National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ratified accepted acceded

  1. Belarus ratifies START I pact; Ukraine remains last holdout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockwood, D.

    1993-03-01

    The Belarus Parliment ratified START I by a vote of 218 to 1 on February 4, 1993. The Parliment also voted to accede to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty as a non-nuclear weapon state. The Parliment also passed two companion accords with Russia to coordinate the withdrawal of the ICBMs now in Belarus and to define the legal states of those weapons. Ukraine remains the only party to START I that has not yet approved the treaty.

  2. Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The United States Ratifies The Convention On Supplementary Compensation United States and France Sign Joint Statement on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage A Statement from U.S. ...

  3. Acceptance Criteria - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G and I clarified requirements throughout the appendices. Appendix I, Table I-1 in the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the "Payload Container Description" removed "208-L (55 gal)...

  4. TPO's Acceptance Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER'S ACCEPTANCE REPORT DATE OF REQUEST: AWARD NUMBER: DE- AWARD PERIOD FROM: TO: NAME OF AWARDEE: PROJECT TITLE: OVERALL RATING OF AWARDEE'S PERFORMANCE ...

  5. Consumers (Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure) Consumer Acceptance Group A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONSUMERS (CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE AND CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE) EV Everywhere Workshop July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers * Building category awareness * "Butts in the seat" * \Car sharing & rental * DOE should run a pilot project with rental car & car sharing companies to subsidize initial integration of Evs into those fleets * Social media * Groupon coupons - need to use the breadth of available social media

  6. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C ...

  7. Cathodic protection acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordquist, E.M.

    1994-09-02

    This acceptance test procedure is to document testing of added anodes to existing Rectifier No. 11. Anodes were added under Project W-151, Tank 101-AZ Waste Retrieval System.

  8. Acceptable Documents for Identity Proofing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is a requirement that the identity of a DOE Digital Identity Subscriber be verified against acceptable identity source documents. A Subscriber must appear in person and present their Federal...

  9. Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Japanese ratification of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) marks an important milestone towards creating a global nuclear liability regime that will assure prompt and meaningful compensation in the event of a nuclear accident and will facilitate international cooperation on nuclear projects such as ongoing clean-up work at the Fukushima site."

  10. The United States Ratifies The Convention On Supplementary Compensatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (CSC) Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the 2014 IAEA General Conference -- As Prepared for Delivery United States and France Sign Joint Statement on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage

  11. Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    , Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Mixed Transuranic Waste Streams Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge Summary...

  12. Wind Energy Community Acceptance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Energy Community Acceptance Jump to: navigation, search Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 21768 The following resources address community acceptance topics. Resources...

  13. Technical Position, Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing and Recording Radiation Doses to Individuals Technical Position, Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing and Recording Radiation Doses...

  14. Acceptance of Smaller CHP Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Market Acceptance of Smaller CHP Systems This project developed a flexible, packaged combined heat and power (CHP) system that produces 330 kilowatts (kW) of electrical power output and 410 kW of thermal output while increasing efficiency and reducing total cost of owner- ship. Introduction Many CHP systems less than 1 megawatt (MW) use reciprocat- ing internal combustion engines. Unfortunately, reductions in the size of these engines are associated with reduced effciency and increased

  15. Acceptance and Rejection of CSES Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accepting, Rejecting Proposals Acceptance and Rejection of CSES Proposals High quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. Contact Director Reiner Friedel (505) 665-1936 Email Professional Staff Assistant Georgia D. Sanchez (505) 665-0855 Email Acceptance Final decisions on acceptance and/or rejection of all proposals are reached after each science discipline's review meeting, held right after the close of

  16. Nuclear power and public acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschmann, H.

    1989-01-01

    Public acceptance is a decisive factor of growing importance, although economics has been and will remain the most decisive factor in ordering new nuclear capacity. Nuclear energy can make an important contribution toward preventing and reducing the greenhouse effect. Many politicians tend to base their decisions not on facts but rather on so called public opinion and consequently to overreact in particular on environmental issues. The entire debate hinges on public confidence rather than on a lack of information. There is no 100% guarantee that technical facilities will operate completely accident-free. Therefore, standards should be harmonized, plants should be operated safely and consequences of possible accidents should be limited. There needs to be some kind of early information system between countries concerning upcoming issues as a prerequisite for acting instead of reacting, because this is an essential tool in convincing the public that they can have more confidence. Technical information alone does not answer the real questions of the public. Political, technical, and economic matters as well as public opinion are interwoven and cannot be separated from each. Therefore, the exchange of experience gained in all these sectors on an international basis must be improved.

  17. Nuclear Engineering Science Laboratory Synthesis program accepting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Engineering Science Laboratory Synthesis program accepting applications for spring, summer 2016 Opportunity provides students with research experience at Oak Ridge National ...

  18. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles...

  19. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Environmental...

  20. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Backsplash for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA...

  1. EV Everywhere ? Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop David Sandalow Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs U.S....

  2. Part IV: Section E - Inspection and Acceptance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section E - Page ii PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 FAR 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) 1 E.2 Acceptance 1 E.3 Certification 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section E - Page 1 of 1 PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 FAR 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) The Government has the right to inspect and

  3. FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL counterintelligence FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post Cloyd has most ... Cloyd brings to Los Alamos 25 years of FBI experience in counterintelligence (including ...

  4. SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted S. Wood; Curtis L. Smith

    2009-07-01

    This document describe & report the overall SAPHIRE 8 Software acceptance test paln to offically release the SAPHIRE version 8 software to the NRC custoer for distribution.

  5. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  6. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-17

    This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

  7. Approaches to acceptable risk: a critical guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischhoff, B.; Lichtenstein, S.; Slovic, P.; Keeney, R.; Derby, S.

    1980-12-01

    Acceptable-risk decisions are an essential step in the management of technological hazards. In many situations, they constitute the weak (or missing) link in the management process. The absence of an adequate decision-making methodology often produces indecision, inconsistency, and dissatisfaction. The result is neither good for hazard management nor good for society. This report offers a critical analysis of the viability of various approaches as guides to acceptable-risk decisions. This report seeks to define acceptable-risk decisions and to examine some frequently proposed, but inappropriate, solutions. 255 refs., 22 figs., 25 tabs.

  8. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  9. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    November 26, 2014 - 2:55pm Addthis The Energy Department began accepting applications on November 24 for its FY 2015 Phase 1 grant topics, including a Wind Program topic, under the ...

  10. Gas characterization system software acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vo, C.V.

    1996-03-28

    This document details the results of software acceptance testing of gas characterization systems. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  11. Part IV: Section E - Inspection and Acceptance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) 1 E.2 Acceptance 1 E.3 Certification 1 ... Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) The Government has the right to inspect ...

  12. Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the holiday season approaches, it is important to remember there are restrictions on Federal employees accepting gifts from outside sources and from other Federal employees. Just as there is no "working lunch" exception to the gift prohibition, there is no "holiday party" exception. A gift includes anything of monetary value, including a gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, training, transportation, lodging, and

  13. Nuclear Engineering Science Laboratory Synthesis program accepting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications for spring, summer 2016 Nuclear Engineering Science Laboratory Synthesis program accepting applications for spring, summer 2016 Opportunity provides students with research experience at Oak Ridge National Laboratory FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 11, 2015 FY16-06 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The Nuclear Engineering Science Laboratory Synthesis (NESLS) program is accepting applications for spring and summer 2016. NESLS is a cooperative research initiative at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

  14. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA

  15. Acceptance Priority Ranking & Annual Capacity Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-31

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (the Act), assigns the Federal Government the responsibility for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. Section 302(a) of the Act authorizes the Secretary to enter into contracts with the owners and generators of commercial spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste. The Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (Standard Contract) established the contractual mechanism for the Department's acceptance and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. It includes the requirements and operational responsibilities of the parties to the Standard Contract in the areas of administrative matters, fees, terms of payment, waste acceptance criteria, and waste acceptance procedures. The Standard Contract provides for the acquisition of title to the spent nuclear fuel and/or high-level waste by the Department, its transportation to Federal facilities, and its subsequent disposal.

  16. Hanford Site solid waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellefson, M.D.

    1998-07-01

    Order 5820.2A requires that each treatment, storage, and/or disposal facility (referred to in this document as TSD unit) that manages low-level or transuranic waste (including mixed waste and TSCA PCB waste) maintain waste acceptance criteria. These criteria must address the various requirements to operate the TSD unit in compliance with applicable safety and environmental requirements. This document sets forth the baseline criteria for acceptance of radioactive waste at TSD units operated by WMH. The criteria for each TSD unit have been established to ensure that waste accepted can be managed in a manner that is within the operating requirements of the unit, including environmental regulations, DOE Orders, permits, technical safety requirements, waste analysis plans, performance assessments, and other applicable requirements. Acceptance criteria apply to the following TSD units: the Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBG) including both the nonregulated portions of the LLBG and trenches 31 and 34 of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground for mixed waste disposal; Central Waste Complex (CWC); Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP); and T Plant Complex. Waste from all generators, both from the Hanford Site and from offsite facilities, must comply with these criteria. Exceptions can be granted as provided in Section 1.6. Specific waste streams could have additional requirements based on the 1901 identified TSD pathway. These requirements are communicated in the Waste Specification Records (WSRds). The Hanford Site manages nonradioactive waste through direct shipments to offsite contractors. The waste acceptance requirements of the offsite TSD facility must be met for these nonradioactive wastes. This document does not address the acceptance requirements of these offsite facilities.

  17. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program accepting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications for 2017-2018 Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program accepting applications for 2017-2018 Deadline for applying is Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE August 19, 2016 FY16-44 Chad Becker, Eddy Whitson and Kevin Fritts with EPA ENERGY STAR certificate WASHINGTON, D.C.-The U.S. Department of Energy's Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is now accepting applications for 2017-2018. The program provides a unique opportunity for

  18. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2005-10-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  19. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept the following: • DOE hazardous and non-hazardous non-radioactive classified waste • DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW) • DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) • U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and shall be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. Classified waste may be sent to the NNSS as classified matter. Section 3.1.18 provides the requirements that must be met for permanent burial of classified matter. The NNSA/NFO and support contractors are available to assist the generator in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NFO Environmental Management Operations (EMO) at (702) 295-7063, and the call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  20. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2012-02-28

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept DOE non-radioactive classified waste, DOE non-radioactive hazardous classified waste, DOE low-level radioactive waste (LLW), DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste for permanent disposal. Classified waste is the only waste accepted for disposal that may be non-radioactive and will be required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for radioactive waste as specified in this document. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project (WMP) at (702) 295-7063, and your call will be directed to the appropriate contact.

  1. Energy Department Extends Acceptance Policy for Spent Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy Department Extends Acceptance Policy for Spent Nuclear Fuel from Foreign Research Reactors December 06, 2004 Energy Department Extends Acceptance Policy for Spent Nuclear ...

  2. EERE Success Story-Challenge Accepted: Reducing the Soft Costs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Challenge Accepted: Reducing the Soft Costs of Going Solar EERE Success Story-Challenge Accepted: ... solar capacity, which is enough energy to power approximately 100,000 homes. ...

  3. Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow Control in Residential Retrofit Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow ...

  4. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action ...

  5. Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, ...

  6. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- EM (RWAP) Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Acceptance Program NNSANFO Language Options U.S. DOENNSA - Nevada Field Office Click to subscribe to NNSS News Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP) RWAP photo The mission ...

  7. Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Acceptability of Sustainable Transport Measures: A Review of the Literature Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Acceptability of Sustainable...

  8. Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of ESPC Projects Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of ESPC Projects ...

  9. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, ...

  10. Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, ...

  11. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-01-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  12. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-09-03

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

  13. FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL counterintelligence FBI officer accepts LANL counterintelligence post Cloyd has most recently served as assistant director of the Counterintelligence Division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters. November 10, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

  14. DOE/NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Proper Characterization and Disposal of Sealed Radioactive Sources Revision 2, October 1997 Revised by: DOE/NV Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program and The NTSWAC Working Group EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The "Position Paper on the Proper Characterization and Disposal of Sealed Radioactive Sources" was originally developed by the NVO-325 Work Group, Sealed Source Waste Characterization Subgroup. The NVO-325 Workgroup, now called the NTSWAC Working Group, is comprised of representatives

  15. Los Alamos Venture Acceleration Fund accepting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) Los Alamos Selected as Atomic Weapons Laboratory Los Alamos, NM Groves selects Los Alamos, New Mexico, as site for separate scientific laboratory to design an atomic bomb

    Funding available for New Mexico businesses February 6, 2013 Los Alamos Venture Acceleration Fund accepting 2013 applications LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, February 6, 2013-The Venture Acceleration Fund (VAF) of Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), the company that manages and operates Los

  16. Call for Proposals: VAF Now Accepting Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 VAF Call for Proposals Call for Proposals: VAF Now Accepting Applications Selected companies will receive financial awards to assist in taking their innovations to market more quickly. The median award amount has averaged $45,000. March 7, 2016 VAF call for proposals The VAF is the only non-dilutive local source of seed financing for very early stage technology startups in northern New Mexico. The funding fills a unique niche in that it supports companies that lack collateral for debt

  17. Acceptance Criteria Framework for Autonomous Biological Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzenitis, J M

    2006-12-12

    The purpose of this study was to examine a set of user acceptance criteria for autonomous biological detection systems for application in high-traffic, public facilities. The test case for the acceptance criteria was the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) operating in high-traffic facilities in New York City (NYC). However, the acceptance criteria were designed to be generally applicable to other biological detection systems in other locations. For such detection systems, ''users'' will include local authorities (e.g., facility operators, public health officials, and law enforcement personnel) and national authorities [including personnel from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the BioWatch Program, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)]. The panel members brought expertise from a broad range of backgrounds to complete this picture. The goals of this document are: (1) To serve as informal guidance for users in considering the benefits and costs of these systems. (2) To serve as informal guidance for developers in understanding the needs of users. In follow-up work, this framework will be used to systematically document the APDS for appropriateness and readiness for use in NYC.

  18. Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts Guidance on the Acceptance of Gifts by Federal Employees Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts (45.27 KB) More Documents & Publications PROCESSING INVITATIONS FOR A PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEE Inspection Report: IG-0754 Table 10 Costs of Foreign Travel, IG-0397

  19. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C Breakout Report | Department of Energy Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C Breakout Report Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA group_c_report_out_caci.pdf

  20. Site acceptance test, W-030 MICON system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-10

    Monitoring and control of the W-030 ventilation upgrade is provided by a distributed control system (DCS) furnished by MICON Corporation. After shipment to the Hanford Site, the site acceptance test (SAT) for this system was conducted in a laboratory environment over a six month period, involving four distinct phases and numerous hardware and software modifications required to correct test exceptions. The final results is a system which is not fully compliant with procurement specifications but is determined to meet minimum Project W-030 safety and functional requirements. A negotiated settlement was reached with the supplier to establish a `path forward` for system implementation. This report documents the `as-run` status of the SAT. The SAT was completed in August of 1995. It was later followed by comprehensive acceptance testing of the W-030 control-logic configuration software; results are documented in WHC-SD-W030-ATR-011. Further testing is reported as part of process system startup operational testing, performed after the MICON installation.

  1. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines David ... DE-AC36-08GO28308 Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test ...

  2. Applications are now being accepted for the Broader Engagement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    now being accepted for the Broader Engagement Program at SC14 May 5, 2014 by Richard Gerber Applications are now being accepted for the Broader Engagement (BE) Program at SC14,...

  3. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid - June 6, 2013 | Department of Energy Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid, approved at the June 5-6, 2013 EAC Meeting. EAC Recommendations for DOE Action on Consumer Acceptance of Smart Grid - June 6, 2013 (338.72 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Responses to EAC Work Products - September 2013

  4. Guidelines and Checklist for Commissioning and Government Acceptance of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ESPC ENABLE Projects | Department of Energy and Checklist for Commissioning and Government Acceptance of ESPC ENABLE Projects Guidelines and Checklist for Commissioning and Government Acceptance of ESPC ENABLE Projects Document provides guidance and a checklist to help agencies through the final steps of the ESPC ENABLE project, including project acceptance. By accepting the work of the energy service company (ESCO), the agency is confirming that the energy conservation measures have been

  5. Social Acceptance of Wind: A Brief Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation discusses concepts and trends in social acceptance of wind energy, profiles recent research findings, and discussions mitigation strategies intended to resolve wind power social acceptance challenges as informed by published research and the experiences of individuals participating in the International Energy Agencies Working Group on Social Acceptance of Wind Energy

  6. ENHANCING STAKEHOLDER ACCEPTANCE OF BIOREMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Focht, Will; Albright, Matt; Anex, Robert P., Jr., ed.

    2009-04-21

    This project inquired into the judgments and beliefs of people living near DOE reservations and facilities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, Tennessee about bioremediation of subsurface contamination. The purpose of the investigation was to identify strategies based on these judgments and beliefs for enhancing public support of bioremediation. Several methods were used to collect and analyze data including content analysis of transcripts of face-to-face personal interviews, factor analysis of subjective perspectives using Q methodology, and statistical analysis of results from a large-sample randomized telephone survey. Content analysis of interview transcripts identified themes about public perceptions and constructions of contamination risk, risk management, and risk managers. This analysis revealed that those who have no employment relationship at the sites and are not engaged in technical professions are most concerned about contamination risks. We also found that most interviewees are unfamiliar with subsurface contamination risks and how they can be reduced, believe they have little control over exposure, are frustrated with the lack of progress in remediation, are concerned about a lack of commitment of DOE to full remediation, and distrust site managers to act in the public interest. Concern is also expressed over frequent site management turnover, excessive secrecy, ineffective and biased communication, perceived attempts to talk the public into accepting risk, and apparent lack of concern about community welfare. In the telephone survey, we asked respondents who were aware of site contamination about their perceptions of risk from exposure to subsurface contamination. Response analysis revealed that most people believe that they are at significant risk from subsurface contamination but they acknowledge that more education is needed to calibrate risk perceptions against scientific risk assessments. Most rate their personal

  7. ORISE Contract, PART I - SCHEDULE, Section E Inspection and Acceptance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 52.246-5 INSPECTION OF SERVICES - COST-REIMBURSEMENT (APR 1984) ......................................................................................................................... 3 E.2 ACCEPTANCE (MAY 1997) .......................................................................................... 4 Section E - Page 1 of 4 DE-AC05-06OR23100 Blank Page Section E - Page 2 of 4 DE-AC05-06OR23100 PART I - SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 52.246-5

  8. Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer | Jefferson Lab Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology Officer Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology Officer Drew Weisenberger Drew Weisenberger, who has led the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at Jefferson Lab since 2008, recently accepted the additional role of Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for the lab. Andrew "Drew" Weisenberger, head of the Experimental Nuclear Physics Division's Radiation Detector

  9. Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ESPC Projects | Department of Energy Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of ESPC Projects Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government Acceptance of ESPC Projects Document lists all the elements required for a completed energy savings performance contract (ESPC) project to receive federal government acceptance. Download the guidance, checklist, and contract clauses. (89.5 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide to Government Witnessing and

  10. Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Projects | Department of Energy Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects Energy, Treasury Now Accepting Applications for Funding For Renewable Energy Projects July 31, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - With the goal of expanding development of renewable energy projects throughout the United States and creating new jobs, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of the Treasury today announced they are now accepting

  11. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy Agenda EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Agenda Agenda for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA agenda_caci.pdf (218.57 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop - Backsplash EV Everywhere Grand Challenge:

  12. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Turbines | Department of Energy Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Large Wind Turbines November 26, 2014 - 2:55pm Addthis The Energy Department began accepting applications on November 24 for its FY 2015 Phase 1 grant topics, including a Wind Program topic, under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. SBIR/STTR grants are

  13. Applications Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy Applications Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy January 19, 2010 - 3:10pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for The National Geothermal Academy. Funded by the Geothermal Technologies Program, this 8-week intensive summer course for undergraduate and graduate students covers all aspects of geothermal energy development from

  14. Applications Now Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Now Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy Applications Now Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy January 19, 2011 - 4:46pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Program is pleased to announce that applications are now being accepted for The National Geothermal Academy. Funded by the Geothermal Technologies Program, this 8-week intensive summer course for undergraduate and graduate students covers all aspects of geothermal

  15. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications | Department of Energy Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting Applications March 26, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - A Department of Energy (DOE) program that helps graduate students and early career professionals gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) is accepting applications

  16. Guidelines and Checklist for Commissioning and Government Acceptance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines and Checklist for Commissioning and Government Acceptance of ESPC ENABLE ... More Documents & Publications Guidelines, Checklist, and Contract Clauses for Government ...

  17. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance Workshop: Breakout Group B...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon Group B - Consumer Acceptance Report Out.pdf More Documents & ...

  18. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon ...

  19. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attnedance list for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon ...

  20. CRF Experiment Confirms Accepted Oxidation Scheme of Proposed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EnergyWater History Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Decision Models for ... generally accepted dimethyl ether (DME) oxidation scheme at low temperature (540 K, 267 C). ...

  1. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop- Backsplash

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Backsplash for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA

  2. Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    units complies with all environmental, safety, and operational requirements. This web site describes the Hanford Site program for acceptance of radioactive waste....

  3. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  4. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now ... Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research ...

  5. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now ... (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. ...

  6. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2016 Now Accepting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2016 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in ... professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon ...

  7. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now ... professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon ...

  8. Oh Canada! B.C. ratifies North America's first carbon tax

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2008-08-15

    British Columbia began collecting increased tax revenue on fossil fuels on July 1 with a promise to rebate those taxes through reduced income and business tax rates. This 'revenue recycling' plan makes little progress toward the province's goal to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions 33% by 2020, yet it is hailed by proponents as a legislative milestone. Others believe BC residents are victims of another governmental 'bait and switch' program. This paper examines the legislation. 2 figs.

  9. Structural acceptance criteria Remote Handling Building Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mertz, G.

    1999-12-16

    This structural acceptance criteria contains the requirements for the structural analysis and design of the Remote Handling Building (RHB) in the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF). The purpose of this acceptance criteria is to identify the specific criteria and methods that will ensure a structurally robust building that will safely perform its intended function and comply with the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) structural requirements.

  10. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation & Control Skid V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-08-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  11. Rotary mode core sampling service trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-056. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-111 Rev.1.

  12. Social Acceptance of Geothermal Power Generation in Japan | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Generation in Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Social Acceptance of Geothermal Power Generation in Japan Abstract In...

  13. Survey of methods for improving operator acceptance of computerized aids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frey, P. R.; Kisner, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    The success of current attempts to improve the operational performance and safety of nuclear power plants by installing computerized operational aids in the control rooms is dependent, in part, on the operator's attitude toward the aid. Utility experience with process computer systems indicates that problems may already exist with operator acceptance of computerized aids. The growth of the role that computers have in nuclear power plants makes user acceptance of computer technology an important issue for the nuclear industry. The purpose of this report is to draw from the literature factors related to user acceptance of computerized equipment that may also be applicable to the acceptance of computerized aids used in the nuclear power plant control room.

  14. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator F7 Flight Unit Acceptance Buy Off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-20

    These are viewgraphs from the subject presentation. The LMMS E-7 history is outlined; Qualification and use of the F-7 GPHS-RTG for the Cassini mission; and the F-7 acceptance test program and performance are described.

  15. 1-MWe heat exchangers for OTEC. Final acceptance document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, J.E.

    1980-06-19

    Acceptance documents for major units of 1 MWe OTEC heat exchangers, including condensers and evaporators, are provided. Included are a transportation plan for the heat exchangers and design specifications for the phase separator. (LEW)

  16. EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Waste Acceptance Product Specification (WAPS) for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms Presentation to the HLW Corporate Board July 24, 2008 By Tony KlukKen Picha 2 Background * ...

  17. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN19.6 and 200 GeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  18. Draft EA for the Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA for the Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly ... AND DISPOSITION OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL CONTAINING U.S.-ORIGIN HIGHLY ENRICHED ...

  19. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance Workshop: Breakout Group B Report Out

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Group B breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA

  20. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin...

  1. Social Acceptance of Geothermal Energy in Southern Italy | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Social Acceptance of Geothermal Energy in Southern Italy Abstract Although Italy has any possible reason to be...

  2. CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLAB ACCESS: The REAL ID Act (Public Law 109-13) now determines which state driver's license can be presented and accepted as a valid ID document for access to Jefferson Lab. The...

