Sample records for rate sector industrial

  1. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sector - New SEE Action Publication March 24, 2014 - 12:56pm Addthis Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector provides...

  2. Private Sector Rates (FY 2015) Instrument Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Source Laser $150 $175 Nanophoton Raman 11 Raman Spectroscopy $150 $175 Newport Solar Simulator Solar Rates for the Material Research Laboratory Facilities Rates for Private Sector companies and researchers

  3. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency Scenario (non-residential sector only) – AssumesIndia: Industry and Non Residential Sectors Jayant Sathaye,and support. The Non Residential sector analysis benefited

  4. Cross-Sector Impact Analysis of Industrial Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); CreskoEngineering, Joe [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Carpenter, Alberta [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Masanet, Eric [Northwestern University, Evanston] [Northwestern University, Evanston; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; Shehabi, Arman [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial or manufacturing sector is a foundational component to all economic activity. In addition to being a large direct consumer of energy, the manufacturing sector also produces materials, products, and technologies that influence the energy use of other economic sectors. For example, the manufacturing of a lighter-weight vehicle component affects the energy required to ship that component as well as the fuel efficiency of the assembled vehicle. Many energy efficiency opportunities exist to improve manufacturing energy consumption, however comparisons of manufacturing sector energy efficiency investment opportunities tend to exclude any impacts that occur once the product leaves the factory. Expanding the scope of analysis to include energy impacts across different stages of product life-cycle can highlight less obvious opportunities and inform actions that create the greatest economy-wide benefits. We present a methodology and associated analysis tool (LIGHTEnUP Lifecycle Industry GHgas, Technology and Energy through the Use Phase) that aims to capture both the manufacturing sector energy consumption and product life-cycle energy consumption implications of manufacturing innovation measures. The tool architecture incorporates U.S. national energy use data associated with manufacturing, building operations, and transportation. Inputs for technology assessment, both direct energy saving to the manufacturing sector, and indirect energy impacts to additional sectors are estimated through extensive literature review and engineering methods. The result is a transparent and uniform system of comparing manufacturing and use-phase impacts of technologies.

  5. Energy Use and Savings in the Canadian Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The changing role of energy as a production input in the industrial sector in Canada is examined. Energy use patterns are reviewed in terms of the energy input types, both purchased and self-produced, the actual energy form and quality requirements...

  6. Energy Use and Savings in the Canadian Industrial Sector 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The changing role of energy as a production input in the industrial sector in Canada is examined. Energy use patterns are reviewed in terms of the energy input types, both purchased and self-produced, the actual energy form and quality requirements...

  7. Analysis of fuel shares in the industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Belzer, D.B.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These studies describe how fuel shares have changed over time; determine what factors are important in promoting fuel share changes; and project fuel shares to the year 1995 in the industrial sector. A general characterization of changes in fuel shares of four fuel types - coal, natural gas, oil and electricity - for the industrial sector is as follows. Coal as a major fuel source declined rapidly from 1958 to the early 1970s, with oil and natural gas substituting for coal. Coal's share of total fuels stabilized after the oil price shock of 1972-1973, and increased after the 1979 price shock. In the period since 1973, most industries and the industrial sector as a whole appear to freely substitute natural gas for oil, and vice versa. Throughout the period 1958-1981, the share of electricity as a fuel increased. These observations are derived from analyzing the fuel share patterns of more than 20 industries over the 24-year period 1958 to 1981.

  8. Perform, Achieve and Trade (PAT): An Innovative Mechanism for Enhancing Energy Efficiency in India's Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnik, S. P.; Martin, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 31st March 2012, India quietly announced a historic regulation for industrial sector in a bid to ensure energy security of the country. The regulation, with an aim to enhance energy efficiency in energy intensive industrial sectors, is empowered...

  9. Efficient Energy Utilization in the Industrial Sector - Case Studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . As indicated earlier, the industrial complex, w~ich uses 44 percent of the total energy, has the langest share in the balancing of energy supply and dem~nd. Because of this, many companies are finding that an organized energy conservation program can reduc... is now expen sive; therefore, the available supply of cheap oil and gas is being rapidly exhausted, and consumption cannot continue to grow at the pace to which we have become accustomed. Changes are taking place, espe cially in the industrial sector...

  10. Energy Management Through Innovative Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

  11. Energy use and CO2 emissions of China’s industrial sector from a global perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Sheng; Kyle, G. Page; Yu, Sha; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Luckow, Patrick W.; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Zhang, Xiliang; Edmonds, James A.

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial sector has accounted for more than 50% of China’s final energy consumption in the past 30 years. Understanding the future emissions and emissions mitigation opportunities depends on proper characterization of the present-day industrial energy use, as well as industrial demand drivers and technological opportunities in the future. Traditionally, however, integrated assessment research has handled the industrial sector of China in a highly aggregate form. In this study, we develop a technologically detailed, service-oriented representation of 11 industrial subsectors in China, and analyze a suite of scenarios of future industrial demand growth. We find that, due to anticipated saturation of China’s per-capita demands of basic industrial goods, industrial energy demand and CO2 emissions approach a plateau between 2030 and 2040, then decrease gradually. Still, without emissions mitigation policies, the industrial sector remains heavily reliant on coal, and therefore emissions-intensive. With carbon prices, we observe some degree of industrial sector electrification, deployment of CCS at large industrial point sources of CO2 emissions at low carbon prices, an increase in the share of CHP systems at industrial facilities. These technological responses amount to reductions of industrial emissions (including indirect emission from electricity) are of 24% in 2050 and 66% in 2095.

  12. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sector Market Study Report to Pacific Gas and Electric (Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) industrial audits [9], Industrial Sector Market Study of PG&E customers, (a report

  13. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy efficiency in the petrochemical industry,” Chapter 3steel, petroleum and petrochemical, chemical, non-ferrousintensive process in the petrochemical industry with an

  14. Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Minerals - Industry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Industrial Minerals Association - North America The International Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) was formed in early 2002 to tap the benefits...

  15. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building SectorsEnergy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building SectorsEnergy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors.

  16. Industrial Sector Energy Demand: Revisions for Non-Energy-Intensive Manufacturing (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the industrial sector, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) analysis and projection efforts generally have focused on the energy-intensive industriesfood, bulk chemicals, refining, glass, cement, steel, and aluminumwhere energy cost averages 4.8% of annual operating cost. Detailed process flows and energy intensity indicators have been developed for narrowly defined industry groups in the energy-intensive manufacturing sector. The non-energy-intensive manufacturing industries, where energy cost averages 1.9% of annual operating cost, previously have received somewhat less attention, however. In Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO), energy demand projections were provided for two broadly aggregated industry groups in the non-energy-intensive manufacturing sector: metal-based durables and other non-energy-intensive. In the AEO2006 projections, the two groups accounted for more than 50% of the projected increase in industrial natural gas consumption from 2004 to 2030.

  17. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Iyer, Maithili; McNeil, Michael; Kramer, Klaas Jan; Roy, Joyashree; Roy, Moumita; Chowdhury, Shreya Roy

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzed the potential for increasing energy efficiency and reducing greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) in the non-residential building and the industrial sectors in India. The first two sections describe the research and analysis supporting the establishment of baseline energy consumption using a bottom up approach for the non residential sector and for the industry sector respectively. The third section covers the explanation of a modeling framework where GHG emissions are projected according to a baseline scenario and alternative scenarios that account for the implementation of cleaner technology.

  18. BC Hydro Industrial Sector: Marketing Sector Marketing Plan (Fiscal 2005/Fiscal 2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, P.; Wallace, K.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BC Hydro, the major electricity utility in the Province of British Columbia has been promoting industrial energy efficiency for more than 15 years. Recently it has launched a new Demand Side Management initiative with the objective of obtaining 2000...

  19. Types of Nuclear Industry Jobs Commercial and Government Sectors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may be key to "fastTwistTypes of Nuclear Industry

  20. Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of how the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR Kelly Patrick U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kelly...

  1. Comparative analysis of energy data bases for the industrial and commercial sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Belzer, D.B.; Bohn, A.A.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy data bases for the industrial and commercial sectors were analyzed to determine how valuable this data might be for policy analysis. The approach is the same for both end-use sectors: first a descrption or overview of relevant data bases identifies the available data; the coverage and methods used to generate the data are then explained; the data are then characterized and examples are provided for the major data sets under consideration. A final step assesses the data bases under consideration and draws conclusions. There are a variety of data bases considered for each of the end-use sectors included in this report. Data bases for the industrial sector include the National Energy Accounts, process-derived data bases such as the Drexel data base and data obtained from industry trade associations. For the commercial sector, three types of data bases are analyzed: the Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Surveys, Dodge Construction Data and the Building Owners and Manager's Association Experience Exchange Report.

  2. he agricultural sector is rapidly being trans-formed into an industry of major importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    T he agricultural sector is rapidly being trans- formed into an industry of major importance, with superior performance in most cases. To manage the increasing complexity of agricultural systems agri- culture, where the goal is to improve the efficiency of opera- tion of agricultural enterprises

  3. Strategic Rate Design: The Role of Industrial Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, J. I.; House, R.

    STRA TEGIC RA TE DESIGN: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL TARIFFS Jeffrey 1. Rosenblum Rate Design Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Strategic rate design refers to the use of deliberate pricing strategies... occurred in cogeneration capacity in Texas. The utilities use their rate tariffs strategically to influence the growth of self-generation. This paper will discuss several aspects of strategic rate design to influence industrial energy sales (measured...

  4. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its models. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects. The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2015) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of industrial output. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  5. Economies of Scale and Scope in Network Industries: Lessons for the UK water and sewerage sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollitt, Michael G.; Steer, Stephen J.

    means that water markets globally (and specifically the demand for water and sewerage services) will continue to grow well into the twenty-first century. Since 1960 the world population has doubled to approximately 7 billion today, and is projected... sectors1 Michael G. Pollitt Steven J. Steer ESRC Electricity Policy Research Group University of Cambridge August 2011 Abstract Many studies of the water and sewerage industries place significant importance on the benefits of economies...

  6. Cost Bases for Incentive Rates Applicable to Industrial Loads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stover, C. N.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incentive rates applicable to industrial customers are presently receiving a great deal of attention and increased acceptance. This represents a substantial change in attitude, particularly on the part of the ...

  7. Sector trends and driving forces of global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions: focus in industry and buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Khrushch, Marta

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disaggregation of sectoral energy use and greenhouse gas emissions trends reveals striking differences between sectors and regions of the world. Understanding key driving forces in the energy end-use sectors provides insights for development of projections of future greenhouse gas emissions. This report examines global and regional historical trends in energy use and carbon emissions in the industrial, buildings, transport, and agriculture sectors, with a more detailed focus on industry and buildings. Activity and economic drivers as well as trends in energy and carbon intensity are evaluated. The authors show that macro-economic indicators, such as GDP, are insufficient for comprehending trends and driving forces at the sectoral level. These indicators need to be supplemented with sector-specific information for a more complete understanding of future energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.

  8. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20april%202006.pdf ETSU, 1999. Industrial Sector CarbonSee discussion of this report in ETSU, AEA Technology, 2001.a report prepared by ETSU (now AEA Energy & Environment) on

  9. Published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory No. 1 2010 The industrial sector accounts for nearly one-third of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory No. 1 2010 The industrial sector accounts for nearly one research and development agreements (CRADAs) and two large work-for-others projects. Ev- ery single one

  10. Comparison Study of Energy Intensity in the Textile Industry: A Case Study in Five Textile Sub-sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, A.; Hasanabadi, A.; Abdorrazaghi, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contributes to the understanding of energy use in the textile industry by comparing the energy intensity of textile plants in five major sub-sectors, i.e. spinning, weaving, wet-processing, worsted fabric manufacturing, and carpet...

  11. Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model (18-sector version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, M.H. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (US). Dept. of Physics; Thimmapuram, P.; Fisher, R.E.; Maciorowski, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new 18-sector Long-term Industrial Energy Forecasting (LIEF) model is designed for convenient study of future industrial energy consumption, taking into account the composition of production, energy prices, and certain kinds of policy initiatives. Electricity and aggregate fossil fuels are modeled. Changes in energy intensity in each sector are driven by autonomous technological improvement (price-independent trend), the opportunity for energy-price-sensitive improvements, energy price expectations, and investment behavior. Although this decision-making framework involves more variables than the simplest econometric models, it enables direct comparison of an econometric approach with conservation supply curves from detailed engineering analysis. It also permits explicit consideration of a variety of policy approaches other than price manipulation. The model is tested in terms of historical data for nine manufacturing sectors, and parameters are determined for forecasting purposes. Relatively uniform and satisfactory parameters are obtained from this analysis. In this report, LIEF is also applied to create base-case and demand-side management scenarios to briefly illustrate modeling procedures and outputs.

  12. ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

  14. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for SelectedIndustrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky,Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    "World best practice" energy intensity values, representingthe most energy-efficient processes that are in commercial use in atleast one location worldwide, are provided for the production of iron andsteel, aluminium, cement, pulp and paper, ammonia, and ethylene. Energyintensity is expressed in energy use per physical unit of output for eachof these commodities; most commonly these are expressed in metric tonnes(t). The energy intensity values are provided by major energy-consumingprocesses for each industrial sector to allow comparisons at the processlevel. Energy values are provided for final energy, defined as the energyused at the production facility as well as for primary energy, defined asthe energy used at the production facility as well as the energy used toproduce the electricity consumed at the facility. The "best practice"figures for energy consumption provided in this report should beconsidered as indicative, as these may depend strongly on the materialinputs.

  15. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    public sector, and one in the private sector. Total energy consumptionenergy consumption increased by over 60% in the commercial building (including both public and private) sector.public sector ownership. 2.2.3 Energy data At the national or state level, end-use level energy consumption

  16. A State Regulator's View of 'PURPA' And Its Impact on Energy Conservation in the Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improving utility production efficiency, lowering costs and possibly reducing the need for new high cost production facilities. On the other hand, time of use rates may ultimately cause some electric users, especially certain large industrial customers... and resources by electric utilities." Two types of efficiency are addressed here. The first, is economic efficiency, which in classical economics implies the setting of prices which result in the appropriate allocation and conservation of society...

  17. Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) for Selected Industrial Sectors in the Lower Fraser Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Concrete Industry Lime Industry Refined Petroleum Products (Bulk Storage) Other Petroleum and Coal Products and Planing Mill Products Industry Wire and Wire Products Industries Hydraulic Cernent Industry Ready Mixed

  18. 'Tilted' Industrial Electric Rates: A New Negative Variable for Energy Engineers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, R. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of purchased electricity for industry is rising even faster than for other sectors. Conventional means of reducing power costs include internal techniques like load management, demand controls and energy conservation. External mechanisms...

  19. Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy security through more effective utilization of our country’s resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

  20. How managing more efficiently substances in the design process of industrial products? An example from the aeronautics sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemagnen, Maud; Brissaud, Daniel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lowering environmental impacts of products, i.e. ecodesign, is considered today as a new and promising approach environment protection. This article focuses on ecodesign in the aeronautical sector through the analysis of the practices of a company that designs and produces engine equipments. Noise, gas emissions, fuel consumptions are the main environmental aspects which are targeted by aeronautics. From now on, chemical risk linked to the use of materials and production processes has to be traced, not only because of regulation pressure (e.g. REACh) but also because of customers requirements. So far, the aeronautical sector hasn't been focusing much on managing chemical risks at the design stage. However, new substances regulations notably require that chemical risk management should be by industries used as early as possible in their product development process. The aeronautics sector has therefore to elaborate new chemical risk management. The aim of this paper is to present a new method hat should be adap...

  1. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from electricity generation, direct fuel combustion tofuel consumption in the commercial sector is assumed to be used entirely for back-up electricity generation.

  2. ENCUENTRO EMPRESA-UNIVERSIDAD OPORTUNIDADES DE NEGOCIO EN EL MBITO DEL SECTOR INDUSTRIAL MARINO E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    . Producción industrial de biomasa de insectos, mediante la valorización de subproductos de origen vegetal

  3. NFC Industrial Access and Equipment Rates valid 7/1/13 to 6/30/14 RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    NFC Industrial Access and Equipment Rates valid 7/1/13 to 6/30/14 RATES SUBJECT TO CHANGE ACCESS/USE UNITS RATE ACCESS FEE monthly fee $91.00 LAB USAGE FEE per lab session $67.50 LAB USAGE MAX PER MONTH per month $631.00 EQUIPMENT INCLUDED EQUIPMENT UNITS RATE ALDATOMIC LAYER DEP ALD Savannah 200 minute

  4. Future Public Policy and Ethical Issues Facing the Agricultural and Microbial Genomics Sectors of the Biotechnology Industry: A Roundtable Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane E. Hoffmann

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 12, 2003, the University of Maryland School of Law's Intellectual Property and Law & Health Care Programs jointly sponsored and convened a roundtable discussion on the future public policy and ethical issues that will likely face the agricultural and microbial genomics sectors of the biotechnology industry. As this industry has developed over the last two decades, societal concerns have moved from what were often local issues, e.g., the safety of laboratories where scientists conducted recombinant DNA research on transgenic microbes, animals and crops, to more global issues. These newer issues include intellectual property, international trade, risks of genetically engineered foods and microbes, bioterrorism, and marketing and labeling of new products sold worldwide. The fast paced nature of the biotechnology industry and its new developments often mean that legislators, regulators and society, in general, must play ''catch up'' in their efforts to understand the issues, the risks, and even the benefits, that may result from the industry's new ways of conducting research, new products, and novel methods of product marketing and distribution. The goal of the roundtable was to develop a short list of the most significant public policy and ethical issues that will emerge as a result of advances in these sectors of the biotechnology industry over the next five to six years. More concretely, by ''most significant'' the conveners meant the types of issues that would come to the attention of members of Congress or state legislators during this time frame and for which they would be better prepared if they had well researched and timely background information. A concomitant goal was to provide a set of focused issues for academic debate and scholarship so that policy makers, industry leaders and regulators would have the intellectual resources they need to better understand the issues and concerns at stake. The goal was not to provide answers to any of the issues or problems, simply to identify those topics that deserve our attention as a society. Some of the issues may benefit from legislation at the federal or state levels, others may be more appropriately addressed by the private sector. Participants at the roundtable included over a dozen experts in the areas of microbiology, intellectual property, agricultural biotechnology, microbial genomics, bioterrorism, economic development, biotechnology research, and bioethics. These experts came from federal and state government, industry and academia. The participants were asked to come to the roundtable with a written statement of the top three to five public policy/ ethical issues they viewed as most likely to be significant to the industry and to policy makers over the next several years.

  5. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

  6. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy demand. The energy consumption mix i n China'sstructure and product mix in energy-intensive industries;Table 4). The sector's mix of energy sources that year was

  7. Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector Over the Long-Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greening, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -established industrial energy model, ITEMS (Industrial Technology and Energy Modeling System), and is calibrated to MECS 1994 and 1998. However, as compared to ITEMS, MARKAL is an optimization framework. And, this particular version of MARKAL has a forecast horizon...

  8. Gauging risks: Rising interest rates and industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, P.S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With major utility industry restructuring looming, risk issues have become proportionally more important and complex. California regulators, for example, have increased the return for the state`s electric utilities to account for the pace of restructuring in the `Blue Book` proceedings. Performance-based regulatory reform efforts, new environmental regulations, and swings in interest rate trends have already been cited to support utility risk bonuses. Yet, in many cases, regulators have refused to award bonus adjustments, finding such changes to well known and reflected in the standard financial models used in setting return on equity. Nevertheless, regulators have acknowledged that restructuring might increase utilities` cost of capital. While finding that consumers might benefit from restructuring and competition at the retail level, the Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control advised careful consideration of downside risks. The possibility that shareholders might be left to cover high-cost investment stranded as a result of increased competition in the electric market has also figured in the return-on-equity debate. At the same time, the question of whether investors assume the risk of paying for uneconomic utility investments has become a focal point in the policy debate over stranded costs.

  9. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuels used in the refinery sector were also collected fromof the emissions from the refinery sector are included incommitment of 44% and the refinery and food sectors

  10. Profile of the rubber and plastics industry. EPA Office of Compliance sector notebook project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rubber and miscellaneous plastics products industry, as defined by the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 30, includes establishments that manufacture products from plastic resins, natural and synthetic rubber, reclaimed rubber, futta percha, balata, and gutta siak. The second section provides background information on the size, geographic distribution, employment, production, sales, and economic condition of the Rubber and Plastics Products industry. The type of facilities described within the document are also described in terms of their Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) codes. Additionally, this section contains a list of the largest companies in terms of sales.

  11. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    essential to monitor and study energy consumption trends.and study energy consumption trends. E.S. 3. Industry Themonitor and study energy consumption trends. From a policy

  12. The impact on photovoltaic worth of utulity rate and reform and of specific market, financial, and policy variables : a commercialindustrialinstitution sector analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work provides an assessment of the economic outlook for photovoltaic systems in the commercial, industrial and institutional sectors in the year 1986. We first summarize the expected cost and performance goals for ...

