupling. Taking into account the resulting set of series to estimate perturbative uncertainties is crucial, since some ways to treat the perturbative expansion can exhibit extraordinarily small scale dependence when the two scales are set equal. As an additional refinement, we address the issue that double scale variation could overestimate the perturbative uncertainties. We supplement the analysis with a test that quantifies the convergence rate of each perturbative series by a single number. We find that this convergence te...

  4. Gadolinium-neutron-activation determination with a Pu-Be source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konyaev, A.E.; Kositsyn, V.F.; Medvedev, A.B.; Rudenko, V.S.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nondestructive neutron activation method for determining gadolinium content for reactor construction materials was developed. The method uses a Pu-Be neutron source capable of giving 10/sup 8/ neutrons per second and the neutron reaction with a /sup 160/Gd target. To determine the flux attenuation, induced-activity distributions were measured along the radius with artificial compacts of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ specimens with varying gadolinium contents. The specimens were irradiated in unscreened and screened containers. The ratios of the unfiltered and filtered activities were not more than 1.06 +/- 0.04. The dependence of the gamma-ray absorption coefficient on gadolinium content and the effect of gadolinium content on the count rate due to /sup 161/Gd were determined. The nondestructive neutron-activation determination of gadolinium was possible for gadolinium concentrations where the radial induced-activity distribution was constant. The method for calculating the gamma-ray absorption coefficient was simple and reliable for measurement geometry close to 4pi. Neutron activation results agreed with chemical measurement within the error limits.

  5. Method and apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamel, W.R.

    1982-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required bending of the fluid flow.

  6. Supernova rates and stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

  7. The determination of time lags using SOLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank P. Pijpers

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A common problem in astronomy is the determination of the time shift between two otherwise identical time series of measured flux from a variable source, in short the determination of a time lag. Two examples of where this problem occurs are in the determination of the Hubble constant from multiple images of gravitationally lensed variable quasars and also in the determination of distances to OH/IR stars. It is shown here that this problem can be seen as a restricted inversion problem. It therefore can be solved using the subtractive optimally localized averages (SOLA) method for inversion which has been described elsewhere (Pijpers & Thompson 1992, 1994 ; Pijpers & Wanders 1994).

  8. Distance dependent rates of photoinduced charge separation and dark charge recombination in fixed distance porphyrin-quinone molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Niemczyk, M.P.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three zinc tetraphenylporphyrin-anthraquinone derivatives were prepared in which the edge-to-edge distances between the porphyrin and quinone ..pi.. systems are fixed by a rigid hydrocarbon spacer molecule. Triptycene, trans-1,2-diphenylcyclopentane, and adamantane were used to fix the porphyrin-anthraquinone distance at 2.5, 3.7, and 4.9 A, respectively. These molecules possess 1,2, and 3 saturated carbon atoms, respectively, between the porphyrin donor and the quinone acceptor. Rate constants for photoinduced electron transfer from the lowest excited singlet state of the zinc tetraphenylporphyrin donor to the anthraquinone acceptor were measured. In addition, the corresponding radical ion pair recombination rate constants for each of these molecules were also determined. The rate constants for both photoinduced charge separation and subsequent radical ion pair recombination decrease by approximately a factor of 10 for each saturated carbon atom intervening between the porphyrin donor and the quinone acceptor. These results are consistent with a model in which the rate of electron transfer is determined by weak mixing of the sigma orbitals of the saturated hydrocarbon spacer with the ..pi.. orbitals of the donor and acceptor. 22 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Synchronous Phasor-like Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Phasor measurement units struggle to make acceptable estimates of frequency and rate of change of frequency. The most important cause of the problem is that the quantity being measured is not actually a phasor. The paper substitutes a different equation for the phasor equatin, and obtains its solution by curve-fitting.

  10. MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    MANDATORY MEASURES OUTDOOR LIGHTING CONTROLS (Reference: Sub-Chapter 4, Section 130.2) #12;SECTION 5 Additions and Alterations Any alteration that increases the connected lighting load must meet all No measures required OUTDOOR LIGHTING11/20/2014 #12;SECTION 5 BACKLIGHT, UPLIGHT, AND GLARE (BUG) RATINGS

  11. Determination of the radioactive material and plutonium holdup in ducts and piping in the 324 Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haggard, D.L.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the measurements Performed to determine the radionuclide content and mass of plutonium in exposed ducts, filters, and piping in the 324 Building at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in Washington State. This information is needed to characterize facility radiation levels, to verify compliance with criticality safety specifications, and to allow more accurate nuclear material control using nondestructive assay (NDA) methods. Gamma assay techniques typically employed for NDA analysis were used to determine the gamma-emitting isotopes in the ducts, filters, and piping. Passive neutron counting was selected to estimate -the plutonium content because high gamma levels from fission and activation products effectively mask any gamma emissions from plutonium. A high-purity gamma-ray detector Was used to measure the mixed fission and activation radionuclides. A neutron slab detector containing five {sup 3}He proportional counters was used to determine the neutron emission rates and estimate the mass of plutonium present. Both measurement systems followed the methods and procedures routinely used for nuclear waste assay and safeguards measurements.