  3. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) | Department of Energy Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies (June 2015) Since 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy, using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the electric power industry have jointly

  4. Los Alamos Waste Acceptance Criteria | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Acceptance Criteria Los Alamos Waste Acceptance Criteria This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Additional documents referenced and listed in the Phase 2 Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14, 2014, report in Attachment F. Bibliography and References, are available on various public

  5. Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deadline Is March 27 | Department of Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27 Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications: Deadline Is March 27 March 12, 2015 - 11:49am Addthis Deborah Tewa focused on tribal off-grid photovoltaic systems and renewable energy systems during her 2002 internship. Photo courtesy from Sandra Begay-Campbell, Sandia National Laboratories. Deborah Tewa focused on tribal off-grid photovoltaic systems and

  6. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Mahlon Heileson

    2006-10-01

    The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

  7. NNSA Accepts University of California Settlement Offer for Deficiencies in

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Procedure | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Accepts University of California Settlement Offer for Deficiencies in Security Procedure December 17, 2007 WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has accepted an offer from the University of California regarding the final notice of violation issued to the university in September 2007 for violations of the department's classified information security requirements during

  8. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Introduction | Department of Energy Workshop Introduction EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Introduction Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA 1_sandalow_caci.pdf (3.39 MB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Framing Workshop Overview EV Everywhere Battery Workshop Introduction EV Everywhere Grand Challenge

  9. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Report | Department of Energy D Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Report Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA group_d_report_out_caci.pdf (148.33 KB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Consumer

  10. SUSTAINABILITY NEWS EPA's 2013 Federal Electronics Challenge Accepting Nominations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EPA's 2013 Federal Electronics Challenge Accepting Nominations Nominations are currently being accepted for the Environmental Protection Agency's 2013 Federal Electronics Challenge (FEC). The FEC recognizes teams and individuals from across the Federal government who demonstrate a commitment to electronic stewardship through sustainable purchasing, management, and disposal of electronic assets. Last year, DOE won one-third of all FEC awards. The deadline for nominations is January 31, 2013. For

  11. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-04-10

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

  12. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  13. Strain-Based Acceptance Criteria for Energy-Limited Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer D. Snow; Dana K. Morton

    2009-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code was primarily written with stress-based acceptance criteria. These criteria are applicable to force, displacement, and energy-controlled loadings and ensure a factor of safety against failure. However, stress-based acceptance criteria are often quite conservative for one time energy-limited events such as accidental drops and impacts. For several years, the ASME Working Group on Design of Division 3 Containments has been developing the Design Articles for Section III, Division 3, “Containments for Transportation and Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Material and Waste,” and has wanted to establish strain-based acceptance criteria for accidental drops of containments. This Division 3 working group asked the Working Group on Design Methodology (WGDM) to assist in developing these strain-based acceptance criteria. This paper discusses the current proposed strain-based acceptance criteria, associated limitations of use, its background development, and the current status.

  14. Determinants of debit cards acceptance: An empirical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, Shafinar; Adnan, Azimah; Azizi, Amsyar; Bakri, Mohamed Hariri; Zulkepli, Jafri

    2014-12-04

    These days, most of the Malaysians realize that the consumption of debit card will help them to reduce the household debt. Thus, it is important to analyse the acceptance of debit cards for further enhancement and expanding its market share in Malaysia. In addition, there is lacked of research being conducted on the determinants affecting the acceptance of debit cards among Malaysians. Thus, the study aimed to investigate the factors affecting the acceptance of debit cards. This study focuses on payment methods, consumer attitude, and safety of debit card in acceptance of debit cards. Questionnaires were distributed to the 300 respondents. The sampling procedure adopted was stratified random sampling. The data obtained were analysed using SPSS 20.0 which involves scale reliability, descriptive and regression analysis. The result indicates that payment methods, consumer attitude and safety are the determinants of debit cards acceptance. Safety is the best predictor as most of the customers are confidents to use debit cards because of the security being developed around these debit card transactions. The analyses presented in this study can be used by policymakers and managers as a guide to promote banking products and services. The findings achieved in this study will be of interest for practitioners and academics concerned with developments of the Malaysian banking industry.

  15. Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, R.A.

    1995-03-06

    The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

  16. PUREX SAMCONS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-10-07

    This Acceptance Test Report for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Acceptance Test Procedure validates the operation of the UPS, all alarming and display functions and the ability of the UPS to supply power to the SAMCONS as designed. The proper installation of the PUREX SAMCONS Trailer UPS components and wiring will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of the SAMCONS computer UPS will be verified by performance of a timed functional load test, and verification of associated alarms and trouble indications. This test procedure will be performed in the SAMCONS Trailer and will include verification of receipt of alarms at the SAMCONS computer stations. This test may be performed at any time after the completion of HNF-SD-CP-ATP-083, PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Acceptance Test Procedure, when computer display and alarm functions have been proven to operate correctly.

  17. Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies | Department of Energy Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies Now Available: Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies June 26, 2015 - 5:30pm Addthis Since 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy, using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and the electric power

  18. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2006-06-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

  19. CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS: The REAL ID Act (Public Law 109-13) now determines which state driver's license can be presented and accepted as a valid ID document for access to Jefferson Lab. The following states/US territories have been determined by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to have failed to comply with the REAL ID Act: American Samoa, Minnesota, Missouri, Washington As of March 2, 2015, Jefferson Lab will begin using the REAL ID Act verification for all

  20. Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy The documents included in this listing are additional references not included in the Phase 2 Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Attachment F: Bibliography and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the final report. Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOE

  1. Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrader, T. A.; Macbeth, P. J.

    2002-02-26

    On February 25, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLW/MLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLW/MLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified dispos al process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

  2. Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHRADER, T.; MACBETH, P.

    2002-01-01

    On February 25, 2000, the US. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLWMLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLWMLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified disposal process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

  3. Gas characterization system 241-AN-105 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AN-105. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  4. Gas characterization system 241-AW-101 field acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1996-03-01

    This document details the field Acceptance Testing of a gas characterization system being installed on waste tank 241-AW-101. The gas characterization systems will be used to monitor the vapor spaces of waste tanks known to contain measurable concentrations of flammable gases.

  5. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T.; McCurley, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection.

  6. NNSS Waste Acceptance 11-6-13_final_print-ready

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NNSS Waste Acceptance Waste disposed at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) must comply with the NNSS waste acceptance criteria. Compliance is evaluated by a team of experts ...

  7. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  8. MCO combustible gas management leak test acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHERRELL, D.L.

    1999-05-11

    Existing leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed multi-canister overpacks (MCO) were evaluated to ensure that MCOs can be handled and stored in stagnant air without compromising the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project's overall strategy to prevent accumulation of combustible gas mixtures within MCO's or within their surroundings. The document concludes that the integrated leak test acceptance criteria for mechanically sealed and weld sealed MCOs (1 x 10{sup -5} std cc/sec and 1 x 10{sup -7} std cc/sec, respectively) are adequate to meet all current and foreseeable needs of the project, including capability to demonstrate compliance with the NFPA 60 Paragraph 3-3 requirement to maintain hydrogen concentrations [within the air atmosphere CSB tubes] t or below 1 vol% (i.e., at or below 25% of the LFL).

  9. 105 K East isolation barrier acceptance analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCracken, K.J.; Irwin, J.J.

    1995-05-31

    The objective of this document is to report and interpret the findings of the isolation barrier acceptance tests performed in 105KE/100K. The tests were performed in accordance with the test plan (McCracken 1995c) and acceptance test procedure (McCracken 1995a). The test report (McCracken 1995b) contains the test data. This document compares the test data (McCracken 1995b) against the criteria (McCracken 1995a, c). A discussion of the leak rate analytical characterization (Irwin 1995) describes how the flow characteristics and the flow rate will be determined using the test data from the test report (McCracken 1995b). The barriers must adequately control the leakage from the main basin to the discharge chute to less than the 1,500 gph (5,680 lph) Safety Analysis Report (SAR 1994) limit.

  10. Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) Model (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Objectives Forecasts sales of competing vehicle technologies among consumer segments. Analyzes how technology, infrastructure, consumer behavior, and policy affect sales of new technologies and determines the resulting societal, environmental and economic impacts. Key Attributes & Strengths MA3T can be used to investigate the societal benefits, costs, and employment impacts of market transitions

  11. ORISE: ORISE now accepting applications for EERE Postdoctoral Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awards now accepting applications for EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards Ph.D. recipients will conduct research in energy efficiency and renewable energy at universities, national laboratories and other research facilities FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 19, 2016 FY16-25 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORISE, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) institute, is seeking Ph.D. researchers for a paid, two-year fellowship through the DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE). The EERE Postdoctoral

  12. Rotary mode core sampling service trailer Acceptance Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-11-28

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-056 Rev.2 including ECNs 608798 and 616386. The equipment being tested is a furniture type trailer with storage cabinets, lighting and HVAC systems installed. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The ATP be performed by representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company with the assistance of the Seller at the Seller`s location.

  13. ORISE: Applications being accepted for internships and research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    opportunities with Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Program Applications being accepted for internships and research opportunities with Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management Program ORAU-administered program gives students and recent graduates opportunities to explore a federal career with the U.S. Department of Energy FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 12, 2015 FY15-31 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.- The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) currently

  14. ORISE: Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program accepting applications for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 from graduate and undergraduate students the 2016 Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program from graduate and undergraduate students Women and minorities encouraged to apply; deadline is Dec. 21, 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 3, 2015 FY16-11 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORISE is currently accepting applications for the 2016 Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program (MLEF), which is a 10-week summer program for students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. The MLEF Program

  15. CRF Experiment Confirms Accepted Oxidation Scheme of Proposed Diesel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alternative: Dimethyl Ether Experiment Confirms Accepted Oxidation Scheme of Proposed Diesel Alternative: Dimethyl Ether - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power &

  16. SUSTAINABILITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 2014 DOE Sustainability Awards Now Accepting Nominations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2014 DOE Sustainability Awards Now Accepting Nominations The Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) sponsors the DOE Sustainability Awards to recognize outstanding achievements of teams and individuals at DOE facilities across the country. The DOE Sustainability Awards celebrate programs, projects, and people that advance the Department's sustainability mission, including excellence in energy, water, and vehicle fleet management. The process for submitting nominations for the 2014 Awards is

  17. PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-09-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays.

  18. DOE acceptance of commercial mixed waste -- Studies are under way

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plummer, T.L.; Owens, C.M.

    1993-03-01

    The topic of the Department of Energy acceptance of commercial mixed waste at DOE facilities has been proposed by host States and compact regions that are developing low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. States support the idea of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste because (a) very little commercial mixed waste is generated compared to generation by DOE facilities (Department of Energy--26,300 cubic meters annually vs. commercial--3400 cubic meters annually); (b) estimated costs for commercial disposal are estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubic foot; (c) once treatment capability becomes available, 70% of the current levels of commercial mixed waste will be eliminated, (d) some State laws prohibit the development of mixed waste disposal facilities in their States; (e) DOE is developing a nationwide strategy that will include treatment and disposal capacity for its own mixed waste and the incremental burden on the DOE facilities would be minuscule, and (6) no States are developing mixed waste disposal facilities. DOE senior management has repeatedly expressed willingness to consider investigating the feasibility of DOE accepting commercial mixed waste. In January 1991, Leo Duffy of the Department of energy met with members of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Forum, which led to an agreement to explore such an arrangement. He stated that this seems like a cost-effective way to solve commercial mixed waste management problems.

  19. OSTIblog Articles in the accepted manuscript Topic | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information accepted manuscript

  20. DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initial SPR Bids DOE Does Not Accept Initial SPR Bids April 4, 2007 - 12:17pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy today said that it had reviewed, and deemed unacceptable, the bids that it had received in response to a solicitation to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The Office of Fossil Energy determined that the bids were too high and not a reasonable value for taxpayers. In keeping with

  1. Notice of inquiry on waste acceptance issues: Response summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    On May 25, 1994, the Department of Energy published a Notice of Inquiry on Waste Acceptance Issues in the Federal Register. Through this Notice of Inquiry, the Department sought to implement the Secretary`s initiative to explore with affected parties various options and methods for sharing the costs related to the financial burden associated with continued on-site storage by eliciting the views of affected parties on: (1) The Department`s preliminary view that it does not have a statutory obligation to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel in 1998 in the absence of an operational repository or other suitable storage facility constructed under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended; (2) The need for an interim, away-from-reactor storage facility prior to repository operations; and (3) Options for offsetting, through the Nuclear Waste Fund, a portion of the financial burden that may be incurred by utilities in continuing to store spent nuclear fuel at reactor sites beyond 1998. The Department received a total of 1,111 responses representing 1,476 signatories to this Notice of Inquiry. The responses included submittals from utilities (38 responses); public utility/service commissions and utility regulators (26 responses); Federal, state, and local governments, agencies, and representatives (23 responses); industry and companies (30 responses); public interest groups and other organizations (19 responses); and members of the general public (975 responses).

  2. PVUSA procurement, acceptance, and rating practices for photovoltaic power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dows, R.N.; Gough, E.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report is one in a series of PVUSA reports on PVUSA experiences and lessons learned at the demonstration sites in Davis and Kerman, California, and from participating utility host sites. During the course of approximately 7 years (1988--1994), 10 PV systems have been installed ranging from 20 kW to 500 kW. Six 20-kW emerging module technology arrays, five on universal project-provided structures and one turnkey concentrator, and four turnkey utility-scale systems (200 to 500 kW) were installed. PVUSA took a very proactive approach in the procurement of these systems. In the absence of established procurement documents, the project team developed a comprehensive set of technical and commercial documents. These have been updated with each successive procurement. Working closely with vendors after the award in a two-way exchange provided designs better suited for utility applications. This report discusses the PVUSA procurement process through testing and acceptance, and rating of PV turnkey systems. Special emphasis is placed on the acceptance testing and rating methodology which completes the procurement process by verifying that PV systems meet contract requirements. Lessons learned and recommendations are provided based on PVUSA experience.

  3. Summary Of Identification Of Rrgulatory Acceptability Of Enhanced Attenuation Categories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K

    2006-01-04

    Chlorinated solvents once introduced to the subsurface are a persistent contaminant. Though many types of active treatments have been developed and deployed to treat contaminated sites, most sites will ultimately incorporate the use of passive treatments into the remediation process. A process favored by many is the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation that relies on the natural attenuation processes occurring within the system to remediate the contaminants. However, it is likely there will be instances where the natural attenuation processes will be insufficient to reduce the level of contamination to acceptable levels in an acceptable span of time. Rather than redeploying source treatments, the Department of Energy along with the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) are developing the concept of Enhanced Attenuation (EA). An enhancement is any type of intervention that might be implemented in a source-plume system that increases the magnitude of attenuation by natural processes beyond that which occurs without intervention. Enhanced Attenuation is the result of applying an enhancement or intervention technique that will sustainably manipulate a natural attenuation process leading to an increased reduction in mass flux of contaminants. Efforts are moving forward along several fronts in developing this concept. This effort is a follow-on to initial discussions with site owners, regulators and stakeholder organizations in the development of the concepts of Enhanced Attenuation, the use of mass balance to evaluate the stability of a waste site/groundwater plume, and identification of tools that will support characterization and monitoring efforts for MNA and EA treatments. Those discussions are documented in the report titled ''Summary Document of Workshops for Hanford, Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site as part of the Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Passive Remediation for Chlorinated Solvents-DOE Alternative Project for Technology

  4. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alp, Ercan E.; Mooney, Timothy M.; Toellner, Thomas

    1996-06-04

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut (.alpha.=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5-30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the .mu.eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator.

  5. High energy resolution, high angular acceptance crystal monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.

    1996-06-04

    A 4-bounce dispersive crystal monochromator reduces the bandpass of synchrotron radiation to a 10-50 meV range without sacrificing angular acceptance. The monochromator includes the combination of an asymmetrical channel-cut single crystal of lower order reflection and a symmetrical channel-cut single crystal of higher order reflection in a nested geometric configuration. In the disclosed embodiment, a highly asymmetrically cut ({alpha}=20) outer silicon crystal (4 2 2) with low order reflection is combined with a symmetrically cut inner silicon crystal (10 6 4) with high order reflection to condition a hard x-ray component (5--30 keV) of synchrotron radiation down to the {micro}eV-neV level. Each of the crystals is coupled to the combination of a positioning inchworm and angle encoder via a respective rotation stage for accurate relative positioning of the crystals and precise energy tuning of the monochromator. 7 figs.

  6. NNSS Waste Acceptance 11-6-13_final_print-ready

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NNSS Waste Acceptance Waste disposed at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) must comply with the NNSS waste acceptance criteria. Compliance is evaluated by a team of experts in the areas of quality assurance, waste traceability, radiological characterization/nuclear criticality, and hazardous material characterization. The State of Nevada is involved throughout this waste review process. Waste Acceptance Criteria: Provide requirements, terms, and conditions under which waste is accepted for

  7. Tank monitor and control system (TMACS) software project Westronics Driver acceptance test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasscock, J.A.

    1998-08-18

    The acceptance test for the Westronics driver. This driver connects the Westronics Smart Multiplexer with the TMACS monitoring system.

  8. HOW TO DEAL WITH WASTE ACCEPTANCE UNCERTAINTY USING THE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FORECASTING AND ANALYSIS CAPABILITY SYSTEM (WACFACS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redus, K. S.; Hampshire, G. J.; Patterson, J. E.; Perkins, A. B.

    2002-02-25

    The Waste Acceptance Criteria Forecasting and Analysis Capability System (WACFACS) is used to plan for, evaluate, and control the supply of approximately 1.8 million yd3 of low-level radioactive, TSCA, and RCRA hazardous wastes from over 60 environmental restoration projects between FY02 through FY10 to the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). WACFACS is a validated decision support tool that propagates uncertainties inherent in site-related contaminant characterization data, disposition volumes during EMWMF operations, and project schedules to quantitatively determine the confidence that risk-based performance standards are met. Trade-offs in schedule, volumes of waste lots, and allowable concentrations of contaminants are performed to optimize project waste disposition, regulatory compliance, and disposal cell management.

  9. Data Quality Objectives for WTP Feed Acceptance Criteria - 12043

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakali, Aruna V.; Benson, Peter A.; Duncan, Garth; Johnston, Jill C.; Lane, Thomas A.; Matis, George; Olson, John W.; Banning, Davey L.; Greer, Daniel A.; Seidel, Cary M.; Thien, Michael G.

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is under construction for the U.S. Department of Energy by Bechtel National, Inc. and subcontractor URS Corporation (contract no. DE-AC27-01RV14136). The plant when completed will be the world's largest nuclear waste treatment facility. Bechtel and URS are tasked with designing, constructing, commissioning, and transitioning the plant to the long term operating contractor to process the legacy wastes that are stored in underground tanks (from nuclear weapons production between the 1940's and the 1980's). Approximately 56 million gallons of radioactive waste is currently stored in these tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. There are three major WTP facilities being constructed for processing the tank waste feed. The Pretreatment (PT) facility receives feed where it is separated into a low activity waste (LAW) fraction and a high level waste (HLW) fraction. These fractions are transferred to the appropriate (HLW or LAW) facility, combined with glass former material, and sent to high temperature melters for formation of the glass product. In addition to PT, HLW and LAW, other facilities in WTP include the Laboratory (LAB) for analytical services and the Balance of Facilities (BOF) for plant maintenance, support and utility services. The transfer of staged feed from the waste storage tanks and acceptance in WTP receipt vessels require data for waste acceptance criteria (WAC) parameters from analysis of feed samples. The Data Quality Objectives (DQO) development was a joint team effort between WTP and Tank Operations Contractor (TOC) representatives. The focus of this DQO effort was to review WAC parameters and develop data quality requirements, the results of which will determine whether or not the staged feed can be transferred from the TOC to WTP receipt vessels. The approach involved systematic planning for data collection consistent with EPA guidance for the seven-step DQO process

  10. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  11. Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

    2006-03-11

    While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

  12. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), DOE/WIPP-069, was initially developed by a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Steering Committee to provide performance requirements to ensure public health and safety as well as the safe handling of transuranic (TRU) waste at the WIPP. This revision updates the criteria and requirements of previous revisions and deletes those which were applicable only to the test phase. The criteria and requirements in this document must be met by participating DOE TRU Waste Generator/Storage Sites (Sites) prior to shipping contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste forms to the WIPP. The WIPP Project will comply with applicable federal and state regulations and requirements, including those in Titles 10, 40, and 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The WAC, DOE/WIPP-069, serves as the primary directive for assuring the safe handling, transportation, and disposal of TRU wastes in the WIPP and for the certification of these wastes. The WAC identifies strict requirements that must be met by participating Sites before these TRU wastes may be shipped for disposal in the WIPP facility. These criteria and requirements will be reviewed and revised as appropriate, based on new technical or regulatory requirements. The WAC is a controlled document. Revised/changed pages will be supplied to all holders of controlled copies.

  13. ISOLOK VALVE ACCEPTANCE TESTING FOR DWPF SME SAMPLING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. Of the opportunities, a focus area related to optimizing the equipment and efficiency of the sample turnaround time for DWPF Analytical Laboratory was identified. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated the possibility of using an Isolok{reg_sign} sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard{reg_sign} valve for taking process samples. Previous viability testing was conducted with favorable results using the Isolok sampler and reported in SRNL-STI-2010-00749 (1). This task has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time and decrease CPC cycle time. This report summarizes the results from acceptance testing which was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 (2) and which was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-RP-2011-00145 (3). The Isolok to be tested is the same model which was tested, qualified, and installed in the Sludge Receipt Adjustment Tank (SRAT) sample system. RW-0333P QA requirements apply to this task. This task was to qualify the Isolok sampler for use in the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) sampling process. The Hydragard, which is the current baseline sampling method, was used for comparison to the Isolok sampling data. The Isolok sampler is an air powered grab sampler used to 'pull' a sample volume from a process line. The operation of the sampler is shown in Figure 1. The image on the left shows the Isolok's spool extended into the process line and the image on the right shows the sampler retracted and then dispensing the liquid into the sampling container. To determine tank homogeneity, a Coliwasa sampler was used to grab samples at a high and low location within the mixing tank. Data from the two locations

  14. Use of acceptable knowledge to demonstrate TRAMPAC compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitworth, J. (Julia); Becker, B. (Blair); Guerin, D. (David); Shokes, T. (Tamara)

    2004-01-01

    Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory-Carlsbad Operations (LANL-CO) has supported the Central Characterization Project (CCP) managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from various small-quantity TRU waste generators to hub sites or other DOE sites in TRUPACT-II shipping containers. This support has involved using acceptable knowledge (AK) to demonstrate compliance with various requirements of Revision 19 of the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods of Payload Compliance (TRAMPAC). LANL-CO has worked to facilitate TRUPACT-II shipments from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) and Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) to Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), respectively. The latter two sites have TRU waste certification programs approved to ship waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In each case, AK was used to satisfy the necessary information to ship the waste to other DOE facilities. For the purposes of intersite shipment, AK provided data to WIPP Waste Information System (WWIS) transportation modules to ensure that required information was obtained prior to TRUPACT-II shipments. The WWIS modules were used for the intersite shipments, not to enter certification data into WWIS, but rather to take advantage of a validated system to ensure that the containers to be shipped were compliant with TRAMPAC requirements, particularly in the evaluation of quantitative criteria. LANL-CO also assisted with a TRAMPAC compliance demonstration for homogeneous waste containers shipped in TRUPACT-II containers from ANL-E to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the purpose of core sampling. The basis for the TRAMPAC compliance determinations was AK regarding radiological composition, chemical composition, TRU waste container packaging, and absence of prohibited items. Also, even in the case where AK is not used to

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Group B - Consumer Acceptance Report Out [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    POLICY EV Everywhere Workshop July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Group B' Consumer Acceptance Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Consumer Education/Emotion * Vehicle Exposure - butts in seats (ride & drive, car sharing, IT/phones, rental fleets) * Consumers understanding their needs * Range anxiety/opportunity * Customer Personal Value Proposition * Charging Exposure * Start small (battery size and charging level), move complicated *

  16. Anthony Thomas accepts position of Chief Scientist and Theory Group Leader

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Anthony Thomas accepts position of Chief Scientist and Theory Group Leader at Jefferson Lab Dr. Anthony Thomas Dr. Anthony Thomas Anthony Thomas accepts position of Chief Scientist and Theory Group Leader at Jefferson Lab December 3, 2003 The Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is pleased to announce that Dr. Anthony Thomas has accepted the position of Chief Scientist and Head of the Theory Group at Jefferson Lab. As Chief

  17. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-06-17

    Suzanne Tegen presented this information as part of the June 17, 2015 WINDExchange webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use. This presentation provides an overview of current NREL research related to wind energy deployment considerations, the DOE Wind Vision as it relates to public acceptance and land use, why public acceptance of wind power matters, where the U.S. wind resource is best, and how those rich resource areas overlay with population centers.

  18. Systems acceptance and operability testing for rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29

    This document provides instructions for the system acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling system, modified for use in flammable gas tanks.