  13. Unrestricted. Siemens AG 2013. All rights reserved.Page 2 October 2013 Corporate Technology Siemens is organized in 4 Sectors: Industry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    · Smart Grid · Building Technologies · Osram 2) Corporate functions Corporate Technology Corp. Finance Siemens is organized in 4 Sectors: Industry, Energy, Healthcare and Infrastructure & Cities Siemens: Facts ... Corp. Technology Corp. Development Infrastructure & Cities HealthcareEnergyIndustry ~ 14 bn.1) ~ 18 bn

  14. Impact of Industrial Electric Rate Structure on Energy Conservation - A Utility Viewpiont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the price of energy rises, changes in industrial electric rates will have an impact on energy usage and conservation. Utilities interested in reducing system peak demands may reflect this need in the rate structure as an incentive...

  15. Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0 Weekly7a.7. Petroleum and3.

  16. Successful public sector enforcement of environmental standards in the Toritama Jeans industry in Pernambuco, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarte, Maria Ella J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-observance of environmental standards among small firms in traditional industries such as garment, footwear, furniture and tanneries have caused major environmental degradation in many places throughout the world. ...

  17. Chemical resistance determination test scheme and rating system development for industrial glove evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornils, William Joseph

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHEMICAL RESISTANCE DETERMINATION TEST SCHEME AND RATING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL GLOVE EVALUATION A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH CORNILS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene CHEMICAL RESISTANCE DETERMINATION TEST SCHEME AND RATING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FOR INDUSTRIAL GLOVE EVALUATION A Thesis by WILLIAM JOSEPH CORNILS Approved...

  18. The Importance of Natural Gas in the Industrial Sector With a Focus on Energy-Intensive Industries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumberAugust7,Biofuels:

  19. Cost Bases for Incentive Rates Applicable to Industrial Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stover, C. N.

    great deal of attention and increased acceptance. This represents a substantial change in attitude, particularly on the part of the regulatory commissions; a few years ago any proposal related to an incentive type rate would not have been... in rate discrimination as between customer classes. Over the last few years many utilities have experienced changes that have resulted in increased interest in incentive rates by the utility, by its customer, and by the regulatory commission. In most...

  20. Model documentation report: Industrial sector demand module of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Industrial Demand Model. The report catalogues and describes model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of the NEMS Industrial Model for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its model. Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.

  1. Deregulation in Japanese gas industries : significance and problems of gas rate deregulation for large industrial customers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inoue, Masayuki

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the circumstances surrounding Japanese City gas industries have been changing drastically. On one hand, as energy suppliers, natural gas which has become major fuel resource for city gas, as public utilities, ...

  2. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    update to the California Energy Balance (LBNL, forthcoming). The comparison shows that Denmark’s manufacturing sector

  3. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy industries (such as smelting, oil refining, glass andheavy industry (e.g. , iron and steel, oil refining, and

  4. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. With the working of energy programs and policies on carbon regulation, how to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions become extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions (e.g., carbon emission) for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models. In this report, we first conduct brief overview on different representations of end-use technologies (mitigation measures) in various energy-climate models, followed by problem statements, and a description of the basic concepts of quantifying the cost of conserved energy including integrating non-regrets options. A non-regrets option is defined as a GHG reduction option that is cost effective, without considering their additional benefits related to reducing GHG emissions. Based upon these, we develop information on costs of mitigation measures and technological change. These serve as the basis for collating the data on energy savings and costs for their future use in integrated assessment models. In addition to descriptions of the iron and steel making processes, and the mitigation measures identified in this study, the report includes tabulated databases on costs of measure implementation, energy savings, carbon-emission reduction, and lifetimes. The cost curve data on mitigation measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  5. Sector-specific issues and reporting methodologies supporting the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Volume 1: Part 1, Electricity supply sector; Part 2, Residential and commercial buildings sector; Part 3, Industrial sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE encourages you to report your achievements in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and sequestering carbon under this program. Global climate change is increasingly being recognized as a threat that individuals and organizations can take action against. If you are among those taking action, reporting your projects may lead to recognition for you, motivation for others, and synergistic learning for the global community. This report discusses the reporting process for the voluntary detailed guidance in the sectoral supporting documents for electricity supply, residential and commercial buildings, industry, transportation, forestry, and agriculture. You may have reportable projects in several sectors; you may report them separately or capture and report the total effects on an entity-wide report.

  6. Cost of Service and Rate Design Issues Affecting Industrial Customers in Retail Rate Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stover, C. N. Jr.

    . If energy costs are a significant element in the cost of doi~g business, then the industrial customer must be familiar with the activities involved in the ratemaking process, be aware of the issues that might be raised as a part of the process, know... electric energy cost is a major component of the overall cost of doing business, it is imperative that the customer be familiar with the ratemaking activities and, in particular, know how his individual costs might be affected by the resolution...

  7. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    example, the chemical and petrochemical sectors use largeoil (US EIA, 2009a), petrochemical fuel use (US EIA, 2009b)Metallic Minerals Chemical and Petrochemical Primary Metals

  8. The Effect of Uncertainty on Pollution Abatement Investments: Measuring Hurdle Rates for Swedish Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ex post data. The method is based on a structural option value model where the future price, oil price uncertainty, abatement investment, sulfur emissions, pulp and paper industry, energy in the measurement of costs, heterogeneity in discount rates or, still, market failures (see for example Hausman

  9. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration, 2009c. EIA-906/920 Database: Monthly UtilityEIA), 2009. Form EIA-906/920 Database: Monthly Utility andEIA power sector annual database (EIA, 2009) and converting

  10. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Support Unit (ETSU), 1988. “High Level Control ofCircle Industries and SIRA (ETSU, 1988). The LINKman system

  11. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemicals, light industry (iron foundries, cold storage andindustry ? Use of CHP ? Debottlenecking ? Increased production capacity ? Better use of production capacity ? Energy management Cold storage

  12. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry (iron foundries, cold storage and refrigeration,Energy management Cold storage and refrigeration ? Newelectric power; heat/cold storage; heat pumps using ambient

  13. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy monitoring system Paper and Paperboard industry ? Integrated energy management system ?monitoring was handled by “accredited organizations that certify the energy management systems” (

  14. Railroad competition and rate making: the implications for industrial coal prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the railroad industry, which is the primary transportation mode for coal, enters the 1980s, two factors are significantly altering the way in which railroads do business, particularly in relationship to shippers who must rely solely on rail. The first factor, railroad deregulation, is embodied in the provisions of the Staggers Rail Act of 1980 (PL96-448). The second factor affecting rail transportation for industrial coal users is the trend toward rail mergers and consolidations, in some cases due to financial problems. This trend, coupled with the willingness of government to allow major bankrupt carriers such as the Rock Island and the Milwaukee Road to be liquidated in whole or in part, is resulting in fewer railraods with increased market power. Discussed in this report are: the impacts of railroad deregulation on industrial coal users; the effects of railroad consolidations on the bargaining power of coal producers, receivers and railroads; and finally, strategy and tactics for industrial coal users to maximize their leverage weight in obtaining efficient coal transportation at reasonable rates. (DMC)

  15. Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to provide training and energy audits and to help industrial1997 to end of March - Energy audits have allow to avoidagrees to undertake an energy audit, develop a management

  16. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by ERC, is 448.3 trillion Btu (TBtu). The total CaliforniaBecause the cost of an electrical Btu is roughly 4 timesthat of a source fuel Btu, industrial categories that use

  17. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHIP - Solar heat for industrial processes. Internationalsolar power could be used to provide process heat for

  18. OTHER INDUSTRIES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO funded research results in novel technologies in diverse industries beyond the most energy intensive ones within the U.S. Manufacturing sector. These technologies offer quantifiable energy...

  19. Economic Impact Analysis of Exchange Rate, RFS2, and Farm Program Support Changes on the U.S. Crop Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhew, Chanhee

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................................... 103 Ethanol ........................................................................................................... 108 Biodiesel... (especially those of biodiesel) in that a biofuel sector is highly dependent on government programs (Elam 2008; Kouplow 2006). The RFS2 requires mandatory use of biofuels to increase to 36 billion gallons per year (with a maximum of 15 billion gallons...

  20. Public/private sector cooperation to promote industrial energy efficiency: Allied partners and the US Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Cockrill, Chris; Tutterow, Vestal; Radspieler, Anthony

    2003-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, the US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (USDOE) has been involved in a unique voluntary collaboration with industry called the Allied Partner program. Initially developed under the Motor Challenge program, the partnership concept continues as a central element of USDOE's BestPractices, which in 2001 integrated all of USDOE's near-term industrial program offerings including those in motors, compressed air, pump, fan, process heating and steam systems. Partnerships are sought with end use industrial companies as well as equipment suppliers and manufacturers, utilities, consultants, and state agencies that have extensive existing relationships with industrial customers. Partners are neither paid nor charged a fee for participation. Since the inception of Allied Partners, the assumption has been that these relationships could serve as the foundation for conveying a system energy-efficiency message to many more industrial facilities than could be reached through a typical government-to-end-user program model. An independent evaluation of the Motor Challenge program, reported at the last EEMODS conference, attributed US $16.9 million or nearly 67 percent of the total annual program energy savings to the efforts of Allied Partners in the first three years of operation. A recent evaluation of the Compressed Air Challenger, which grew out of the former Motor Challenger program, attribute additional energy savings from compressed air training alone at US $12.1 million per year. Since the reorganization under BestPractices, the Allied Partner program has been reshaped to extend the impact of all BestPractices program activities. This new model is more ambitious than the former Motor Challenge program concerning the level of collaborative activities negotiated with Allied Partners. This paper describes in detail two new types of program initiatives involving Allied Partners: Qualified Specialist Training and Energy Events. The Qualified Specialist activity was conceived as a way of engaging the supply side of industry, consultants, and utilities to greatly increase use of decision making software developed by USDOE to assist industrial facilities in assessing the energy efficiency of their energy-using systems. To date, USDOE has launched Qualified Specialist training with member companies of the Hydraulic Institute (HI) and with distributors and consultants associated with the Compressed Air Challenge. These activities train and qualify industry professionals to use and to train customers to use USDOE's Pumping System Assessment Tool (PSAT) and AIRMaster + software programs, respectively. The industry experts provide a public benefit by greatly increasing customer access to the software and assessment techniques. Participating Specialists anticipate a business benefit by providing a valuable service to key customers that is associated with USDOE. The Energy Event concept was developed in 2001 in cooperation with the California Energy Commission in response to the state's energy crisis and has been extended to other geographic areas during 2002. The three California events, named ''Energy Solutions for California Industry,'' relied on Allied Partners to provide system-based solutions to industrial companies as both speakers and exhibitors. These one-day events developed a model for a serious solutions-oriented format that avoids the typical trade show atmosphere through strict exhibitor guidelines, careful screening of speaker topics, and reliance on case studies to illustrate cost- and energy-saving opportunities from applying a systems approach. Future plans to use this activity model are discussed as well as lessons learned from the California series.

  1. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industry or plants could benefit from new technologies such as cold storagecold storage and space cooling systems technology has. The electricity use in these industriesindustries may also be able to take advan- tage of TES; however, the technology of integrating cold storage

  2. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, starch and corn refining, since these can be a source of fuel products. The sugar cane industry

  3. The DOE s In-Plant Training (INPLT) Model to Promote Energy Efficiency in the Industrial Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL] [ORNL; Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL] [ORNL; De Fontaine, Mr. Andre [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program] [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Industrial Technology Program; Schoeneborn, Fred C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-Plant Training (INPLT) is a new model for developing energy efficiency expertise within the US manufacturing companies participating in the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program-a nationwide initiative to drive a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity in 10 years. INPLTs are designed to fill a market niche by providing hands on training in a real world manufacturing plant environment. Through INPLTs, participants from multiple manufacturing plants, supply chains, utilities, and other external stakeholders learn how to conduct energy assessments, use energy analysis tools to analyze energy saving opportunities, develop energy management systems, and implement energy savings projects. Typical INPLT events are led by DOE-certified Energy Experts and range from 2-4 days. Topics discussed include: identification of cross-cutting or system specific opportunities; introduction to ISO 50001 Energy Management Systems; and energy project implementation and replication. This model is flexible, and can be tailored to suit the needs of specific industries. The INPLTs are a significant departure from the traditional single plant energy assessment model previously employed by DOE. INPLTs shift the focus from the concept of a single-plant s energy profile to a broader focus on training and capacity building among multiple industrial participants. The objective is to enable trainees to identify, quantify, implement and replicate future energy saving projects without continued external assistance. This paper discusses the INPLT model and highlights some of the initial outcomes from the successfully delivered INPLTs and the overall impact in terms of numbers of plants/participants trained, impacted energy footprints, and potential replication of identified opportunities.

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Industrial sector energy demand On This Page Heat and power energy... Industrial fuel mix changes... Iron and steel... Delivered energy use... Chemical industry use of fuels......

  5. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial sector energy demand Manufacturing heat and power energy consumption increases modestly figure data Despite a 49-percent increase in industrial shipments, industrial...

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial sector energy demand Growth in industrial energy consumption is slower than growth in shipments figure data Despite a 76-percent increase in industrial shipments,...

  7. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of its electricity requirements in the USA (US DOE, 2002)USA, where motor-driven systems account for 63% of industrial electricity

  8. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Cement Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Xu, T.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Adoption of efficient end-use technologies is one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. How to effectively analyze and manage the costs associated with GHG reductions becomes extremely important for the industry and policy makers around the world. Energy-climate (EC) models are often used for analyzing the costs of reducing GHG emissions for various emission-reduction measures, because an accurate estimation of these costs is critical for identifying and choosing optimal emission reduction measures, and for developing related policy options to accelerate market adoption and technology implementation. However, accuracies of assessing of GHG-emission reduction costs by taking into account the adoption of energy efficiency technologies will depend on how well these end-use technologies are represented in integrated assessment models (IAM) and other energy-climate models.

  9. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial...

  10. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron and steel production. IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,tempera- ture range. IEA/Caddet, Sittard, The Netherlands.industry. Cheltenham, UK, IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme,

  11. Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Lenny

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process residual like bagasse are now available (Cornland etsugar in- dustry uses bagasse and the edible oils industrySection 7.4.7. ). The use of bagasse for energy is likely to

  12. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private Participation in the Electricity Sector World BankTelecommunications and Electricity Sectors." Governance 19,Power Struggle: Reforming the Electricity Industry." In The

  13. Measuring the Social Rate of Return to R&D in the Energy Industry: A Study of the OECD Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    for biomass energy R&D, with clearly demarcated support for both pre-commercial research devoted to innovation for renewable energy and energy efficiency, and has declined for fossil fuel and nuclear technology. The 20051 Measuring the Social Rate of Return to R&D in the Energy Industry: A Study of the OECD Countries

  14. Rate of Industrial Conservation - Petroleum Refining, Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Manufacture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prengle, H. W. Jr.; Golden, S. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are the goals and expectations for decreases in industrial energy use during the next 10-20 years? The specific energy consumption (SEC) of a plant or industry, measured in BTU of fuel used/ton of product produced, can be used to monitor the energy conserved...

  15. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates FY 15 PRR worksheet (PDF - 31K) FY...

  16. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on...

  17. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of which: CHP ele generation Residential Nonspecified (OtherOther Services (CHP heat Fuel use) Residential End Use (non-Residential Nonspecified (Other Sector) NEW Office (CHP heat

  18. 'Tilted' Industrial Electric Rates: A New Negative Variable for Energy Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, R. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policies on the use of coal and nuclear power. As a result, electricity began taking larger chunks out of household budgets and industry's operating costs -- even though in real, inflation adjusted dollars it barely increased at all. Residential...

  19. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plans Organization and Implementation of Energy ConservationIndustrial Energy Conservation Investment Funding 3.Case Studies of Energy Conservation Investments by Industry

  20. The Role of the Sellafield Ltd Centres of Expertise in Engaging with the Science, Environment and Technology Supply Chain and University Sector to Support Site Operations and Decommissioning in the UK Nuclear Industry - 13018

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, Ed [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Uranium and Reactive Metals Centre of Expertise Lead, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Connor, Donna [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Technical Capability Manager, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Keighley, Debbie [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)] [Head of Profession, Technical Directorate, Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and maintenance of the broad range of the highly technical skills required for safe and successful management of nuclear sites is of vital importance during routine operations, decommissioning and waste treatment activities.. In order to maintain a core team of technical experts, across all of the disciplines required for these tasks, the approach which has been taken by the Sellafield Ltd has been the formation of twenty five Centres of Expertise (CoE), each covering key aspects of the technical skills required for nuclear site operations. Links with the Specialist University Departments: The CoE leads are also responsible for establishing formal links with university departments with specialist skills and facilities relevant to their CoE areas. The objective of these links is to allow these very specialist capabilities within the university sector to be more effectively utilized by the nuclear industry, which benefits both sectors. In addition to the utilization of specialist skills, the university links are providing an important introduction to the nuclear industry for students and researchers. This is designed to develop the pipeline of potential staff, who will be required in the future by both the academic and industrial sectors. (authors)

  1. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Losses CHP, Commercial Power CHP, Electric Power CHP, Industrial Power Electric Generators, Utilities

  2. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Letters of IntentAgreements The electric power sector participates in the Climate VISION program through the Electric Power Industry Climate Initiative (EPICI) and its Power...

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the emissions expressed in million...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon...

  6. Building Profits and Goodwill in the Wood Product Industry with Time-Of-Use Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, W. K.

    utilities across the U.S. are searching for alternatives to building generating plants. One of the alternatives used by Carolina Power & Light Company is Time-of-Use Rates. These rates give monetary incentives to customers who change their electrical... nationally known wood pro ducts manufacturer with a 235-employee plywood plant located in Moncure, North Carolina. The plant receives electric ser vice from Carolina Power & Light Company (CP&L), an investor-owned electric utility serving over 825...

  7. Interactions between Electric-drive Vehicles and the Power Sector in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Ryan; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates from the electricity sector to assumed values inrates from the electricity sector to assumed values intend to underestimate electricity sector emissions, and it

  8. Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO). In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sector-bulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

  9. Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the U.S. Pulp and Paper Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference, VolumeBNL). 2001. The Energy Technology Systems AnalysisKramer Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012

  10. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of crude oil and oil products; (iii) retrofitting existingof petroleum products, limit proliferation of oil usingand product mix in energy-intensive industries; converting oil-

  11. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT California Energy Balance Update and Decomposition Analysis for the Industry and Building Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid waste from landfill gas in electricity source data,and Wood Derived Fuels Landfill Gas GWh Other Biogas MSWFuels Industrial CHP Landfill Gas Other Biogas NAICS 22 CHP

  12. NOAA Helps the Construction Sector Build for a Changing Climate The construction industry is comprised of a wide range of business involved in engineering standards,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    million, and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatt hours. Climate Information Reduces Construction Costs and Energy Consumption NOAA provides airfreezing data to the home building industry, which in annual building cost savings of $330 million and energy cost savings of 586,000 megawatthours. #12

  13. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GOV) and energy consumption grew at annual rates of 12% and 5.6% respectively, and the average energy intensity of China's

  14. Industrial sector energy conservation programs in the People`s Republic of China during the seventh five-year plan (1986--1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Zhiping [State Planning Commission, Beijing (China). Energy Research Inst.; Sinton, J.E.; Yang Fuqiang; Levine, M.D.; Ting, M.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impetus at the national level to invest in energy conservation is quite strong and has long been reflected not only in official pronouncements, but also in the investments and organizational activities of the Chinese government. In the early 1980s the central government began a program of direct investments in industrial energy conservation that continues to the present. In addition, concurrently established governmental and quasi-governmental agencies have pursued conservation through administrative and educational measures. In Section 2 of this paper the authors outline the policies and institutions that supported China`s program of energy conservation investments in the Sixth and Seventh Five-Year Plans (FYPs) (1981--1985 and 1986--1990). In Section 3 they describe examples of the types of conservation projects pursued in four industrial subsectors: ferrous metals manufacturing; non-ferrous metals mining and manufacturing; chemicals manufacturing; and building materials manufacturing. Section 4 presents a simple methodology for comparing the costs of energy conservation to those of energy supply. Further discussion points out the applicability and limitations of this methodology to State Planning Commission published statistical material on the overall results of energy conservation investments. Though problematic, such analysis indicates that energy conservation investments were probably substantially cheaper than investments in equivalent energy supply would have been. They end with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered in carrying out the conservation investment programs.

  15. Industrial policy and the Indian electronics industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, Robert (Robert Eric)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, production within India's Electronics sector amounted to a low $12 billion when compared to the global output of $1400 billion. The slow growth in the local industry is often judged to be the result of late ...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    various sources describing the energy consumption of the industrial sector and the carbon emissions in particular. Below is an estimate of the million metric tons of carbon...

  17. Industry Supply Chain Development (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supply Chain Development programs are focused on targeted industries that have significant growth opportunities for Ohio's existing manufacturing sector from emerging energy resources and...