  12. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  13. association determines parathyroid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of...

  14. Measurement of sodium-argon cluster ion recombination by coherent microwave scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang Zhili [Mechanical, Aerospace and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996 (United States); Shneider, Mikhail N. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Viggiano, Albert A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This present work demonstrates a non-intrusive measurement of the rate constant for sodium-argon cluster ions (Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar) recombining with electrons. The measurements begin with resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization of the Na followed by coherent microwave scattering (radar) to monitor the plasma density. The Na{sup +}{center_dot}Ar adduct was formed in a three-body reaction. The plasma decay due to recombination reactions was monitored as a function of time and modeled to determine the rate constant. At 473 K, the rate constant is 1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}x10{sup -6}cm{sup 3}/s in an argon buffer at 100 Torr and initial Na number density of 5.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}.

  15. Measurement of neutron capture on 50Ti at thermonuclear energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. V. Sedyshev; P. Mohr; H. Beer; H. Oberhummer; Yu. P. Popov; W. Rochow

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Karlsruhe and Tuebingen 3.75 MV Van de Graaff accelerators the thermonuclear 50Ti(n,gamma)51Ti(5.8 min) cross section was measured by the fast cyclic activation technique via the 320.852 and 928.65 keV gamma-ray lines of the 51Ti-decay. Metallic Ti samples of natural isotopic composition and samples of TiO2 enriched in 50Ti by 67.53 % were irradiated between two gold foils which served as capture standards. The capture cross-section was measured at the neutron energies 25, 30, 52, and 145 keV, respectively. The direct capture cross section was determined to be 0.387 +/- 0.011 mbarn at 30 keV. We found evidence for a bound state s-wave resonance with an estimated radiative width of 0.34 eV which destructively interfers with direct capture. The strength of a suggested s-wave resonance at 146.8 keV was determined. The present data served to calculate, in addition to the directly measured Maxwellian averaged capture cross sections at 25 and 52 keV, an improved stellar 50Ti(n,gamma)51Ti rate in the thermonuclear energy region from 1 to 250 keV. The new stellar rate leads at low temperatures to much higher values than the previously recommended rate, e.g., at kT=8 keV the increase amounts to about 50 %. The new reaction rate therefore reduces the abundance of 50Ti due to s-processing in AGB stars.

  16. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy`s treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation.

  17. Additional experimental evidence against a solar influence on nuclear decay rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric B. Norman

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Conflicting results from two experiments studying the decay of Cl-36 point to instrumental artifacts rather than a solar influence being responsible for variations in measured counting rates.

  18. Measurement of radionuclides in waste packages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodzinski, Ronald L. (Richland, WA); Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA); Rieck, Henry G. (Richland, WA); Wogman, Ned A. (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for non-destructively assaying the radionuclide content of solid waste in a sealed container by analysis of the waste's gamma-ray spectrum and neutron emissions. Some radionuclides are measured by characteristic photopeaks in the gamma-ray spectrum; transuranic nuclides are measured by neutron emission rate; other radionuclides are measured by correlation with those already measured.

  19. Method of detecting system function by measuring frequency response

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, John L.; Morrison, William H.; Christophersen, Jon P.; Motloch, Chester G.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of rapidly measuring an impedance spectrum of an energy storage device in-situ over a limited number of logarithmically distributed frequencies are described. An energy storage device is excited with a known input signal, and a response is measured to ascertain the impedance spectrum. An excitation signal is a limited time duration sum-of-sines consisting of a select number of frequencies. In one embodiment, magnitude and phase of each frequency of interest within the sum-of-sines is identified when the selected frequencies and sample rate are logarithmic integer steps greater than two. This technique requires a measurement with a duration of one period of the lowest frequency. In another embodiment, where selected frequencies are distributed in octave steps, the impedance spectrum can be determined using a captured time record that is reduced to a half-period of the lowest frequency.

  20. Environmental Radioactivity Measurements in Harran Plain of Sanliurfa, Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozkurt, A.; Yorulmaz, N. [Harran University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Osmanbey Campus, 63300, Sanliurfa (Turkey); Kam, E. [TAEK, Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Centre, Altinsehir Yolu 5. km, Halkali, 34303 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to assess the environmental radioactivity levels of Harran Plain located within the boundaries of the south-eastern province of Sanliurfa, Turkey. In addition to being at the center of Turkey's major irrigation and development project (South Eastern Anatolian Project, GAP), this 1500 km2 region is famous for its historic attractions. The outdoor gamma dose rates were measured at selected points of the study area using a plastic scintillator. The activity concentrations in the soil samples collected from the study area were determined by gamma spectrometry for the natural radionuclides 238U, 232Th and 40K and the fission product 137Cs. The gross alpha and beta activities in the water samples collected from the region was measured using a low-level gamma spectrometry device. A comparison of the measurement results obtained in this study with those of national and world averages are presented in graphical and tabular forms.