  19. Social Acceptance of Wind Power in the United States: Evaluating Stakeholder Perspectives (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Lantz, E.

    2009-05-01

    As the wind industry strives to achieve 20% wind energy by 2030, maintaining high levels of social acceptance for wind energy will become increasingly important. Wind Powering America is currently researching stakeholder perspectives in the U.S. market and reviewing findings from wind energy projects around the world to better understand social acceptance barriers. Results from European studies show that acceptance varies widely depending on local community values. A preliminary survey shows similar results in the United States. Further research will be conducted to refine our understanding of key social acceptance barriers and evaluate the best ways to mitigate negative perspectives on wind power.

  20. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop Attendence List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attnedance list for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA

  1. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout session presentation for the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA

  2. Project W-151 flexible receiver radiation detector system acceptance test plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyer, G.L.

    1994-12-06

    The attached document is the Acceptance Test Plan for the portion of Project W-151 dealing with acceptance of gamma-ray detectors and associated electronics manufactured at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The document provides a written basis for testing the detector system, which will take place in the 305 building (300 Area).

  3. Acceptance of waste for disposal in the potential United States repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, D.; Svinicki, K.

    1996-07-01

    This paper addresses the process for the acceptance of waste into the waste management system (WMS) with a focus on the detailed requirements identified from the Waste Acceptance System Requirements Document. Also described is the recent dialogue between OCRWM and the Office of Environmental Management to resolve issues, including the appropriate interpretation and application of regulatory and system requirements to DOE-owned spent fuel. Some information is provided on the design of the repository system to aid the reader in understanding how waste that is accepted into the WMS is received and emplaced in the repository.

  4. Multi-discipline Waste Acceptance Process at the Nevada National Security Site - 13573

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carilli, Jhon T.; Krenzien, Susan K.

    2013-07-01

    The Nevada National Security Site low-level radioactive waste disposal facility acceptance process requires multiple disciplines to ensure the protection of workers, the public, and the environment. These disciplines, which include waste acceptance, nuclear criticality, safety, permitting, operations, and performance assessment, combine into the overall waste acceptance process to assess low-level radioactive waste streams for disposal at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. Four waste streams recently highlighted the integration of these disciplines: the Oak Ridge Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project material, West Valley Melter, and classified waste. (authors)

  5. Applications are now being accepted for the Broader Engagement Program at

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SC14 are now being accepted for the Broader Engagement Program at SC14 Applications are now being accepted for the Broader Engagement Program at SC14 May 5, 2014 by Richard Gerber Applications are now being accepted for the Broader Engagement (BE) Program at SC14, which will be held in New Orleans from November 16-21, 2014. The BE Program is designed to diversify the pool of talent in high-performance computing (HPC) by introducing, engaging, and supporting students and professionals

  6. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-18

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control. (PIC) skid designed as ''V''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  7. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-06-20

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designated as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  8. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-12-05

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''U''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  9. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid W

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-18

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''W''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  10. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''R''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  11. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-27

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  12. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-18

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing Of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''T''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  13. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the fabrication shop.

  14. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-10-11

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop.

  15. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a 50% reduction in building energy consumption. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings (890.97 KB) More Documents & ...

  16. Acceptance and operability test report for the 327 building retention process sewer diverter station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, A.R.

    1996-09-04

    This test report includes the results of acceptance and operability testing of the 327 building diverter station. The test included steps for flushing, calibrating, and operating the system on backup power.

  17. Acceptance {ampersand} operability test report for the 324 building retention process sewer diverter station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, A.R.

    1996-09-04

    This test report includes the results of acceptance and operability testing of the 324 building diverter station. The test included steps for flushing, calibrating, and operating the system on backup power.

  18. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-12-13

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) provides for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP will be performed after the construction of the PIC skid in the shop.

  19. Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition System (SCADA) Substation C3-3 Acceptance Test Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZAKRAJSEK, M.F.

    2000-10-17

    The purpose of this acceptance test procedure (ATP) is to demonstrate that the newly installed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) computer system functions as intended by the design.

  20. Hazardous Waste Acceptance and Pick-up Guide | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Waste Acceptance and Pick-up Guide Version Number: 0 Document Number: Guide 10200.011 Effective Date: 02/2013 File (public): PDF icon guide_10200.011_rev0

  1. EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries.  The spent fuel would be shipped across...

  2. Example Procedures for Developing Acceptance-Range Criteria for BESTEST-EX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Judkoff, Ben Polly, Marcus Bianchi

    2010-08-01

    This document provides an example procedure for establishing acceptance-range criteria to assess results from software undergoing BESTEST-EX. This example method for BESTEST-EX is a modified version of the method described in HERS BESTEST.

  3. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-05-22

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer`s (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing.

  4. Quantification of uncertainty in machining operations for on-machine acceptance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Su, Jiann-Chemg

    2008-09-01

    Manufactured parts are designed with acceptance tolerances, i.e. deviations from ideal design conditions, due to unavoidable errors in the manufacturing process. It is necessary to measure and evaluate the manufactured part, compared to the nominal design, to determine whether the part meets design specifications. The scope of this research project is dimensional acceptance of machined parts; specifically, parts machined using numerically controlled (NC, or also CNC for Computer Numerically Controlled) machines. In the design/build/accept cycle, the designer will specify both a nominal value, and an acceptable tolerance. As part of the typical design/build/accept business practice, it is required to verify that the part did meet acceptable values prior to acceptance. Manufacturing cost must include not only raw materials and added labor, but also the cost of ensuring conformance to specifications. Ensuring conformance is a substantial portion of the cost of manufacturing. In this project, the costs of measurements were approximately 50% of the cost of the machined part. In production, cost of measurement would be smaller, but still a substantial proportion of manufacturing cost. The results of this research project will point to a science-based approach to reducing the cost of ensuring conformance to specifications. The approach that we take is to determine, a priori, how well a CNC machine can manufacture a particular geometry from stock. Based on the knowledge of the manufacturing process, we are then able to decide features which need further measurements from features which can be accepted 'as is' from the CNC. By calibration of the machine tool, and establishing a machining accuracy ratio, we can validate the ability of CNC to fabricate to a particular level of tolerance. This will eliminate the costs of checking for conformance for relatively large tolerances.

  5. Social Acceptance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Certifying the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Lessons Learned from the WIPP Experience. 1998. SAND98-2512C. K.W. Larson, et. al. Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM. ...

  6. Documentation of acceptable knowledge for LANL Plutonium Facility transuranic waste streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.; Foxx, C.; Rogers, P.S.Z.

    1998-07-01

    Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site-specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the transuranic waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility`s mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC.

  7. Documentation of acceptable knowledge for Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility TRU waste stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, A.J.; Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Foxx, C.L.; Rogers, P.Z.

    1998-03-01

    Characterization of transuranic waste from the LANL Plutonium Facility for certification and transportation to WIPP includes the use of acceptable knowledge as specified in the WIPP Quality Assurance Program Plan. In accordance with a site specific procedure, documentation of acceptable knowledge for retrievably stored and currently generated transuranic waste streams is in progress at LANL. A summary overview of the TRU waste inventory is complete and documented in the Sampling Plan. This document also includes projected waste generation, facility missions, waste generation processes, flow diagrams, times, and material inputs. The second part of acceptable knowledge documentation consists of assembling more detailed acceptable knowledge information into auditable records and is expected to require several years to complete. These records for each waste stream must support final assignment of waste matrix parameters, EPA hazardous waste numbers, and radionuclide characterization. They must also include a determination whether waste streams are defense waste streams for compliance with the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act. The LANL Plutonium Facility`s mission is primarily plutonium processing in basic special nuclear material (SNM) research activities to support national defense and energy programs. It currently has about 100 processes ranging from SNM recovery from residues to development of plutonium 238 heat sources for space applications. Its challenge is to characterize and certify waste streams from such diverse and dynamic operations using acceptable knowledge. This paper reports the progress on the certification of the first of these waste streams to the WIPP WAC.

  8. WRAP low level waste restricted waste management (LLW RWM) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leist, K.J.

    1997-11-24

    On April 22, 1997, the Low Level Waste Restricted Waste Management (LLW RWM) glovebox was tested using acceptance test procedure 13027A-87. Mr. Robert L. Warmenhoven served as test director, Mr. Kendrick Leist acted as test operator and test witness, and Michael Lane provided miscellaneous software support. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine glovebox control system interlocks, operator Interface Unit (OIU) menus, alarms, and messages. Basic drum port and lift table control sequences were demonstrated. OIU menus, messages, and alarm sequences were examined, with few exceptions noted. Barcode testing was bypassed, due to the lack of installed equipment as well as the switch from basic reliance on fixed bar code readers to the enhanced use of portable bar code readers. Bar code testing was completed during performance of the LLW RWM OTP. Mechanical and control deficiencies were documented as Test Exceptions during performance of this Acceptance Test. These items are attached as Appendix A to this report.

  9. Risk perception, risk evaluation and human values: cognitive bases of acceptability of a radioactive waste repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, T.C.; Lindell, M.K.; Rankin, W.L.

    1981-07-01

    Public acceptance of radioactive waste management alternatives depends in part on public perception of the associated risks. Three aspects of those perceived risks were explored in this study: (1) synthetic measures of risk perception based on judgments of probability and consequences; (2) acceptability of hypothetical radioactive waste policies, and (3) effects of human values on risk perception. Both the work on synthetic measures of risk perception and on the acceptability of hypothetical policies included investigations of three categories of risk: (1) Short-term public risk (affecting persons living when the wastes are created), (2) Long-term public risk (affecting persons living after the time the wastes were created), and (3) Occupational risk (affecting persons working with the radioactive wastes). The human values work related to public risk perception in general, across categories of persons affected. Respondents were selected according to a purposive sampling strategy.

  10. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC), Rev. 7-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-05-01

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NTSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal.

  11. EERE Success Story-Challenge Accepted: Reducing the Soft Costs of Going

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar | Department of Energy Challenge Accepted: Reducing the Soft Costs of Going Solar EERE Success Story-Challenge Accepted: Reducing the Soft Costs of Going Solar January 7, 2016 - 11:03am Addthis Solar installers dressed up as superheroes to complete the installation on the KidsQuest Children’s Museum in Washington as part of the Solarize Bellevue campaign. Photo by Allison DeAngelis. Solar installers dressed up as superheroes to complete the installation on the KidsQuest Children's

  12. DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks DOE Accepts Bids for Northeast Home Heating Oil Stocks February 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has awarded contracts to three companies who successfully bid for the purchase of 984,253 barrels of heating oil from the Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve. Awardee Amount Morgan Stanley 500,000 barrels Shell Trading U.S. Company 250,000 barrels George E. Warren Corporation 234,253

  13. Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group D Breakout Session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    infrastructure Group D Charging Infrastucture Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Limited infrastructure * PHEVs (110V infrastructure suitable) * AEVs (tethered to home) * Make commercial charging free (to consumers) - Google model * Utilities are compensated * Value proposition for site host? Infrastructure provider? * Parking garage - put EVSEs on high floors * Free parking for EVs * Fast charging - needs to be

  14. Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Charging Infrastructure Group E Breakout Session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure Group E Charging Infrastructure Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers and Infrastructure Scenarios * Infrastructure Scenarios * Domicile & Workplace Charging: Being available were vehicles spend a lot of time (Level 1/2) * Gas Station model * Fast charging * Battery Swap * Flow Batteries: Electrolyte swap for long distance traveling * Dynamic Wireless Charging * Strategically placed and visible * Widespread and visible Charging Infrastructure (Group E)

  15. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid ''K''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNS, B.R.

    1999-10-28

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) HNF-4276. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid designed as ''K''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  16. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-03-29

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''P''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix.

  17. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-07-25

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid ''V''. The scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Services (SFS) shop upon completion of the construction of the PIC skid.

  18. Project W-320, backup: 1000 CFM portable exhausters acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, O.D.

    1998-07-25

    This document is to identify the Project W-320 1000 CFM portable exhauster documentation required to be turned over from the Projects Organization to the Tank Farm Operations as part of the acceptance of the 1000 CFM portable exhausters for beneficial use.

  19. Acceptable knowledge document for INEEL stored transuranic waste -- Rocky Flats Plant waste. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-23

    This document and supporting documentation provide a consistent, defensible, and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for waste generated at the Rocky Flats Plant which is currently in the accessible storage inventory at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The inventory consists of transuranic (TRU) waste generated from 1972 through 1989. Regulations authorize waste generators and treatment, storage, and disposal facilities to use acceptable knowledge in appropriate circumstances to make hazardous waste determinations. Acceptable knowledge includes information relating to plant history, process operations, and waste management, in addition to waste-specific data generated prior to the effective date of the RCRA regulations. This document is organized to provide the reader a comprehensive presentation of the TRU waste inventory ranging from descriptions of the historical plant operations that generated and managed the waste to specific information about the composition of each waste group. Section 2 lists the requirements that dictate and direct TRU waste characterization and authorize the use of the acceptable knowledge approach. In addition to defining the TRU waste inventory, Section 3 summarizes the historical operations, waste management, characterization, and certification activities associated with the inventory. Sections 5.0 through 26.0 describe the waste groups in the inventory including waste generation, waste packaging, and waste characterization. This document includes an expanded discussion for each waste group of potential radionuclide contaminants, in addition to other physical properties and interferences that could potentially impact radioassay systems.

  20. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid L

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-09

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5055. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''L''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  1. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-03

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5489. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''N''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  2. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-05-11

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) provides the test results for the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''Q''. The ATR summaries the results and provides a copy of the ATP and inspections in the Appendix.

  3. Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure for Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-12-13

    This is a Test Report for Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) RPP-5073. This test report provides the results of the inspection and testing of the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skid designed as ''M''. The ATP was successfully completed. A copy of the completed ATP is in the Appendix of this document.

  4. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping and Instrumentation Control Skid M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    1999-11-09

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) verifies proper construction per the design drawings and tests for proper functioning of the Pumping and Instrumentation Control (PIC) skid ''M''. The Scope section lists the systems and functions to be checked. This ATP will be performed at the Site Fabrication Service's (SFS) shop upon completion of construction of the PIC skid.

  5. Verification/acceptance test report for the Acromag Calibration System for TMACS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fordham, C.R.

    1995-04-25

    This document provides the Verification/Acceptance Test Report for the Acromag Calibration System (ACS) for the Tank Monitor and Control System. ACS will be implemented to check the calibration of the thermocouple input modules. Purpose of this document is to show that the ACS satisfies the system requirements in WHC-SD-WM-CSRS-009 (WHC 1993b).

  6. Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

    2010-12-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

  7. Preliminary waste acceptance criteria for the ICPP spent fuel and waste management technology development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, L.L.; Shikashio, R.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify requirements to be met by the Producer/Shipper of Spent Nuclear Fuel/High-LeveL Waste SNF/HLW in order for DOE to be able to accept the packaged materials. This includes defining both standard and nonstandard waste forms.

  8. 241-AZ-101 Waste Tank Color Video Camera System Shop Acceptance Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WERRY, S.M.

    2000-03-23

    This report includes shop acceptance test results. The test was performed prior to installation at tank AZ-101. Both the camera system and camera purge system were originally sought and procured as a part of initial waste retrieval project W-151.

  9. The Nuclear Energy Option for the U.S.--How Far Are We from Public Acceptance?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biedscheid, J.A.; Devarakonda, M.

    2004-10-03

    The recent rise of oil and gasoline prices accompanied by reluctant acknowledgement that traditional sources of energy are limited has renewed public interest in renewable energy sources. This perspective on energy is focusing attention on and facilitating acceptance of alternative energy concepts, such as solar, wind, and biomass. The nuclear energy alternative, while clean with potentially abundant fuel supplies and associated with low costs, is burdened with the frequently negative public opinion reserved for things nuclear. Coincident with the heightened examination of alternative energy concepts, 2004 marks the 25-year anniversary of the Three Mile Island accident. Since this pivotal accident in 1979, no new reactor licenses have been granted in the U.S. The resolution of the issues of nuclear waste management and disposition are central to and may advance public discussions of the future use of nuclear energy. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently preparing the licensing application for Yucca Mountain, which was designated in 2003 as the site for a high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel repository in the U.S. The DOE also has been operating a deep geologic repository for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste since 1999. The operational status of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a repository for TRU waste was successfully realized along with the lesson learned that stakeholder trust and acceptance are as critical to the success of a repository program as the resolution of technical issues and obtaining regulatory approvals. For the five years of its operation and for decades prior, the challenge of attaining public acceptance of the WIPP has persisted for reasons aligned with the opposition to nuclear energy. Due to this commonality, the nuclear waste approach to public acceptance, with its pros and cons, provides a baseline for the examination of an approach for the public acceptance of nuclear energy in the U.S. This paper

  10. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

  11. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

    2008-10-01

    This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

  12. ORISE: Applications being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE's Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Applications being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program at ORNL Students have the opportunity to perform research alongside world-renowned national laboratory scientists and engineers FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE July 31, 2014 FY14-34 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The U.S. Department of Energy is currently seeking undergraduate students for paid internships at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the 2015 spring term of the

  13. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the 2015 Mickey Leland Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fellowship Program Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program Women and minorities encouraged to apply, deadline Jan. 2 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 4, 2014 FY15-05 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORISE is currently accepting applications for the 2015 Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program (MLEF), which is a 10-week summer program for students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. The program is administered for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through ORISE,

  14. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the 2015 U.S. Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Homeland Security Summer Internship Program U.S. Department of Homeland Security Summer Internship Program Program represents opportunity for students to perform research at federal facilities located across the U.S. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 20, 2014 FY15-04 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORISE is currently accepting applications for the 2015 U.S. Department of Homeland Security HS-STEM Summer Internship Program, which is a 10-week summer internship program for students majoring in homeland

  15. Four ALCF Papers Accepted to SC13 Technical Papers Program | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Four ALCF Papers Accepted to SC13 Technical Papers Program Author: ALCF staff July 18, 2013 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google E-mail Printer-friendly version Four papers from the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility have been selected for the Technical Papers Program at SC13, the premier annual international supercomputing conference, and the leading venue for presenting high-quality original research in high-performance computing, networking, storage, and

  16. USE OF LEAD SHIELDING Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USE OF LEAD SHIELDING Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC) Container ID: Waste profile: NOTE: If dose rate is < 5 mrem/hr at 30 cm from the standard waste package, lead shielding is unacceptable. Dose rate of loaded waste package without lead shielding: mrem/hr @ 30 cm (attach calculations) Describe lead shielding: Basis for demonstrating lead is not excessive (attached calculations, e.g. Microshield analysis, or attach dose rate survey): Maximum lead shielded

  17. Underwriters Laboratories now accepting certification investigation requests for E85 fuel dispensing equipment

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Hirschmugl Global Media Relations Supervisor Underwriters Laboratories Phone: +1 847 830-1404 E-mail: Joseph.F.Hirschmugl@us.ul.com PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Underwriters Laboratories Announces Development of Certification Requirements for E85 Dispensers Now Accepting Product Submittals for Certification Investigation NORTHBROOK, Ill. Oct. 16, 2007 - Underwriters Laboratories (UL), North America's leading safety testing and certification organization, announced the

  18. The Department of Energy Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied-Air Suits

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-04

    The supplied-air suits that protect DOE contractor and federal employees from exposure to harmful atmospheres and radioactive contaminants are not included in the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) certification process for respiratory protective devices. Therefore, with the awareness and acknowledgement of NIOSH and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Department established a system for acceptance testing of supplied-air suits.

  19. Partial Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 In Situ Vapor Sampler (ISVS) Carts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-05-19

    This document provides the Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) for the Type 4 in-situ vapor sampler (ISVS) system. This document is generated to support the completion of equipment modifications and engineering documentation for the ISVS system that is used for sampling gaseous vapors in the Hanford single shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This ABU documents items for transferring the ISVS system to operations for field use. This document is generated following Characterization Engineering Desk Instruction DI-CE-004-001.

  20. Multifunction Instrument Tree (MIT) Neutron and Gamma Probe Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CANNON, N.S.

    1999-08-08

    The multifunction instrument tree (MIT) probe program has been developed to modify existing Liquid Observation Well (LOW) neutron and gamma probes for use in the validation shafts of the two MITs installed in Tank 241-SY-101. One of the program objectives is that the modified MIT probes be completely compatible with the existing LOW van instrumentation and procedures. The major program objective is to produce neutron and gamma scans from Tank 241-SY-101 that would assist in evaluating waste feature structure and elevation. The MIT probe program is described in greater detail in the engineering task plan (HNF-3322). In accordance with the engineering task plan, a test plan (HNF-3595) was written, reduced diameter (allowing insertion into the MIT validation tube) neutron and gamma probes were acquired, an acceptance and operational test procedure (HNF-3838) was written, acceptance and operational testing of the MIT probes was performed, and a report of these test results (HNF-4369) has been issued. A number of neutron and gamma probe scans have been obtained from the Tank 241-SY-101 MITs, starting on February 8, 1999, in cooperation with Operations. Now that the MIT probes are fully demonstrated, this document transfers ownership of these probes to Operations, utilizing the final acceptance for beneficial use (ABU) form that follows in Section 3.0.

  1. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  2. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  3. Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs.

  4. Design and performance of AERHA, a high acceptance high resolution soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiuzbăian, Sorin G. Hague, Coryn F.; Brignolo, Stefania; Baumier, Cédric; Lüning, Jan; CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris; Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, B.P. 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette ; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Mariot, Jean-Michel; CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75005 Paris ; Jaouen, Nicolas; Polack, François; Thomasset, Muriel; Lagarde, Bruno; Nicolaou, Alessandro; Sacchi, Maurizio; Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05; CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05

    2014-04-15

    A soft x-ray spectrometer based on the use of an elliptical focusing mirror and a plane varied line spacing grating is described. It achieves both high resolution and high overall efficiency while remaining relatively compact. The instrument is dedicated to resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies. We set out how this optical arrangement was judged best able to guarantee performance for the 50 − 1000 eV range within achievable fabrication targets. The AERHA (adjustable energy resolution high acceptance) spectrometer operates with an effective angular acceptance between 100 and 250 μsr (energy dependent) and a resolving power well in excess of 5000 according to the Rayleigh criterion. The high angular acceptance is obtained by means of a collecting pre-mirror. Three scattering geometries are available to enable momentum dependent measurements with 135°, 90°, and 50° scattering angles. The instrument operates on the Synchrotron SOLEIL SEXTANTS beamline which serves as a high photon flux 2 × 200 μm{sup 2} focal spot source with full polarization control.

  5. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    1999-06-14

    This report is fully responsive to the requirements of Section 4.0 Acceptable Knowledge from the WIPP Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Plan, CAO-94-1010, and provides a sound, (and auditable) characterization that satisfies the WIPP criteria for Acceptable Knowledge.

  6. A design study for a compact two stage in-flight separator with a high mass resolution and large acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Kim, Eun-San; Hatanaka, Kichiji

    2015-03-15

    The rare isotope beam separator with a large angular acceptance and energy acceptance is essential for examining the characteristics of unstable nuclei and exotic nuclear reactions. Careful design, however, is required to compensate for the effects of high order aberrations induced by large aperture magnets, which are used to collect rare isotopes obtained from a high energy primary heavy-ion beam hitting a target. In order to minimize the effect of the high order aberration, the optics was based on the mirror symmetry optics, which provides smaller high order aberrations, for the separation of {sup 132}Sn produced by a fission reaction between the primary beam of {sup 238}U and a relatively thick Pb target. The designed optics provides energy acceptance (full), horizontal angular acceptance, and vertical acceptance of approximately 8%, 60 mrad, and 130 mrad, respectively.