  18. Research Projects in Industrial Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Industrial Technology Section.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this booklet is to briefly describe ongoing and completed projects being carried out by Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Industrial Technology Section. In the Pacific Northwest, the industrial sector is the largest of the four consuming sectors. It accounted for thirty-nine percent of the total firm demand in the region in 1987. It is not easy to asses the conservation potential in the industrial sector. Recognizing this, the Northwest Power Planning Council established an objective to gain information on the size, cost, and availability of the conservation resource in the industrial sector, as well as other sectors, in its 1986 Power Plan. Specifically, the Council recommended that BPA operate a research and development program in conjunction with industry to determine the potential costs and savings from efficiency improvements in industrial processes which apply to a wide array of industrial firms.'' The section, composed of multidisciplinary engineers, provides technical support to the Industrial Programs Branch by designing and carrying out research relating to energy conservation in the industrial sector. The projects contained in this booklet are arranged by sector --industrial, utility, and agricultural -- and, within each sector, chronologically from ongoing to completed, with those projects completed most recently falling first. For each project the following information is given: its objective approach, key findings, cost, and contact person. Completed projects also include the date of completion, a report title, and report number.

  19. Innovative New Industrial Technologies: An Industry/DOE Joint Endeavor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, T. J.

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Industrial Programs supports research and development leading to improved energy efficiency and greater overall productivity in the industrial sector. Its basic strategy is a program of cost-shared R...

  20. Canada's Voluntary Industrial Energy Conservation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, C. A., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial Energy Conservation in Canada is organized and promoted through a voluntary program that is administered by industry. Industry is divided into fifteen sectors, each of which is represented by a Voluntary Task Force. Information exchange...

  1. Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Housing Institutional Sector N Table ES-2. Private Sector Project Economics: Benefit/Cost Analysis 10% Discount Rate

  2. Industry Sector Case Study Building Technologies Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    's remote location far away from any infrastructure, planning focused on making it as self and its control components. If needed, the system is backed up by a combined heat and power (CHP) plant might be used up, necessitating a switch to LP gas, a scarce resource at this remote location. Desigo

  3. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Industrial Sector Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 1. Primary model documentation. Final report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search...

  4. Quality of Power in the Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchbanks, G. J.

    and assistance to upgrade the quality of power into the plant. Even though studies have shown only 20% of the problems identified are actually utility generated it is the responsibility of the utility to help the customer isolate and solve the problem.... The motto of the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Quality of Power program is "If a customer perceives he has a problem, we have a problem." The commitment has been made to assist the customer until he is satis fied the problem is in fact solved. INTRODUCTION...

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS, VOL. 55, NO. 3, MARCH 2008 1421 On the Use of a Lower Sampling Rate for Broken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    the continuity of the process and production chains of many industries. The list of the indus- tries industries, petrochemical industries, and domestic appliance industries. Induction motors are often used

  6. Abstract--The profound change in the electric industry worldwide in the last twenty years assigns an increasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Value. I. INTRODUCTION He reformed electric industry scheme sets the transmission sector at the center

  7. Electricity Use in the Pacific Northwest: Utility Historical Sales by Sector, 1989 and Preceding Years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report officially releases the compilation of regional 1989 retail customer sector sales data by the Bonneville Power Administration. This report is intended to enable detailed examination of annual regional electricity consumption. It gives statistics covering the time period 1970--1989, and also provides observations based on statistics covering the 1983--1989 time period. The electricity use report is the only information source that provides data obtained from each utility in the region based on the amount of electricity they sell to consumers annually. Data is provided on each retail customer sector: residential, commercial, industrial, direct-service industrial, and irrigation. The data specifically supports forecasting activities, rate development, conservation and market assessments, and conservation and market program development and delivery. All of these activities require a detailed look at electricity use. 25 figs., 34 tabs.

  8. Sector 30 - useful links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Useful Links Sector 30 Printing from your laptop at the beamline Data retrival onsite from ftp:ftp.xray.aps.anl.govpubsector30 Sector Orientation Form HERIX experiment header...

  9. Industrial Retrofits are Possible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stobart, E. W.

    . In April of 1987, the provincial government initiated a program to assist industrial energy users to reduce their energy usage. This program was designed to concentrate on an in-depth analysis of the complete operations of industrial plants... with the analyses being performed by specialist, private sector, engineering consultants. The program is in 3 phases providing an Ontario industrial plant with an Energy Analysis, a Feasibility Analysis Grant and a Project Engineering Design Grant...

  10. The Contribution of Services and other Sectors to Australian Productivity Growth 1980-2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    The Contribution of Services and other Sectors to Australian Productivity Growth 1980-2004 A Report pointers to the Australian literature on sectoral productivity growth. Finally, we would like to thank ................................................................................................................................6 Labour Productivity: Macroeconomic Trends and Industry Patterns

  11. Energy efficiency in building sector in India through Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    electricity consumption in India (2012) #12;Growth in electricity consumption by building sector At a conservative 9 % growth rate electricity consumption of building sector by 2020 will be more than 2 times ( Source: DB Research) #12;Electricity Consumption Pattern in Residential Sector (Source: BEE, Figure taken

  12. NEMS industrial module documentation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEMS Industrial Demand Model is a dynamic accounting model, bringing together the disparate industries and uses of energy in those industries, and putting them together in an understandable and cohesive framework. The Industrial Model generates mid-term (up to the year 2010) forecasts of industrial sector energy demand as a component of the NEMS integrated forecasting system. From the NEMS system, the Industrial Model receives fuel prices, employment data, and the value of output of industrial activity. Based on the values of these variables, the Industrial Model passes back to the NEMS system estimates of consumption by fuel types.

  13. 2008 Industrial Technologies Market Report, May 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energetics; DOE

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial sector is a critical component of the U.S. economy, providing an array of consumer, transportation, and national defense-related goods we rely on every day. Unlike many other economic sectors, however, the industrial sector must compete globally for raw materials, production, and sales. Though our homes, stores, hospitals, and vehicles are located within our borders, elements of our goods-producing industries could potentially be moved offshore. Keeping U.S. industry competitive is essential to maintaining and growing the U.S. economy. This report begins with an overview of trends in industrial sector energy use. The next section of the report focuses on some of the largest and most energy-intensive industrial subsectors. The report also highlights several emerging technologies that could transform key segments of industry. Finally, the report presents policies, incentives, and drivers that can influence the competitiveness of U.S. industrial firms.

  14. Estimates of future regional heavy oil production at three production rates--background information for assessing effects in the US refining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications from a project considering the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degree} to 20{degree} API gravity inclusive) production being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The report includes projections of future heavy oil production at three production levels: 900,000; 500,000; and 300,000 BOPD above the current 1992 heavy oil production level of 750,000 BOPD. These free market scenario projections include time frames and locations. Production projections through a second scenario were developed to examine which heavy oil areas would be developed if significant changes in the US petroleum industry occurred. The production data helps to define the possible constraints (impact) of increased heavy oil production on the US refining industry (the subject of a future report). Constraints include a low oil price and low rate of return. Heavy oil has high production, transportation, and refining cost per barrel as compared to light oil. The resource is known, but the right mix of technology and investment is required to bring about significant expansion of heavy oil production in the US.

  15. Energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jingsi, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, I examine the spatial and economic factors that influence energy intensity in China's iron and steel sector, namely industrial value added, renovation investment, coke consumption, and local coke supply. ...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Iron and Steel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Climate VISION goal of achieving a 10 percent increase in sector-wide average energy efficiency by 2012 using a 2002 baseline. Read the U.S. Steel Industry Energy Efficiency Fact...

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    vehicles. dDoes not include lease, plant, and pipeline fuel. eNatural gas consumed in the residential and commercial sectors. f Includes consumption for industrial combined heat...

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cDoes not includes lease, plant, and pipeline fuel. dNatural gas consumed in the residential and commercial sectors. eIncludes consumption for industrial combined heat and...

  19. China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Nina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heater Residential CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) 2020 ResidentialEnergy Industrial Sector CO2 Emissions (Mt CO2) IndustrialFigure 5. Power Sector CO2 Emissions by Scenario E3 Max Tech

  20. Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Provider","All Sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Green Mountain Power Corp","Investor-Owned",2477751,835602,896610,745539,0 2,"Central...

  1. An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TerraTek

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep drilling research program titled 'An Industry/DOE Program to Develop and Benchmark Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits and HP/HT Drilling Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration' was conducted at TerraTek's Drilling and Completions Laboratory. Drilling tests were run to simulate deep drilling by using high bore pressures and high confining and overburden stresses. The purpose of this testing was to gain insight into practices that would improve rates of penetration and mechanical specific energy while drilling under high pressure conditions. Thirty-seven test series were run utilizing a variety of drilling parameters which allowed analysis of the performance of drill bits and drilling fluids. Five different drill bit types or styles were tested: four-bladed polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC), 7-bladed PDC in regular and long profile, roller-cone, and impregnated. There were three different rock types used to simulate deep formations: Mancos shale, Carthage marble, and Crab Orchard sandstone. The testing also analyzed various drilling fluids and the extent to which they improved drilling. The PDC drill bits provided the best performance overall. The impregnated and tungsten carbide insert roller-cone drill bits performed poorly under the conditions chosen. The cesium formate drilling fluid outperformed all other drilling muds when drilling in the Carthage marble and Mancos shale with PDC drill bits. The oil base drilling fluid with manganese tetroxide weighting material provided the best performance when drilling the Crab Orchard sandstone.

  2. Deregulating and regulatory reform in the U.S. electric power sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the evolution of wholesale and retail competition in the U.S electricity sector and associated industry restructuring and regulatory reforms. It begins with a discussion of the industry structure and ...

  3. Delivered Energy Consumption Projections by Industry in the Annual Energy Outlook 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents delivered energy consumption and intensity projections for the industries included in the industrial sector of the National Energy Modeling System.

  4. Economic Crisis and the Logistics Industry: Financial Insecurity for Warehouse Workers in the Inland Empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonacich, Edna; De Lara, Juan David

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing the SACOG Region’s Logistics Sector: How Much, HowEconomic Crisis and the Logistics Industry Acknowledgements13 Economic Crisis and the Logistics Industry: Financial

  5. Government and Industry a Force for Collaboration at the Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and Industry A Force for Collaboration at the Energy Roadmap Update Workshop Sept. 16, 2009 Energy sector leaders in the public and private sectors have once again come together to...

  6. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency- Study (Appendix A), June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome these...

  7. Barriers to Industrial Energy Efficiency- Report to Congress, June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines barriers that impede the adoption of energy efficient technologies and practices in the industrial sector, and identifies successful examples and opportunities to overcome...

  8. China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation, Adaptation, and Espionage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvenon, James; Luce, Matthew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 China’s Defense Electronics Industry: Innovation,of the Chinese defense electronics sector can be attributedAdvanced defense electronics components and systems play a

  9. Advanced, Energy-Efficient Hybrid Membrane System for Industrial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (1 slide) Develo Project Objecve Current StateChallenges Heavy industrial water utilization footprint Freshwater Withdrawals in the U.S. by Sector (2005) Domestic...

  10. HOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY WITH THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to these concerns, since it on the whole is based on fossil fuels and shows a very fast growth rate. The transport integrated in the energy system and increase the share of fuels based on sustainable energy. Around 90HOW DO WE CONVERT THE TRANSPORT SECTOR TO RENEWABLE ENERGY AND IMPROVE THE SECTOR'S INTERPLAY

  11. Impact of New Federal Efficiency Performance Standards on the Industrial Motor Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.

    Conference, New Orleans, LA, May 12-15, 2009 percent increase over the previous two years. Rising electric rates, growing concerns about global warming, changes in the motor marketplace, and a new political environment in Washington create... of industry. This class of motors also accounts for a significant portion of the motor electricity consumption in the commercial sector (Nadel et al. 2002). Because of the large share of electricity consumption accounted for by this class of product...

  12. applications radioprotecao industrial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 421 National Industrial Hemp Strategy ii March 2008Executive Summary Growth of the Canadian Industrial Hemp Sector...

  13. arab oil industry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Impact and Strategies (3) TECH 562 Kostic, Milivoje M. 492 National Industrial Hemp Strategy ii March 2008Executive Summary Growth of the Canadian Industrial Hemp Sector...

  14. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    38 3.2.1. SDG&E Residential Electric Rates and TheirFootprint of Single-Family Residential New Construction.Solar photovoltaic financing: residential sector deployment,

  15. Industrial Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Industrial Permit Industrial Permit The Industrial Permit authorizes the Laboratory to discharge point-source effluents under the...

  16. Hepp and Speer Sectors within Modern Strategies of Sector Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Smirnov; V. A. Smirnov

    2008-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hepp and Speer sectors were successfully used in the sixties and seventies for proving mathematical theorems on analytically or/and dimensionally regularized and renormalized Feynman integrals at Euclidean external momenta. We describe them within recently developed strategies of introducing iterative sector decompositions. We show that Speer sectors are reproduced within one of the existing strategies.

  17. Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    generation equipment less than 1 MW) such as microturbines, fuel cells, and reciprocating engines offers promise to renew growth in the U.S. industrial sector. Based on the...

  18. Development Requirements for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, R. N.; Priebe, S. J.; Bliem, C. J.; Mills, J. I.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE is attempting to advance the use of heat pumps to save energy in industrial processes. The approach has emphasized developing better heat pump technology and transferring that technology to the private sector. DOE requires that heat pump...

  19. Development Requirements for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, R. N.; Priebe, S. J.; Bliem, C. J.; Mills, J. I.

    DOE is attempting to advance the use of heat pumps to save energy in industrial processes. The approach has emphasized developing better heat pump technology and transferring that technology to the private sector. DOE requires that heat pump...

  20. Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intersociety Energy ConJersion Engineering ConL, Paper No. 689054, ppl. 398 406 (1968). 678 ESL-IE-84-04-118 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 15-18, 1984 Table 1 Working-Fluid Parameters...

  1. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.; Fridley, David; Lin, Jiang; Price,Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a detailed, bottom-up analysis ofenergy consumption in China. It recalibrates official Chinese governmentstatistics by reallocating primary energy into categories more commonlyused in international comparisons. It also provides an analysis of trendsin sectoral energy consumption over the past decades. Finally, itassesses the future outlook for the critical period extending to 2020,based on assumptions of likely patterns of economic activity,availability of energy services, and energy intensities. The followingare some highlights of the study's findings: * A reallocation of sectorenergy consumption from the 2000 official Chinese government statisticsfinds that: * Buildings account for 25 percent of primary energy, insteadof 19 percent * Industry accounts for 61 percent of energy instead of 69percent * Industrial energy made a large and unexpected leap between2000-2005, growing by an astonishing 50 percent in the 3 years between2002 and 2005. * Energy consumption in the iron and steel industry was 40percent higher than predicted * Energy consumption in the cement industrywas 54 percent higher than predicted * Overall energy intensity in theindustrial sector grew between 2000 and 2003. This is largely due tointernal shifts towards the most energy-intensive sub-sectors, an effectwhich more than counterbalances the impact of efficiency increases. *Industry accounted for 63 percent of total primary energy consumption in2005 - it is expected to continue to dominate energy consumption through2020, dropping only to 60 percent by that year. * Even assuming thatgrowth rates in 2005-2020 will return to the levels of 2000-2003,industrial energy will grow from 42 EJ in 2005 to 72 EJ in 2020. * Thepercentage of transport energy used to carry passengers (instead offreight) will double from 37 percent to 52 percent between 2000 to 2020,.Much of this increase is due to private car ownership, which willincrease by a factor of 15 from 5.1 million in 2000 to 77 million in2020. * Residential appliance ownership will show signs of saturation inurban households. The increase in residential energy consumption will belargely driven by urbanization, since rural homes will continue to havelow consumption levels. In urban households, the size of appliances willincrease, but its effect will be moderated by efficiency improvements,partially driven by government standards. * Commercial energy increaseswill be driven both by increases in floor space and by increases inpenetration of major end uses such as heating and cooling. Theseincreases will be moderated somewhat, however, by technology changes,such as increased use of heat pumps. * China's Medium- and Long-TermDevelopment plan drafted by the central government and published in 2004calls for a quadrupling of GDP in the period from 2000-2020 with only adoubling in energy consumption during the same period. A bottom-upanalysis with likely efficiency improvements finds that energyconsumption will likely exceed the goal by 26.12 EJ, or 28 percent.Achievements of these goals will there fore require a more aggressivepolicy of encouraging energy efficiency.

  2. Multi-Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS Dept ofActing Chiefof Inks andmulti-sector

  3. Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Promoting Green Jobs in the Building and Construction Sector BUILDING FOR ECOLOGICALLY RESPONSIVE Industries" SMX Convention Center, Pasay City CHRISTOPHER CRUZ DE LA CRUZ Philippine Green Building Council 8 the ability of future generations to meet their own needs" #12;· "The fastest growing regional green building

  4. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity sector assets and prices to prevent de- industrialization and cushion the impact of hyperinflation on householdelectricity to “households and other socially-important consumer groups” at priceshousehold incomes, and price increases will not go unnoticed. 862 Russians also care about reliable electricity

  5. Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

  6. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

  7. Presentation 2.2: Biofuels -A Strategic Option for the Global Forest Sector? Michael Obersteiner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presentation 2.2: Biofuels - A Strategic Option for the Global Forest Sector? Michael Obersteiner Generation Biofuels. We will close with a SWOT analysis of the forest sector vis-à-vis the oil industry the emerging big player on the biofuels market. 117 #12;#12;Michael Obersteiner & Sten Nilsson International

  8. Market trends in the U.S. ESCO industry: Results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles A.; Osborn, Julie G.; Hopper, Nicole C.; Singer, Terry E.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective information and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects-the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry. We estimate that the ESCO industry completed $1.8-2.1B of projects in 2000. The industry has grown rapidly over the last decade with revenues increasing at a 24% annualized rate. We summarize and compare project characteristics and costs and analyze energy savings, including the relationship between predicted and actual savings. ESCOs typically invested about $2.30/ft{sup 2} per project in various energy efficiency improvements, although there is large variation in project costs within and across market segments. We find that lighting-only projects report median electricity savings of 47% of targeted equipment consumption; the median for lighting-&-non-lighting projects is 23% of the total electric bill baseline. We examine project economics, including project net benefits, benefit/cost ratio and simple payback time. Median simple payback time is seven years for institutional sector projects and three years in the private sector. We estimate direct economic benefits of $1.62 billion for the 1080 projects in our database with both cost and savings data. The median benefit/cost ratio is 2.1 for 309 private sector projects and 1.6 for 771 institutional sector projects. We discuss the role of policies and programs adopted by state/federal legislatures and agencies that have played an important role in stimulating ESCO activity in various markets. Finally, we estimate the overall size and growth of the energy-efficiency services industry over the last ten years based on a survey of 63 ESCOs.

  9. Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Industrial Engineering Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) #12;PURPOSE: The Texas Tech University - Industrial Engineering Industrial Ad- visory Board (IAB) is an association of professionals with a com- mon goal - promoting and developing the Texas Tech Department of Industrial Engineering and its students

  10. Energy Sector Market Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Benioff, R.; Mosey, G.; Bird, L.; Brown, J.; Brown, E.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Aabakken, J.; Parks, K.; Lapsa, M.; Davis, S.; Olszewski, M.; Cox, D.; McElhaney, K.; Hadley, S.; Hostick, D.; Nicholls, A.; McDonald, S.; Holloman, B.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of energy market analysis sponsored by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weatherization and International Program (WIP) within the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The analysis was conducted by a team of DOE laboratory experts from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with additional input from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The analysis was structured to identify those markets and niches where government can create the biggest impact by informing management decisions in the private and public sectors. The analysis identifies those markets and niches where opportunities exist for increasing energy efficiency and renewable energy use.

  11. Industrial energy efficiency policy in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Sinton, Jonathan; Yun, Jiang

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chinese industrial sector energy-efficiency policy has gone through a number of distinct phases since the founding of the People s Republic in 1949. An initial period of energy supply growth in the 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s was followed by implementation of significant energy efficiency programs in the 1980s. Many of these programs were dismantled in the 1990s during the continuing move towards a market-based economy. In an effort to once again strengthen energy efficiency, the Chinese government passes the Energy Conservation Law in 1997 which provides broad guidance for the establishment of energy efficiency policies. Article 20 of the Energy Conservation Law requires substantial improvement in industrial energy efficiency in the key energy-consuming industrial facilities in China. This portion of the Law declares that ''the State will enhance energy conservation management in key energy consuming entities.'' In 1999, the industrial sector consumed nearly 30 EJ, or 76 percent of China's primary energy. Even though primary energy consumption has dropped dramatically in recent years, due mostly to a decline in coal consumption, the Chinese government is still actively developing an overall policy for energy efficiency in the industrial sector modeled after policies in a number of industrialized countries. This paper will describe recent Chinese government activities to develop industrial sector energy-efficiency targets as a ''market-based'' mechanism for improving the energy efficiency of key industrial facilities.

  12. Public Sector Electric Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

  13. Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance and economic on system performance, reliability, and overall considerations (rate of return on investment economics have impeded widespread development and [ROI]), six organic fluids were identified to deployment of organic Rankine-cycle power... included with the GC unit inte grates the peaks and produc s a report consisting of retention time, peak area, and area percent. The detector's analog output is connected via an A/D converter to a Perkin Elmer (PE) Sigma 15 chromatography data station...