  7. The role of acceptable knowledge in transuranic waste disposal operations - 11117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chancellor, Christopher John; Nelson, Roger

    2010-11-08

    The Acceptable Knowledge (AK) process plays a key role in the delineation of waste streams destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). General Electric's Vallecitos Nuclear Center (GEVNC) provides for an ideal case study of the application of AK in a multiple steward environment. In this review we will elucidate the pivotal role Acceptable Knowledge played in segregating Department of Energy (DOE) responsibilities from a commercial facility. The Acceptable Knowledge process is a necessary component of waste characterization that determines whether or not a waste stream may be considered for disposal at the WIPP site. This process may be thought of as an effort to gain a thorough understanding of the waste origin, chemical content, and physical form gleaned by the collection of documentation that concerns generator/storage site history, mission, and operations; in addition to waste stream specific information which includes the waste generation process, the waste matrix, the quantity of waste concerned, and the radiological and chemical make up of the waste. The collection and dissemination of relevant documentation is the fundamental requirement for the AK process to work. Acceptable Knowledge is the predominant process of characterization and, therefore, a crucial part of WIPP's transuranic waste characterization program. This characterization process, when conducted to the standards set forth in WIPP's operating permit, requires confirmation/verification by physical techniques such as Non-Destructive Examination (NDE), Visual Examination (VE), and Non-Destructive Assay (NDA). These physical characterization techniques may vary in their appropriateness for a given waste stream; however, nothing will allow the substitution or exclusion of AK. Beyond the normal scope of operations, AK may be considered, when appropriate, a surrogate for the physical characterization techniques in a procedure that appeals to concepts such As Low As Reasonably Achievable

  8. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the summer 2015 U.S. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Scholars Program summer 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Scholars Program Opportunities open to students, post-graduates and now veterans FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 10, 2014 FY15-07 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORISE is currently accepting applications for the summer 2015 U.S. Department of Energy Scholars Program, which offers unique opportunities that introduce students, post-graduates and now veterans to DOE's mission and operations. ORAU manages the program for DOE, through the Oak Ridge

  9. A proposed acceptance process for commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software in reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preckshot, G.G.; Scott, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper proposes a process for acceptance of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software products for use in reactor systems important to safety. An initial set of four criteria establishes COTS software product identification and its safety category. Based on safety category, three sets of additional criteria, graded in rigor, are applied to approve/disapprove the product. These criteria fall roughly into three areas: product assurance, verification of safety function and safety impact, and examination of usage experience of the COTS product in circumstances similar to the proposed application. A report addressing the testing of existing software is included as an appendix.

  10. W-026 acceptance test plan plant control system hardware (submittal {number_sign} 216)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-14

    Acceptance Testing of the WRAP 1 Plant Control System Hardware will be conducted throughout the construction of WRAP I with the final testing on the Process Area hardware being completed in November 1996. The hardware tests will be broken out by the following functional areas; Local Control Units, Operator Control Stations in the WRAP Control Room, DMS Server, PCS Server, Operator Interface Units, printers, DNS terminals, WRAP Local Area Network/Communications, and bar code equipment. This document will contain completed copies of each of the hardware tests along with the applicable test logs and completed test exception reports.

  11. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-04-02

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs.

  12. DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases DOE Does Not Accept SPR Bids and Suspends Plans for Future Purchases May 2, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy has rejected all offers received from the second solicitation issued this spring that sought to purchase up to four million barrels of crude oil for the United States' crude oil reserve. Both solicitations resulted in no awards because the Department

  13. Public Acceptability of and Preferences for Used Nuclear Fuel Management in the U.S.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2014: 1 Public Acceptance and Preferences for Used Nuclear Fuel Management in the U.S. Hank C. Jenkins-Smith Kuhika Gupta Center for Energy, Security & Society University of Oklahoma Energy 2014: 2 Research Goals and Methods  CES&S: Partnership between University of Oklahoma and Sandia National Labs  Goal: track and analyze the evolution of public perceptions about UNF management in the U.S.  Methods: complementary streams of data, such as: * Public opinion surveys » Annual

  14. Waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    This Revision 4 of the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), WIPP-DOE-069, identifies and consolidates existing criteria and requirements which regulate the safe handling and preparation of Transuranic (TRU) waste packages for transportation to and emplacement in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This consolidation does not invalidate any existing certification of TRU waste to the WIPP Operations and Safety Criteria (Revision 3 of WIPP-DOE--069) and/or Transportation: Waste Package Requirements (TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging [SARP]). Those documents being consolidated, including Revision 3 of the WAC, currently support the Test Phase.

  15. PARALLELS OF RADIATION- AND FINANCIAL-RISK MANAGEMENT ON PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogue, M.

    2010-01-04

    The financial collapse of 2007 provides an opportunity for a cross-discipline comparison of risk assessments. Flaws in financial risk assessments bear part of the blame for the financial collapse. There may be a potential for similar flaws to be made in radiological risk assessments. Risk assessments in finance and health physics are discussed in the context of a broader view of the risk management environment. Flawed risk assessments can adversely influence public acceptance of radiological technologies, so the importance of quality is magnified.

  16. W-026 acceptance test report system integration equipment (SIE)(submittal {number_sign} 018.6.A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-27

    Acceptance testing of the System Integration Equipment (SIE) at Hanford was performed in two stages. The first was inconclusive, and resulted in a number of findings. These finding. are summarized as part of this report. The second stage of testing addressed these findings, and performed full system testing per the approved test procedure. This report includes summaries of all testing, results and finding.. Although the SIE did not in some cases perform as required for plant operations, it did perform per the system specification. (These discrepancies were noted and are addressed elsewhere.) Following testing, the system was formaLLy accepted. Documentation of this acceptance is incLuded in this report.

  17. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2015-03-10

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliable used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular stochastic value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory, we discuss three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  18. Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Fantoni, Moris; Busto, Mirko; Genon, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Maria Chiara

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

  19. Methods for verifying compliance with low-level radioactive waste acceptance criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the methods that are currently employed and those that can be used to verify compliance with low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC). This report presents the applicable regulations representing the Federal, State, and site-specific criteria for accepting LLW. Typical LLW generators are summarized, along with descriptions of their waste streams and final waste forms. General procedures and methods used by the LLW generators to verify compliance with the disposal facility WAC are presented. The report was written to provide an understanding of how a regulator could verify compliance with a LLW disposal facility`s WAC. A comprehensive study of the methodology used to verify waste generator compliance with the disposal facility WAC is presented in this report. The study involved compiling the relevant regulations to define the WAC, reviewing regulatory agency inspection programs, and summarizing waste verification technology and equipment. The results of the study indicate that waste generators conduct verification programs that include packaging, classification, characterization, and stabilization elements. The current LLW disposal facilities perform waste verification steps on incoming shipments. A model inspection and verification program, which includes an emphasis on the generator`s waste application documentation of their waste verification program, is recommended. The disposal facility verification procedures primarily involve the use of portable radiological survey instrumentation. The actual verification of generator compliance to the LLW disposal facility WAC is performed through a combination of incoming shipment checks and generator site audits.

  20. Waste Acceptance Decisions and Uncertainty Analysis at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redus, K. S.; Patterson, J. E.; Hampshire, G. L.; Perkins, A. B.

    2003-02-25

    The Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) Attainment Team (AT) routinely provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations with Go/No-Go decisions associated with the disposition of over 1.8 million yd3 of low-level radioactive, TSCA, and RCRA hazardous waste. This supply of waste comes from 60+ environmental restoration projects over the next 15 years planned to be dispositioned at the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF WAC AT decision making process is accomplished in four ways: (1) ensure a clearly defined mission and timeframe for accomplishment is established, (2) provide an effective organization structure with trained personnel, (3) have in place a set of waste acceptance decisions and Data Quality Objectives (DQO) for which quantitative measures are required, and (4) use validated risk-based forecasting, decision support, and modeling/simulation tools. We provide a summary of WAC AT structure and performance. We offer suggestions based on lessons learned for effective transfer to other DOE.

  1. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications for Low-Head Hydropower Turbines and MHK Monitoring Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department began accepting applications on November 24 for its FY 2015 Phase 1 grant topics, including two Water Power Program topics, under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Technology Transfer (STTR) programs.

  2. Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, A.

    2010-05-05

    The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

  3. The future potential of earth sheltered structures: cost, acceptability and planning considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.; Carmody, J.

    1980-12-01

    Earth sheltered structures have received an increasing amount of attention over the past few years. This has been primarily due to their typically low requirements for both heating and cooling energy. Their potential; however, not only lies in their energy performance but also in their ability to deal with a number of planning and design issues that must be faced in many locations. These issues include: noise protection, storm protection, saving a usable land area above the building and providing a minimum impact on the environment and ecology of a site. Against this promising potential must be weighed the factors which have made such structures undesirable from a designer's and user's point of view in the past. In addition, there are also a few new constraints which have arisen as the use of this building form has grown. This paper examines these issues and discusses the current acceptability and possible future potential of earth sheltered structures.

  4. Acceptance Performance Test Guideline for Utility Scale Parabolic Trough and Other CSP Solar Thermal Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.; Wagner, M. J.; Kearney, D. W.

    2011-08-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. Progress on interim guidelines was presented at SolarPACES 2010. Significant additions and modifications were made to the guidelines since that time, resulting in a final report published by NREL in April 2011. This paper summarizes those changes, which emphasize criteria for assuring thermal equilibrium and steady state conditions within the solar field.

  5. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H.; Lesperance, A.; Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L.

    1996-09-01

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  6. Proposed GTA welding specification and acceptance criteria for the MC4163

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwiatkowski, J.J.

    1991-04-12

    This specification documents the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process and production weld acceptance criteria requirements for the MC4163. This document is written specifically to apply to the welds on the MC4163 and is not to be used as a general gas tungsten arc welding specification. All sections of this specification must be complied with unless specifically exempted in writing. There are a total of five welds with three different joint designs required to fabricate the MC4163. In the order of fabrication they are (1) initiator closure disc, (2) nozzle to case girth welds, two and, (3) nozzle closure disc welds, two. This specification will only address the nozzle to case girth welds and the nozzle closure disc welds.

  7. Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-29

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the waste acceptance criteria applicable to the transportation, storage, and disposal of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These criteria serve as the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) primary directive for ensuring that CH-TRU waste is managed and disposed of in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment.The authorization basis of WIPP for the disposal of CH-TRU waste includes the U.S.Department of Energy National Security and Military Applications of Nuclear EnergyAuthorization Act of 1980 (reference 1) and the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA;reference 2). Included in this document are the requirements and associated criteriaimposed by these acts and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA,reference 3), as amended, on the CH-TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP.|The DOE TRU waste sites must certify CH-TRU waste payload containers to thecontact-handled waste acceptance criteria (CH-WAC) identified in this document. Asshown in figure 1.0, the flow-down of applicable requirements to the CH-WAC istraceable to several higher-tier documents, including the WIPP operational safetyrequirements derived from the WIPP CH Documented Safety Analysis (CH-DSA;reference 4), the transportation requirements for CH-TRU wastes derived from theTransuranic Package Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT Certificates ofCompliance (references 5 and 5a), the WIPP LWA (reference 2), the WIPP HazardousWaste Facility Permit (reference 6), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency(EPA) Compliance Certification Decision and approval for PCB disposal (references 7,34, 35, 36, and 37). The solid arrows shown in figure 1.0 represent the flow-down of allapplicable payload container-based requirements. The two dotted arrows shown infigure 1.0 represent the flow-down of summary level requirements only; i.e., the sitesmust reference the regulatory source

  8. (Acceptance testing of the 150-kW electron-beam furnace)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohriner, E.K.; Howell, C.R.

    1990-09-18

    The travelers observed the acceptance testing of the 150-kW electron-beam (EB) furnace constructed by Leybold (Hanau) Technologies prior to disassembly and shipping. The testing included: (1) operation of the mold withdrawal system (2) vacuum pumping and vacuum chamber leak-up rates, (3) power stability at full power, (4) x-radiation monitoring at full power, and (5) demonstration of system interlocks for loss of water cooling, loss of vacuum, loss of power, and emergency shutdown. Preliminary training was obtained in furnace operation, EB gun maintenance, and use of the programmable logic controller for beam manipulation. Additional information was obtained on water-cooling requirements and furnace platform construction necessary for the installation. The information gained and training received will greatly assist in minimizing the installation and startup operation costs of the furnace.

  9. Technology certification and technology acceptance: Promoting interstate cooperation and market development for innovative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockbank, B.R.

    1995-03-01

    In the past two years, public and private efforts to promote development and deployment of innovative environmental technologies have shifted from the analysis of barriers to the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at surmounting those barriers. Particular attention has been directed at (1) streamlining fragmented technology acceptance processes within and among the states, and (2) alleviating disincentives, created by inadequate or unverified technology cost and performance data, for users and regulators to choose innovative technologies. Market fragmentation currently imposes significant cost burdens on technology developers and inhibits the investment of private capital in environmental technology companies. Among the responses to these problems are state and federal technology certification/validation programs, efforts to standardize cost/performance data reporting, and initiatives aimed at promoting interstate cooperation in technology testing and evaluation. This paper reviews the current status of these initiatives, identifies critical challenges to their success, and recommends strategies for addressing those challenges.

  10. Utility-Scale Parabolic Trough Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines, April 2009 - December 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2011-05-01

    Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here are specifically written for parabolic trough collector systems with a heat-transport system using a high-temperature synthetic oil, but the basic principles are relevant to other CSP systems.

  11. The value of adding regional to local stakeholder involvement in evaluating the acceptability of innovative technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Patricia, S.

    1995-12-01

    Technology is urgently needed to clean up contamination by volatile organic compounds at United States Department of Energy (DOE) and industrial sites throughout the country. In many cases, however, existing technology is too slow, inefficient, or expensive. The record of technology development is similarly disappointing. Remediation technologies developed at great expense and evaluated piecemeal over long periods have not been deployed because, in the end, the public judged them ineffective or unacceptable. The need for remediation is too great and resources too limited to continue with ineffective technology evaluation. Early and continuing stakeholder involvement is essential to developing successful, deployable technologies. In order to make good decisions about which technologies to deploy, remedial project managers need to know stakeholders` requirements for the performance of proposed technologies. Expanding stakeholder involvement regionally identifies the concerns of a broad range of stakeholders at a arid DOE sites throughout the West - issues that must be taken into account if technologies are to be accepted for wide deployment.

  12. Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

  13. Preliminary Assessment of the Hanford Tank Waste Feed Acceptance and Product Qualification Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C. C.; Adamson, Duane J.; Herman, D. T.; Peeler, David K.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Reboul, S. H.; Stone, M. E.; Peterson, Reid A.; Chun, Jaehun; Fort, James A.; Vienna, John D.; Wells, Beric E.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing Hanford Tank waste feed acceptance and product qualification. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the planned waste feed acceptance and qualification testing for Hanford tank wastes. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) feed criteria development with emphasis on identifying the feed properties and the process requirements, 2) the Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process qualification program, and 3) the WTP HLW glass product qualification program. Opportunities for streamlining the accetpance and qualification programs were also considered in the gap assessment. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps and/or implement the opportunities were identified. These approaches will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate and long-term benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with tank waste removal and preparation, transfers from the tank farm to the WTP, processing within the WTP Pretreatment Facility, and in producing qualified HLW glass products. Additionally, implementation of the identified opportunities provides the potential for long-term cost savings given the anticipated

  14. SU-E-P-46: Clinical Acceptance Testing and Implementation of a Portable CT Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; Hicks, R; O’Donnell-Moran, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Planning for the first installation in New England of a new portable CT unit to be used in the Operating Room required the integration of many departments including Surgery, Neurosurgery, Information Services, Clinical Engineering, Radiology and Medical Physics/Radiation Safety. Acceptance testing and the quality assurance procedures were designed to optimize image quality and patient and personnel radiation exposure. Methods: The vendor’s protocols were tested using the CT Dosimetry phantoms. The system displayed the CTDIw instead of the CTDIvol while testing the unit. Radiation exposure was compared to existing CT scanners from installed CT units throughout the facility. Brainlab measures all 4 periphery slots on the CT Dosimetry phantom. The ACR measures only the superior slot for the periphery measurement. A comprehensive radiation survey was also performed for several locations. Results: The CTDIvol measurements were comparable for the following studies: brain, C-Spine, and sinuses. However, the mobile CT measurements were slightly higher than other CT units but within acceptable tolerance if measured using the ACR method.Based on scatter measurements, it was determined if any personnel were to stay in the OR Suite during image acquisition that the appropriate lead apron and thyroid shields had to be worn.In addition, to reduce unnecessary scatter, there were two mobile 6 foot wide shields (1/16″ lead equivalent) available to protect personnel in the room and adjacent areas. Conclusion: Intraoperative CT provides the physician new opportunities for evaluation of the progression of surgical resections and device placement at the cost of increasing the amount of trained personnel required to perform this procedure. It also brings with it challenges to keep the radiation exposure to the patients and staff within reasonable limits.

  15. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  16. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  17. DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O E-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE Table of Content E.1 FAR 52.246-5 INSPECTION OF SERVICES--COST- REIMBURSEMENT (APR 1984) ................................................................................................................... 1 E.2 ACCEPTANCE .................................................................................................... 1 DE-EM-0001971 WIPP M&O E-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 FAR 52.246-5

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-12-20

    As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

  19. Characterization of Tank 23H Supernate Per Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria Analysis Requirements -2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L

    2005-05-05

    Variable depth Tank 23H samples (22-inch sample [HTF-014] and 185-inch sample [HTF-013]) were pulled from Tank 23H in February, 2005 for characterization. The characterization of the Tank 23H low activity waste is part of the overall liquid waste processing activities. This characterization examined the species identified in the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the transfer of waste into the Salt-Feed Tank (SFT). The samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and analyzed. Apart from radium-226 with an average measured detection limit of < 2.64E+03 pCi/mL, which is about the same order of magnitude as the WAC limit (< 8.73E+03 pCi/mL), none of the species analyzed was found to approach the limits provided in the Saltstone WAC. The concentration of most of the species analyzed for the Tank 23H samples were 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits. The achievable detection limits for a number of the analytes were several orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits, but one or two orders of magnitude higher than the requested detection limits. Analytes which fell into this category included plutonium-241, europium-154/155, antimony-125, tin-126, ruthenium/rhodium-106, selenium-79, nickel-59/63, ammonium ion, copper, total nickel, manganese and total organic carbon.

  20. Characterization of Tank 23H Supernate Per Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria Analysis Requirements-2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L

    2005-06-01

    Variable depth Tank 23H samples (22-inch sample [HTF-014] and 185-inch sample [HTF-013]) were pulled from Tank 23H in February, 2005 for characterization. The characterization of the Tank 23H low activity waste is part of the overall liquid waste processing activities. This characterization examined the species identified in the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the transfer of waste into the Salt-Feed Tank (SFT). The samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and analyzed. Apart from radium-226 with an average measured detection limit of < 2.64E+03 pCi/mL, which is about the same order of magnitude as the WAC limit (< 8.73E+03 pCi/mL), none of the species analyzed was found to approach the limits provided in the Saltstone WAC. The concentration of most of the species analyzed for the Tank 23H samples were 2-5 orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits. The achievable detection limits for a number of the analytes were several orders of magnitude lower than the WAC limits, but one or two orders of magnitude higher than the requested detection limits. Analytes which fell into this category included plutonium-241, europium-154/155, antimony-125, tin-126, ruthenium/rhodium-106, selenium-79, nickel-59/63, ammonium ion, copper, total nickel, manganese and total organic carbon.

  1. Design of the Large Acceptance Muon Beamline at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakahara, K.; Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Nishiyama, K.; Kawamura, N.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Koda, A.; Nagamine, K.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Adachi, T.; Sasaki, K.; Tanaka, K.; Kimura, N.; Makida, Y.; Ajima, Y.; Ishida, K.; Matsuda, Y.

    2008-02-21

    The Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF) is currently under construction at J-PARC in Tokai, Japan. The muon section of the facility will house the muon production target and four secondary beamlines used to transport the muons into two experimental halls. One of the beamlines is a large acceptance beamline (the so called Super Omega Muon beamline) which, when completed, will produce the largest intensity pulse muon beam in the world. The expected rate of surface muons for this beamline is 5x10{sup 8} {mu}{sup +}/s, and a cloud muon rate of 10{sup 7} {mu}{sup -}/s. The extracted muons will be used for projects involving the production of ultra-slow muons as well as for muon-catalyzed fusion. The beamline consists of the normal-conducting capture solenoids, the superconducting curved transport solenoids, and the Dai Omega-type axial focusing magnet. Currently, the capture and transport solenoids are under design, with the former in its final stages and the latter being finalized for construction of test coils. The design of the Dai Omega-type axial focusing magnet is under consideration with particular emphasis on its compatibility with the transport solenoids.

  2. TRU waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This document is intended to delineate the criteria by which unclassified waste will be accepted for emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and describe the bases upon which these criteria were established. These criteria are not intended to be specifications but rather limits that will allow waste generating and shipping sites to develop their own procedures and specifications for preparation of TRU waste for shipment to the WIPP. These criteria will also allow waste generating sites to plan future facilities for waste preparation that will produce TRU waste forms compatible with WIPP waste emplacement and isolation requirements. These criteria only apply to contract-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste forms and are not intended to apply to beta-gamma wastes, spent fuel, high-level waste (HLW), low-level waste (LLW), low specific activity (LSA) waste, or forms of radioactive waste for experimental purposes. Specifications for receipt of experimental waste forms will be prepared by the responsible projects in conjunction with the staff of the WIPP project at a later date. In addition, these criteria only apply to waste emplaced in bedded rock salt. Technical bases for these criteria may differ significantly from those for other host rocks. 25 refs. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multi-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Poh -Sang; Sindelar, Robert L.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic in-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  4. Development of flaw acceptance criteria for aging management of spent nuclear fuel multiple-purpose canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-03-09

    A typical multipurpose canister (MPC) is made of austenitic stainless steel and is loaded with spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation when it is exposed to aggressive atmospheric environments during a possibly long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Because heat treatment for stress relief is not required for the construction of an MPC, stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic In-service Inspection. The first-order instability flaw sizes has been determined with bounding flaw configurations, that is, through-wall axial or circumferential cracks, and part-through-wall long axial flaw or 360° circumferential crack. The procedure recommended by the American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service code (Second Edition) is used to estimate the instability crack length or depth by implementing the failure assessment diagram (FAD) methodology. The welding residual stresses are mostly unknown and are therefore estimated with the API 579 procedure. It is demonstrated in this paper that the residual stress has significant impact on the instability length or depth of the crack. The findings will limit the applicability of the flaw tolerance obtained from limit load approach where residual stress is ignored and only ligament yielding is considered.

  5. Cross-Site Transfer System at Hanford: long-term strategy for waste acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shekarriz, A; Onishi, Y.; Smith, P.A.; Sterner, M.; Rector, D.R.; Virden, J.

    1997-02-01

    This report summarizes results of a technical panel review of the current methodology for accepting waste for transport through the Hanford Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS), which was constructed to replace the existing pipelines that hydraulically connect the 200 West and 200 East areas. This report is a complement to an existing document (Hudson 1996); the methodology proposed in that document was refined based on panel recommendations. The refinements were focused around predicting and preventing the 3 main modes suspected of plugging the existing CSTS: precipitation, gelation, particle dropout/settling. The proposed analysis will require integration of computer modeling and laboratory experiments to build a defensible case for transportability of a proposed slurry composition for a given tank. This will be validated by recirculating actual tank waste, in-tank and in-farm, prior to transport. The panel`s recommendation was that the probability of success of waste transfer would be greatly improved by integrating the predictive analysis with real-time control during RCSTS operation. The methodology will be optimized.

  6. COOLING TIME, FREEFALL TIME, AND PRECIPITATION IN THE CORES OF ACCEPT GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-20

    Star formation in the universe's largest galaxiesthe ones at the centers of galaxy clustersdepends critically on the thermodynamic state of their hot gaseous atmospheres. Central galaxies with low-entropy, high-density atmospheres frequently contain multiphase star-forming gas, while those with high-entropy, low-density atmospheres never do. The dividing line between these two populations in central entropy, and therefore central cooling time, is amazingly sharp. Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain the dichotomy. One points out that thermal conduction can prevent radiative cooling of cluster cores above the dividing line. The other holds that cores below the dividing line are subject to thermal instability that fuels the central active galactic nucleus (AGN) through a cold-feedback mechanism. Here we explore those hypotheses with an analysis of the H? properties of ACCEPT galaxy clusters. We find that the two hypotheses are likely to be complementary. Our results support a picture in which cold clouds inevitably precipitate out of cluster cores in which cooling outcompetes thermal conduction and rain down on the central black hole, causing AGN feedback that stabilizes the cluster core. In particular, the observed distribution of the cooling-time to freefall-time ratio is nearly identical to that seen in simulations of this cold-feedback process, implying that cold-phase accretion, and not Bondi-like accretion of hot-phase gas, is responsible for the AGN feedback that regulates star formation in large galaxies.