  14. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brush, Adrian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    industrial sectors. Modern control systems are often notmay already have modern process control systems in place togrowing rapidly. Modern process control systems exist for

  15. ITL BULLETIN FOR AUGUST 2011 PROTECTING INDUSTRIAL CONTROL SYSTEMS KEY COMPONENTS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , transportation, healthcare, and emergency services sectors. Federal agencies also operate critical production, handling, and distribution. ICS are used in many industries: electric, water, oil and gas

  16. HTGR Industrial Application Functional and Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. E. Demick

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document specifies the functional and performance requirements to be used in the development of the conceptual design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) based plant supplying energy to a typical industrial facility. These requirements were developed from collaboration with industry and HTGR suppliers over the preceding three years to identify the energy needs of industrial processes for which the HTGR technology is technically and economically viable. The functional and performance requirements specified herein are an effective representation of the industrial sector energy needs and an effective basis for developing a conceptual design of the plant that will serve the broadest range of industrial applications.

  17. Innovative Utility Pricing for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, J. A.

    tariffs can re a market for power during the time when it has sult in benefits to industry, to the electric abundant capacity available. From the other rate utility, and to other ratepayers on the electric payers' perspective, there will be a continued...INNOVATIVE UTILITY PRICING FOR INDUSTRY James A. Ross Drazen-Brubaker &Associates, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri ABSTRACT The electric utility industry represents only one source of power available to industry. Al though the monopolistic...

  18. Greenhouse Gas Programs, Energy Efficiency, and the Industrial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, A.; Tutterow, V.; Harris, J.

    The United States has made significant progress in reducing total energy use through energy efficiency improvements over the past decade, yet the United States still ranks as the highest absolute greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter in the world with 23...

  19. Efficient Energy Utilization in the Industrial Sector - Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Leakage and misuse of compressed air can normally be reduced by 10 percent, resulting in an annual savings of approximately $10,000 to $20,000. Heat recovery, using air compressor cooling water, can and is being used for space heating...

  20. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    feedstock, followed by heavy oil, which requires an averageammonia is made from heavy oil and coal, which is much lesspartial oxidization of heavy fuel oil, gasification of coal,

  1. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a back-pressure steam turbine to generate electricity (compressor uses a steam turbine, using internally generatedwith a gas turbine, producing steam and electricity. The hot

  2. Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM) Framework Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Nihan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Supply Modeling Package EFOM-12C Mark 1 MathematicalEnergy Supply Modeling Package EFOM-12C Mark 1 User’s Guide,the Economy EU European Union EFOM Energy Flow Optimization

  3. Labor's Share By Sector And Industry, 1948-1965

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Close, Frank A.; Shulenburger, David E.

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .6548 0.8667 0.8742 0.6078 0.6050 0.4867 0.7133 0.7113 0.6700 0.6553 0.8821 0.8888 0.6007 0.5978 0.4652 0.7465 0.7445 0.6829 0.6641 0.8709 0.8760 0.5934 0.5909 0.4666 0.7409 0.7389 0.6809 0.6649 0.8686 0.8810 0.5784 0.5757 0.4640 0.7393 0.7372 0.6828 0...

  4. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1996. COREX, Revolution in Ironmaking, Linz, Austria:VAI. ;GJ/t Material Preparation Ironmaking Sintering PelletizingGJ/t Material Preparation Ironmaking Sintering Pelletizing

  5. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.W. , M.T. Towers and T.C. Browne. 2002. Energy CostD.W. , M.T. Towers and T.C. Browne. 2002. Energy CostD.W. , M.T. Towers and T.C. Browne. 2002. Energy Cost

  6. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recovered from the black liquor recovery process (combustingand development in black liquor gasification has not yetgreen liquor”, similar to the black liquor recovery process,

  7. Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM) Framework Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Nihan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTMENT COST . anninvcost Annualized investment cost of a technology bound_Total of discounted investment costs discinvcost Discounted

  8. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be produced onsite at the smelter or in separate plants19, 20 The most efficient smelters consume 400-440 kg ofyears five aluminum smelter types have become widespread:

  9. Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector - New SEE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014ContributingDOEDepartment of EnergySmallDesign GuideAction

  10. Fact #619: April 19, 2010 Transportation Sector Revenue by Industry |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of EnergyEnergy 5: March 22, 2010Statistics

  11. Table E5. Industrial Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO)U.S. CoalInputsTotal Stocks4. ElectricE4.E5.

  12. Coal Industry Annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

  13. Coal industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  14. The dynamics of technology di?usion and the impacts of climate policy instruments in the decarbonisation of the global electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercure, J.-F.; Pollitt, H.; Chewpreecha, U.; Salas, P.; Foley, A. M.; Holden, P. B.; Edwards, N. R.

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    as exogenous trends of emissions for non-fuel-related sectors (e.g. land use), obtained from the EDGAR database. While the changes modelled include those in power sector emissions, they also include modest changes in other sectors (e.g. industry) occurring due...

  15. Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-Assisted Technology Provides Heat for California Industries Industrial/Agriculture/Water End 2011 The Issue Solar thermal technology focuses the Sun's rays to heat water, and is a promising renewable resource for California's industrial sector. Commercially available solar water heating

  16. Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes

  17. A New, Stochastic, Energy Model of the U.S. is Under Construction: SEDS and Its Industrial Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roop, J. M.

    -duty vehicles and heavy-duty vehicles. The industrial sector is currently modeled as a single sector, using the latest Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) to calibrate energy consumption to end-use energy categories: boilers, process heating...

  18. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  19. Coal industry annual 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

  20. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

  1. Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Federal Sector Renewable Energy Project Implementation: ""What's Working and Why Presentation by...

  2. Market study for direct utilization of geothermal resources by selected sectors of economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive analysis is presented of industrial markets potential for direct use of geothermal energy by a total of six industry sectors: food and kindred products; tobacco manufactures; textile mill products; lumber and wood products (except furniture); chemicals and allied products; and leather and leather products. A brief statement is presented regarding sectors of the economy and major manufacturing processes which can readily utilize direct geothermal energy. Previous studies on plant location determinants are summarized and appropriate empirical data provided on plant locations. Location determinants and potential for direct use of geothermal resources are presented. The data was gathered through interviews with 30 senior executives in the six sectors of economy selected for study. Probable locations of plants in geothermal resource areas and recommendations for geothermal resource marketing are presented. Appendix A presents factors which impact on industry location decisions. Appendix B presents industry executives interviewed during the course of this study. (MHR)

  3. Interfuel Substitution and Energy Use in the UK Manufacturing Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbuks, Jevgenijs

    of the following reasons. First, studies based on the aggregate data fail to account for large di¤erences in technological requirements for fuel types used in speci?c industries. For ex- ample, most cement kilns today use coal and petroleum coke as primary fuels... in the manufacturing processes. Waverman (1992) pointed out that fuels used by industrial sectors for non-energy purposes, such as coking coal, petrochemical feedstocks, or lubricants, have few available substitutes, and should therefore be excluded from the data...

  4. Welfare Impacts of Electricity Generation Sector Reform in the Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toba, Natsuko

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -cost-benefit-analysis (SCBA) basically designs a behavioural and cost model of an industry and simulates it over the post privatization period with and without the sundry changes attributed to the privatization. Thus a counterfactual scenario (viz., enterprise without... ownership regime and those from the private sector participation/ownership. 4. The SCBA Methodology Galal, et al. (1994) identify three main groups in society, viz., consumers, private producers, and government as their framework in assessing...

  5. Energy-economy interactions revisited within a comprehensive sectoral model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D. A.; Laitner, J. A.

    2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model with considerable sector and technology detail, the ``All Modular Industry Growth Assessment'' Model (AMIGA). It is argued that a detailed model is important to capture and understand the several rolls that energy plays within the economy. Fundamental consumer and industrial demands are for the services from energy; hence, energy demand is a derived demand based on the need for heating, cooling mechanical, electrical, and transportation services. Technologies that provide energy-services more efficiently (on a life cycle basis), when adopted, result in increased future output of the economy and higher paths of household consumption. The AMIGA model can examine the effects on energy use and economic output of increases in energy prices (e.g., a carbon charge) and other incentive-based policies or energy-efficiency programs. Energy sectors and sub-sector activities included in the model involve energy extraction conversion and transportation. There are business opportunities to produce energy-efficient goods (i.e., appliances, control systems, buildings, automobiles, clean electricity). These activities are represented in the model by characterizing their likely production processes (e.g., lighter weight motor vehicles). Also, multiple industrial processes can produce the same output but with different technologies and inputs. Secondary recovery, i.e., recycling processes, are examples of these multiple processes. Combined heat and power (CHP) is also represented for energy-intensive industries. Other modules represent residential and commercial building technologies to supply energy services. All sectors of the economy command real resources (capital services and labor).

  6. Rates & Repayment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and...

  7. Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trombley, D.; Elliott, R. N.; Chittum, A.

    Expanding the Industrial Assessment Center Program: Building an Industrial Efficiency Workforce Daniel Trombley Engineering Associate R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director of Research American Council for an Energy-Efficient... of access to technical information and trained workforce. One of the most successful programs for achieving energy efficiency savings in the manufacturing sector is the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) program...

  8. Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1.Year Jan Feb Mar‹ See

  9. Rail Coal Transportation Rates to the Electric Power Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail Coal

  10. "Greening" Industrial Steam Generation via On-demand Steam Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both recent economic and environmental conditions in the U.S. have converged to bring about unprecedented attention to energy efficiency and sustainability in the country's industrial sector. Historically, energy costs in ...

  11. Charting a Path to Net Zero Energy: Public-Private Sector Perspectives of the Commercial Buildings Consortium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming the commercial buildings market to become "net-zero-energy-capable" will require dramatically lower levels of energy use sector wide. A comprehensive and concerted industry effort, partnering with utilities and government, must...

  12. Charting a Path to Net Zero Energy: Public-Private Sector Perspectives of the Commercial Buildings Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transforming the commercial buildings market to become "net-zero-energy-capable" will require dramatically lower levels of energy use sector wide. A comprehensive and concerted industry effort, partnering with utilities and government, must...

  13. Turkey energy and environmental review - Task 7 energy sector modeling : executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Turkey's demand for energy and electricity is increasing rapidly. Since 1990, energy consumption has increased at an annual average rate of 4.3%. As would be expected, the rapid expansion of energy production and consumption has brought with it a wide range of environmental issues at the local, regional and global levels. With respect to global environmental issues, Turkey's carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions have grown along with its energy consumption. Emissions in 2000 reached 211 million metric tons. With GDP projected to grow at over 6% per year over the next 25 years, both the energy sector and the pollution associated with it are expected to increase substantially. This is expected to occur even if assuming stricter controls on lignite and hard coal-fired power generation. All energy consuming sectors, that is, power, industrial, residential, and transportation, will contribute to this increased emissions burden. Turkish Government authorities charged with managing the fundamental problem of carrying on economic development while protecting the environment include the Ministry of Environment (MOE), the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR), and the Ministry of Health, as well as the Turkish Electricity Generation & Transmission Company (TEAS). The World Bank, working with these agencies, is planning to assess the costs and benefits of various energy policy alternatives under an Energy and Environment Review (EER). Eight individual studies have been conducted under this activity to analyze certain key energy technology issues and use this analysis to fill in the gaps in data and technical information. This will allow the World Bank and Turkish authorities to better understand the trade-offs in costs and impacts associated with specific policy decisions. The purpose of Task 7-Energy Sector Modeling, is to integrate information obtained in other EER tasks and provide Turkey's policy makers with an integrated systems analysis of the various options for addressing the various energy and environmental concerns. The work presented in this report builds on earlier analyses presented at the COP 6 conference in Bonn.

  14. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nuclear Historical Primary Energy Consumption by sector Energy Use by Sector (EJ Services Transportation Agriculture

  15. How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, Nathaniel T.; Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David G.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urbanization has re-shaped China's economy, society, and energy system. Between 1990 and 2007 China added 290 million new urban residents, bringing the total urbanization rate to 45%. This population adjustment spurred energy demand for construction of new buildings and infrastructure, as well as additional residential use as rural biomass was replaced with urban commercial energy services. Primary energy demand grew at an average annual rate of 10% between 2000 and 2007. Urbanization's effect on energy demand was compounded by the boom in domestic infrastructure investment, and in the export trade following World Trade Organization (WTO) accession in 2001. Industry energy consumption was most directly affected by this acceleration. Whereas industry comprised 32% of 2007 U.S. energy use, it accounted for 75% of China's 2007 energy consumption. Five sub-sectors accounted for 78% of China's industry energy use in 2007: iron and steel, energy extraction and processing, chemicals, cement, and non-ferrous metals. Ferrous metals alone accounted for 25% of industry and 18% of total primary energy use. The rapid growth of heavy industry has led China to become by far the world's largest producer of steel, cement, aluminum, and other energy-intensive commodities. However, the energy efficiency of heavy industrial production continues to lag world best practice levels. This study uses scenario analysis to quantify the impact of urbanization and trade on industrial and residential energy consumption from 2000 to 2025. The BAU scenario assumed 67% urbanization, frozen export amounts of heavy industrial products, and achievement of world best practices by 2025. The China Lightens Up (CLU) scenario assumed 55% urbanization, zero net exports of heavy industrial products, and more aggressive efficiency improvements by 2025. The five dominant industry sub-sectors were modeled in both scenarios using a LEAP energy end-use accounting model. The results of this study show that a CLU-style development path would avoid 430 million tonnes coal-equivalent energy use by 2025. More than 60% of these energy savings would come from reduced activity and production levels. In carbon terms, this would amount to more than a billion-tonne reduction of energy-related carbon emissions compared with the BAU scenario in 2025, though the absolute level of emissions rises in both scenarios. Aside from the energy and carbon savings related to CLU scenario development, this study showed impending saturation effects in commercial construction, urban appliance ownership, and fertilizer application. The implication of these findings is that urbanization will have a direct impact on future energy use and emissions - policies to guide urban growth can play a central role in China's efforts to mitigate emissions growth.

  16. The Office of Industrial Technologies technical reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) conducts R D activities which focus on the objectives of improving energy efficiency and providing for fuel flexibility within US industry in the area of industrial energy conservation. The Office also conducts programs to reduce waste generation, increase recycling efforts, and improve the use of wastes as process feedstocks. An active program of technology transfer and education supports these activities and encourages adoption of new technologies. To accomplish these objectives OIT cooperates with the private sector to identify its technological needs and to share R D efforts. R D is conducted to the point that a new technology is shown to work and that it can be transferred to the private sector end-users. This bibliography contains information on all scientific and technical reports sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Conservation Program during the years 1988--1990.

  17. Energy Sector Vulnerability to Climate Change: Adaptation Options to Increase Resilience (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmark, R. L.; Bilello, D.; Macknick, J.; Hallet, K. C.; Anderson, R.; Tidwell, V.; Zamuda, C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting an assessment of vulnerabilities of the U.S. energy sector to climate change and extreme weather. Emphasizing peer reviewed research, it seeks to quantify vulnerabilities and identify specific knowledge or technology gaps. It draws upon a July 2012 workshop, ?Climate Change and Extreme Weather Vulnerability Assessment of the US Energy Sector?, hosted by the Atlantic Council and sponsored by DOE to solicit industry input.

  18. Gasification world database 2007. Current industry status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on trends and drivers affecting the growth of the gasification industry is provided based on information in the USDOE NETL world gasification database (available on the www.netl.doe.gov website). Sectors cover syngas production in 2007, growth planned through 2010, recent industry changes, and beyond 2010 - strong growth anticipated in the United States. A list of gasification-based power plant projects, coal-to-liquid projects and coal-to-SNG projects under consideration in the USA is given.

  19. Emerging Opportunities in Industrial Electrification Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, P. S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the manufacturing sector. Nearly half of manufacturing energy use was in the process industries, which include chemicals, petroleum products, pulp and paper, foods, textiles, and tobacco. Metals production, primarily aluminum and steel, accounted for about 21... %, and metals fabrication, including transportation, machinery, instrumentation and electronics, and other metal products, about 19%. The balance of about 14% was used in other non-metals industries, such as stone, clay, and glass, rubber and plastics...

  20. Industrial Demand-Side Management in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaussaud, D.

    of programs result in lower consumption and/or lower peak demand, and ultimately reduce the need to build new capacity. Hence demand-side management can be used as a resource option to be considered alongside more traditional supply-side resources in a...INDUSTRIAL DEMAND-SIDE MANAGEMENT IN TEXAS Danielle Jaussaud Economic Analysis Section Public Utility Commission of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT The industrial sector in Texas is highly energy intensive and represents a large share...

  1. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume II. Energy data on the US manufacturing subsector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to characterize industrial energy service, current energy demand, its end uses, and cost of typical energy applications and resultant services in the industrial sector were examined and a projection of state industrial energy demands and prices to 1990 was developed. Volume II presents in Section 2 data on the US manufacturing subsector energy demand, intensity, growth rates, and cost for 1971, 1974, and 1976. These energy data are disaggregated not only by fuel type but also by user classifications, including the 2-digit SIC industry groups, 3-digit subgroups, and 4-digit SIC individual industries. These data characterize typical energy applications and the resultant services in this subsector. The quantities of fuel and electric energy purchased by the US manufacturing subsector were converted to British thermal units and reported in billions of Btu. The conversion factors are presented in Table 4-1 of Volume I. To facilitate the descriptive analysis, all energy cost and intensity data were expressed in constant 1976 dollars. The specific US industrial energy service characteristics developed and used in the descriptive analysis are presented in Volume I. Section 3 presents the computer program used to produce the tabulated data.

  2. Sector 1 Frequently Asked Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sector 1 Safety Plan (pdf) Useful X-Ray Related Numbers Si a0 5.4308 Angstrom CeO2 a05.411 Angstrom Cd-109 gamma 88.036 keV X-ray energywavelength conversion...

  3. Commercial Building Energy Asset Rating Program -- Market Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Molly J.; Wang, Na

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, HaydenTanner, LLC conducted an in-depth analysis of the potential market value of a commercial building energy asset rating program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The market research objectives were to: (1) Evaluate market interest and need for a program and tool to offer asset rating and rapidly identify potential energy efficiency measures for the commercial building sector. (2) Identify key input variables and asset rating outputs that would facilitate increased investment in energy efficiency. (3) Assess best practices and lessons learned from existing national and international energy rating programs. (4) Identify core messaging to motivate owners, investors, financiers, and others in the real estate sector to adopt a voluntary asset rating program and, as a consequence, deploy high-performance strategies and technologies across new and existing buildings. (5) Identify leverage factors and incentives that facilitate increased investment in these buildings. To meet these objectives, work consisted of a review of the relevant literature, examination of existing and emergent asset and operational rating systems, interviews with industry stakeholders, and an evaluation of the value implication of an asset label on asset valuation. This report documents the analysis methodology and findings, conclusion, and recommendations. Its intent is to support and inform the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on the market need and potential value impacts of an asset labeling and diagnostic tool to encourage high-performance new buildings and building efficiency retrofit projects.

  4. Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Diane Schaub

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its inception, the University of Florida Industrial Assessment Center has successfully completed close to 400 energy assessments of small to medium manufacturing facilities in Florida, southern Georgia and southern Alabama. Through these efforts, recommendations were made that would result in savings of about $5 million per year, with an implementation rate of 20-25%. Approximately 80 engineering students have worked for the UF-IAC, at least 10 of whom went on to work in energy related fields after graduation. Additionally, through the popular course in Industrial Energy Management, many students have graduated from the University of Florida with a strong understanding and support of energy conservation methods.

  5. Current and future industrial energy service characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications and resultant services in the industrial sector of the United States and 15 selected states are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research on: (1) market suitability analysis, (2) market development, (3) end-use matching, (3) industrial applications case studies, and (4) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. In reviewing existing industrial energy data bases, the level of detail, disaggregation, and primary sources of information were examined. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC, primary fuel, and end use. Projections of state level energy prices to 1990 are developed using the energy intensity approach. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed. Future end-use energy requirements were developed for each 4-digit SIC industry and were grouped as follows: (1) hot water, (2) steam (212 to 300/sup 0/F, each 100/sup 0/F interval from 300 to 1000/sup 0/F, and greater than 1000/sup 0/F), and (3) hot air (100/sup 0/F intervals). Volume I details the activities performed in this effort.

  6. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FederalState Programs DOE Industrial Materials of the Future Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) is a crosscutting activity of the Industrial Technologies Program. The...

  7. Water Impacts of the Electricity Sector (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the water impacts of the electricity sector. Nationally, the electricity sector is a major end-user of water. Water issues affect power plants throughout the nation.

  8. Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass Resources for the Federal Sector is a fact sheet that explains how biomass resources can be incorporated into the federal sector, and also how they can provide opportunities to meet federal renewable energy goals.

  9. Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrifica...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Electrification and Transportation Sector Electrification Plug-in Hybrid (PHEV) Vehicle Technology Advancement and Demonstration Activity Advanced Vehicle...

  10. Energy efficiency programs and policies in the industrial sector in industrialized countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23. Wisconsin – Focus on Energy website: http://pageId =4 24. International Energy Agency (IEA) documents:index.html 16. Renewable Energy Equity Fund (REEF) website:

  11. Energy efficiency programs and policies in the industrial sector in industrialized countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sustainable energy system was begun, further supporting those goals of increased renewable energy sources and energy efficiency. Sweden

  12. Garnering the Industrial Sector: A Comparison of Cutting Edge Industrial DSM Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyricopoulos, P. F.; Wikler, G. A.; Faruqui, A.; Wood, B. G.

    ~ p~oduct quality! greater relIability, or facl1ltatlOn of long-term environmental compliance. ? Minimizing risk. Changing production procedures is a risk. Customers are lookin f for proven technologies and procedures that e$ure smooth...

  13. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobs |

  14. Industrial Energy Efficiency: Designing Effective State Programs for the Industrial Sector: Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of EnergyTreatment andJuneJobs |Executive Summary

  15. Reporting Conservation Results in the Chemical Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doerr, R. E.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1974, the Manufacturing Chemists Association (MCA) developed an energy rate method for reporting the energy conservation results of the chemical industry to the Federal Energy Administration. The MCA Energy Rate Method has served as a model...

  16. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameterin Building Sector Electricity Consumption Appendix 1. WorldElectricity in Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii

  17. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private Participation in the Electricity Sector World BankTelecommunications and Electricity Sectors." Governance 19,41 with journalist covering electricity sector, Vladivostok,

  18. Characteristics of spot-market rate indexes for truckload transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bignell, Andrew (Andrew Souglas)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the truckload transportation industry in the United States, a number of indexes are published that attempt to measure changes in rates, but no single index has emerged as an industry standard. Industry participants, ...

  19. Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave | 1 Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave INFORME para la Sostenibilidad Energética y Ambiental, FUNSEAM. #12;Smart Grids: Sectores y actividades clave eléctrica y los diferentes sectores que forman la smart grid. 6 Figura 2. Evolución y previsión de

  20. Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector: Up by the Stairs and Down by the Parachute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aizenman, Joshua; Pinto, Brian; Sushko, Vladyslav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    May 2012 Financial Sector Ups and Downs and the Real Sector:to reclassifying financial sector ups and downs as turning

  1. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16...-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights reserved. • Fundamentals of the US Electric Sector Business Model • Today’s Challenges Faced by U.S. Electric Sector • The Math Does Not Lie: A Look into the Sector’s Future • Disruption to Today...

  2. User:GregZiebold/Sector test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga,planning methodologies and tools | Open EnergyCalpakGatewaySector

  3. Cross-sector Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of EnergyCross-Sector Sign In About |

  4. External research and energy efficiency in the process industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaarsberg, T.M.; Foust, T.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process industries in the US are under enormous pressure. These industries, even more than US industry on average, face skyrocketing environmental costs, a rapidly changing electricity market, potential climate change policies, aging infrastructure and strong international competition. To be profitable they must reduce their costs and environmental impacts while increasing their product quality, turnaround time, productivity and output. Most of these industries have already cut costs and labor as much as possible. Therefore, to survive, these industries must innovate. History shows that industries that are the most innovative are the most successful. These industries are vital to the US economy. For example, the metals, pulp and paper, chemicals and the petroleum refining industries account for more than $800 billion in products shipped and employ more than three million workers. Although the US has shifted dramatically toward services with 77% of workers and 74% of GDP now in the service sector, what many have missed is that the process industries are important customers for many of these new services. ServOnly the last two years of NSF industrial R and D data provide any breakout of non-manufacturing R and D. This paper discusses the past, current and possible future role of eternal research and development (R and D)--much of which is now in the service sector--in fostering innovation and thus energy efficiency in these industries. The authors suggest that these industries are more innovative than previously thought because of external research.

  5. Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

  6. Power Politics: The Political Economy of Russia's Electricity Sector Liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wengle, Susanne Alice

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity Sector in Russia: Regional Aspects " In Economics EducationElectricity Sector in Russia: Regional Aspects " in Economics Education

  7. INDUST: An Industrial Data Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfert, G. L.; Moore, N. L.

    .5% of the natural gas consump tion, 98.1% of the fuel oil consumption, 99.2% of the coal/coke consumption, and 99.7% of a class of fuels called "other" fuels. Within these 13 indus try groups, INDUST addresses a wide variety of energy-intense industries... the manufac turing sector, Table 1 shows the latest EIA pro visional estimate of energy consumption (in trillion Btu) for 1985. The EIA reports fuel consumption according to five categories: electricity, fuel oil, natural gas, coal and coke, and other...

  8. Shrenik Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik Industries Jump to: navigation, search

  9. Ventower Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:ShreniksourceVentower Industries Jump to:

  10. Macroscopic theory of dark sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris E. Meierovich

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple Lagrangian with squared covariant divergence of a vector field as a kinetic term turned out an adequate tool for macroscopic description of the dark sector. The zero-mass field acts as the dark energy. Its energy-momentum tensor is a simple additive to the cosmological constant. Massive fields {\\phi}_{I} with {\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0 describe two different forms of dark matter. The space-like ({\\phi}^{K}{\\phi}_{K}0) massive field displays repulsive elasticity. In balance with dark energy and ordinary matter it provides a four parametric diversity of regular solutions of the Einstein equations describing different possible cosmological and oscillating non-singular scenarios of evolution of the universe. In particular, the singular big bang turns into a regular inflation-like transition from contraction to expansion with the accelerate expansion at late times. The fine-tuned Friedman-Robertson-Walker singular solution is a particular limiting case at the boundary of existence of regular oscillating solutions in the absence of vector fields. The simplicity of the general covariant expression for the energy-momentum tensor allows to display the main properties of the dark sector analytically and avoid unnecessary model assumptions.

  11. Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implemented in Canada, what would be the response of the industrial sector in terms of energy consumptionHybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application for modeling industrial energy consumption, among them a series of environmental and security externalities

  12. Crossing innovation & product projects management: A comparative analysis in automotive industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Crossing innovation & product projects management: A comparative analysis in automotive industry in automotive industry INTRODUCTION Projectification and platform approaches have been two main transformation in the automotive industry. This sector provides an interesting empirical opportunity to study this question, since

  13. Examination of the factors and issues for an environmental technology utilization partnership between the private sector and the Department of Energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brouse, P.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) held a meeting on November 12, 1992 to evaluate the DOE relations with industry and university partners concerning environmental technology utilization. The goal of this meeting was to receive feedback from DOE industry and university partners for the identification of opportunities to improve the DOE cooperative work processes with the private sector. The meeting was designed to collect information and to turn that information into action to improve private sector partnerships with DOE.

  14. MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    MIT and Automotive Industries MIT Industry Brief MIT's Industrial Liaison Program (ILP) can bring@ilp.mit.edu, or visit http://ilp-www.mit.edu. MIT and Automotive Industries The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a leading center of research and education on topics important to the automotive industry

  15. Rate Schedules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

  16. Public Sector New Construction and Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) Bureau of Energy and Recycling administers the public sector energy efficiency programs required by the Illinois Energy...

  17. Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) administers the Illinois Energy Now programs, including the Public Sector Energy Efficiency Aggregation Program. The program will...

  18. Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Geothermal Sector, Indonesia (Presentation) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Accelerating Investments in the Geothermal...

  19. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  20. Draft Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  1. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Business Roundtable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results Every Sector, One RESOLVE: A Progress Report on Business Roundtable's Climate RESOLVE Program, September 2004 (PDF 1.8 MB) Download Acrobat Reader...

  2. Transforming Federal sector procurement of performance based energy services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahle, D.E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal agencies are mandated to reduce their energy use by 30% by 2005. The investment in energy projects required to achieve this reduction is estimated at $4 billion to $6 billion. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has developed streamlined procurement vehicles to allow Federal agencies to acquire private-sector-financed, performance-based energy services for all Federal buildings. These procurement vehicles, called Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) will be in place covering all regions of the US by summer 1998. The six regional DOE ESPC contracts will provide agencies the ability to contract for up to $4.5 billion in private sector financed energy services. This represents an estimated potential of $3 billion in private sector investments in Federal buildings for energy efficiency, renewable energy and water conservation projects. DOE has developed guidelines and unique project development tools that will allow Federal agencies to contract for ESPC services in months rather than in the years it used to take to develop and implement site specific ESPC projects. The Federal government's buying power has transformed the energy services and utilities industries by stimulating the formation of new cross-industry teams and partnerships to meet the breadth of capability and ability to respond to the needs of Federal facilities in large geographic regions. This paper presents results to date and describes the linkages between the Super ESPC Program and the US Climate Change Proposal. A key US strategy that calls for Federal leadership, and in particular for DOE to spearhead a comprehensive effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from Federal sources.

  3. Refining industry trends: Europe and surroundings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guariguata, U.G.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European refining industry, along with its counterparts, is struggling with low profitability due to excess primary and conversion capacity, high operating costs and impending decisions of stringent environmental regulations that will require significant investments with hard to justify returns. This region was also faced in the early 1980s with excess capacity on the order of 4 MMb/d and satisfying the {open_quotes}at that point{close_quotes} demand by operating at very low utilization rates (60%). As was the case in the US, the rebalancing of the capacity led to the closure of some 51 refineries. Since the early 1990s, the increase in demand growth has essentially balanced the capacity threshold and utilization rates are settled around the 90% range. During the last two decades, the major oil companies have reduced their presence in the European refining sector, giving some state oil companies and producing countries the opportunity to gain access to the consumer market through the purchase of refining capacity in various countries-specifically, Kuwait in Italy; Libya and Venezuela in Germany; and Norway in other areas of Scandinavia. Although the market share for this new cast of characters remains small (4%) relative to participation by the majors (35%), their involvement in the European refining business set the foundation whereby US independent refiners relinquished control over assets that could not be operated profitably as part of a previous vertically integrated structure, unless access to the crude was ensured. The passage of time still seems to render this model valid.

  4. The Department of Energy's Solar Industrial Program: New ideas for American industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.V.; Hauser, S.G.; Clyne, R.J.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As society becomes more and more sensitive to the environment, and energy supplies become more scarce, the application of solar energy is expanding into new areas. The industrial sector is one of the most difficult for solar energy to impact because of its technical diversity and economic requirements. However, the opportunities are still abundant. The Department of Energy's Solar Industrial Program is dedicated to advancing the applications of solar energy in this sector. Research and technology development activities are currently focused in three areas: solar process heat, advanced materials manufacturing, and destruction of chemical wastes. The Solar Energy Research Institute manages these activities for DOE with close interactions with other federal agencies, private industry, and universities. 7 figs.

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors: Work...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of EPA. The plan describes actions the industry intends to take to achieve its Climate VISION goal by 2010. Read the Semiconductor Industry Association Work Plan (PDF 94...

  6. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users The

  7. Industry @ ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf SmartIndustrial Users

  8. Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)HydrogenRFP »summerlectures [ICO]default Sign InIndustrial

  9. EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry in Gabon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry: .....................................................................................................................................................2 Part I: The EU, China and the external environmental dimension....................................................................3 1.1 China as a competitor normative power in the environmental sector

  10. Sustainability Policy and Green Growth of the South Korean Construction Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Hwayeon

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    South Korea is among a host of countries trying to achieve sustainable development across whole industry sectors by adopting "Green Growth" as the vision of the national development in the Korean government. The government has executed a vast effort...

  11. New 3E Plus Computer Program- A Tool for Improving Industrial Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayman, N. J.

    The task of determining how much insulation is necessary in the US industrial and manufacturing sector to save money, use less energy, reduce plant emissions and improve process efficiency has been greatly simplified thanks to a software program...

  12. The Public Utility and Industry: A Customer- Supplier Relationship for Long-Term Survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, J. R.

    The entire country is undergoing a significant change in customer attitide toward services and products. This change is geared toward a quality service/ product for the least cost. Industry and the utility sector need to apply the aspects of quality...

  13. Modeling ruminant methane emissions from the U.S. beef cattle industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turk, Danny Carroll

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer models were constructed to estimate methane emissions from cow/calf, replacement heifers, burs, stockers and feedlot sectors of the U.S. beef cattle industry. Methane (CH4) yields were calculated based on net energy values and forage...

  14. Technology partnerships: Enhancing the competitiveness, efficiency, and environmental quality of American industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the Department of Energy`s Office of Industrial Technologies and its private sector partnerships is presented. Commercial success stories and real-world benefits of the technology partnerships are discussed.

  15. National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization Resource (NESCOR) project was to address cyber security issues for the electric sector, particularly in the near and mid-term. The following table identifies the strategies from the DOE Roadmap to Achieve Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity published in September 2011 that are applicable to the NESCOR project.

  16. Institute of Public Sector Accounting Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE STATE" New Public Sector Seminar, Edinburgh, 6-7th November 2014 Co-Chairs: Liisa Kurunmaki, Irvine and consultants depend on in the management of public service organisations, and what is the statusInstitute of Public Sector Accounting Research I·P·S·A·R In Government, Public Services

  17. Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    action. Our study seeks to inform the decisions of both government managers and private entrepreneursApril 2000 Managing Technical Risk: Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage 00-787 Managing Technical Risk Understanding Private Sector Decision Making on Early Stage Technology

  18. Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology & Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ninth annual Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy will be held from December 7–9, 2014, in San Diego, California, at the Westin Gaslamp Quarter. Bringing together representatives from various countries all around the Pacific Rim, this event will focus on the growth of the industrial biotechnology and bioenergy sectors in North America and the Asia-Pacific region. Glenn Doyle, BETO's Deployment & Demonstration Technology Manager, will be moderating and speaking at a session on entitled "Utilizing Strategic Partnerships to Grow Your Business" on December 9.

  19. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 1 Welcome MIE Industrial Advisory Board October 15, 2010 #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 2 MIE Dorothy Adams Undergraduate/Graduate Secretary David Schmidt Associate Professor & Graduate Program Director #12;Mechanical & Industrial Engineering 3 MIE James Rinderle

  20. Industrial Decision Making 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, R. N.; McKinney, V.; Shipley, A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial investment decision-making. The paper will also address several important questions: • Why has industrial investment declined? • What is the outlook for industrial investment? • How can programs engage industry for future opportunities?...

  1. Surety of the nation`s critical infrastructures: The challenge restructuring poses to the telecommunications sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, R.; Drennen, T.E.; Gilliom, L.; Harris, D.L.; Kunsman, D.M.; Skroch, M.J.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The telecommunications sector plays a pivotal role in the system of increasingly connected and interdependent networks that make up national infrastructure. An assessment of the probable structure and function of the bit-moving industry in the twenty-first century must include issues associated with the surety of telecommunications. The term surety, as used here, means confidence in the acceptable behavior of a system in both intended and unintended circumstances. This paper outlines various engineering approaches to surety in systems, generally, and in the telecommunications infrastructure, specifically. It uses the experience and expectations of the telecommunications system of the US as an example of the global challenges. The paper examines the principal factors underlying the change to more distributed systems in this sector, assesses surety issues associated with these changes, and suggests several possible strategies for mitigation. It also studies the ramifications of what could happen if this sector became a target for those seeking to compromise a nation`s security and economic well being. Experts in this area generally agree that the U. S. telecommunications sector will eventually respond in a way that meets market demands for surety. Questions remain open, however, about confidence in the telecommunications sector and the nation`s infrastructure during unintended circumstances--such as those posed by information warfare or by cascading software failures. Resolution of these questions is complicated by the lack of clear accountability of the private and the public sectors for the surety of telecommunications.

  2. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. The focus of industrial engineering is on process improvement

  3. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING Industrial engineering is concerned with looking at the "big picture" of systems that allow organizations and individuals to perform at their best. Industrial engineers bridge should be used and how they should be used. Industrial engineers design and run the factories and systems

  4. Challenges for implementing industrial policy in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leith, Kendra Sawyer

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although Mexico experienced high growth rates in the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s, the country has not fared well in terms of improvements in poverty and equality, growth in GDP, and job growth in some sectors in the last ...

  5. Methodological and Practical Considerations for DevelopingMultiproject Baselines for Electric Power and Cement Industry Projects inCentral America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant; Galitsky, Christina; Dorion,Kristel

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) andthe Center for Sustainable Development in the Americas (CSDA) conductedtechnical studies and organized two training workshops to developcapacity in Central America for the evaluation of climate changeprojects. This paper describes the results of two baseline case studiesconducted for these workshops, one for the power sector and one for thecement industry, that were devised to illustrate certain approaches tobaseline setting. Multiproject baseline emission rates (BERs) for themain Guatemalan electricity grid were calculated from 2001 data. Inrecent years, the Guatemalan power sector has experienced rapid growth;thus, a sufficient number of new plants have been built to estimateviable BERs. We found that BERs for baseload plants offsetting additionalbaseload capacity ranged from 0.702 kgCO2/kWh (using a weighted averagestringency) to 0.507 kgCO2/kWh (using a 10th percentile stringency),while the baseline for plants offsetting load-followingcapacity is lowerat 0.567 kgCO2/kWh. For power displaced from existing load-followingplants, the rate is higher, 0.735 kgCO2/kWh, as a result of the age ofsome plants used for meeting peak loads and the infrequency of their use.The approved consolidated methodology for the Clean Development Mechanismyields a single rate of 0.753 kgCO2/kWh. Due to the relatively smallnumber of cement plants in the region and the regional nature of thecement market, all of Central America was chosen as the geographicboundary for setting cement industry BERs. Unfortunately, actualoperations and output data were unobtainable for most of the plants inthe region, and many data were estimated. Cement industry BERs rangedfrom 205 kgCO2 to 225 kgCO2 per metric ton of cement.

  6. Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, R.C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

  7. Photovoltaic industry progress through 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of the US photovoltaics (PV) industry over the past decade has been impressive. First designed to provide power for satellites using high-cost production techniques, PV is now the economical choice in many remote terrestrial applications. The remarkable growth of PV in terms of quality of cells and modules, production techniques, and system design, was initiated by a cooperative effort of the US Government and the domestic PV manufacturers. European and Japanese firms entered the PV industry later, but are also growing rapidy. The Europeans continue to supply PV systems for village electrification and water pumping to many Third World countries. The Japanese have been developing the amorphous silicon (A-Si) technology by expanding its use in consumer goods. The world PV industry saw dramatic changes in industry ownership and in the emphasis on developing new and improved technology during 1984. The objective of this report is to present information on the developments of the world PV industry and focuses on developments occurring in 1984. Information is presented on a regional basis (US, Europe, Japan, other) to avoid disclosing company-confidential data. All information was gleaned from several sources, including a review of the technical literature and direct contacts with PV manufacturers. Prior to publishing the regional totals, all numbers were compared with those of other sources. The information contained in this report is prepared for use by the Department of Energy for their use in long-term R and D planning. However, this information should also be of interest by PV manufacturers and to those who may be contemplating entering the PV market. PV shipments for 1984, government supports for PV, and various PV market sectors are discussed.

  8. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  9. Utility Roles in Preserving the Industrial Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, J. S.

    While the price of energy may have stabilized for the moment, the impact of several years of rate increases in the cost of energy, materials, and labor has made American industry re-evaluate its operations. Utilities serving clusters of industrial...

  10. Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRB) are tax-exempt bonds that can be used to stimulate capital investment and job creation by providing private borrowers with access to financing at interest rates that...

  11. Emerging trends in the satellite industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Vagn Knudsen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Risk aversion in the satellite industry has fostered long development cycles and low rates of innovation in the past. Emerging trends in propulsion technology development and spacecraft architecture design could lead to ...

  12. Electricity sector restructuring and competition : lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We now have over a decade of experience with the privatization, restructuring, regulatory reform, and wholesale and retail competition in electricity sectors around the world. The objectives and design attributes of these ...

  13. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, John

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ...

  14. India's pulp and paper industry: Productivity and energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Katja

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's pulp and paper sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both statistical and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that productivity declined over the observed period from 1973-74 to 1993-94 by 1.1% p.a. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's pulp and paper sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protection afforded by high tariffs on imported paper products and other policies, which allowed inefficient, small plants to enter the market and flourish. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with liberalization of the sector, and tighter environmental controls, the industry is moving towards higher efficiency and productivity. However, the analysis also shows that because these improvements are being hampered by significant financial and other barriers the industry might have a long way to go.

  15. Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Activities to Secure Control Systems in the Energy Sector Presentation-given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  16. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and market assessment Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size2008. “The Size of the U.S. Energy Efficiency Market. Reportmarket spending Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size

  17. EIA Energy Efficiency-Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities Commercial Buildings Sector Energy Intensities: 1992- 2003 Released Date: December 2004 Page Last Revised: August 2009 These tables...

  18. Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11 Calibration of the Energy Consumption Data forSectoral energy consumption data are available in publishedof the sectoral energy consumption data in the statistics

  19. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Sector Electricity Consumption parameter logisticin Building Sector Electricity Consumption iii iv Sectoralsome water with electricity consumption, it is not possible

  20. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Transportation energy use grows slowly in comparison with historical trend figure data Transportation sector energy consumption grows at an...

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

  2. Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate Renewable Energy Projects Energy Department Announces New Private Sector Partnership to Accelerate...

  3. Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference...