  7. Hydrogen Vehicles: Impacts of DOE Technical Targets on Market Acceptance and Societal Benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing; Greene, David L

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen vehicles (H2V), including H2 internal combustion engine, fuel cell and fuel cell plugin hybrid, could greatly reduce petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the transportation sector. The U.S. Department of Energy has adopted targets for vehicle component technologies to address key technical barriers towidespread commercialization of H2Vs. This study estimates the market acceptance of H2Vs and the resulting societal benefits and subsidy in 41 scenarios that reflect a wide range of progress in meeting these technical targets. Important results include: (1) H2Vs could reach 20e70% market shares by 2050, depending on progress in achieving the technical targets.With a basic hydrogen infrastructure (w5% hydrogen availability), the H2V market share is estimated to be 2e8%. Fuel cell and hydrogen costs are the most important factors affecting the long-term market shares of H2Vs. (2) Meeting all technical targets on time could result in about an 80% cut in petroleumuse and a 62% (or 72% with aggressive electricity de-carbonization) reduction in GHG in 2050. (3) The required hydrogen infrastructure subsidy is estimated to range from $22 to $47 billion and the vehicle subsidy from $4 to $17 billion. (4) Long-term H2V market shares, societal benefits and hydrogen subsidies appear to be highly robust against delay in one target, if all other targets are met on time. R&D diversification could provide insurance for greater societal benefits. (5) Both H2Vs and plug-in electric vehicles could exceed 50% market shares by 2050, if all targets are met on time. The overlapping technology, the fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, appears attractive both in the short and long runs, but for different reasons.

  8. Evaluation of the Acceptability of Potential Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Products at the Envirocare Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.

    2001-01-11

    The purpose of this report is to review and document the capability of potential products of depleted UF{sub 6} conversion to meet the current waste acceptance criteria and other regulatory requirements for disposal at the facility in Clive, Utah, owned by Envirocare of Utah, Inc. The investigation was conducted by identifying issues potentially related to disposal of depleted uranium (DU) products at Envirocare and conducting an initial analysis of them. Discussions were then held with representatives of Envirocare, the state of Utah (which is a NRC Agreement State and, thus, is the cognizant regulatory authority for Envirocare), and DOE Oak Ridge Operations. Provisional issue resolution was then established based on the analysis and discussions and documented in a draft report. The draft report was then reviewed by those providing information and revisions were made, which resulted in this document. Issues that were examined for resolution were (1) license receipt limits for U isotopes; (2) DU product classification as Class A waste; (3) use of non-DOE disposal sites for disposal of DOE material; (4) historical NRC views; (5) definition of chemical reactivity; (6) presence of mobile radionuclides; and (7) National Environmental Policy Act coverage of disposal. The conclusion of this analysis is that an amendment to the Envirocare license issued on October 5, 2000, has reduced the uncertainties regarding disposal of the DU product at Envirocare to the point that they are now comparable with uncertainties associated with the disposal of the DU product at the Nevada Test Site that were discussed in an earlier report.

  9. Social acceptability of Satellite Power Systems (SPS): the near-term outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klineberg, S L

    1980-05-01

    It is important, at this early stage in the concept development and evaluation of Satellite Power Systems, to explore aspects of contemporary social change that may be expected to complicate the process of achieving the necessary support of the American public for this new technological venture. Current public attitudes make it appear unlikely that a consensus will evolve during the 1980s favoring costly efforts to develop vast new supplies of conventional energy. Opinion polls reveal a pervasive worry over inflation, a broadening of aspirations to encompass quality-of-life concerns, a growing distrust of central governments, large corporations, big science and technology, and a continuing commitment to environmental protection - all of which suggests a social environment that is likely to resist the development of a major new high-technology energy system such as the SPS. Opposition to satellite power will focus on the high front-end development costs, on environmental and technical uncertainties, and on a generalized distrust of large bureaucracies and esoteric technologies. The SPS concept is also likely to be viewed with skepticism by those with vested interests in the long-run uses of coal, shale, fission, fusion, or on-site solar technologies. The growing commitment to energy conservation and the spreading deployment of dispersed renewable-energy systems strongly suggest that the unmet US demand for centrally generated electricity is unlikely to grow sufficiently over the next twenty years to convince a reluctant public of the need for so large an investment of scarce resources in the SPS program. Satellite Power Systems will have a problem in the area of public acceptability.

  10. Compliance with Waste Acceptance Criteria of WIPP and NTS for Vitrified Low-Level and TRU Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbour, J.R.; Andrews, M.K.

    1998-07-01

    A joint project between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been established to evaluate vitrification as an option for the immobilization of waste within ORNL tank farms. This paper presents details of calculations based on current best available analyses of the Oak Ridge Tanks on the limits for waste loadings imposed by the waste acceptance criteria.

  11. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221F-HET/Drums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    1999-08-23

    Since beginning operations in 1954, the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site FB-Line conducted atomic energy defense activities consistent with the listing in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The facility mission was to process and convert dilute plutonium solution into highly purified weapons grade plutonium metal. As a result of various activities conducted in support of the mission (e.g., operation, maintenance, repair, clean up, and facility modifications), the facility generated transuranic waste. This document, along with referenced supporting documents, provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration,equipment, process operations, and waste management practices.

  12. Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-08-12

    To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that

  13. Full-Scale Cask Testing and Public Acceptance of Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments - 12254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilger, Fred; Halstead, Robert J.; Ballard, James D.

    2012-07-01

    Full-scale physical testing of spent fuel shipping casks has been proposed by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) 2006 report on spent nuclear fuel transportation, and by the Presidential Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) on America's Nuclear Future 2011 draft report. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 2005 proposed full-scale testing of a rail cask, and considered 'regulatory limits' testing of both rail and truck casks (SRM SECY-05-0051). The recent U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project, NRC evaluation of extended spent fuel storage (possibly beyond 60-120 years) before transportation, nuclear industry adoption of very large dual-purpose canisters for spent fuel storage and transport, and the deliberations of the BRC, will fundamentally change assumptions about the future spent fuel transportation system, and reopen the debate over shipping cask performance in severe accidents and acts of sabotage. This paper examines possible approaches to full-scale testing for enhancing public confidence in risk analyses, perception of risk, and acceptance of spent fuel shipments. The paper reviews the literature on public perception of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste transportation risks. We review and summarize opinion surveys sponsored by the State of Nevada over the past two decades, which show consistent patterns of concern among Nevada residents about health and safety impacts, and socioeconomic impacts such as reduced property values along likely transportation routes. We also review and summarize the large body of public opinion survey research on transportation concerns at regional and national levels. The paper reviews three past cask testing programs, the way in which these cask testing program results were portrayed in films and videos, and examines public and official responses to these three programs: the 1970's impact and fire testing of spent fuel truck casks at Sandia National Laboratories, the 1980's

  14. Inventory of Safety-Related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems and Related Experiences with System Approval and Acceptance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PNNL-23618 Inventory of Safety-related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems with some Experiences related to Approval and Acceptance DR Conover September 2014 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Storage Program under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 i ii Summary Purpose The purpose of this document is to identify laws; rules; model codes; and codes, standards, regulations (CSR) specifications related to safety

  15. SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

    2011-02-22

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides

  16. Optimizing surface quality of stainless alloys and using a modified ASTM G 48B procedure for acceptance testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of high-temperature oxide scales and Cr-depleted zones on stainless alloys, such as 6% Mo superaustenitic steels, can significantly reduce their corrosion resistance. Effective methods to remove these layers and restore the surface to an optimized condition are detailed. Also, an acceptance test using a modified ASTM G 48B method at 35 C (95 F) for 72 h with a specimen having a crevice, and special corrosion criteria for failure, are described. Comparison of this test method with one using an uncreviced specimen at lower temperatures and for less time is discussed.

  17. Acceptance for Beneficial Use for the Canister Cleaning System for the K West basin Project A-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FARWICK, C.C.

    2000-04-04

    This documents the documentation that is required to be turned over to Operations with the Canister Cleaning System (CCS). The Acceptance for Beneficial Use will be updated as required prior to turnover. This document is prepared for the purposes of documenting an agreement among the various disciplines and organizations within the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project as to what is required in terms of installed components of the CCS. This documentation will be used to achieve project closeout and turnover of ownership of the CCS to K Basins Operations.

  18. Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Mixed TRU Waste Streams: SR-W026-221F-HET-A through D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    2001-10-02

    This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for the heterogeneous debris mixed transuranic waste streams generated in the FB-Line after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997.

  19. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  20. Nuclear energy acceptance and potential role to meet future energy demand. Which technical/scientific achievements are needed?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenkel, Roland

    2012-06-19

    25 years after Chernobyl, the Fukushima disaster has changed the perspectives of nuclear power. The disaster has shed a negative light on the independence, reliability and rigor of the national nuclear regulator and plant operator and the usefulness of the international IAEA guidelines on nuclear safety. It has become clear that, in the light of the most severe earthquake in the history of Japan, the plants at Fukushima Daiichi were not adequately protected against tsunamis. Nuclear acceptance has suffered enormously and has changed the perspectives of nuclear energy dramatically in countries that have a very risk-sensitive population, Germany is an example. The paper analyses the reactions in major countries and the expected impact on future deployment of reactors and on R and D activities. On the positive side, the disaster has demonstrated a remarkable robustness of most of the 14 reactors closest to the epicentre of the Tohoku Seaquake although not designed to an event of level 9.0. Public acceptance can only be regained with a rigorous and worldwide approach towards inherent reactor safety and design objectives that limit the impact of severe accidents to the plant itself (like many of the new Gen III reactors). A widespread release of radioactivity and the evacuation (temporary or permanent) of the population up to 30 km around a facility are simply not acceptable. Several countries have announced to request more stringent international standards for reactor safety. The IAEA should take this move forward and intensify and strengthen the different peer review mission schemes. The safety guidelines and peer reviews should in fact become legally binding for IAEA members. The paper gives examples of the new safety features developed over the last 20 years and which yield much safer reactors with lesser burden to the environment under severe accident conditions. The compatibility of these safety systems with the current concepts for fusion-fission hybrids, which

  1. SLUDGE BATCH 6 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-05-21

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Six (SB6) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB6 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB5. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-09-110) taken on October 8, 2009. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by eight washes, nine decants, an addition of Pu from Canyon Tank 16.3, and an addition of NaNO{sub 2}. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task II.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB6 will be taken and transferred

  2. SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.

    2010-10-07

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was

  3. acceptable-ID.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. Lakeview GCAP Acceptance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Lakeview, Oregon, Processing Site’s groundwater compliance action plan (GCAP) received U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concurrence last month. This makes Lakeview the first Uranium...

  5. Installation and Acceptance Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21

    This chapter addresses activities required to install the software, data bases, or data that comprise the software product onto the hardware platform at sites of operation.

  6. Acceptance Process - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    examination, or sampled for field or laboratory analysis to confirm that the waste matches the Waste Profile Sheet. Any discrepancies between the verification results and the...

  7. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-07-28

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and

  8. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

  9. Is predictive emission monitoring an acceptable low cost alternative to continuous emission monitoring for complying with enhanced monitoring requirements?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jernigan, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    Title VII of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (the {open_quotes}Act{close_quotes}) expanded and clarified the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) enforcement capabilities under the Act. Section 702 of the 1990 Amendments clarified EPA`s ability to require sources to provide information. Additionally, Section 702(b) required EPA to promulgate rules on enhanced monitoring and compliance certifications by adding a new section 114(a)(3) of the Act which states in part: {open_quotes}The Administrator shall in the case of any person which is the owner or operator of a major stationary source, and any in the case of any other person, require enhanced monitoring and submission of compliance certifications. Compliance certifications shall include (A) identification of the applicable requirement that is the basis of the certification, (B) the method used for determining the compliance status of the source, (C) the compliance status, (D) whether compliance is continuous or intermittent, (E) such other facts as the Administrator may require...{close_quotes} The 1990 Amendments contained several other changes that either relate directly to section 114(a)(3) or provide additional indications of the intent behind the new section. First, section 504(b) of the Amendments permits the Administrator to promulgate appropriate tests methods and monitoring requirements for determining compliance. That section states that {open_quotes}continuous emissions monitoring need not be required if alternative methods are available that provide sufficiently reliable and timely information for determining compliance.{close_quotes} This paper will describe Predictive Emission Systems (PEMS) and how the applications of PEMS may be a low cost, accurate, and acceptable alternative to Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems (CEMS) for complying with Enhanced Monitoring requirements.

  10. W-026, acceptance test report imaging passive/active neutron(IPAN) (submittal {number_sign}54.3 - C3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-02-21

    In the Spring of 1996, Site Acceptance Tests were performed for the 2 Imaging Passive/Active Neutron (IPAN) assay systems installed in the WRAP I Facility. This report includes the test documentation and the completed test checklists, with comments and resolutions. All testing was completed, with comments resolved by August 1996.

  11. History of Uranium-233(sup233U)Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant. In support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moment, R.L.; Gibbs, F.E.; Freiboth, C.J.

    1999-04-01

    This report documents the processing of Uranium-233 at the Rocky Flats Plant (Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site). The information may be used to meet Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC)and for determining potential Uranium-233 content in applicable residue waste streams.

  12. Savannah River Site Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Program - Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Waste Stream: SR-T001-221-HET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunsford, G.F.

    2001-01-24

    This document, along with referenced supporting documents provides a defensible and auditable record of acceptable knowledge for one of the waste streams from the FB-Line. This heterogeneous debris transuranic waste stream was generated after January 25, 1990 and before March 20, 1997. The waste was packaged in 55-gallon drums, then shipped to the transuranic waste storage facility in ''E'' area of the Savannah River Site. This acceptable knowledge report includes information relating to the facility's history, configuration, equipment, process operations and waste management practices. Information contained in this report was obtained from numerous sources including: facility safety basis documentation, historical document archives, generator and storage facility waste records and documents, and interviews with cognizant personnel.

  13. HLW Return from France to Germany - 15 Years of Experience in Public Acceptance and Technical Aspects - 12149

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Germany over the whole 15-year long project running time could be faced efficiently. It has to be concluded that despite of all problems the anti-nuclear activities have caused so far, all transports of vitrified HLW have always been completed successfully by adapting the commonly established safety, security and public acceptance measures to the special conditions and needs in Germany and coordinating the activities of all parties involved but at the expense of high costs for industry and government and a challenging operational complexity. Apart from an anticipatory project planning a good communication between all involved industrial parties and the French and the German government was the key to the effective management of such shipments and to minimize the radiological, economic, environmental, public and political impact. The future will show how efficiently the gained experience can be used for further return projects which are to be realized since no reprocessed waste has yet been returned from UK and neither the medium-level nor the low-level radioactive waste has been transferred from France to Germany. (author)

  14. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental assessment (EA) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to accept used nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOEs Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition. This used nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear reactors used for research and development purposes.

  15. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental assessment (EA) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to accept spent nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition. This spent nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear reactors used for research and development purposes.

  16. A FRAMEWORK TO DEVELOP FLAW ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT OF MULTIPURPOSE CANISTERS FOR EXTENDED STORAGE OF USED NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.; Duncan, A.; Adams, T.

    2014-04-07

    A multipurpose canister (MPC) made of austenitic stainless steel is loaded with used nuclear fuel assemblies and is part of the transfer cask system to move the fuel from the spent fuel pool to prepare for storage, and is part of the storage cask system for on-site dry storage. This weld-sealed canister is also expected to be part of the transportation package following storage. The canister may be subject to service-induced degradation especially if exposed to aggressive environments during possible very long-term storage period if the permanent repository is yet to be identified and readied. Stress corrosion cracking may be initiated on the canister surface in the welds or in the heat affected zone because the construction of MPC does not require heat treatment for stress relief. An acceptance criteria methodology is being developed for flaw disposition should the crack-like defects be detected by periodic Inservice Inspection. The external loading cases include thermal accident scenarios and cask drop conditions with the contribution from the welding residual stresses. The determination of acceptable flaw size is based on the procedure to evaluate flaw stability provided by American Petroleum Institute (API) 579 Fitness-for-Service (Second Edition). The material mechanical and fracture properties for base and weld metals and the stress analysis results are obtained from the open literature such as NUREG-1864. Subcritical crack growth from stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and its impact on inspection intervals and acceptance criteria, is not addressed.

  17. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  18. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Interim Report on Customer Acceptance, Retention, and Response to Time-Based Rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Hans, Liesel; Scheer, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Time-based rate programs1, enabled by utility investments in advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), are increasingly being considered by utilities as tools to reduce peak demand and enable customers to better manage consumption and costs. There are several customer systems that are relatively new to the marketplace and have the potential for improving the effectiveness of these programs, including in-home displays (IHDs), programmable communicating thermostats (PCTs), and web portals. Policy and decision makers are interested in more information about customer acceptance, retention, and response before moving forward with expanded deployments of AMI-enabled new rates and technologies. Under the Smart Grid Investment Grant Program (SGIG), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) partnered with several utilities to conduct consumer behavior studies (CBS). The goals involved applying randomized and controlled experimental designs for estimating customer responses more precisely and credibly to advance understanding of time-based rates and customer systems, and provide new information for improving program designs, implementation strategies, and evaluations. The intent was to produce more robust and credible analysis of impacts, costs, benefits, and lessons learned and assist utility and regulatory decision makers in evaluating investment opportunities involving time-based rates. To help achieve these goals, DOE developed technical guidelines to help the CBS utilities estimate customer acceptance, retention, and response more precisely.

  19. Acceptance for Beneficial Use for the 100K Service Water Pumps Auto Start Modifications Project 1K-97-3466M

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MULLER, F.J.

    2000-03-27

    This Acceptance for Beneficial Use checklist covers the modifications to the K Basins service water pumps that added an auto-start function for reliability of the fire suppression system. The following information is to document the Acceptance for Beneficial Use (ABU) with a checklist and supporting information. The service water pumps have been modified so that on low system pressure after a time delay, the standby pump will automatically start. This ABU checklist matrix indicates the organizations that are responsible for the preparation of --or for the provision of input to--the identified documentation required by K Basins Operations. Looking at the items in the matrix, it can be seen that the subproject does not bear the sole responsibility for the generation of all these items. Rather, many items are outside of the subproject's scope such that other Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) organizations are needed to prepare or perform them (e.g., Training, Procedures, Facility Engineering, Startup, etc.). This supporting document, by virtue of all signatures approving it on the Engineering Data Transmittal, documents an agreement among the various represented disciplines and organizations within the SNF Project as to what is required in terms of documentation to transfer custody to Operations.

  20. Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

    1980-02-01

    This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

  1. Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Consumer Acceptance Group...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... vehicle goals: * Look at market, through research, to determine diversity and "sweet spots" * Broadening goals beyond 5 passenger sedan * Include more types and sizes PHEV ...

  2. DACS upgrade acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-09-28

    The readiness of the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) to provide monitoring and control of the mixer pump, directional drive system, and the instrumentation associated with the SY-101 tank and support systems, and the proper functioning of the DACS with new Model 984-785 Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), new MODBUS PLUS version 2.01 software for the PLCs, and version 3.72 of the GENESIS software will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tanks. These sensors provide information such as: tank vapor space and ventilation system H{sub 2} concentration; tank waste temperature; tank pressure; waste density; operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; strain (for major equipment); and waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations.

  3. DACS upgrade acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-12-21

    The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: (1) tank vapor space and ventilation system H{sub 2} concentration; (2) tank waste temperature; (3) tank pressure; (4) waste density; (5) operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; (6) strain (for major equipment); and (7) waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-082. Rev. 0-13.

  4. Trinity Acceptance Tests Performance Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajan, Mahesh

    2015-12-01

    Ensuring Real Applications perform well on Trinity is key to success. Four components: ASC applications, Sustained System Performance (SSP), Extra-Large MiniApplications problems, and Micro-benchmarks.

  5. Measurement of single spin asymmetry and fifth structure function for the proton(electron vec, electron Kaon+)Lambda reaction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahksha Nasseripour

    2005-08-31

    The single spin asymmetry, A{sub LT} ?, and the polarized structure function, ?{sub LT}?, for the p(e,e?K{sup +})? reaction in the resonance region have been measured and extracted using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. Data were taken at an electron beam energy of 2.567 GeV. The large acceptance of CLAS allows for full azimuthal angle coverage over a large range of center-of-mass scattering angles. Results were obtained that span a range in Q{sup 2} from 0.5 to 1.3 GeV{sup 2} and W from threshold up to 2.1 GeV and were compared to existing theoretical calculations. The polarized structure function is sensitive to the interferences between various resonant amplitudes, as well as to resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. This measurement is essential for understanding the structure of nucleons and searching for previously undetected nucleon excited states (resonances) predicted by quark models. The W dependence of the ?{sub LT} ? in the kinematic regions dominated by s and u channel exchange (cos q{sup cm} k = ?0.50, ?0.167, 0.167) indicated possible resonance structures not predicted by theoretical calculations. The ?{sub LT} ? behavior around W = 1.875 GeV could be the signature of a resonance predicted by the quark models and possibly seen in photoproduction. In the very forward angles where the reaction is dominated by the t-channel, the average ?{sub LT} ? was zero. There was no indication of the interference between resonances or resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. This might be indicating the dominance of a single t-channel exchange. Study of the sensitivity of the fifth structure function data to the resonance around 1900 MeV showed that these data were highly sensitive to the various assumptions of the models for the quantum number of this resonance. This project was part of a larger CLAS program to measure cross sections and polarization observables for kaon electroproduction in the nucleon resonance region.

  6. SU-E-T-71: Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of a Commercial Monte Carlo Electron Dose Calculation Model (eMC) for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheu, R; Tseng, T; Powers, A; Lo, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide commissioning and acceptance test data of the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo model (eMC v.11) for TrueBeam linac. We also investigated the uncertainties in beam model parameters and dose calculation results for different geometric configurations. Methods: For beam commissioning, PTW CC13 thimble chamber and IBA Blue Phantom2 were used to collect PDD and dose profiles in air. Cone factors were measured with a parallel plate chamber (PTW N23342) in solid water. GafChromic EBT3 films were used for dose calculation verifications to compare with parallel plate chamber results in the following test geometries: oblique incident, extended distance, small cutouts, elongated cutouts, irregular surface, and heterogeneous layers. Results: Four electron energies (6e, 9e, 12e, and 15e) and five cones (66, 1010, 1515, 2020, and 2525) with standard cutouts were calculated for different grid sizes (1, 1.5,2, and 2.5 mm) and compared with chamber measurements. The results showed calculations performed with a coarse grid size underestimated the absolute dose. The underestimation decreased as energy increased. For 6e, the underestimation (max 3.3 %) was greater than the statistical uncertainty level (3%) and was systematically observed for all cone sizes. By using a 1mm grid size, all the calculation results agreed with measurements within 5% for all test configurations. The calculations took 21s and 46s for 6e and 15e (2.5mm grid size) respectively distributed on 4 calculation servants. Conclusion: In general, commissioning the eMC dose calculation model on TrueBeam is straightforward and thedose calculation is in good agreement with measurements for all test cases. Monte Carlo dose calculation provides more accurate results which improves treatment planning quality. However, the normal acceptable grid size (2.5mm) would cause systematic underestimation in absolute dose calculation for lower energies, such as 6e. Users need to be cautious in this

  7. Draft principles, policy, and acceptance criteria for decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy contaminated surplus facilities and summary of international decommissioning programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, B.K.; Gillette, J.; Jackson, J.

    1994-12-01

    Decommissioning activities enable the DOE to reuse all or part of a facility for future activities and reduce hazards to the general public and any future work force. The DOE Office of Environment, Health and Safety has prepared this document, which consists of decommissioning principles and acceptance criteria, in an attempt to establish a policy that is in agreement with the NRC policy. The purpose of this document is to assist individuals involved with decommissioning activities in determining their specific responsibilities as identified in Draft DOE Order 5820.DDD, ``Decommissioning of US Department of Energy Contaminated Surplus Facilities`` (Appendix A). This document is not intended to provide specific decommissioning methodology. The policies and principles of several international decommissioning programs are also summarized. These programs are from the IAEA, the NRC, and several foreign countries expecting to decommission nuclear facilities. They are included here to demonstrate the different policies that are to be followed throughout the world and to allow the reader to become familiar with the state of the art for environment, safety, and health (ES and H) aspects of nuclear decommissioning.

  8. Now Accepting Applications for Alvarez Fellowship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November/December 2010 November/December 2010 December 22, 2010 In this issue: * NNSA Secures Highly Enriched Uranium and Plutonium in Kazakhstan * VP Biden Presents Baldrige Quality Award to Kansas City Plant Contractor * Ken Baker Honored for Public Service * Abigail Cuthbertson Receives 201 Linton Brooks Medal for Public Service * Employees Throughout the Nuclear Security Enterprise Give Back This Holiday Season * Nonproliferation R&D Leads to Award-winning Cancer Screening Device *

  9. Secretary Richardson Accepts Recommendations for Improving Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the University of California. On June 30, Secretary Richardson asked Administrator Gordon to prepare recommendations for restructuring the University of California (UC) contracts ...

  10. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Angeles, CA 1sandalowcaci.pdf (3.39 MB) More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere Framing Workshop Overview EV Everywhere Battery Workshop Introduction EV Everywhere Grand ...

  11. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program accepting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deadline for applying is Nov. 19, 2015, at 8 p.m. EST FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Oct. 7, 2015 ... Program applications are due by Thurs., Nov. 19, 2015, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted ...