  4. The Economics of Public Sector Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, Rufus

    result in incentives for over-investment in quality and capacity improvements because, by over-investing, the PSIH stimulates demand and obtains a larger subsidy. In terms of responsiveness an organization operating a more ‘commercial’ pricing policy (e... area (building especially), or keeping up to date with the decisions of their elected representatives. While much data is supplied from outside the public sector, compared to many other areas of the economy, the public sector plays an unusually...

  5. Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Size and Expectations for Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Charles; Fuller, Merrian C.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Peters, Jane S.; McRae, Marjorie; Albers, Nathaniel; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Spahic, Mersiha

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy efficiency services sector (EESS) is poised to become an increasingly important part of the U.S. economy. Climate change and energy supply concerns, volatile and increasing energy prices, and a desire for greater energy independence have led many state and national leaders to support an increasingly prominent role for energy efficiency in U.S. energy policy. The national economic recession has also helped to boost the visibility of energy efficiency, as part of a strategy to support economic recovery. We expect investment in energy efficiency to increase dramatically both in the near-term and through 2020 and beyond. This increase will come both from public support, such as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and significant increases in utility ratepayer funds directed toward efficiency, and also from increased private spending due to codes and standards, increasing energy prices, and voluntary standards for industry. Given the growing attention on energy efficiency, there is a concern among policy makers, program administrators, and others that there is an insufficiently trained workforce in place to meet the energy efficiency goals being put in place by local, state, and federal policy. To understand the likelihood of a potential workforce gap and appropriate response strategies, one needs to understand the size, composition, and potential for growth of the EESS. We use a bottom-up approach based upon almost 300 interviews with program administrators, education and training providers, and a variety of EESS employers and trade associations; communications with over 50 sector experts; as well as an extensive literature review. We attempt to provide insight into key aspects of the EESS by describing the current job composition, the current workforce size, our projections for sector growth through 2020, and key issues that may limit this growth.

  6. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

  7. ImSET: Impact of Sector Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, Joseph M.; Scott, Michael J.; Schultz, Robert W.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This version of the Impact of Sector Energy Technologies (ImSET) model represents the ''next generation'' of the previously developed Visual Basic model (ImBUILD 2.0) that was developed in 2003 to estimate the macroeconomic impacts of energy-efficient technology in buildings. More specifically, a special-purpose version of the 1997 benchmark national Input-Output (I-O) model was designed specifically to estimate the national employment and income effects of the deployment of Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) -developed energy-saving technologies. In comparison with the previous versions of the model, this version allows for more complete and automated analysis of the essential features of energy efficiency investments in buildings, industry, transportation, and the electric power sectors. This version also incorporates improvements in the treatment of operations and maintenance costs, and improves the treatment of financing of investment options. ImSET is also easier to use than extant macroeconomic simulation models and incorporates information developed by each of the EERE offices as part of the requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act.

  8. "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (EIA-861 data file)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data updated Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990- 2012 - Total emission rates added Table 10. Supply and Disposition of Electricity, 1990- 2012 - Data issues...

  9. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Pathways The DOE's Industries of the Future process helps entire industries articulate their long-term goals and publish them in a unified vision for the future. To...

  10. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Selldorff, John; Atwell, Monte

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy resources are key components to increasing U.S. energy productivity and makes the U.S. manufacturing sector more competitive. Companies find a competitive advantage in implementing efficiency technologies and practices, and technologies developed and manufactured in the U.S. enable greater competitiveness economy-wide.

  11. Industrial Structure and Monetary Policy in a Small Open Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    Industrial Structure and Monetary Policy in a Small Open Economy Thomas A. Lubik Department supply which is empirically quite small. In principle, this link can be broken in a multisectoral economy sectors. This paper reinterprets this line of reasoning in a small open economy with a traded and a non

  12. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Industrial Efficiency and Energy Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selldorff, John; Atwell, Monte

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial efficiency and low-cost energy resources are key components to increasing U.S. energy productivity and makes the U.S. manufacturing sector more competitive. Companies find a competitive advantage in implementing efficiency technologies and practices, and technologies developed and manufactured in the U.S. enable greater competitiveness economy-wide.

  13. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  18. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  19. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise...

  20. Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

  1. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  2. Contracting Out of Service Activities and the Effects on Sectoral Employment Patterns in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tregenna, Fiona

    that it is government that is also responsible for upholding labour legislation). By way of background to the empirical analysis that follows, we have discussed outsourcing as a form of corporate restructuring, which has implications inter alia for the sectoral... outsourcing as a type of shift in corporate and industrial structure, and the specific dynamics of outsourcing in the South African case. This contextualises the empirical analysis of intersectoral shifts in the employment of these two occupations, which...

  3. Third-Party Financing and Power Purchase Agreements for Public Sector PV

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department Third Report to the President

  4. North Carolina State University | College of Engineering | Raleigh, NC | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu FOSTERING PRIVATE SECTOR JOB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    300 companies annually with project and industry development. The Solar Center is home.ncsc.ncsu.edu FOSTERING PRIVATE SECTOR JOB CREATION AND INVESTMENT The North Carolina Solar Center was founded in 1988 at NC State University. The Solar Center breaks down barriers for clean energy businesses who want

  5. Essays on sectoral shifts of labor demand: measurements and effects on the incidence and the duration of unemployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byun, Yanggyu

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    industries. Abraham and Katz (1984) point out that this as- 1 The idea of sectoral shifts hypothesis has also been used in recent studies to introduce persistent unemployment in a real business cycle model (Mikhail et al. (2003)), to study the macroeconomic e...

  6. Formulating a VET roadmap for the waste and recycling sector: A case study from Queensland, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, G., E-mail: gudavis@cytanet.com.cy [Dr Georgina Davis, ABN 12 744 598 837, Banksia Beach, Brisbane, QLD 4507 (Australia)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Existing qualifications do not meet the needs of the sector in Queensland. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Businesses may not be best positioned to identify training needs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Companies are developing training internally to meet their own specific needs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smaller companies lack the resources to develop internal training are disadvantaged. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is industry support for an entry-level, minimum industry qualification. - Abstract: Vocational Education and Training (VET) is an essential tool for providing waste management and recycling workers with the necessary skills and knowledge needed to beneficially influence their own employment and career development; and to also ensure productivity and safe working conditions within the organisations in which they are employed. Current training opportunities within Queensland for the sector are limited and not widely communicated or marketed; with other States, particularly Victoria and New South Wales, realising higher numbers of VET enrollments for waste management courses. This paper presents current VET opportunities and trends for the Queensland waste management sector. Results from a facilitated workshop to identify workforce requirements and future training needs organised by the Waste Contractors and Recyclers Association of Queensland (WCRAQ) are also presented and discussion follows on the future training needs of the industry within Queensland.

  7. Dr. John M. Shaw NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Petroleum Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    to the hydrocarbon production, transport and refining sectors. Redefining Heavy Oil Characterization: A DissidentDr. John M. Shaw NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Petroleum Thermodynamics Department of Chemical industrial research chair in petroleum thermodynamics. During his career he has developed expertise

  8. Using E-Commerce in the Forest Products Industry Chapter 1.2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using E-Commerce in the Forest Products Industry Chapter 1.2. Using E-Commerce in the Forest The forest products industry is rapidly adopting e-commerce solutions as it advances in the information age. In this chapter, the unique e-commerce needs of this sector's small businesses are discussed. Current experience

  9. Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: Interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrella, I; Holly, Sean

    . The correlation between the aggregated series and the sum of sectors is 99.8% and 99.35% respectively for the growth rate of output and hours. We interpret this to suggest that it is safe to proceed as if u is diagonal. 17 5 Technology shocks and hours Real...

  10. The Prospective Evolution of the Vietnamese Power Sector: The Vulnerability and Externality Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -growth-rate economy which requires high energy inputs. Therefore, the country is under pressure to develop a secure and affordable energy supply to support the socio-economic development. The power sector has been causing of energy security is often understood as developing and maintaining a reliable energy supply

  11. Electric Utility Industry Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the April 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers significant electric industry trends and industry priorities with federal customers.

  12. Uranium industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing.

  13. CASL Industry Council Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IndustryCouncil.shtml The new members that joined the Industry Council include NPP owneroperators with analysis capability: Tyrone Stevens of Exelon, and SMR vendors:...

  14. Live Webinar on Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar titled "Better Buildings Challenge: Public-Sector Update."

  15. Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. Commercial Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residential and commercial sector installations, for a total of 9 GW. Clearly, commercial DG with CHP

  16. Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

    "ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

  17. Varieties of innovation : the creation of wind and solar industries in China, Germany, and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahm, Jonas M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Where and how does innovation take place in contemporary high-technology sectors? Theories of innovation presume a division of labor between firms in industrialized economies that invent and commercialize new technologies ...

  18. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    03/06/content_7729607.htm ETSU, 1999. Industrial SectorSee discussion of this report in ETSU, AEA Technology, 2001.environment/ccl/pdf/etsu-analysis.pdf Feng, F. , 2007. “

  19. Crossing the Valley of Death: Policy Options to Advance the Uptake of Energy-Efficient Emerging Technologies in US Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J.; Bostrom, P.; Lung, R. B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    operating practices. In the United States the industrial sector is impacted by many policies-fiscal and monetary, economic development, energy pricing, climate legislation, tax code, and direct subsidies, among others-all of which help shape the strategy...

  20. Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

  1. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  2. Profile of the chemicals industry in California: Californiaindustries of the future program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) established the Industries of the Future (IOF) program to increase energy efficiency, reduce waste production and to improve competitiveness, currently focusing on nine sectors. The IOF is a partnership strategy involving industry, the research community and the government, working together to identify technology needs, promote industrial partnerships and implement joint measures with all partners involved. The State Industries of the Future (SIOF) program delivers the accomplishments of the national Industries of the Future strategy to the local level, to expand the technology opportunities to a larger number of partners and reach smaller businesses and manufacturers that were not initially involved in the IOF effort. The state programs bring together industry, academia, and state agencies to address the important issues confronting industry in the state. These public-private coalitions facilitate industry solutions locally and enhance economic development. California has started a State Industries of the Future effort, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy. The California Energy Commission (CEC) is leading the SIOF program in California, as part of many other programs to improve the energy efficiency and performance of industries in California. The California State IOF program aims to build a network of participants from industry, academia and government in four selected industrial sectors as a basis for the development of a strategic partnership for industrial energy efficient technology in the state. In California the IOF effort focuses petroleum refining, chemical processing, food processing and electronics. As part of this effort, the SIOF program will develop roadmaps for technology development for the selected sectors. On the basis of the roadmap, the program will develop successful projects with co-funding from state and federal government, and promote industry-specific energy-efficiency. An important element of the SIOF-program is the preparation of R&D roadmaps for each of the selected industries. The roadmap will help to identify priority needs for the participating industries to meet their energy challenges. The roadmap effort builds on the roadmaps developed by DOE, and on the conditions specific for the industry in California. Key to the successful preparation of a roadmap in the selected industries is the development of a profile of the industries. The profile provides a basis for the participants in the roadmap-effort, especially as the structure of the industries in California can be different than in the nation. The sector profiles describe the current economic and energy situation of these industries in California, the processes and energy uses, and the potential future developments in each industry. The profiles are an integral part of the roadmap, to help working group partners to evaluate the industry's R&D needs for their industry in California. In this report, we focus on the chemicals industry. The industry is an important economic factor in the state, providing over 82,300 jobs directly, and more in indirect employment. Value of shipments in 2001 was just under $25.7 Billion, or 6% of all manufacturing in California. There are over 1,500 chemical plants in California, of which 52% are pharmaceutical companies. Many companies operate chemical plants in California. The industry consumes 8% of the electricity and 5% of the natural gas in California. In this report, we start with a description of the chemical industry in the United States and California. This is followed by a discussion of the energy consumption and energy intensity of the Californian chemical industry. Chapter 3 focuses on the main sub-sectors. For each of the sub-sectors a general process description is provided in Chapter 4. Based on this analysis, in Chapter 5, we discuss potential technology developments that can contribute to further improving the energy efficiency in chemical plants, with a focus on the situation in California.

  3. Process Control Systems in the Chemical Industry: Safety vs. Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Hahn; Thomas Anderson

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, the primary focus of the chemical industry has been safety and productivity. However, recent threats to our nation’s critical infrastructure have prompted a tightening of security measures across many different industry sectors. Reducing vulnerabilities of control systems against physical and cyber attack is necessary to ensure the safety, security and effective functioning of these systems. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has developed a strategy to secure these vulnerabilities. Crucial to this strategy is the Control Systems Security and Test Center (CSSTC) established to test and analyze control systems equipment. In addition, the CSSTC promotes a proactive, collaborative approach to increase industry's awareness of standards, products and processes that can enhance the security of control systems. This paper outlines measures that can be taken to enhance the cybersecurity of process control systems in the chemical sector.

  4. ESCO market and industry trends: Updated results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Julie G.; Goldman, Charles A.; Hopper, Nicole C.

    2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's U.S. energy efficiency services industry is one of the most successful examples of private sector energy efficiency services in the world, yet little empirical information is available on the actual market activity of this industry. LBNL, together with the National Association of Energy Services Companies (NAESCO), has compiled the most comprehensive dataset of the energy efficiency services industry: nearly 1,500 case studies of energy efficiency projects. Our analysis of these projects helps shed light on some of the conventional wisdom regarding industry performance and evolution. We report key statistics about typical projects and industry trends that will aid state, federal, and international policymakers, and other investors interested in the development of a private sector energy efficiency services industry.

  5. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates and Rate Schedules **Effective October 1, 2014** FY 2014 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2013 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2012 Rates and Rate Schedules FY...

  6. State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector under the EPA's Clean Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 State and Regional Comprehensive Carbon Pricing and Greenhouse Gas Regulation in the Power Sector goal of comprehensive carbon pricing along with various other policies (LCFS) · Into this setting drops rate" and the role of renewable energy and energy efficiency in the rate targets and in compliance

  7. Industry Analysis February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    technology ­ Clean tech/ clean technology #12;7 Industry Studies · IbisWorld ­ U.S. and global industry-Industries · Biodiesel ­ Biofuel ­ Alternate fuels ­ Green fuels ­ Renewable fuels/energy ­ Green energy ­ Green Canada, Census, Industry Canada, the OECD, European Union, IMF, World Bank, UN . . . Never pay for stats

  8. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    : Occupational biomechanics, work physiology, industrial ergonomics, environmental hygiene, cognitive engineeringINDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING GRADUATE PROGRAMS The Master of Science in Industrial Engineering (M Systems and Engineering (M.S.M.S.E.), the Doctor of Philosophy in Industrial Engineering, and the Doctor

  9. Geothermal industry employment: Survey results & analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) is ofteh asked about the socioeconomic and employment impact of the industry. Since available literature dealing with employment involved in the geothermal sector appeared relatively outdated, unduly focused on certain activities of the industry (e.g. operation and maintenance of geothermal power plants) or poorly reliable, GEA, in consultation with the DOE, decided to conduct a new employment survey to provide better answers to these questions. The main objective of this survey is to assess and characterize the current workforce involved in geothermal activities in the US. Several initiatives have therefore been undertaken to reach as many organizations involved in geothermal activities as possible and assess their current workforce. The first section of this document describes the methodology used to contact the companies involved in the geothermal sector. The second section presents the survey results and analyzes them. This analysis includes two major parts. The first part analyzes the survey responses, presents employment numbers that were captured and describes the major characteristics of the industry that have been identified. The second part of the analysis estimates the number of workers involved in companies that are active in the geothermal business but did not respond to the survey or could not be reached. Preliminary conclusions and the study limits and restrictions are then presented. The third section addresses the potential employment impact related to manufacturing and construction of new geothermal power facilities. Indirect and induced economic impacts related with such investment are also investigated.

  10. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component for 2011 Firm Power Rates 2015 Rates and Rate Schedule - Current * 2010 Rates and Rate Schedule 2009 Rates and...

  11. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2015 Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2014 Rates BCP Annual Rate Process Central Arizona Project Transmission Rate Process...

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Aluminum Association The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum...

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications The Mining Industry Climate Action Plan (MICAP) (PDF 308 KB) Download Acrobat Reader MICAP focuses on carbon dioxide...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Technical Information Publications Case Studies Publications Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction Opportunities in the U.S. Cement Industry,...

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations American Forest & Paper Association (AF&PA) AF&PA's message is to provide significant value to member companies through outstanding performance in those areas...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Pathways As part of the mining vision process, industry develops technology roadmaps to identify critical pathways for the R&D needed to reach their goals. These...

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Agreements The U.S. semiconductor industry, represented by the members of the Environmental Protection Agency's PFC ReductionClimate Partnership for the Semiconductor...

  18. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Voluntary Aluminum Industry Partnership (VAIP), representing 98% of primary aluminum production in the United States, have committed under the Climate VISION program to a direct...

  19. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Chemistry Council (ACC), representing 85% of the chemical industry production in the U.S., has agreed American Chemistry Council Logo to an overall greenhouse gas...

  20. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    intends to eliminate emissions of SF6 by evaluating and adopting environmentally friendly alternative protective cover gases. The industry may also seek to improve its energy...

  1. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise Auto Aluminum...

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations International Magnesium Association Founded in 1943, the mission of the International Magnesium Association (IMA) is to promote the use of the metal magnesium...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Partnership The Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP) is an innovative pollution prevention program developed jointly by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    producers recognize that reducing greenhouse gas emissions and improving energy efficiency offers a competitive edge in world markets. In 1996, the U.S. industry entered into...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the...

  6. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the...

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry of the Future Tools & Publications ITP offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the...

  8. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publications The Industrial Technologies Program offers a wide array of publications, videos, software, and other information products for improving energy efficiency in the...

  9. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Washington in February of 2002. The paper briefly describes the issues surrounding climate change and the Magnesium Industry, and gives an overview of the SF6 Emission...

  10. Industrial Energy Audit Guidebook: Guidelines for Conducting an Energy Audit in Industrial Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Price, Lynn

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Various studies in different countries have shown that significant energy-efficiency improvement opportunities exist in the industrial sector, many of which are cost-effective. These energy-efficiency options include both cross-cutting as well as sector-specific measures. However, industrial plants are not always aware of energy-efficiency improvement potentials. Conducting an energy audit is one of the first steps in identifying these potentials. Even so, many plants do not have the capacity to conduct an effective energy audit. In some countries, government policies and programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency. However, usually only limited technical and financial resources for improving energy efficiency are available, especially for small and medium-sized enterprises. Information on energy auditing and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to industrial plants. This guidebook provides guidelines for energy auditors regarding the key elements for preparing for an energy audit, conducting an inventory and measuring energy use, analyzing energy bills, benchmarking, analyzing energy use patterns, identifying energy-efficiency opportunities, conducting cost-benefit analysis, preparing energy audit reports, and undertaking post-audit activities. The purpose of this guidebook is to assist energy auditors and engineers in the plant to conduct a well-structured and effective energy audit.

  11. Conceptualising Inventory Prepositioning in the Humanitarian Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Conceptualising Inventory Prepositioning in the Humanitarian Sector Delia Richardson, Sander de chain to reduce delivery time of relief inventory improves responsiveness. This is the essence of inventory pre-positioning (IPP). IPP is yet to be clearly defined; and the main factors affecting IPP

  12. WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WATER AND ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE WARMING IN THE SIERRA NEVADA: Water Year explores the sensitivity of water indexing methods to climate change scenarios to better understand how water management decisions and allocations will be affected by climate change. Many water management

  13. NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE Name Affiliation Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATURAL GAS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 2011-2013 Name Affiliation Sector Dernovsek, David Bonneville Power Defenbach, Byron Intermountain Gas Distribution Dragoon, Ken NWPCC Council Friedman, Randy NW Natural Gas Distribution Gopal, Jairam Southern CA Edison Electric Utility Hamilton, Linda Shell Trading Gas & Power

  14. End User Functional and Performance Requirements for HTGR Energy Supply to Industrial Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document specifies end user functional and performance requirements to be used in the development of the design of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) based plant supplying energy to industrial processes. These requirements were developed from collaboration with industry and HTGR suppliers and from detailed evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology in industrial processes. The functional and performance requirements specified herein are an effective representation of the industrial sector energy needs and an effective basis for developing a plant design that will serve the broadest range of industrial applications.

  15. Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Energy Services Company (ESCO) industry is often cited as the most successful model for the private sector delivery of energy-efficiency services. This study documents actual performance of the ESCO industry in order to provide policymakers and investors with objective informative and customers with a resource for benchmarking proposed projects relative to industry performance. We have assembled a database of nearly 1500 case studies of energy-efficiency projects - the most comprehensive data set of the U.S. ESCO industry available. These projects include $2.55B of work completed by 51 ESCOs and span much of the history of this industry.

  16. Industry Leaders Saving Energy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:DepartmentDepartmentEnergy AprilWith theIndustrial Sector

  17. Energy Productivity Via Time-of-Day Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael, R. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompted by a combination of PURPA and a national concern about electricity price and supply, many utilities now have in place industrial time-of-day electric rates. When properly designed, these rates present an opportunity for energy...

  18. The US steel industry: An energy perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azimi, S. A.; Lowitt, H. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates the state of the US steel industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. The specific objectives were: to update and verify energy and materials consumption data at the various process levels in 1983; to determine the potential energy savings attainable with current (1983), state-of-the-art, and future production practices and technologies (2000); and to identify new areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. The results of this study concluded that in year 2000, there is a potential to save between 40% and 46% of the energy used in current production practices, dependent on the projected technology mix. R and D needs and opportunities were identified for the industry. Potential R and D candidates for DOE involvement with the private sector were assessed and selected from the identified list.

  19. The US textile industry: An energy perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badin, J. S.; Lowitt, H. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates the state of the US textile industry in terms of energy consumption and conservation. Specific objectives were: To update and verify energy and materials consumption data at the various process levels in 1984; to determine the potential energy savings attainable with current (1984), state-of-the-art, and future production practices and technologies (2010); and to identify new areas of research and development opportunity that will enable these potential future savings to be achieved. Results of this study concluded that in the year 2010, there is a potential to save between 34% and 53% of the energy used in current production practices, dependent on the projected technology mix. RandD needs and opportunities were identified for the industry in three categories: process modification, basic research, and improved housekeeping practices that reduce energy consumption. Potential RandD candidates for DOE involvement with the private sector were assessed and selected from the identified list.

  20. Modeling diffusion of electrical appliances in the residential sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

    2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a methodology for modeling residential appliance uptake as a function of root macroeconomic drivers. The analysis concentrates on four major energy end uses in the residential sector: refrigerators, washing machines, televisions and air conditioners. The model employs linear regression analysis to parameterize appliance ownership in terms of household income, urbanization and electrification rates according to a standard binary choice (logistic) function. The underlying household appliance ownership data are gathered from a variety of sources including energy consumption and more general standard of living surveys. These data span a wide range of countries, including many developing countries for which appliance ownership is currently low, but likely to grow significantly over the next decades as a result of economic development. The result is a 'global' parameterization of appliance ownership rates as a function of widely available macroeconomic variables for the four appliances studied, which provides a reliable basis for interpolation where data are not available, and forecasting of ownership rates on a global scale. The main value of this method is to form the foundation of bottom-up energy demand forecasts, project energy-related greenhouse gas emissions, and allow for the construction of detailed emissions mitigation scenarios.

  1. The Industrial Electrification Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry, I. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI's role as the research organization of the electric power industry, in coordination with potential user industries, is to 1) define the viability of candidate electrification technologies by monitoring the state-of-the-art and continuously...

  2. Electrotechnologies in Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarnath, K. R.

    The Industrial Program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) promotes the efficient use of electricity to improve the competitive position of the American industry. Electrotechnologies that improve productivity, improve quality...

  3. and Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    technologicalandlogisticssystemsbygathering, structuring, and managing information. Indus- trial engineers apply their knowledge not only45 Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 220 Engineering Lab Degrees: Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering Contact: James R. Rinderle

  4. Demographics and industry returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollet, Joshua A.; DellaVigna, Stefano

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry category Child care Children’s books Children’s clothing Toysindustry Child care Children’s books Children’s clothing ToysIndustries are associated with high demand by children (child care, toys) and

  5. INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    INDUSTRIAL ENGINEER APPRENTICE OPPORTUNITY SUMMER 2013 Industrial Engineering COOP Student needed-Fri, for summer 2013. Student must be enrolled in BS Engineering program. (Preferably completed 2-3 yrs

  6. Industry Analysis October 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Different regulations for some industries in Canada, the U.S. and Europe ie. telecommunications, energy of energy, materials, industrial waste, byproducts #12;Contact Constance Adamson Stauffer Library adamsonc

  7. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Rates Loveland Area Projects Firm Power Rates Open Access Transmission Tariff Rates Chart of Loveland Area Projects Historical Transmission Rates...

  8. Laser experiments explore the hidden sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ahlers; H. Gies; J. Jaeckel; J. Redondo; A. Ringwald

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, the laser experiments BMV and GammeV, searching for light shining through walls, have published data and calculated new limits on the allowed masses and couplings for axion-like particles. In this note we point out that these experiments can serve to constrain a much wider variety of hidden-sector particles such as, e.g., minicharged particles and hidden-sector photons. The new experiments improve the existing bounds from the older BFRT experiment by a factor of two. Moreover, we use the new PVLAS constraints on a possible rotation and ellipticity of light after it has passed through a strong magnetic field to constrain pure minicharged particle models. For masses <~0.05 eV, the charge is now restricted to be less than (3-4)x10^(-7) times the electron electric charge. This is the best laboratory bound and comparable to bounds inferred from the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background.

  9. The Lepton Sector of a Fourth Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Burdman; Leandro Da Rold; Ricardo D. Matheus

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  10. Constraining Dark Sectors with Monojets and Dijets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chala, Mikael; McCullough, Matthew; Nardini, Germano; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider dark sector particles (DSPs) that obtain sizeable interactions with Standard Model fermions from a new mediator. While these particles can avoid observation in direct detection experiments, they are strongly constrained by LHC measurements. We demonstrate that there is an important complementarity between searches for DSP production and searches for the mediator itself, in particular bounds on (broad) dijet resonances. This observation is crucial not only in the case where the DSP is all of the dark matter but whenever - precisely due to its sizeable interactions with the visible sector - the DSP annihilates away so efficiently that it only forms a dark matter subcomponent. To highlight the different roles of DSP direct detection and LHC monojet and dijet searches, as well as perturbativity constraints, we first analyse the exemplary case of an axial-vector mediator and then generalise our results. We find important implications for the interpretation of LHC dark matter searches in terms of simpli...

  11. Advanced metering techniques in the federal sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.; Halverson, M.A.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lack of utility metering in the federal sector has hampered introduction of direct billing of individual activities at most military installations. Direct billing will produce accountability for the amount of energy used and is a positive step toward self-directed energy conservation. For many installations, automatic meter reading (AMR) is a cost-effective way to increase the number of meters while reducing labor requirements and providing energy conservation analysis capabilities. The communications technology used by some of the AMR systems provides other demand-side management (DSM) capabilities. This paper summarizes the characteristics and relative merits of several AMR/DSM technologies that may be appropriate for the federal sector. A case study of an AMR system being installed at Fort Irwin, California, describes a cost-effective two-way radio communication system used for meter reading and load control.

  12. Geothermal Industry Partnership Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to information about partnership opportunities and programs for the geothermal industry.

  13. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  14. The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliff, G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changing US Electric Sector Business Model CATEE 2013 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference San Antonio, Texas December 17, 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... Electricity Business Model • Observations on the Future and Conclusions Presentation overview 2 ESL-KT-13-12-57 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Copyright © 2013 Deloitte Development LLC. All rights...

  15. Viable textures for the fermion sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Cárcamo Hernández; I. de Medeiros Varzielas

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a modification of the Fukuyama-Nishiura texture and compare it to the precision quark flavour data, finding that it fits the data very well but at the cost of accidental cancelations between parameters. We then propose different viable textures for quarks, where only the Cabibbo mixing arises from the down sector, and extend to the charged leptons while constructing a complementary neutrino structure that leads to viable lepton masses and mixing.

  16. Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Agriculture, Forestry Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource...

  17. DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communication...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Federal Communications Commission's Communications, Security, Reliability, and Interoperability Council DOE Encourages Utility Sector Nominations to the Federal Communications...

  18. Mechanical & Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Mario A. Rotea Professor and Department Head #12;2Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Outline · Undergraduate Degree Programs · Graduate Degree Programs · The Faculty · The Research · Summary #12;3Mechanical & Industrial Engineering Undergraduate Programs ­ BSME & BSIE 0 20 40 60

  19. Data:D3fbcbb2-180d-46e9-9854-832ef16c22d5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    known: Rate name: Economic Development II Service Sector: Commercial Description: This tariff is a successor rate for all private sector commercial and industrial customers...

  20. WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

  1. The Rise and Decline of U.S. Private Sector Investments in Energy R&D since the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents two distinct datasets that describe investments in energy research and development (R&D) by the US private sector since the mid1970s, which is when the US government began to systematically collect these data. The first dataset is based upon a broad survey of more than 20,000 firms’ industrial R&D activities. This broad survey of US industry is coordinated by the US National Science Foundation. The second dataset discussed here is a much narrower accounting of the energy R&D activities of the approximately two dozen largest US oil and gas companies conducted by the US Department of Energy’s Energy Information Agency. Even given the large disparity in the breadth and scope of these two surveys of the private sector’s support for energy R&D, both datasets tell the same story in terms of the broad outlines of the private sector’s investments in energy R&D since the mid 1970s. The broad outlines of the US private sector’s support for energy R&D since the mid 1970s is: (1) In the immediate aftermath of the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973, there is a large surge in US private sector investments in energy R&D that peaked in the period between 1980 and 1982 at approximately $3.7 billion to $6.7 billion per year (in inflation adjusted 2010 US dollars) depending upon which survey is used (2) Private sector investments in energy R&D declined from this peak until bottoming out at approximately $1.8 billion to $1 billion per year in 1999; (3) US private sector support for energy R&D has recovered somewhat over the past decade and stands at $2.2 billion to $3.4 billion. Both data sets indicate that the US private sector’s support for energy R&D has been and remains dominated by fossil energy R&D and in particular R&D related to the needs of the oil and gas industry.

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Electric Power -...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    paths that government and industry can take to expand use of hydrogen-based energy. Fuel Cell Report to Congress (PDF 1.1 MB) The recommended program adjustments and...

  3. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results No measured results exist at this time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry...

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors: GHG...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2005, the industry's PFC emissions were equivalent to 4.3 million metric tons of CO2 (Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2005, U.S. EPA, 2007). Since...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    target for the U.S. (7%) and the EU (8%). During the same period, chemical industry production rose 41%. As a result, GHG emissions intensity improved 38%. Indirect greenhouse gas...

  6. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information Energy Footprints DOE developed a series of Energy Footprints to map the flow of energy supply and demand in U.S. manufacturing industries. Identifying the sources...

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Footprints DOE developed a series of Energy Footprints to map the flow of energy supply and demand in U.S. manufacturing industries. Identifying the sources and end uses of...

  8. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry commitments. As the program develops and the...

  9. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    time in terms of greenhouse gas intensity reductions, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program and evolving industry commitments. As the program develops and the...

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium: Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Results At this time, given the recent start-up of the Climate VISION program, and the evolving industry commitments, there are no measured results. As the program develops and the...

  11. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technology Pathways U.S. chemical producers recognize that energy efficiency offers a competitive edge in world markets. In 1996 the U.S. industry entered into partnership with ITP...

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Forest Products:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million in...

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million in...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million in...

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Chemical Manufacturing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million in...

  16. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million in...

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Automobile Manufacturers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant Assessments Plant-Wide Assessments Plant-wide assessments are one way to work with the DOE Industrial Technologies Programmost companies realize a minimum of 1 million in...

  18. DSM Electricity Savings Potential in the Buildings Sector in APP Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, MIchael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management (DSM) in the Electricity Sector: Urgent Need for¼rcan, 2007, Electricity and natural gas sectors in Korea: aand commercial sub-sectors, electricity use is distributed

  19. Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies in the Electricity Sector. Discussion Paper 99-51,emissions from the electricity sector. Several states have2020 emissions from the electricity sector by 18%. Extending

  20. Country Review of Energy-Efficiency Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can, Stephane de la Rue du

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial Incentives in the Residential Sector Stephane deFinancial Incentives in the Residential Sector Stephane desavings achieved in the residential sector. In contrast,

  1. Demonstrating and Deploying Private Sector Technologies at DOE Sites - Issues to be Overcome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedick, R. C.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) continues to pursue cost-effective, environmental cleanup of the weapons complex sites with a concomitant emphasis on deployment of innovative technologies as a means to this end. The EM Office of Science and Technology (OST) pursues a strategy that entails identification of technologies that have potential applications throughout the DOE complex: at multiple DOE sites and at multiple facilities on those sites. It further encourages a competitive procurement process for the various applications entailed in the remediation of a given facility. These strategies require a competitive private-sector supplier base to help meet EM needs. OST supports technology development and deployment through investments in partnerships with private industry to enhance the acceptance of their technology products within the DOE market. Since 1992, OST and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have supported the re search and development of technology products and services offered by the private sector. During this time, NETL has managed over 140 research and development projects involving industrial and university partners. These projects involve research in a broad range of EM related topics, including deactivation and decommissioning, characterization, monitoring, sensors, waste separation, groundwater remediation, robotics, and mixed waste treatment. Successful partnerships between DOE and Industry have resulted in viable options for EM's cleanup needs, and require continued marketing efforts to ensure that these technology solutions are used at multiple DOE sites and facilities.

  2. Industrial Dojo Program Fosters Industrial Internet Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window) Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) GE Launches Cloud Foundry 'Industrial Dojo,' Contributes to Open Source to Foster Continued...

  3. LANSCE | Lujan Center | Industrial Users

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Users The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center offers a diverse set of capabilities and instruments for industrial projects. Industrial users are invited to contact Fredrik...

  4. Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 FLARE GAS FLOW RATE MEASUREMENT "Accurate measurement of the very low flow rates which are normally present is very difficult" 0, p 15-8). "It is generally considered too...-04-91 Proceedings from the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 to calibration conditions. Turndown is 40:1 and pressure loss is negligible. APPLICATION FLOW RATE The mass flow meter described has been applied to a wide...

  5. State Demand-Side Management Programs Funds are Exploding! How Industries Can Best Use These Programs to Maximize Their Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicol, J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Find out from an Industrial Program Manager that runs a successful state DSM/Energy Efficiency program for the industrial sector how to best find, use and benefit from these types of programs. The amount of money that states are investing in DSM...

  6. Stimulating Manufacturing Excellence in Small and Medium Enterprises, SMESME 2005 Stimulating Industrial Excellence in European Textile SME's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    Industrial Excellence in European Textile SME's Nicholas Bilalis 1 , Emmanuel Alvizos 1 , Emmanuel There are more than 100.000 European SME's, in the whole chain of operation from spinning to clothing. Keywords: Industrial Excellence, Textile Sector, IEA, SME 1. Introduction The findings presented

  7. 202-328-5000 www.rff.orgSector Effects of the Shale Gas Revolution in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper reviews the impact of the shale gas revolution on the sectors of electricity generation, transportation, and manufacturing in the United States. Natural gas is being substituted for other fuels, particularly coal, in electricity generation, resulting in lower greenhouse gas emissions from this sector. The use of natural gas in the transportation sector is currently negligible but is projected to increase with investments in refueling infrastructure and natural gas vehicle technologies. Petrochemical and other manufacturing industries have responded to lower natural gas prices by investing in domestically located manufacturing projects. This paper also speculates on the impact of a possible shale gas boom in China. Key Words: shale gas, electricity, transportation, and manufacturing JEL Classification Numbers: L71, L9, Q4 © 2013 Resources for the Future. All rights reserved. No portion of this paper may be reproduced without permission of the authors. Discussion papers are research materials circulated by their authors for purposes of information and discussion.

  8. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  9. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  10. INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take of industries including consulting, technology development, software, supply chain manufacturing, engineering

  11. Haiti: energy efficiency in the sugar and manufacturing industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streicher, A.

    1985-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of energy use in Haiti, aimed at identifying possible projects to complement current A.I.D. support for institution building and energy planning within the Ministry of Mines and Energy Resources (MMRE), is presented. Key findings are that: (1) the sugar and manufacturing industries rely heavily on biomass fuels - wood, charcoal, and bagasse (sugar cane residue); and (2) demand for commercial energy and for electricity is growing rapidly despite supply constraints. The report calls for A.I.D. to: initiate a program to reduce biomass consumption (which is causing severe soil erosion and deforestation), especially in the small distilleries called guildives; collaborate with MMRE and the World Bank to develop a detailed workplan to promote energy efficiency in the guildives, focusing on technology development; help MMRE and the private sector to project Haiti's industrial energy and electricity needs through the year 2000; and sponsor a program of energy audits and efficiency improvements in the manufacturing sector.

  12. Wind Energy Workforce Development: A Roadmap to a Sustainable Wind Industry (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Kelly, M.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States moves toward a vision of greatly expanded wind energy use as outlined in the U.S. Department of Energy's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, the need for skilled workers at all levels in the industry is repeatedly identified as a critical issue. This presentation is an overview of the educational infrastructure and expected industry needs to support the continued development of a vibrant U.S. wind industry through a discussion of the activities identified that must be put in place to train workers. The paper will also provide a framework to address issues raised from each of the education and industry sectors, identifying a roadmap for developing an educational infrastructure to support wind technology. The presentation will also provide an understanding of the available resources, materials, and programs available across the industry. This presentation provides an overview of the educational infrastructure and expected industry needs to support the continued development of a vibrant U.S. wind industry as part of a collaborative effort to develop a wind workforce roadmap. This presentation will provide 1) A review of needed programs to train workers for the wind industry; 2) An overview of the importance education will play if the nation is to expand wind energy (both in development and deployment terms) and a review of ongoing activities with a focus on federal efforts; 3) A review of the materials and resources available across the industry and a framework to address issues raised from each of the education and industry sectors.

  13. Industry Research and Recommendations for New Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, B.; Leach, M.; Gregory, N.; Pless, S.; Selkowitz, S.; Matthew, P.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers evaluated industry needs and developed logic models to support possible future commercial new construction research and deployment efforts that could be led or supported by DOE's Commercial Building Integration program or other national initiatives. The authors believe that these recommendations support a proposed course of action from the current state of commercial building energy efficiency to a possible long-term goal of achieving significant market penetration of cost-effective NZE buildings in all building sectors and climates by 2030.

  14. Industrial Technologies Funding Profile by Subprogram | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovemberInvestigationsCommitteeBlog Archive Indian EnergyIndustrial Sector

  15. High Penetration of Renewable Energy in the Transportation Sector: Scenarios, Barriers, and Enablers; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Brown, A.; Heath, G.; Mai, T.; Ruth, M.; Melaina, M.; Simpkins, T.; Steward, D.; Warner, E.; Bertram, K.; Plotkin, S.; Patel, D.; Stephens, T.; Vyas, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation accounts for 71% of U.S. petroleum use and 33% of its greenhouse gases emissions. Pathways toward reduced greenhouse gas emissions and petroleum dependence in the transportation sector have been analyzed in considerable detail, but with some limitations. To add to this knowledge, the U.S. Department of Energy has launched a study focused on underexplored greenhouse-gas-abatement and oil-savings opportunities related to transportation. This Transportation Energy Futures study analyzes specific issues and associated key questions to strengthen the existing knowledge base and help cultivate partnerships among federal agencies, state and local governments, and industry.

  16. Biofuels in the U.S. Transportation Sector (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustained high world oil prices and the passage of the Energy Policy Act 2005 (EPACT) have encouraged the use of agriculture-based ethanol and biodiesel in the transportation sector; however, both the continued growth of the biofuels industry and the long-term market potential for biofuels depend on the resolution of critical issues that influence the supply of and demand for biofuels. For each of the major biofuelscorn-based ethanol, cellulosic ethanol, and biodieselresolution of technical, economic, and regulatory issues remains critical to further development of biofuels in the United States.

  17. Energy use in the U.S. steel industry: a historical perspective and future opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubbles, John

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. steel industry has taken enormous strides over the past decades to reduce its energy consumption; since the end of World War II, the industry has reduced its energy intensity (energy use per shipped ton) by 60 percent. Between 1990 and 1998 alone, intensity has dropped from 20 to 18 million Btu (MBtu) per ton. This figure is projected to decrease to 15 MBtu/ton by 2010 with an asymptotic trend towards 14 MBtu/ton. Domestic shipments are projected to flatten out over the next decade to around 105 million tons which means that total energy consumption will also decrease. Historically, the steel industry has accounted for about 6 percent of U.S. energy consumption. Today, that figure is less than 2 percent and will decrease further to 1.5 percent by 2010. The primary causes for the decrease in energy consumption since WWII are: The use of pellets in the blast furnace and the application of new technology in the ironmaking process to further reduce fuel rates per net ton of hot metal (NTHM); The total replacement of the open hearth process by basic oxygen and electric furnaces; The almost total replacement of ingot casting by continuous casting (which improved yield dramatically and thus reduced the tons of raw steel required per ton of shipments); and The growth of the electric furnace sector of the industry at the expense of hot metal-based processes (which has also stimulated scrap recycling so that about 55 percent of ''new'' steel is now melted from scrap steel). This report focuses on the concept of good practices (i.e., those that are sustainable and can use today's technology). If all the industry could operate on this basis, the additional savings per ton could total 2 MBtu, As further restructuring occurs and the swing from hot metal-based to electric furnace-based production continues, the average consumption will approach the good practice energy per ton. Further savings will accrue through new technology, particularly in the areas of reduced blast furnace fuel rates and reheating efficiency, both of which relate to large tonnages of material.