  12. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting Technical Document for the Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

  13. Venture Acceleration Fund now accepting 2012 applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern...

  14. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Acceptable Knowledge Documentat...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This document was used to determine facts and conditions during the Department of Energy Accident Investigation Board's investigation into the radiological release event at the ...

  15. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon groupereportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere...

  16. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Charging Infrastructure Workshop on July 30, 2012 held at the LAX Marriott, Los Angeles, CA PDF icon groupdreportoutcaci.pdf More Documents & Publications EV Everywhere...

  17. Two-stage sampling for acceptance testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Bryan, M.F.

    1992-09-01

    Sometimes a regulatory requirement or a quality-assurance procedure sets an allowed maximum on a confidence limit for a mean. If the sample mean of the measurements is below the allowed maximum, but the confidence limit is above it, a very widespread practice is to increase the sample size and recalculate the confidence bound. The confidence level of this two-stage procedure is rarely found correctly, but instead is typically taken to be the nominal confidence level, found as if the final sample size had been specified in advance. In typical settings, the correct nominal [alpha] should be between the desired P(Type I error) and half that value. This note gives tables for the correct a to use, some plots of power curves, and an example of correct two-stage sampling.

  18. Two-stage sampling for acceptance testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Bryan, M.F.

    1992-09-01

    Sometimes a regulatory requirement or a quality-assurance procedure sets an allowed maximum on a confidence limit for a mean. If the sample mean of the measurements is below the allowed maximum, but the confidence limit is above it, a very widespread practice is to increase the sample size and recalculate the confidence bound. The confidence level of this two-stage procedure is rarely found correctly, but instead is typically taken to be the nominal confidence level, found as if the final sample size had been specified in advance. In typical settings, the correct nominal {alpha} should be between the desired P(Type I error) and half that value. This note gives tables for the correct a to use, some plots of power curves, and an example of correct two-stage sampling.

  19. The Murmansk Initiative - RF: Acceptance Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czajkowski, C.; Wester, D. W.; Dyer, R. S.; Soerlie, A. A.; Moller, B.; Barnes, E.

    2002-02-26

    The Murmansk Initiative-RF (MI) was conceived to provide the Russian Federation (RF) with the capacity to manage low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW) and comply with the requirements of the London Convention that prohibit ocean dumping. The trilateral project among Norway, the RF, and the United States of America (U.S.) began in 1994 and was the first to utilize exclusively Russian subcontractors to upgrade and expand an existing LLRW treatment plant on the premises of RTP Atomflot in Murmansk, Russia. The project moved quickly through the design phase. Progress during the construction phase was somewhat slower because of difficulties with acquisition of hardware, inexperience with automated instrumentation and control equipment, and unexpected design changes in the cementation unit. The project advanced into the test-operation phase, which is currently underway, in June 2001. Initial runs with liquid waste have revealed that procedures for unloading spent ion-exchange sorbents could be improved and that sludges formed during removal of alkaline-earth metals should be compacted in order for the facility to operate at its full potential. Resolution of these issues is expected within the next few months.

  20. Acceptance and Rejection of IGPPS Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High quality, cutting-edge science in the areas of astrophysics, space physics, solid planetary geoscience, and climate science. Contact Director Reiner Friedel (505)...

  1. Now Accepting Applications: BUILD Funding Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through its annual Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD) funding opportunity, the Energy Department will make $1 million available to fund efforts by U.S. based...

  2. Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies Model ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and multiple regions. For more information, contact the ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division at http:www.ornl.govscieesetsdcontactus.shtml References Retrieved...

  3. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    systems optimized for use in tidal, current, wave, andor ocean thermal energy converters. ... For more information on water power research, development, testing, and deployment, ...

  4. Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program accepting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Albert Einstein Alerts President Roosevelt of German Atomic Energy Program Albert Einstein Alerts President Roosevelt of German Atomic Energy Program Washington, DC Albert Einstein writes President Franklin D. Roosevelt, alerting the President to the importance of research on nuclear chain reactions and the possibility that research might lead to developing powerful bombs. Einstein notes that Germany has stopped the sale of uranium and

  5. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The CLAS Physics Data Base contains experimental data obtained by the CLAS Collaboration since 1998. Currently content of the DB is limited by experimental data on measured observables such as cross-sections, polarization asymmetries and structure functions. Information on completely integrated single and multi-differential cross-sections are available for various exclusive reactions off proton, neutron and nuclei, induced by real and virtual photons. The kinematics range covered by data sets are W < 4.0 GeV and Q2 < 5.0 GeV2. The search engine allows data to be selected according to various criteria, for instance: the initial and final states, particular kinematics range, observables of interest, date and author name(s) [Copied from http://clasweb.jlab.org/physicsdb/intro.html] A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are many experiments with data that the public can freely access.

  6. WIPP waste acceptance criteria and transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.F.; Ward, T.R.; Gregory, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, USA, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility designed as a permanent repository for transuranic wastes in the center of a 2,000-foot-thick salt bed situated 2,150 feet underground. Construction of the facility started in 1975, under a congressional act of site selection. In 1979, demonstration of safe disposal at the WIPP was authorized by Public Law 96-164. The operational philosophy and practice at the facility are: (1) start clean -- stay clean, (2) meet or exceed regulatory requirements, and (3) control radiation exposure levels to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Strict safety measures must be taken in the areas of waste preparation, transportation, and facility operation.

  7. LOPP Example Acceptance Letter | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    letter regarding selection of preliminary lessee for lease of power privilege. Author Bureau of Reclamation Published Department of Interior, 2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  8. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are many experiments with data that the public can freely access.

  9. Energy Department Accepting Small Business Grant Applications...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A mandatory letter of intent is due no later than December 15, 2014 at 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time. The submission deadline for full applications is February 3, 2015. Read the ...

  10. Now Accepting Applications for Alvarez Fellowship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers in computer science, applied mathematics or any computational science discipline who have received their Ph.D. within the last three years are encouraged to apply. The ...

  11. Postdoctoral Society of Argonne Bylaws | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society of Argonne Bylaws Bylaws of the Postdoctoral Society of Argonne. PDF icon psa_bylaws_ratified_20120425.pdf

  12. Ayuda:Vigilados | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    visualizacin de "cambios recientes", pero que solo se limita a mostrar cambios en su grupo de "Recent changes" ". Usted podr acceder a su lista de seguimiento pulsando el...

  13. Ayuda:Registro de Cambios | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    la edicin. Vista Mejorada Si se encuentra conectado al sitio y se tiene habilitado Javascript, se podr probar la vista "mejorada". Para acceder a esto simplemente dirjase a...

  14. Surge-accepting accumulator transmission for windmills and the like

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strutman, W.A.

    1980-12-16

    An alternator, powered by a wind rotor having pitch changeable blades, is maintained at a fixed speed despite variations in wind speed and cyclic perturbations in rotor shaft speed due to rotor dynamics. In one embodiment, a geared speed increaser, coupling the rotor to the alternator, is mounted for reversible rotation relative to the rotor shaft. A fluid transfer means, such as a torque motor, coupled to a pressurized accumulator, applies such a torsional reaction to the speed increaser to permit its rotation at a rate which accommodates the difference between the instantaneous rotor shaft speed and that rotor shaft speed corresponding to the alternator's fixed speed. The fluid transfer means and accumulator means together permit a maximum angular displacement of the speed increaser sufficient to provide a time interval in which the rotor blade pitch may be corrected and the rotor shaft returned to normal speed. Pitch changes are effected, in part, responsive to rotation of the speed increaser.

  15. Waste retrieval sluicing system data acquisition system acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-07-31

    This document describes the test procedure for the Project W-320 Tank C-106 Sluicing Data Acquisition System (W-320 DAS). The Software Test portion will test items identified in the WRSS DAS System Description (SD), HNF-2115. Traceability to HNF-2115 will be via a reference that follows in parenthesis, after the test section title. The Field Test portion will test sensor operability, analog to digital conversion, and alarm setpoints for field instrumentation. The W-320 DAS supplies data to assist thermal modeling of tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. It is designed to be a central repository for information from sources that would otherwise have to be read, recorded, and integrated manually. Thus, completion of the DAS requires communication with several different data collection devices and output to a usable PC data formats. This test procedure will demonstrate that the DAS functions as required by the project requirements stated in Section 3 of the W-320 DAS System Description, HNF-2115.

  16. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear Fuel Containing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This spent nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear ...

  17. Increasing the Market Acceptance of Smaller CHP Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaged Combined Heat and Power System ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Increasing the ... A lean-burn com- bustion confguration will provide enhanced reliability and emissions that ...

  18. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the summer 2015 U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Management Program (FEMP), one of approximately 20 DOE program offices that support the overall DOE Scholars Program. Through DOE's FEMP, veterans will be given ...

  19. Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is part of the team that worked on the components and technology that brought to life a breast-cancer diagnostic device - a molecular-imaging camera - now commercially produced...

  20. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Danielson, Assistant Secretary of Energy, EERE 8:55-9:05 AM RESULTS FROM INITIAL FRAMING WORKSHOP Patrick Davis, DOE EERE Vehicle Technologies Program 9:05-9:25 AM THE EV ...

  1. Acceptance Test Procedure: SY101 air pallet system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koons, B.M.

    1995-05-30

    The purpose of this test procedure is to verify that the system(s) procured to load the SY-101 Mitigation Test Pump package fulfills its functional requirements. It will also help determine the man dose expected due to handling of the package during the actual event. The scope of this procedure focuses on the ability of the air pallets and container saddles to carry the container package from the new 100 foot concrete pad into 2403-WD where it will be stored awaiting final disposition. This test attempts to simulate the actual event of depositing the SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test pump into the 2403-WD building. However, at the time of testing road modifications required to drive the 100 ton trailer into CWC were not performed. Therefore a flatbed trailer will be use to transport the container to CWC. The time required to off load the container from the 100 ton trailer will be recorded for man dose evaluation on location. The cranes used for this test will also be different than the actual event. This is not considered to be an issue due to minimal effects on man dose.

  2. Microsoft Word - Orbital_Reconstruction bh pp2 changes accepted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Role of an Oxygen Vacancy Nanostructure on the Switchable Photovoltaic Effect in BiFeO 3 ... Moreover, a switchable photovoltaic effect and its diode effect have been demonstrated. 2 ...

  3. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENERGY FACILITIES; SITE SELECTION; ICES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; LEGAL ...

  4. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing already, but that new, high-performance homes may require additional mixing. Also our results suggest that some differentiation should be made in policies and standards for systems that provide continuous exhaust, thereby reducing relative dose for occupants overall.

  5. Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    * Complete reactor control rod system. * Note: Does not include the steam turbine generator portion of the power plant. - Sensitive nuclear technology: Any information...

  6. Predetermining acceptable noise limits in EXAFS spectra in the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 75; ABSORPTION; ACTINIDES; DATA; ELEMENTS; ERRORS; FINE STRUCTURE; LEVELS; MEETINGS; MINERALS; NOISE; SPECTRA; ...

  7. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. ... AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENERGY FACILITIES; SITE ...

  8. Accepting Applications: $3.96 Million Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A second round of funding for the Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program is now available from the Energy Department's Water Power Program.

  9. Accepting Applications: $3.96 Million Hydroelectric Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The incentive is available to developers who added hydroelectric power generating capabilities to existing non-powered dams throughout the United States. Equipping local, ...

  10. ORISE: Applications being accepted for 2015 spring term of DOE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    program encourages undergraduate students to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics careers, providing them with the opportunity to perform research for 16 weeks...

  11. Applications Now Being Accepted for National Geothermal Academy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The course is a collaborative effort among faculty from the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), Stanford University, Cornell University, Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), ...

  12. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Research Org: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO. Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Solar Energy Technologies Program Country of Publication: United States ...

  13. Understanding Energy Code Acceptance within the Alaska Building Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2012-02-14

    This document presents the technical assistance provided to the Alaska Home Financing Corporation on behalf of PNNL regarding the assessment of attitudes toward energy codes within the building community in Alaska. It includes a summary of the existing situation and specific assistance requested by AHFC, the results of a questionnaire designed for builders surveyed in a suburban area of Anchorage, interviews with a lender, a building official, and a research specialist, and recommendations for future action by AHFC.

  14. Modelling acceptance of sunlight in high and low photovoltaic concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leutz, Ralf

    2014-09-26

    A simple model incorporating linear radiation characteristics, along with the optical trains and geometrical concentration ratios of solar concentrators is presented with performance examples for optical trains of HCPV, LCPV and benchmark flat-plate PV.

  15. Indian Energy Summer Internship Program Now Accepting Applications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deborah Tewa focused on tribal off-grid photovoltaic systems and renewable energy systems ... Deborah Tewa focused on tribal off-grid photovoltaic systems and renewable energy systems ...

  16. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system field acceptance testprocedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E) installed on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas are constructed as intended by the design.

  17. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 30 ... LABORATORY; PERFORMANCE; PERFORMANCE TESTING; RECOMMENDATIONS; SIMULATION; ...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Group B - Consumer Acceptance Report Out...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & drive * Drive cycle should be truly personal * DOE EV rental experience locations * ... map * Disseminate logo stickers or branding * Incentives for cash-strapped ...

  19. Tank monitor and control system sensor acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willingham, W.E.

    1997-09-26

    This ATR documents the testing of sensors connected to the TMACS. This revision adds test data sheets for 241-TX farm and individual tanks 241-A-101, 241-AX-102 and 241-B-103.

  20. ORISE: Applications being accepted for internships and research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The mission of OREM is to remove environmental legacies resulting from decades of uranium enrichment activities and energy and scientific research. Students and recent college ...

  1. A Method of Choosing the Optimal Position, Orientation, and Acceptance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion reactors with this ability could operate with improved efficiency over those that simply convert the fusion reactor power to electricity by means of conventional thermal ...

  2. Now Accepting Proposals for the 2016 Collegiate Wind Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory is looking for teams of university students to participate in the 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Collegiate Wind...

  3. 20150605_bilayer_accepted_resubmitted_v1.dvi

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using density functional theory and perturbation analysis, we investigated, under an external electric field, the electronic properties of BLGs in various stackings relevant to ...

  4. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2016 Now Accepting Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program.

  5. Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2015 Now Accepting Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program.

  6. Benchmarking of Multiparticle Phase Scan and Acceptance Scan...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurement data. The analysis showed an accurate agreement between the measurement and simulation even when the beam bunch is rather long (the Full Width Half Maximum beam bunch...

  7. New Pilot Accepting Small Business Requests to Work Closely with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the U.S. economy, accounting for three-quarters of all new jobs in this country. ... and generate three out of every four new jobs, according to the U.S. Chamber of ...

  8. Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting Technical Document for the Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

  9. Challenge Accepted: Reducing the Soft Costs of Going Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Every year, it becomes even more affordable to go solar. However, one thing remains consistent: the non-hardware, or soft costs related to permitting, installation, and maintenance account for...

  10. ORISE: EERE Robotics Internship Program now accepting applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office. The Robotics Internship Program is soliciting current students and recent high school and college graduates who have experience in robotics competitions in high...

  11. Accelerating Acceptance of Fuel Cell Backup Power Systems - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher

    2014-07-21

    Since 2001, Plug Power has installed more than 800 stationary fuel cell systems worldwide. Plug Power’s prime power systems have produced approximately 6.5 million kilowatt hours of electricity and have accumulated more than 2.5 million operating hours. Intermittent, or backup, power products have been deployed with telecommunications carriers and government and utility customers in North and South America, Europe, the United Kingdom, Japan and South Africa. Some of the largest material handling operations in North America are currently using the company’s motive power units in fuel cell-powered forklifts for their warehouses, distribution centers and manufacturing facilities. The low-temperature GenSys fuel cell system provides remote, off-grid and primary power where grid power is unreliable or nonexistent. Built reliable and designed rugged, low- temperature GenSys delivers continuous or backup power through even the most extreme conditions. Coupled with high-efficiency ratings, low-temperature GenSys reduces operating costs making it an economical solution for prime power requirements. Currently, field trials at telecommunication and industrial sites across the globe are proving the advantages of fuel cells—lower maintenance, fuel costs and emissions, as well as longer life—compared with traditional internal combustion engines.

  12. Draft EA for the Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Methods of determining whether standards are attained depend ... energy supply versus the previous coal-based supply. ... of the existing biomass plants in K- and L-Areas and the ...

  13. INL/JOU-14-33388 Accepted Manuscript Thorium: ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Under DOE Idaho ... Recently, interest in thorium's potential use in a nuclear fuel cycle has been renewed. ...

  14. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the 2015 Mickey Leland...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the 2015 Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Program (MLEF), which is a 10-week summer program for students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. ...

  15. Federal ESPC Process Phase 5: Post-Acceptance Performance | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    first year's funding and to set up the payment stream to the ESCO. Agency ... Normally, the agency withholds a part of the ESPC payment equal to the shortfall and ...

  16. Standard-E hydrogen monitoring system shop acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C.

    1997-10-02

    The purpose of this report is to document that the Standard-E Hydrogen Monitoring Systems (SHMS-E), fabricated by Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) for installation on the Waste Tank Farms in the Hanford 200 Areas, are constructed as intended by the design. The ATP performance will verify proper system fabrication.

  17. Acceptance of Classified Excess Components for Disposal at Area 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poling, Jeanne; Saad, Max

    2012-04-09

    This slide-show discusses weapons dismantlement and disposal, issues related to classified waste and their solutions.

  18. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge: Consumer Acceptance and Charging...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    organizations: A123 Systems Air Resources Board Arcimoto, Inc Argonne National Laboratory ARPA-EBooz Allen Hamilton Better Place, Inc BMW Chrysler Group LLC ClipperCreek, Inc. ...

  19. Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    low-level radioactive waste (LLW) * DOE mixed low-level waste (MLLW) * U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) classified waste The LLW and MLLW listed above may also be classified waste. ...

  20. DWPF COAL CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-06-21

    A paper study was completed to assess the impact on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)'s Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) acid addition and melter off-gas flammability control strategy in processing Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) to SB13 with an added Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) stream and two Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) products (Strip Effluent and Actinide Removal Stream). In all of the cases that were modeled, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted Reducing/Oxidizing (REDOX) Ratio of 0.20 Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe. There was sufficient formic acid in these combinations to reduce both the manganese and mercury present. Reduction of manganese and mercury are both necessary during Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing, however, other reducing agents such as coal and oxalate are not effective in this reduction. The next phase in this study will be experimental testing with SB10, FBSR, and both SWPF simulants to validate the assumptions in this paper study and determine whether there are any issues in processing these streams simultaneously. The paper study also evaluated a series of abnormal processing conditions to determine whether potential abnormal conditions in FBSR, SWPF or DWPF would produce melter feed that was too oxidizing or too reducing. In most of the cases that were modeled with one parameter at its extreme, an acid mix using formic acid and nitric acid could be achieved that would produce a predicted REDOX of 0.09-0.30 (target 0.20). However, when a run was completed with both high coal and oxalate, with minimum formic acid to reduce mercury and manganese, the final REDOX was predicted to be 0.49 with sludge and FBSR product and 0.47 with sludge, FBSR product and both SWPF products which exceeds the upper REDOX limit.

  1. Nevada State Environmental Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    variance requests is selected program areas administrated by NDEP as well as ratify air pollution enforcement actions (settlement agreements). Nevada State Environmental...

  2. A Statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz on India...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Japanese Ratify Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) United States and France Sign Joint Statement on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage The United ...

  3. Environmental acceptability of high-performance alternatives for depleted uranium penetrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerley, C.R.; Easterly, C.E.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1996-08-01

    The Army`s environmental strategy for investigating material substitution and management is to measure system environmental gains/losses in all phases of the material management life cycle from cradle to grave. This study is the first in a series of new investigations, applying material life cycle concepts, to evaluate whether there are environmental benefits from increasing the use of tungsten as an alternative to depleted uranium (DU) in Kinetic Energy Penetrators (KEPs). Current military armor penetrators use DU and tungsten as base materials. Although DU alloys have provided the highest performance of any high-density alloy deployed against enemy heavy armor, its low-level radioactivity poses a number of environmental risks. These risks include exposures to the military and civilian population from inhalation, ingestion, and injection of particles. Depleted uranium is well known to be chemically toxic (kidney toxicity), and workplace exposure levels are based on its renal toxicity. Waste materials containing DU fragments are classified as low-level radioactive waste and are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. These characteristics of DU do not preclude its use in KEPs. However, long-term management challenges associated with KEP deployment and improved public perceptions about environmental risks from military activities might be well served by a serious effort to identify, develop, and substitute alternative materials that meet performance objectives and involve fewer environmental risks. Tungsten, a leading candidate base material for KEPS, is potentially such a material because it is not radioactive. Tungsten is less well studied, however, with respect to health impacts and other environmental risks. The present study is designed to contribute to the understanding of the environmental behavior of tungsten by synthesizing available information that is relevant to its potential use as a penetrator.

  4. Microsoft Word - (ThU)O2-manuscript-as accepted

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B. Liu1, *, D.S. Aidhy1, Y. Zhang1, 2, W.J. Weber2,1 * 1Materials Science and ... +1-865-576-6301 Email: liub2@ornl.gov W.J. Weber Department of Materials Science and ...

  5. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a follow-up to the February webinar on wind power siting challenges and the April webinar on radar and wind energy projects, moderator Patrick Gilman from the Energy Department and technical...

  6. Is Entombment an Acceptable Option for Decommissioning? An International Perspective - 13488

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belencan, Helen; Nys, Vincent; Guskov, Andrey; Francois, Patrice; Watson, Bruce; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2013-07-01

    Selection of a decommissioning strategy is one of the key steps in the preparation for decommissioning of nuclear facilities and other facilities using radioactive material. Approaches being implemented or considered by Member States include immediate dismantling, deferred dismantling and entombment. Other options or slight modifications of these strategies are also possible. Entombment has been identified in the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards as one of the three basic decommissioning strategies and has been defined as a decommissioning strategy by which radioactive contaminants are encased in a structurally long lived material until radioactivity decays to a level permitting the unrestricted release of the facility, or release with restrictions imposed by the regulatory body. Although all three strategies have been considered, in principle, applicable to all facilities, their application to some facilities may not be appropriate owing to political concerns, safety or environmental requirements, technical considerations, local conditions or financial considerations. The IAEA is currently revising the decommissioning Safety Standards and one of the issues widely discussed has been the applicability of entombment in the context of decommissioning and its general objective to enable removal of regulatory control from the decommissioned facility. The IAEA recently established a consultancy to collect and discuss experience and lessons learned from entombment projects, to identify regulatory requirements and expectations for applying entombment as a decommissioning option strategy, in compliance with the internationally agreed standards. (authors)

  7. Immobilization and Waste Form Product Acceptance for Low Level and TRU Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtzscheiter, E.W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Harbour, J.R.

    1998-05-01

    The Tanks Focus Area is supporting technology development in immobilization of both High Level (HLW) and Low Level (LLW) radioactive wastes. The HLW process development at Hanford and Idaho is patterned closely after that of the Savannah River (Defense Waste Processing Facility) and West Valley Sites (West Valley Demonstration Project). However, the development and options open to addressing Low Level Waste are diverse and often site specific. To start, it is important to understand the breadth of Low Level Wastes categories.

  8. Green Racing: Accelerating the Use of Advanced Technologies & Renewable Fuels, Developing Market Acceptance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  9. ORISE: ORISE is accepting applications for the 2015 U.S. Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for students majoring in homeland security-related science, technology, engineering and mathematics (HS-STEM) disciplines. The program is administered for DHS through ORISE,...

  10. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today it is accepting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposals for the second year of the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research Program to support the research of outstanding scientists early in their careers. | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Office of Science Announces the Early Career Research Program for FY 2011 News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact

  11. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid Q

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-14

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  12. Acceptance Test Procedure for New Pumping Instrumentation and Control Skid P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOCH, M.R.

    2000-02-14

    This Test Plan provides a test method to dedicate the leak detection relays used on the new Pumping Instrumentation and Control (PIC) skids. The new skids are fabricated on-site. The leak detection system is a safety class system per the Authorization Basis.

  13. Energy Department Accepting Applications for a $3.6 Million Hydroelectric Production Incentive Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Department today announced an incentive program for developers adding hydroelectric power generating capabilities to existing non-powered dams throughout the United States.

  14. Using Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing in Lieu of Radiography for Acceptance of Carbon Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Nove, Carol A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is conducting studies for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the capability, effectiveness, and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as a replacement method for radiographic testing (RT) for volumetric examination of nuclear power plant (NPP) components. This particular study focused on evaluating the use of UT on carbon steel plate welds. Welding fabrication flaws included a combination of planar and volumetric types, e.g., incomplete fusion, lack of penetration, cracks, porosity, and slag inclusions. The examinations were conducted using phased-array (PA) UT techniques applied primarily for detection and flaw type characterization. This paper will discuss the results of using UT in lieu of RT for detection and classification of fabrication flaws in carbon steel plate welds.

  15. Energy Department Accepting Applications for a $3.6 Million Hydroelect...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    generating capabilities to existing non-powered dams throughout the United States. Hydropower is the nation's leading source of renewable energy and helps the country avoid over...

  16. Social Acceptance of Wind Energy: Managing and Evaluating Its Market Impacts (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2012-06-01

    As with any industrial-scale technology, wind power has impacts. As wind technology deployment becomes more widespread, a defined opposition will form as a result of fear of change and competing energy technologies. As the easy-to-deploy sites are developed, the costs of developing at sites with deployment barriers will increase, therefore increasing the total cost of power. This presentation provides an overview of wind development stakeholders and related stakeholder engagement questions, Energy Department activities that provide wind project deployment information, and the quantification of deployment barriers and costs in the continental United States.

  17. Hanford immobilized LAW product acceptance: Initial Tanks Focus Area testing data package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JD Vienna; A Jiricka; BP McGrail; BM Jorgensen; DE Smith; BR Allen; JC Marra; DK Peeler; KG Brown; IA Reamer; WL Ebert

    2000-03-08

    The Hanford Site's mission has been to produce nuclear materials for the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste, largely generated during plutonium production, exists in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks. These wastes are to be retrieved and separated into low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) fractions. The total volume of LAW requiring immobilization will include the LAW separated from the tank waste, as well as new wastes generated by the retrieval, pretreatment, and immobilization processes. Per the Tri-Party Agreement (1994), both the LAW and HLW will be vitrified. It has been estimated that vitrification of the LAW waste will result in over 500,000 metric tons or 200,000 m{sup 3} of immobilized LAW (ILAW) glass. The ILAW glass is to be disposed of onsite in a near-surface burial facility. It must be demonstrated that the disposal system will adequately retain the radionuclides and prevent contamination of the surrounding environment. This report describes a study of the impacts of systematic glass-composition variation on the responses from accelerated laboratory corrosion tests of representative LAW glasses. A combination of two tests, the product consistency test and vapor-hydration test, is being used to give indictations of the relative rate at which a glass could be expected to corrode in the burial scenario.

  18. NQA-1 Requirements for Commercial Grade Item Acceptance: ICONE20-54738

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Valkenburg, Taunia S.; Holmes, Richard A.; Tepley, Daniel J.; Sandquist, Gary

    2012-07-19

    Objectives are: (1) Present the DOE Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement (CMRR) Project Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Dedication Process; and (2) Present CMRR Project CGI Lessons-Learned.

  19. WSRC-MS-94-0605 Wall Thinning Acceptance Criteria for Degraded...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Based on the pipe burst experimental data, the maximum hoop ... determined with the FAD methodology described earlier. Note ... Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA, ...

  20. FERC's acceptance of market-based pricing: An antitrust analysis. [Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.C.; Frankena, M.W. )

    1992-06-01

    In large part, FERC's determination of market power is based on an analysis that focuses on the ability of power suppliers to foreclose' other potential power suppliers by withholding transmission access to the buyer. The authors believe that this analysis is flawed because the conditions it considers are neither necessary nor sufficient for the existence of market power. That is, it is possible that market-based rates can be subject to market power even if no transmission supplier has the ability to foreclose some power suppliers; conversely, it is possible that no market power exists despite the ability to foreclose other suppliers. This paper provides a critical analysis of FERC's market-power determinations. The concept of market power is defined and its relationship to competition is discussed in Section 1, while a framework for evaluating the existence of market power is presented in Section 2. In Section 3, FERC's recent order in Terra Comfort is examined using this framework. A brief preview of FERC's order in TECO Power Services comprises Section 4. Overall conclusions are presented in Section 5.

  1. DOE-STD-1167-2003; Respiratory Acceptance Program for Supplied...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... The metered air supply is needed in order to supply breathing air to the supplied- air suit being tested. 19.1.8 Spray Gun. A spray gun or equal device should be used to spray the ...

  2. Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

    2007-05-30

    Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

  3. Microsoft Word - CLE_2.1_Post-Mortem_2009-v9-Accepted.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    08 Proceedings 1 of 8 Post-Mortem of the NERSC Franklin XT Upgrade to CLE 2.1 James M. Craw, Nicholas P. Cardo, Yun (Helen) He Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Berkeley, CA 94720 craw@nersc.gov, cardo@nersc.gov, yhe@lbl.gov And Janet M. Lebens Cray, Inc. jml@cray.com ABSTRACT: This paper will discuss the lessons learned of the events leading up to the production deployment of CLE 2.1 and the post install issues experienced in upgrading

  4. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  5. Nutritional significance and acceptance of solar-dried foods of rural Leyte Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Training in solar dryer construction and food preservation was provided to villagers in three barangays in rural Leyte, Philippines. A 24 hour dietary recall assessed dietary status of the women prior to the solar dried food intervention. Nutrients of greatest dietary concern were thiamine, vitamin A, riboflavin, iron and energy.

  6. Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One recent addition to the arsenal of cost-effective efficiency measures is low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows. A low-e coating or glazing is a thin layer deposited directly on the surface of one...

  7. Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, P.A.

    1991-10-01

    This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.

  8. W-026, acceptance test report motor control centers (submittal{number_sign}515.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T.L.

    1997-01-07

    Westinghouse Energy Services provided start up testing at the WRAP Facility Hanford. This report covers services provided October 9, 1995 to October 18, 1995.

  9. Project W-314 ax-b valve pit upgrade acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnick, T. L.

    1997-09-29

    Program/Project Title: Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation, Phase I Component/System: SN-630 Transfer Line (AZ-02A to AN-B) September 15, 1997.

  10. WSRC-MS-94-0605 Wall Thinning Acceptance Criteria for Degraded...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    072395 - 072795. DOE Contract No. DE-AC09-89SRl8035 This paper was prepared in connection with work done under the above contract number with the U. S. Department of Energy. ...

  11. 241-AN-B pit leak detection ANA-WT-LDSTA-231 acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VANDYKE, D.W.

    1999-08-25

    This document describes the method used to test design criteria for Safety Class, Intrinsically Safe leak detector system installed in 241-AN-B Valve Pit located at 200E Tank Farms. The purpose of this Procedure is to demonstrate that the pit leak detection relay cabinet and intrinsically safe probe circuit is fully operable.

  12. Design acceptance summary report for the new generation transfer pump (NGTP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRONS, J.

    1999-10-27

    This report documents design review of the New Generation Transfer Pump versus the functions and requirements of the SY-101 Rapid Mitigation Project. Previously unpublished documentation for the pump is included in support of the design.

  13. New recycling plant accepts and converts co-mingled plastic trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The plant, owned and operated by Innovative Plastic Products Inc. (IPPI), uses a new patented German process to convert co-mingled plastic trash, including impurities like wood, papers, and metal, into a plastic alloy that is immediately molded into finished product. The products currently being produced by IPPI's facility in Greensboro, Ga., are: flat sheets in various thickness called InnoPlast GP(tm); a modular drainage trough called InnoDain(tm); pallets, dollies, industrial floor tile, and cable spools. Ken Carrier, vice president of Marketing, says that by year end the plant should reach an operating capacity of about 1 million pounds per month of finished product from the recycled plastic waste.

  14. Microsoft Word - final financial plan v4 edits accepted.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clauses (CRAC) and the Dividend Distribution Clause (DDC), the rate adjustment and rebate mechanisms used since the 2002 Power Rate Case. Conditions that affect BPA's...

  15. PUBLIC AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE OF BLENDING OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE VS DILUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldston, W.

    2010-11-30

    On April 21, 2009, the Energy Facilities Contractors Group (EFCOG) Waste Management Working Group (WMWG) provided a recommendation to the Department of Energy's Environmental Management program (DOE-EM) concerning supplemental guidance on blending methodologies to use to classify waste forms to determine if the waste form meets the definition of Transuranic (TRU) Waste or can be classified as Low-Level Waste (LLW). The guidance provides specific examples and methods to allow DOE and its Contractors to properly classify waste forms while reducing the generation of TRU wastes. TRU wastes are much more expensive to characterize at the generator's facilities, ship, and then dispose at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) than Low-Level Radioactive Waste's disposal. Also the reduction of handling and packaging of LLW is inherently less hazardous to the nuclear workforce. Therefore, it is important to perform the characterization properly, but in a manner that minimizes the generation of TRU wastes if at all possible. In fact, the generation of additional volumes of radioactive wastes under the ARRA programs, this recommendation should improve the cost effective implementation of DOE requirements while properly protecting human health and the environment. This paper will describe how the message of appropriate, less expensive, less hazardous blending of radioactive waste is the 'right' thing to do in many cases, but can be confused with inappropriate 'dilution' that is frowned upon by regulators and stakeholders in the public. A proposal will be made in this paper on how to communicate this very complex and confusing technical issue to regulatory bodies and interested stakeholders to gain understanding and approval of the concept. The results of application of the proposed communication method and attempt to change the regulatory requirements in this area will be discussed including efforts by DOE and the NRC on this very complex subject.

  16. Energy Savings with Acceptable Indoor Air Quality Through Improved Air Flow Control in Residential Retrofit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lead Performer: Gas Technology Institute—Des Plaines, IL Partners: -- University of Illinois, Urbana IL -- Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance, Chicago IL

  17. Microsoft Word - Tax credit document for website GC edits 9-24-2015 accepted clean versio....docx

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    of 2 FACT SHEET Accelerating the Development and Deployment of Advanced Technology Vehicles, including Battery Electric and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles President Obama's proposed changes to advanced vehicle tax credits as part of the Administration's Fiscal Year 2016 Revenue Proposals: 1 Provide a Tax Credit for the Production of Advanced Technology Vehicles Current Law A tax credit is allowed for plug-in electric drive motor vehicles. A plug-in electric drive motor vehicle is a vehicle that

  18. EERE Success Story—Performance Validation of Low-e Storm Windows Paves Way for Market Acceptance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One recent addition to the arsenal of cost-effective efficiency measures is low-emissivity (low-e) storm windows. A low-e coating or glazing is a thin layer deposited directly on the surface of one...

  19. Central Characterization Program (CCP), Acceptable Knowledge Summary Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA-55 Mixed Transuranic Waste Streams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supporting Technical Document for the Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

  20. Bay-annulated indigo (BAI) as an excellent electron accepting building block for high performance organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yi; He, Bo; Pun, Andrew

    2016-04-19

    A novel electron acceptor based on bay-annulated indigo (BAI) was synthesized and used for the preparation of a series of high performance donor-acceptor small molecules and polymers. The resulting materials possess low-lying LUMO energy level and small HOMO-LUMO gaps, while their films exhibited high crystallinity upon thermal treatment, commensurate with high field effect mobilities and ambipolar transfer characteristics.

  1. Bay-annulated indigo (BAI) as an excellent electron accepting building block for high performance organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yi; He, Bo; Pun, Andrew

    2015-11-24

    A novel electron acceptor based on bay-annulated indigo (BAI) was synthesized and used for the preparation of a series of high performance donor-acceptor small molecules and polymers. The resulting materials possess low-lying LUMO energy level and small HOMO-LUMO gaps, while their films exhibited high crystallinity upon thermal treatment, commensurate with high field effect mobilities and ambipolar transfer characteristics.

  2. Public acceptability of the use of gamma rays from spent nuclear fuel as a hazardous waste treatment process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, B.J.; Wells, R.P.; Reilly, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Three methods were used to estimate public reaction to the use of gamma irradiation of hazardous wastes as a hazardous waste treatment process. The gamma source of interest is spent nuclear fuel. The first method is Benefit-Risk Decision Making, where the benefits of the proposed technology are compared to its risks. The second analysis compares the proposed technology to the other, currently used nuclear technologies and estimates public reaction based on that comparison. The third analysis is called Analysis of Public Consent, and is based on the professional methods of the Institute for Participatory Management and Planning. The conclusion of all three methods is that the proposed technology should not result in negative public reaction sufficient to prevent implementation.

  3. DWPF COAL-CARBON WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA LIMIT EVALUATION BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL WORK (TANK 48 IMPACT STUDY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Choi, A.

    2010-10-15

    This report summarizes the results of both experimental and modeling studies performed using Sludge Batch 10 (SB10) simulants and FBSR product from Tank 48 simulant testing in order to develop higher levels of coal-carbon that can be managed by DWPF. Once the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process starts up for treatment of Tank 48 legacy waste, the FBSR product stream will contribute higher levels of coal-carbon in the sludge batch for processing at DWPF. Coal-carbon is added into the FBSR process as a reductant and some of it will be present in the FBSR product as unreacted coal. The FBSR product will be slurried in water, transferred to Tank Farm and will be combined with sludge and washed to produce the sludge batch that DWPF will process. The FBSR product is high in both water soluble sodium carbonate and unreacted coal-carbon. Most of the sodium carbonate is removed during washing but all of the coal-carbon will remain and become part of the DWPF sludge batch. A paper study was performed earlier to assess the impact of FBSR coal-carbon on the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) operation and melter off-gas flammability by combining it with SB10-SB13. The results of the paper study are documented in Ref. 7 and the key findings included that SB10 would be the most difficult batch to process with the FBSR coal present and up to 5,000 mg/kg of coal-carbon could be fed to the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. In the present study, a bench-scale demonstration of the DWPF CPC processing was performed using SB10 simulants spiked with varying amounts of coal, and the resulting seven CPC products were fed to the DWPF melter cold cap and off-gas dynamics models to determine the maximum coal that can be processed through the melter without exceeding the off-gas flammability safety basis limits. Based on the results of these experimental and modeling studies, the presence of coal-carbon in the sludge feed to DWPF is found to have both positive (+) and negative (-) impact as summarized below: (-) Coal-carbon is a melter reductant. If excess coal-carbon is present, the resulting melter feed may be too reducing, potentially shortening the melter life. During this study, the Reduction/Oxidation Potential (REDOX) of the melter could be controlled by varying the ratio of nitric and formic acid. (-) The addition of coal-carbon increases the amount of nitric acid added and decreases the amount of formic acid added to control melter REDOX. This means that the CPC with the FBSR product is much more oxidizing than current CPC processing. In this study, adequate formic acid was present in all experiments to reduce mercury and manganese, two of the main goals of CPC processing. (-) Coal-carbon will be oxidized to carbon dioxide or carbon monoxide in the melter. The addition of coal-carbon to the FBSR product will lead to approximately 55% higher offgas production from formate, nitrate and carbon due to the decomposition of the carbon at the maximum levels in this testing. Higher offgas production could lead to higher cold cap coverage or melter foaming which could decrease melt rate. No testing was performed to evaluate the impact of the higher melter offgas flow. (+) The hydrogen production is greatly reduced in testing with coal as less formic acid is added in CPC processing. In the high acid run without coal, the peak hydrogen generation was 15 times higher than in the high acid run with added coal-carbon. (+) Coal-carbon is a less problematic reducing agent than formic acid, since the content of both carbon and hydrogen are important in evaluating the flammability of the melter offgas. Processing with coal-carbon decreases the amount of formic acid added in the CPC, leading to a lower flammability risk in processing with coal-carbon compared to the current DWPF flowsheet. (+) The seven SB10 formulations which were tested during the bench-scale CPC demonstration were all determined to be within the off-gas flammability safety basis limits during the 9X/5X off-gas surge for normal bubbled melter operation. The concentration of coal-carbon in these baseline melter feeds varied widely from 0 to 17,863 ppm, depending on the acid addition strategy used and the extent to which the required reductant (formic acid) was replaced with coal-carbon. All baseline feeds were redox-adjusted and three of them contained TOC higher than the current theoretical TSR limit of 18,900 ppm. (-) Additional coal-carbon was then added to each baseline feed until the calculated off-gas flammability equaled the safety basis limit of 60% of the LFL at the peak of off-gas surge ('max-coal'). In doing so, however, no counterbalancing nitrate was added, thus simulating the scenario where slugs of coal enter the melter as a result of uneven distribution of coal in the slurry.

  4. Acceptance test procedure bldg. 271-U remote monitoring of project W-059 B-Plant canyon exhaust system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDANIEL, K.S.

    1999-09-01

    The test procedure provides for verifying indications and alarms The test procedure provides for verifying indications and alarms associated with the B Plant Canyon Ventilation System as they are being displayed on a remote monitoring workstation located in building 271-U. The system application software was installed by PLCS Plus under contract from B&W Hanford Company. The application software was installed on an existing operator workstation in building 271U which is owned and operated by Bechtel Hanford Inc.

  5. Is the Distribution Grid Ready to Accept Large Scale Photovoltaic Deployment? - State of the Art, Progress and Future Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, M.; Stetz, T.; Brundlinger, R.; Mayr, C.; Hatta, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Ogimoto, K.; Kroposki, B.; Mather, B.; Coddington, M.; Lynn, K.; Graditi, G.; Woyte, A.; MacGill, I.

    2011-01-01

    The installed capacity of photovoltaic systems has recently increased at a much faster rate than the development of grid codes to effectively and efficiently manage high penetrations of PV within the distribution system. In a number of countries, PV penetrations in some regions are now raising growing concerns regarding integration. Management strategies vary considerably by country - some still have an approach that photovoltaic systems should behave as passive as possible while others demand an active participation in grid control. This variety of grid codes also causes challenges in learning from 'best practice'. This paper provides a review of current grid codes in some countries with high PV penetrations. In addition, the paper presents a number of country-specific case studies on different approaches for improved integration of photovoltaic systems in the distribution grid. In particular, we consider integration approaches using active and reactive power control that can reduce or defer expensive grid reinforcement while supporting higher PV penetrations.

  6. Guidelines for generators to meet HWHF acceptance requirements for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes at Berkeley Lab. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, R.

    1996-06-01

    This document provides performance standards that one, as a generator of hazardous chemical, radioactive, or mixed wastes at the Berkeley Lab, must meet to manage their waste to protect Berkeley Lab staff and the environment, comply with waste regulations and ensure the continued safe operation of the workplace, have the waste transferred to the correct Waste Handling Facility, and enable the Environment, Health and Safety (EH and S) Division to properly pick up, manage, and ultimately send the waste off site for recycling, treatment, or disposal. If one uses and generates any of these wastes, one must establish a Satellite Accumulation Area and follow the guidelines in the appropriate section of this document. Topics include minimization of wastes, characterization of the wastes, containers, segregation, labeling, empty containers, and spill cleanup and reporting.

  7. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Old Solvent Tanks S1-S22 to Address Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filpus-Luyckx, P.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1997-10-02

    The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) assumed custody of the Old Solvent Tanks (Tanks S1-S22) in the Old Radioactive Waste Burial Ground (ORWBG, 643-E) from Waste Management in January 1991. The purpose of this Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is to collect and analyze samples of the sludge solids, organic and aqueous phases to determine the level of radioactivity, the isotopic constituents, the specific gravity, and other physical parameters. These data must be obtained to evaluate the process safety of remediating the tanks, to determine the disposal path for the material in the tanks, and to determine the most viable closure technology for the tanks.

  8. Project W-314 sn-634 transfer line a-b to ax-b acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnick, T. L.

    1997-09-29

    Program/Project Title: Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation, Phase I Component/System: SN-630 Transfer Line (AZ-02A to AN-B) September 15, 1997.

  9. A Procedure for Determination of Degradation Acceptance Criteria for Structures and Passive Components in Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Choun, Y-S.; Hahm, D.; Choi, I-K.

    2012-01-30

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory since 2007 to develop a realistic seismic risk evaluation system which includes the consideration of aging of structures and components in nuclear power plants (NPPs). This collaboration program aims at providing technical support to a five-year KAERI research project, which includes three specific areas that are essential to seismic probabilistic risk assessment: (1) probabilistic seismic hazard analysis, (2) seismic fragility analysis including the effects of aging, and (3) a plant seismic risk analysis. The understanding and assessment of age-related degradations of structures, systems, and components and their impact on plant safety is the major goal of this KAERI-BNL collaboration. Four annual reports have been published before this report as a result of the collaboration research.

  10. Interim Report on Consumer Acceptance, Retention, and response to Time-based rates from the Consumer Behavior Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy |June 2015 Interim Report on Impacts from the Consumer Behavior Studies | Page ii Table of Contents Executive Summary .............................................................................................................. iv 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Background about Time-Based Rates and Advanced Metering Infrastructure ............ 1 1.2 Overview of

  11. Inventory of Safety-related Codes and Standards for Energy Storage Systems with some Experiences related to Approval and Acceptance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2014-09-11

    The purpose of this document is to identify laws, rules, model codes, codes, standards, regulations, specifications (CSR) related to safety that could apply to stationary energy storage systems (ESS) and experiences to date securing approval of ESS in relation to CSR. This information is intended to assist in securing approval of ESS under current CSR and to identification of new CRS or revisions to existing CRS and necessary supporting research and documentation that can foster the deployment of safe ESS.

  12. ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low- Rise Residential Buildings- Building America Top Innovation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This 2014 Top Innovation describes Building America research and support in developing and gaining adoption of ASHRAE 62.2.

  13. Implications of Export/Import Reporting Requirements in the United States - International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Additional Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.; Benjamin, Eugene L.; McNair, Gary W.

    2001-02-20

    The United States has signed but not ratified the US/IAEA Safeguards Additional Protocol. If ratified, the Additional Protocol will require the US to report to the IAEA certain nuclear-related exports and imports to the IAEA. This document identifies and assesses the issues associated with the US making those reports. For example, some regulatory changes appear to be necessary. The document also attempts to predict the impact on the DOE Complex by assessing the historical flow of exports and imports that would be reportable if the Additional Protocol were in force.

  14. Major Recovery Act Project Completed at Hanford: Two New Super Cells Go Into Service To Accept Contaminated Soil and Debris Months Ahead of Schedule and Millions Under Budget

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, WASH. – Two new super cells are going into service to expand disposal capacity for contaminated soil and debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State.

  15. Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

    2014-02-26

    Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6 m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

  16. Guidelines for preparing and reviewing applications for the licensing of non-power reactors: Standard review plan and acceptance criteria. NUREG - 1537, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    NUREG - 1537, Part 2 gives guidance on the conduct of licensing action reviews to NRC staff who review non-power reactor licensing applications. These licensing actions include construction permits and initial operating licenses, license renewals, amendments, conversions from highly enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium, decommissioning, and license termination.

  17. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Codes Program Building Energy Codes Program An estimated 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building energy codes ensure they use energy efficiently over the life of the building. An estimated 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building energy codes ensure they use energy efficiently over the life of the building. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports the development and implementation of residential and commercial building

  18. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Ventilation and Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Low-Rise Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovations profile describes Building America research and support in developing and gaining adoption of ASHRAE 62.2, a residential ventilation standard that is critical to transforming the U.S. housing industry to high-performance homes.

  19. W-026, acceptance test report gamma energy assay (GEA) system A(submittal {number_sign}39.8) C3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, T. L.

    1997-01-28

    This test procedure is designed to test all of the functions of the GEA system at the WRAP facility at Hanford, Washington. The procedure is designed to be executed in the sequence given, starting with: * verification of components and labeling * verification or entry of all of the setup parameters * performing the calibrations (energy, efficiency, transmission, and reference peak) * performing the measurements in local mode * performing the measurements in remote mode * confirming the message formats * utility operations (LN2 fill, archiving, password maintenance) The system is designed to be operated in a remote mode in which all commands are received over a network, and the results are returned over the same network. A manual mode is provided for the setup and calibration operations, and for maintenance functions. The system is designed to start up in remote mode. The user can go to local mode when at the keyboard by selecting Exit on the screen shown during remote mode. A user logon screen, requiring 2 username and password, limits access to local mode.

  20. HCA resp matrix in excel format sept 1, 2009.xls

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ratification of Unauthorized Commitments 1. Ratify unauthorized commitments in accordance with FAR 1.602-3(b)(2). Note: DEAR 901.602-3(b)(3) limits the HCA ratification authority only to individual unauthorized commitments of $25,000 or less and states that HCA ratification authority is nondelegable. Appointment of Contracting Officers 2. As stipulated in DEAR 901.601(a), the HCA is responsible for making formal contracting officer appointments within their respective contracting activity. 3.

  1. Microsoft Word - National Report 05-02-03.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 2003 United States of America National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management United States Department of Energy In Cooperation with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission United States Environmental Protection Agency United States Department of State -ii- ABSTRACT AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The United States of America ratified the "Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of

  2. Policy issues facing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty and prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, J.

    1999-04-01

    This report is divided into the following 5 sections: (1) Background; (2) Major Issues Facing Ratification of CTBT; (3) Current Status on CTBT Ratification; (4) Status of CTBT Signatories and Ratifiers; and (5) CTBT Activities Not Prohibited. The major issues facing ratification of CTBT discussed here are: impact on CTBT of START II and ABM ratification; impact of India and Pakistan nuclear tests; CTBT entry into force; and establishment of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization.

  3. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Kentucky. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Until April 1, 1979, the Public Service Commission had been vested with exclusive jurisdiction over the regulation of rates and service of utilities. As of that date two new agencies, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) and the Utility Regulatory Commission (URC), have replaced the Public Service Commission. The ERC consists of three full-time members appointed by the governor for four year terms and is responsible for enforcing the provisions of the Kentucky statutes relating to electric and gas utilities. The three-member URC is responsible for enforcing the provisions relating to non-energy utilities such as telephone, sewer, and water utilities. The statutes vest all regulatory authority over public utilities in either the ERC or the URC. Local governments retain only the power to grant local franchises. However, it should be noted, that any utility owned or operated by a political subdivision of the state is exempt from regulation. Thus, local government has complete authority over utilities which are self-owned. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  4. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Missouri. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Missouri is vested in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members who are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for a term of six years. Commissioners must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests incompatible with the duties of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the general supervision of public utilities. The Public Service Commission Law passed in 1913, makes no provision for the regulation of public utilities by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  5. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Virginia. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilties is vested generally in the State Corporation Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members elected by a joint vote of the two houses of the general assembly. Commissioners serve six-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any company subject to the supervision and regulation of the Commission. The Commission is charged with the primary responsibility of supervising and regulating public utilities. However, local governments retain the power to grant franchises and otherwise regulate the use of streets and other public property. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are not within the jurisdiction of the Commission to the extent that they operate within corporate limits. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  6. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in the United States. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a summary of a series of preliminary reports describing the laws and regulatory programs of the United states and each of the 50 states affecting the siting and operation of energy generating facilities likely to be used in Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). A brief summary of public utility regulatory programs, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority is presented in this report to identify how such programs and authority may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES. Subsequent reports will (1) describe public utility rate regulatory procedures and practices as they might affect an ICES, (2) analyze each of the aforementioned regulatory programs to identify impediments to the development of ICES, and (3) recommend potential changes in legislation and regulatory practices and procedures to overcome such impediments.

  7. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Washington. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Washinton State Constitution grants authority to the legislature to regulate railroads and other common carriers as well as telegraph and telephone companies in the state. No section of the constitution expressly provides for the regulation of electric, gas, water, or heating utilities. The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Utilities and Transportation Commission, formerly designated at the Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of three members appointed by the governor, with the consent of the senate. The term of office for commissioners is six years. Recently enacted legislation provides for the implementation of tax incentives to encourage the development of cogeneration facilities in the state. This plan is to be administered by the Department of Revenue in conjunction with the Energy Office. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  8. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Indiana. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Public Service Commission of Indiana. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor. Commissioners are appointed for four-year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interest in any public utility. Indiana courts have stated that the Commission was created and vested with regulatory authority over public utilities in order to relieve these utilities from local regulation. Local governments do, however, have specific statutory authority to determine, by contract or ordinance, the quality and character of service to be provided by public utilities within the municipality. Local governments may also regulate the use of streets and other public property by public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  9. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Nevada. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate the operatons of public utilities in Nevada is vested generally in the Public Service Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor to four year terms. One of the members is designated by the governor to act as chairman and serves in that capacity at the pleasure of the governor. Commissioners must be free from employment or pecuniary interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Commission. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supercedes that of local governments. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are totally exempt from Commission control. No specific procedure is provided by which the decisions of local governments regarding utilities may be reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  10. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Idaho. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Idaho state legislature has created the Idaho Public Utilities Commission and has given the Commission the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate every public utility in the state. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor with the approval of the senate. Commissioners serve full time and are appointed for six year terms. No more than two of the members may be from the same political party. Title 61 of the Idaho Code, which establishes the Commission and delineates its powers, vests all regulatory responsibility in the Commission to the exclusion of local government. However, as an incident to their franchising power, municipalities may impose reasonable regulations on the use of their streets. The Idaho Supreme Court holds that the transfer of regulatory power over public utilities to the Commission did not diminish the powers and duties of municipalities to control and maintain their streets and alleys. Limited statutory authority also exists giving municipalities the power to regulate the fares, rates, rentals, or charges made for the service rendered under any franchise granted in such city, except such as are subject to regulation by the Public Utilities Commission. With the exception of this limited power, the Commission is the sole agency having regulatory power over Idaho public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  11. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Louisiana. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Louisiana Public Service Commission, composed of five members elected by the general electorate and elected for six-year terms. The Commission is charged with regulating all public utilities and has such other regulatory authority as provided by law. The Commission, however, has no power to regulate a public utility owned, operated, or regulated on the effective data of this constitution (1921) by the governing authority of one or more political subdivisions unless the Commission is authorized to regulate these utilities by the electorate of the political subdivision involved. An additional statutory provision excludes all municipally-owned public utilities from Commission regulation. New Orleans has retained the regulatory authority which it held as of the effective date of the Louisiana Constitution. Therefore, the Commission exercises no regulatory powers over investor or municipally-owned utilities in New Orleans. A municipality is empowered to own and operate a revenue-producing public utility within or without its boundaries and it may sell and distribute the commodity or service of the public utility within or without its corporate limits and may establish rates, rules, and regulations with respect to the sale and distribution. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  12. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Texas. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Texas is generally vested in the Public Utilities Commission. The Commission is comprised of three members appointed by the governor, with the advice of at least two-thirds of the senate, for a six-year term. Prior to the passage of the Texas Public Utility Regulatory Act (PURA) in 1975, the power to regulate public utilities was vested almost exclusively in municipalities. Under PURA, municipalities retain exclusive original jurisdiction over all electric, water, and sewer utilities within the municipality. PURA provides that all regulations pertaining to public utilities promulgated by local regulatory agencies remain in effect unless they are superceded by Commission rules. The municipality's governing body is required to exercise its regulatory authority under rules and standards consistent with those promulgated by the Commission. The Commission has exclusive appellate jurisdiction to review orders and ordinances of regulatory municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  13. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Mississippi. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities in Mississippi is vested generally in the Public Service Commission, composed of three members elected for four year terms from separate districts of the state. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Commission supersedes that of local governments. It is empowered to amend municipal franchises that contain provisions conflicting with its exclusive jurisdiction over the rates and standards of service of public utilities. Local governments play a role in regulating public utilities only through the exercise of their zoning and franchising powers. They may also operate their own utilities which are totally exempt from Commission control, unless they provide services more than one mile beyond their corporate boundaries. Other than a procedure in which certain provisions in municipal franchises may be subject to modification by the Commission, there is no process by which the decisions of local government respecting utilities are reviewed by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  14. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in North Carolina. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    Under the Public Utilities Act of 1965, utilities in North Carolina are regulated by the State's Utility Commission. The Commission consists of seven members who are appointed by the governor, subject to confirmation by the General Assembly sitting in joint session. The Commissioners serve eight year terms and the governor designates one of the commissioners as chairman. The Commission has an office of the executive director, who is appointed to a six year term by the governor subject to confirmaion by the General Assembly. The executive director heads the Commission's public staff. The public staff's duties include reviewing, investigating, and making recommendations on utility rates and services and intervention on behalf of the public in proceedings affecting consumer rates and generating plant certification. The Commission has the same power to regulate the operation of privately-owned public utilities within municipalities as it has to control those ouside. The only power over privately-owned utilities reserved to the municipalities is the power to grant franchises. A municipality may maintain its own utility systems, and such systems are not subject to the control and jurisdiction of the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  15. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Alabama. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Alabama legislature has created the Public Service Commission which has general supervisory powers over utilities. The PSC consists of a president and two associates, who are elected to four-year terms. The PSC has no jurisdiction over municipal utilities and, as a result, local governments retain the power to regulate the operation of their municipally-owned utilities. Municipalities also retain their police power over streets and highways within their territory. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  16. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Illinois. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Illinois Commerce Commission, comprised of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate and appointed for five year terms. They must be free from any employment or pecuniary interests in any business subject to regulation by the Commission. Local governments may exercise a large degree of regulatory authority over public utilities providing services within a municipality. The question of whether a municipality will exercise regulatory control over local public utilities must be put to the voters of the city. If the proposition is approved by a majority of the voters, the municipality may regulate services and rates and exercise most of the regulatory functions otherwise assigned to the Commission. If any public utility is dissatisfied with any action of a municipality, the utility is entitled to apply to the Commission for review of the action. On review, the Commission may take any determination which it deems just and reasonable. In addition, municipally-owned utilities are excluded specifically from the definition of public utility. These utilities are not within the jurisdiction of the Commission and are regulated locally. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  17. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New York. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the New York Public Service Commission. The Commission is composed of five members appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Commissioners are appointed for six-year terms. Commissioners may not have any pecuniary or financial interest in any public utility. Local governing bodies are authorized to exercise such power, jurisdiction and authority in enforcing the laws of the state and the orders, rules, and regulations of the commission as may be prescribed by statute or by the commission with respect to public utilities. A Commission spokesman confirmed that no statutes have been passed pursuant to this provision and the Commission has not ceded any of its regulatory powers to local governments. With the exception of the granting of franchises and permits to use public ways, local governments exercise no regulatory powers over public utilities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  18. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in California. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D.A.; Weaver, C.L.; Gallagher, K.C.; Hejna, D.; Rielley, K.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Constitution of the State of California grants to the Legislature control over persons and private corporations that own or operate a line, plant, or system for the production, generation, or transmission of heat, light, water, or power to be furnished either directly or indirectly to or for the public. The Constitution establishes the Public Utilities Commission and grants certain specific powers to the PUC, including the power to fix rates, establish rules and prescribe a uniform system of accounts. The Constitution also recognizes that the Legislature has plenary power to confer additional authority and jurisdiction upon the PUC. The Constitution prohibits regulation by a city, county, or other municipal body of matters over which the Legislature has granted regulatory power to the PUC. This provision does not, however, impair the right of any city to grant franchises for public utilities. The California legislature has enacted the California Public Utilities Code and has designated the PUC as the agency to implement the regulatory provisions of the Code. The Public Utilities Commission consists of five members appointed by the governor and approved by the senate, a majority of the membership concurring, for staggered 6-year terms. Certain limited powers over the conduct of public utilities may still be exercised by municipalities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  19. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Tennessee. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Tennessee Public Service Commission has been designated by the legislature as the agency primarily responsible for the regulation of public utilities and carriers. The Commission is comprised of three members elected by the voters of the state. Each member of the Commission serves a six-year term. The Commission is given broad supervisory control over public utilities in the public utilities statute. Included under its authority is the power to determine whether a privilege or franchise granted to a public utility by a municipality is necessary and proper for the public convenience. No privilege or franchise is valid until it has been approved by the Commission. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  20. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in New Jersey. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate the operations of public utilities in New Jersey is generally vested in the Board of Public Utilities. The Board is subsumed within the Department of Energy for administrative purposes, but functions largely independently of supervision or control by that agency. The Board is composed of three members who serve for six-year terms. They are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Within the purview of its powers, the authority of the Board supersedes that of local governments. The Board, for example, may grant exemptions from local zoning provisions, and has approving authority over privileges or franchises granted by municipalities to public utilities. The Board, however, cannot override the refusal of a municipality to grant consent to the initiation of operations by a public utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  1. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in South Dakota. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The South Dakota Public Utilities Commission is authorized by statute to regulate gas and electric utilities. The Commission consists of three elected commissioners each of whom serves for a six year term. The Commissioners are elected by district and each must, at the time of election, be a resident of the district from which he has been elected. Each Commissioner must reside in the state capital and devote his entire time to the duties of his office. The Commission is part of the Department of Commerce and Consumer Protection. Municipal power to regulate privately owned electric and gas public utilities was terminated in 1975. A municipally-owned electric utility has the authority to regulate the sale, use, and rates of electric power and energy which it provides. The Commission has no authority to regulate steam, heat, and refrigeration systems; that power resides in cities. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  2. Finding of No Significant Impact for Environmental Assessment on the Implementation of the Authorized Limits Process for Waste Acceptance at the C-746-U Landfill Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  3. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Ohio. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The Public Utilities Commission (PUCO) is a body created by the Ohio State legislature to administer the provisions of the Ohio Public Utilities Act. It is composed of three commissioners appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate. Once appointed, a commissioner serves for a six-year period. The PUCO is vested with the power and jurisdiction to supervise and regulate public utilities and railroads... . The term public utility includes every corporation, company, co-partnership, person or association, their lessees, trustees, or receivers, as defined in the Ohio Code. Among the various services enumerated in the Code under the definition of public utility are an electric light company; a gas company; a pipeline company transporting gas, oil or coal; a waterworks company; a heating or cooling company. The power to regulate public utilities is shared by the PUCO and municipal governments. The municipal regulatory authority is derived from the Ohio Constitution, statutory provisions, and municipal franchising authority. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  4. Study of the impacts of regulations affecting the acceptance of Integrated Community Energy Systems: public utility, energy facility siting and municipal franchising regulatory programs in Massachusetts. Preliminary background report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L; Gallagher, K C; Hejna, D; Rielley, K J

    1980-01-01

    The authority to regulate public utilities is vested generally in the Department of Public Utilities. The Department is under the supervision and control of a commission consisting of three members appointed by the governor for terms of four years. No more than two of the commissioners may be members of the same political party. Commissioners must be freee from any employment or financial interests which are incompatible with the duties of the Department. The Department is responsible for regulating public utilities. The Department is specifically granted general supervisory authority over all gas and electric companies. Specific provisions for the appeal of local decisions exist only in the case of a municipality's approval or disapproval of new operaions by an electric or gas company in a municipality already being served by another such utility. Public utility regulatory statutes, energy facility siting programs, and municipal franchising authority are examined to identify how they may impact on the ability of an organization, whether or not it be a regulated utility, to construct and operate an ICES.

  5. Activities implemented jointly: First report to the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Accomplishments and descriptions of projects accepted under the U.S. Initiative on Joint Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    More than 150 countries are now Party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which seeks, as its ultimate objective, to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases at a level that would prevent dangerous human interference with the climate system. As a step toward this goal, all Parties are to take measures to mitigate climate change and to promote and cooperate in the development and diffusion of technologies and practices that control or reduce emissions and enhance sinks of greenhouse gases. In the US view, efforts between countries or entities within them to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions undertaken cooperatively--called joint implementation (JI)--holds significant potential both for combating the threat of global warming and for promoting sustainable development. To develop and operationalize the JI concept, the US launched its Initiative on Joint Implementation (USIJI) in October 1993, and designed the program to attract private sector resources and to encourage the diffusion of innovative technologies to mitigate climate change. The USIJI provides a mechanism for investments by US entities in projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide and has developed a set of criteria for evaluating proposed projects for their potential to reduce net GHG emissions.

  6. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, the relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Thomas Jr.

    2014-05-09

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) is the most important international security arrangement that we have that is protecting the world community and this has been true for many years. But it did not happen by accident, it is a strategic bargain in which 184 states gave up the right forever to acquire the most powerful weapon ever created in exchange for a commitment from the five states allowed to keep nuclear weapons under the NPT (U.S., U.K., Russia, France and China), to share peaceful nuclear technology and to engage in disarmament negotiations aimed at the ultimate elimination of their nuclear stockpiles. The most important part of this is the comprehensive nuclear test ban (CTBT); the thinking by the 184 NPT non-nuclear weapon states was and is that they understand that the elimination of nuclear weapon stockpiles is a long way off, but at least the NPT nuclear weapon states could stop testing the weapons. The CTBT has been ratified by 161 states but by its terms it can only come into force if 44 nuclear potential states ratify; 36 have of the 44 have ratified it, the remaining eight include the United States and seven others, most of whom are in effect waiting for the United States. No state has tested a nuclear weapon-except for complete outlier North Korea-in 15 years. There appears to be no chance that the U.S. Senate will approve the CTBT for ratification in the foreseeable future, but the NPT may not survive without it. Perhaps it is time to consider an interim measure, for the UN Security Council to declare that any future nuclear weapon test any time, anywhere is a 'threat to peace and security', in effect a violation of international law, which in today's world it clearly would be.

  7. Agreement Between The United States of America and The International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Agreement Between The United States of America and The International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States Signed at Vienna November 18, 1977 Ratification advised by U.S. Senate July 2, 1980 Ratified by U.S. President July 31, 1980 Entered into force December 9, 1980 Proclaimed by U.S. President December 31, 1980 Whereas the United States of America (hereinafter referred to as the "United States") is a Party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation

  8. The Challenge for Arms Control Verification in the Post-New START World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuest, C R

    2012-05-24

    Nuclear weapon arms control treaty verification is a key aspect of any agreement between signatories to establish that the terms and conditions spelled out in the treaty are being met. Historically, arms control negotiations have focused more on the rules and protocols for reducing the numbers of warheads and delivery systems - sometimes resorting to complex and arcane procedures for counting forces - in an attempt to address perceived or real imbalances in a nation's strategic posture that could lead to instability. Verification procedures are generally defined in arms control treaties and supporting documents and tend to focus on technical means and measures designed to ensure that a country is following the terms of the treaty and that it is not liable to engage in deception or outright cheating in an attempt to circumvent the spirit and the letter of the agreement. As the Obama Administration implements the articles, terms, and conditions of the recently ratified and entered-into-force New START treaty, there are already efforts within and outside of government to move well below the specified New START levels of 1550 warheads, 700 deployed strategic delivery vehicles, and 800 deployed and nondeployed strategic launchers (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) silos, Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) tubes on submarines, and bombers). A number of articles and opinion pieces have appeared that advocate for significantly deeper cuts in the U.S. nuclear stockpile, with some suggesting that unilateral reductions on the part of the U.S. would help coax Russia and others to follow our lead. Papers and studies prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense and at the U.S. Air War College have also been published, suggesting that nuclear forces totaling no more than about 300 warheads would be sufficient to meet U.S. national security and deterrence needs. (Davis 2011, Schaub and Forsyth 2010) Recent articles by James M. Acton and others suggest that the

  9. Waste Specification Records - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification Records About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast...

  10. Waste Receipt Quality Assurance Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Receipt Quality Assurance Program About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual...

  11. Forecast and Funding Arrangements - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Waste Forecast and Funding Arrangements About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford...

  12. SF 6432-IN International Commercial Transactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACCEPTANCE LANGUAGE ORDER OF PRECEDENCE PAYMENT QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEM RIGHTS AND ... acceptance of payment shall constitute Seller's unqualified acceptance of this Contract. ...

  13. SF 6432-IN (02-01-13) International Commercial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACCEPTANCE LANGUAGE ORDER OF PRECEDENCE PAYMENT QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEM RIGHTS AND ... acceptance of payment shall constitute Seller's unqualified acceptance of this Contract. ...

  14. SF6432-IN (02-01-12) International Commercial

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ACCEPTANCE LANGUAGE ORDER OF PRECEDENCE PAYMENT QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEM RIGHTS AND ... acceptance of payment shall constitute Seller's unqualified acceptance of this Contract. ...

  15. Points of Contact - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Points of Contact About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Tools Points of Contact Points of Contact Email Email Page...

  16. Fundamental deterrence and START III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.D.

    1998-12-31

    The public`s brief respite from the specter of nuclear holocaust abruptly ended in May 1998 when India, 24 years after its only successful nuclear weapon test, detonated five more just sixty miles from its border with Pakistan. Pakistan quickly declared itself a nuclear power and threatened tests of its own. Various capitals issued condemnations and an assortment of largely symbolic political and economic sanctions. India then proclaimed a moratorium on further testing and announced its willingness to accede to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty as a declared nuclear power. Inevitably, India`s tests will prompt Pakistan and China to accelerate their own nuclear programs, to the detriment of regional stability in South Asia.

  17. Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XML-RPC server accepts POST requests only.

  18. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key: OperationalAccepting General Users Operational Accepting General Users Operational Operational Not Available Not Available (Construction or Commissioning)...

  19. Arms Control: US and International efforts to ban biological weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons Convention, the treaty that bans the development, production, and stockpiling and acquisition of biological weapons was opened for signature in 1972 and came into force in 1975 after being ratified by 22 governments, including the depository nations of the USA, the United Kingdom, and the former Soviet Union. In support of the Convention, the USA later established export controls on items used to make biological weapons. Further, in accordance with the 1990 President`s Enhanced Proliferation Control Initiative, actions were taken to redefine and expand US export controls, as well as to encourage multilateral controls through the Australia Group. Thus far, the Convention has not been effective in stopping the development of biological weapons. The principal findings as to the reasons of the failures of the Convention are found to be: the Convention lacks universality, compliance measures are effective, advantage of verification may outweigh disadvantages. Recommendations for mitigating these failures are outlined in this report.

  20. Low-Level Waste Forum notes and summary reports for 1994. Volume 9, Number 3, May-June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-06-01

    This issue includes the following articles: Vermont ratifies Texas compact; Pennsylvania study on rates of decay for classes of low-level radioactive waste; South Carolina legislature adjourns without extending access to Barnwell for out-of-region generators; Southeast Compact Commission authorizes payments for facility development, also votes on petitions, access contracts; storage of low-level radioactive waste at Rancho Seco removed from consideration; plutonium estimates for Ward Valley, California; judgment issued in Ward Valley lawsuits; Central Midwest Commission questions court`s jurisdiction over surcharge rebates litigation; Supreme Court decides commerce clause case involving solid waste; parties voluntarily dismiss Envirocare case; appellate court affirms dismissal of suit against Central Commission; LLW Forum mixed waste working group meets; US EPA Office of Radiation and Indoor Air rulemakings; EPA issues draft radiation site cleanup regulation; EPA extends mixed waste enforcement moratorium; and NRC denies petition to amend low-level radioactive waste classification regulations.

  1. Potential options to reduce GHG emissions in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, N.; Bonduki, Y.; Perdomo, M.

    1996-12-31

    The Government of Venezuela ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December, 1994. The Convention requires all parties to develop and publish national inventories of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) as well as national plans to reduce or control emissions, taking into account their common but differentiated responsibilities and their specific national and regional development priorities, objectives, and circumstances. Within this context, the Ministry of Environment and Renewable Natural Resources and the Ministry of Energy and Mines developed the `Venezuelan Case-Study to Address Climate Change`. The study was initiated in October 1993, with the financial and technical assistance of the Government of United States, through the U.S. Country Studies Program (USCSP), and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), through the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

  2. Mitigation options for the industrial sector in Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelil, I.A.; El-Touny, S.; Korkor, H.

    1996-12-31

    Though its contribution to the global Greenhouse gases emission is relatively small, Egypt has signed and ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) and has been playing an active role in the international efforts to deal with such environmental challenges. Energy efficiency has been one of the main strategies that Egypt has adopted to improve environmental quality and enhance economic competitiveness. This paper highlights three initiatives currently underway to improve energy efficiency of the Egyptian industry. The first is a project that has been recently completed by OECP to assess potential GHG mitigation options available in Egypt`s oil refineries. The second initiative is an assessment of GHG mitigation potential in the Small and Medium size Enterprises (SME) in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. The third one focuses on identifying demand side management options in some industrial electricity consumers in the same city.

  3. Assessment of the mitigation options in the energy system in Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christov, C.; Vassilev, C.; Simenova, K.

    1996-12-31

    Bulgaria signed the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the UNCEP in Rio in June 1992. The parliament ratified the Convention in March 1995. In compliance with the commitments arising under the Convention, Bulgaria elaborates climate change polity. The underlying principles in this policy are Bulgaria to joint the international efforts towards solving climate change problems to the extent that is adequate to both the possibilities of national economy and the options to attract foreign investments. All policies and measures implemented should be as cost-effective as possible. The Bulgarian GHG emission profile reveals the energy sector as the most significant emission source and also as an area where the great potential for GHG emissions reduction exists. This potential could be achieved in many cases by relatively low cost or even no-cost options. Mitigation analysis incorporates options in energy demand and energy supply within the period 1992-2020.

  4. What's New - Hanford Site

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    What's New About Us Hanford Cultural Resources Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Tools Points of Contact What's New Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size February 2011 - Revision 16 of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria A Revision of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria has been released. The document can be found on the Acceptance Criteria page. Waste packages (55

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  16. Sandia Energy Research & Capabilities

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    CRF Experiment Confirms Accepted Oxidation Scheme of Proposed Diesel Alternative: Dimethyl Ether http:energy.sandia.govcrf-experiment-confirms-accepted-oxidation-scheme-of-propo...

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