  18. Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, R.; Singh, N.R.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Delgass, W.N. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Chemical Engineering and Energy Center at Discovery Park

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid hydrogen-carbon (H{sub 2}CAR) process for the production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels is proposed wherein biomass is the carbon source and hydrogen is supplied from carbon-free energy. To implement this concept, a process has been designed to co-feed a biomass gasifier with H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} recycled from the H{sub 2}-CO to liquid conversion reactor. Modeling of this biomass to liquids process has identified several major advantages of the H{sub 2}CAR process. The land area needed to grow the biomass is <40% of that needed by other routes that solely use biomass to support the entire transportation sector. Whereras the literature estimates known processes to be able to produce {approx}30% of the United States transportation fuel from the annual biomass of 1.366 billion tons, the H{sub 2}CAR process shows the potential to supply the entire United States transportation sector from that quantity of biomass. The synthesized liquid provides H{sub 2} storage in an open loop system. Reduction to practice of the H{sub 2}CAR route has the potential to provide the transportation sector for the foreseeable future, using the existing infrastructure. The rationale of using H{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}CAR process is explained by the significantly higher annualized average solar energy conversion efficiency for hydrogen generation versus that for biomass growth. For coal to liquids, the advantage of H{sub 2}CAR is that there is no additional CO{sub 2} release to the atmosphere due to the replacement of petroleum with coal, thus eliminating the need to sequester CO{sub 2}.

  19. Assessment of industrial attitudes toward generic research needs in tribology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sibley, L.B.; Zlotnick, M.; Levinson, T.M.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on extended discussions during visits with 27 companies representing 13 different parts of the tribology industry (such as bearings, lubricants, coatings, powerplants), it is apparent that only a tiny fraction of the large sums publicly reported as R and D expenditures by industry are used to fund generic tribology research. For example, of the greater than $2 B expenditures reported for R and D in the lubricants sector for 1982, the estimated total for generic tribology research was $12 M. This was the largest expenditure in any sector of the tribology industry and one-third of the total of $36 M. In the automotive industry out of a reported expenditure of $4 B, the estimated generic tribology research was $3 M. In some segments of the tribology industry, for example coatings and filters, there were no expenditures on generic research. There was little tendency to improve the state of the art of the tribology industry through long-term investment in generic R and D in ways that would foster innovation and productivity of energy conservation technology. Expenditures were oriented to development of specific commercial and military products, or to basic research focused on unspecified far term results, although useful spin-off of military developments into commercial fields sometimes occurs. There was a broad consensus in the companies visited that existing research results were not always made easily accessible to potential users in industry. The implication was that industry might benefit more if a larger fraction of the funds were devoted to putting the research results into a form design and development engineers could more readily apply. The need for a more effective presentation of research results was expressed with greater urgency at the smaller companies, but there seemed to be a broad consensus on the need for improvement. Recommendations are given.

  20. Introduction to the Buildings Sector Module of SEDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicholas; Bonnet, Florence; Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDS is a stochastic engineering-economics model that forecasts economy-wide energy consumption in the U.S. to 2050. It is the product of multi-laboratory collaboration among the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and Lumina Decision Systems. Among national energy models, SEDS is unique, as it is the only model written to explicitly incorporate uncertainty in its inputs and outputs. The primary purpose of SEDS is to estimate the impact of various US Department of Energy (DOE)R&D and policy programs on the performance and subsequent adoption rates of technologies relating to every energy consuming sector of the economy (shown below). It has previously been used to assist DOE in complying with the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA). The focus of LBNL research has been exclusively on develop the buildings model (SBEAM), which is capable of running as a stand-alone forecasting model, or as a part of SEDS as a whole. The full version of SEDS, containing all sectors and interaction is also called the 'integrated' version and is managed by NREL. Forecasts from SEDS are often compared to those coming from National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The intention of this document is to present new users and developers with a general description of the purpose, functionality and structure of the buildings module within the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS). The Buildings module, which is capable of running as a standalone model, is also called the Stochastic Buildings Energy and Adoption Model (SBEAM). This document will focus exclusively on SBEAM and its interaction with other major sector modules present within SEDS. The methodologies and major assumptions employed in SBEAM will also be discussed. The organization of this report will parallel the organization of the model itself, being divided into major submodules. As the description progresses, the nature of modules will change from broad, easily understood concepts to lower-level data manipulation. Because SBEAM contains dozens of submodules and hundreds of variables, it would not be relevant or useful to describe each and every one. Rather, the investigation will focus more generally on the operations performed throughout the model. This manual is by no means a complete description of SBEAM; however it should provide the foundation for an introductory understanding of the model. The manual assumes a basic level of understating of Analytica{reg_sign}, the platform on which SEDS and SBEAM have been developed.

  1. Decoupled Sectors and Wolf-Rayet Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willy Fischler; Jimmy Lorshbough; Dustin Lorshbough

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The universe may contain several decoupled matter sectors which primarily couple through gravity to the Standard Model degrees of freedom. We focus here on the description of astrophysical environments that allow for comparable densities and spatial distributions of visible matter and decoupled dark matter. We discuss four Wolf-Rayet galaxies (NGC 1614, NGC 3367, NGC 4216 and NGC 5430) which should contain comparable amounts of decoupled dark and visible matter in the star forming regions. This could lead to the observation of Gamma Ray Burst events with physics modified by jets of dark matter radiation.

  2. Restructuring our Transportation Sector | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof EnhancedRestructuring our Transportation Sector

  3. Property:ProgramSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind projectProperty

  4. Property:DeploymentSector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jump to:DeploymentSector Jump to: navigation,

  5. Property:Sector | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/Organization RAPID/Contact/ID8/PositionmaterialSector Jump to:

  6. Prospects for the power sector in nine developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, S.; Goldman, N.; Martin, N.; Friedmann, R.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on information drawn primarily from official planning documents issued by national governments and/or utilities, the authors examined the outlook for the power sector in the year 2000 in nine countries: China, India, Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan, Argentina and Mexico. They found that the implicit rates of average annual growth of installed electric power capacity between 1991 and 2001 range from a low of 3.3% per year in Argentina to a high of 13.2% per year in Indonesia. In absolute terms, China and India account for the vast majority of the growth. The plans call for a shift in the generating mix towards coal in six of the countries, and continued strong reliance on coal in China and India. The use of natural gas is expected to increase substantially in a number of the countries. The historic movement away from oil continues, although some countries are maintaining dual-fuel capabilities. Plans call for considerable growth of nuclear power in South Korea and China and modest increases in India and Taiwan. The feasibility of the official plans varies among the countries. Lack of public capital is leading towards greater reliance on private sector participation in power projects in many of the countries. Environmental issues are becoming a more significant constraint than in the past, particularly in the case of large-scale hydropower projects. The financial and environmental constraints are leading to a rising interest in methods of improving the efficiency of electricity supply and end use. The scale of such activities is growing in most of the study countries.

  7. Industrial Rates and Demand-Side Management Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasprowicz, L. M.; House, R.

    ), Southwestern Public Service, Southwestern Electric Power, City of Austin, West Texas Utilities, EI Paso Electric, and Texas-New Mexico Power. Wholesale sales by major utilities included in "Others" category. Texas service areas only. Percentages based...,928,250 31.8% Texas Total 49,521 13,804 25.8% 93,847,494 36.9% wI Self-Gen 49,521 17,619 30.7% 119,841042 42.8% Note: Utilities are: TV Electric, Houston Lighting & Power, GulfStates Utilities, Central Power and Light, City Public Service (San Antonio...

  8. Property:IndustrialAvgRate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid JumpEligSysSize JumpTechDsc Jump to:Ind cons

  9. Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and U.S. Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; DeSteese, John G.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last 20 years, utilities and researchers have begun to understand the value in the collection and analysis of interruption cost data. The continued investigation of the monetary impact of power outages will facilitate the advancement of the analytical methods used to measure the costs and benefits from the perspective of the energy consumer. More in-depth analysis may be warranted because of the privatization and deregulation of power utilities, price instability in certain regions of the U.S. and the continued evolution of alternative auxiliary power systems.

  10. Electric Power Interruption Cost Estimates for Individual Industries, Sectors, and the U.S. Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balducci, P. J.; Roop, J. M.; Schienbein, L. A.; DeSteese, J. G.; Weimar, M. R.

    Distributed energy resources (DER) have been promoted as the least-cost approach to meeting steadily increasing energy demand. However, it is unclear whether DER deployment can maintain or improve the electric power supply reliability and quality...

  11. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future perspectives Petroleum production in India has grown3. 5- Refinery Production of petroleum products in India has3.6.1 Overview Production of petroleum products in India has

  12. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a second facility at the Jamnagar site, which is expected to2008. When finished, Jamnagar will be the largest refining

  13. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Senior Vice President, Haldia Petrochemical Limited.Mr.Kaushik Saha, Haldia Petrochemical Limited.Mr.Kaustav Basak, Haldia Petrochemical Limited. Mr.Partha

  14. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption, total electricity demand of each building type is calibrated to governmentElectricity Consumption in Hospitals Hospital No. of Beds Estimated (kWh/Bed/year) Government

  15. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of crude oil in the future. 3.6.3 Energy Consumption Thecrude oil throughput (Sathaye et al, 2005). Energy consumptioncrude oil throughput 15 (Sathaye et al, 2005). We estimated this consumption

  16. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels, including agricultural wastes, sewage, domesticfuels, including agricultural wastes, sewage, domesticin developing the use of agricultural waste to reduce wood

  17. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy (PJ) Total Final Energy (PJ) Coal Electricity CementInvestment Energy Recovered Fuel (Coal) Saved / AnnumEnergy Use (PJ) Final Energy Use (PJ) Coal Electricity Fuel

  18. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of medium / poor coking coals (i.e. Partial Briquetting andNevertheless, the Indian non-coking coals, suitable for SSI,blast furnaces require coking coal that is mostly imported.

  19. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell 2006. Detailed Energy Audit Report for Udyog Bhawan,Cell 2006. Detailed Energy Audit Report for NationalCell 2006. Detailed Energy Audit Report for Vigyan Bhawan,

  20. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    71 Figure 25. Refinery Throughput, Exports and77 Figure 27. Indian Refinery78 Figure 28. Conservation Supply Curve for Refinery

  1. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India Country Report 2005-06. Deutsch Bank Report 2006.India, 2007, “Energy Statistics, 2005-06”, New Delhi, web:generated by steel plants in 2005-06 are currently used to

  2. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management Cell Electrical Power Survey Energy Use IntensityAs per the 17th Electrical Power Survey (EPS) of the Central

  3. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uses heat and yields black liquor that can potentially be2007). However, the black liquor recovery in agro-residueHigh concentration of black liquor Continuous digester

  4. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on waste paper, 32% on bagasse and agriculture residues, andon waste paper, 32% on bagasse and agriculture residues, andbroad leaves Agri-residues Bagasse, rice and wheat Domestic

  5. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for compressing air and syngas. In energy efficient plants,heat Air compressor turbine Syngas compressor turbine Flue-

  6. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lower than the grid. Diesel generation unit have very lowthan from the grid. Diesel generation unit have very lowis added to diesel electricity generation. All commercial

  7. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    43 Energy efficiency and CO2 emission reduction measures and58 CO2 emission reduction measures and associated68 CO2 emission reduction measures and associated

  8. Presentations for Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn energy-saving strategies from leading manufacturing companies and energy experts. The presentations are organized below by topic area. In addition, industrial energy managers, utilities, and...

  9. About Industrial Distributed Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Manufacturing Office's (AMO's) Industrial Distributed Energy activities build on the success of predecessor DOE programs on distributed energy and combined heat and power (CHP) while...

  10. Industrial Demand Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Boiler, Steam, and Cogeneration (BSC) Component. The BSC Component satisfies the steam demand from the PA and BLD Components. In some industries, the PA Component produces...

  11. Lepton sector of a fourth generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdman, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Da Rold, L. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Bariloche (Argentina); Matheus, R. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In extensions of the standard model with a heavy fourth generation, one important question is what makes the fourth-generation lepton sector, particularly the neutrinos, so different from the lighter three generations. We study this question in the context of models of electroweak symmetry breaking in warped extra dimensions, where the flavor hierarchy is generated by choosing the localization of the zero-mode fermions in the extra dimension. In this setup the Higgs sector is localized near the infrared brane, whereas the Majorana mass term is localized at the ultraviolet brane. As a result, light neutrinos are almost entirely Majorana particles, whereas the fourth-generation neutrino is mostly a Dirac fermion. We show that it is possible to obtain heavy fourth-generation leptons in regions of parameter space where the light neutrino masses and mixings are compatible with observation. We study the impact of these bounds, as well as the ones from lepton flavor violation, on the phenomenology of these models.

  12. Mechanical and Industrial Engineering UMassAmherst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Mechanical and Industrial Engineering UMassAmherst OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY COST MODEL Charlene energy can be and the changes in the cost of energy as the design of the wind turbine changes. The wind, the cost of offshore wind energy generated by 100 wind turbines in 60m or more of water depth with a rating

  13. Encyclopedia of Energy, Volume 1, pp 605616. Elsevier. 2004. Author nonexclusive, royalty-free copyright 1 Commercial Sector and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    (equals about 1055 Joule). commercial sector The portion of buildings in a nation or the world including of a building. energy performance An empirical value indicating the energy efficiency of one commercial building compared to other, usually similar, commercial buildings. Energy Star rating system Energy performance

  14. Detection and Analysis of Threats to the Energy Sector: DATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfonso Valdes

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes Detection and Analysis of Threats to the Energy Sector (DATES), a project sponsored by the United States Department of Energy and performed by a team led by SRI International, with collaboration from Sandia National Laboratories, ArcSight, Inc., and Invensys Process Systems. DATES sought to advance the state of the practice in intrusion detection and situational awareness with respect to cyber attacks in energy systems. This was achieved through adaptation of detection algorithms for process systems as well as development of novel anomaly detection techniques suited for such systems into a detection suite. These detection components, together with third-party commercial security systems, were interfaced with the commercial Security Information Event Management (SIEM) solution from ArcSight. The efficacy of the integrated solution was demonstrated on two testbeds, one based on a Distributed Control System (DCS) from Invensys, and the other based on the Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE) from Sandia. These achievements advance the DOE Cybersecurity Roadmap [DOE2006] goals in the area of security monitoring. The project ran from October 2007 until March 2010, with the final six months focused on experimentation. In the validation phase, team members from SRI and Sandia coupled the two test environments and carried out a number of distributed and cross-site attacks against various points in one or both testbeds. Alert messages from the distributed, heterogeneous detection components were correlated using the ArcSight SIEM platform, providing within-site and cross-site views of the attacks. In particular, the team demonstrated detection and visualization of network zone traversal and denial-of-service attacks. These capabilities were presented to the DistribuTech Conference and Exhibition in March 2010. The project was hampered by interruption of funding due to continuing resolution issues and agreement on cost share for four months in 2008. This resulted in delays in finalizing agreements with commercial partners, and in particular the Invensys testbed was not installed until December 2008 (as opposed to the March 2008 plan). The project resulted in a number of conference presentations and publications, and was well received when presented at industry forums. In spite of some interest on the part of the utility sector, we were unfortunately not able to engage a utility for a full-scale pilot deployment.

  15. The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency:Examples from the Food Processing Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 25 years, the U.S. DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) has championed the application of emerging technologies in industrial plants and monitored these technologies impacts on industrial energy consumption. The cumulative energy savings of more than 160 completed and tracked projects is estimated at approximately 3.99 quadrillion Btu (quad), representing a production cost savings of $20.4 billion. Properly documenting the impacts of such technologies is essential for assessing their effectiveness and for delivering insights about the optimal direction of future technology research. This paper analyzes the impacts that several emerging technologies have had in the food processing industry. The analysis documents energy savings, carbon emissions reductions and production improvements and assesses the market penetration and sector-wide savings potential. Case study data is presented demonstrating the successful implementation of these technologies. The paper's conclusion discusses the effects of these technologies and offers some projections of sector-wide impacts.

  16. Retail competition in the UK electricity sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Hugh

    residential · about 50% of total demand · used to phase in competition for coal industry · useful experience) · Initial concern about vertical integration: · between networks and activities across networks · fear-through, for 2 yrs · with 9% price reduction: end of coal protection cost · So retail competition means benefits

  17. Developing an energy efficiency service industry in Shanghai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang; Goldman, Charles; Levine, Mark; Hopper, Nicole

    2004-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of the Chinese economy over the past two decades has led to significant growth in China's energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Between 1980 and 2000, China's energy consumption more than doubled from 602 million to 1.3 billion tons of coal-equivalent (NBS, 2003). In 2000, China's GHG emissions were about 12% of the global total, ranked second behind only the US. According to the latest national development plan issued by the Chinese government, China's energy demand is likely to double again by 2020 (DRC, 2004), based on a quadrupling of its gross domestic product (GDP). The objectives of the national development plan imply that China needs to significantly raise the energy efficiency of its economy, i.e., cutting the energy intensity of its economy by half. Such goals are extremely ambitious, but not infeasible. China has achieved such reductions in the past, and its current overall level of energy efficiency remains far behind those observed in other developed economies. However, challenges remain whether China can put together an appropriate policy framework and the institutions needed to improve the energy efficiency of its economy under a more market-based economy today. Shanghai, located at the heart of the Yangtze River Delta, is the most dynamic economic and financial center in the booming Chinese economy. With 1% of Chinese population (13 million inhabitants), its GDP in 2000 stood at 455 billion RMB yuan (5% of the national total), with an annual growth rate of 12%--much higher than the national average. It is a major destination for foreign as well as Chinese domestic investment. In 2003, Shanghai absorbed 10% of actual foreign investment in all China (''Economist'', January 17-23, 2004). Construction in Shanghai continues at a breakneck pace, with an annual addition of approximately 200 million square foot of residential property and 100 million square foot of commercial and industrial space over the last 5 years. It is one reason that China consumed over 60% of the world's cement production in 2003 (NBS 2004). Energy consumption in Shanghai has been growing at 6-8% annually, with the growth of electricity demand at over 10% per year. Shanghai, with very limited local energy resources, relies heavily on imported coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. While coal still constitutes over half of Shanghai's energy consumption, oil and natural gas use have been growing in importance. Shanghai is the major market for China's West to East (natural gas) Pipeline (WEP). With the input from WEP and off-shore pipelines, it is expected that natural gas consumption will grow from 250 million cubic meters in 2000 to 3000-3500 million cubic meters in 2005. In order to secure energy supply to power Shanghai's fast-growing economy, the Shanghai government has set three priorities in its energy strategy: (1) diversification of its energy structure, (2) improving its energy efficiency, and (3) developing renewable and other cleaner forms of energy. Efficiency improvements are likely to be most critical, particularly in the near future, in addressing Shanghai's energy security, especially the recent electricity shortage in Shanghai. Commercial buildings and industries consume the majority of Shanghai's, as well as China's, commercial energy. In the building sector, Shanghai has been very active implementing energy efficiency codes for commercial and residential buildings. Following a workshop on building codes implementation held at LBNL for senior Shanghai policy makers in 2001, the Shanghai government recently introduced an implementation guideline on residential building energy code compliance for the downtown area of Shanghai to commence in April, 2004, with other areas of the city to follow in 2005. A draft code for commercial buildings has been developed as well. In the industrial sector, the Shanghai government started an ambitious initiative in 2002 to induce private capital to invest in energy efficiency improvements via energy management/services companies (EMC/ESCOs). In partic

  18. Using DOE Industrial Energy Audit Data for Utility Program Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, C. J.; Packard, C. P.; Parfomak, P.

    . Baltimore Gas & Electric Company BG&E provides natural gas and electric service to central Maryland, serving approximately 1,000,000 residential customers, 100,000 commercial customers, and 3,000 industrial customers. The industrial customers in BG... time-of-use rates, credits for reducing demand during critical periods, and rebates for efficient lighting, motors, and air compressors. In 1992, BG&E also began the design of its Custom Industrial Plant Upgrade Program, intended to provide custom...

  19. The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    With the emergence of China as the world's largest energy consumer, the awareness of developing country energy consumption has risen. According to common economic scenarios, the rest of the developing world will probably see an economic expansion as well. With this growth will surely come continued rapid growth in energy demand. This paper explores the dynamics of that demand growth for electricity in the residential sector and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. In 2000, only 66% of developing world households had access to electricity. Appliance ownership rates remain low, but with better access to electricity and a higher income one can expect that households will see their electricity consumption rise significantly. This paper forecasts developing country appliance growth using econometric modeling. Products considered explicitly - refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting, washing machines, fans, televisions, stand-by power, water heating and space heating - represent the bulk of household electricity consumption in developing countries. The resulting diffusion model determines the trend and dynamics of demand growth at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, the paper presents scenarios for reducing residential consumption through cost-effective and/or best practice efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, which allows for a realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities at the national or regional level. The past decades have seen some of the developing world moving towards a standard of living previously reserved for industrialized countries. Rapid economic development, combined with large populations has led to first China and now India to emerging as 'energy giants', a phenomenon that is expected to continue, accelerate and spread to other countries. This paper explores the potential for slowing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions in the residential sector in developing countries and evaluates the potential of energy savings and emissions mitigation through market transformation programs such as, but not limited to Energy Efficiency Standards and Labeling (EES&L). The bottom-up methodology used allows one to identify which end uses and regions have the greatest potential for savings.

  20. The Potential for Energy-Efficient Technologies to Reduce Carbon Emissions in the United States: Transport Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is searching for a meaningful answer to the likelihood that the continued build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will cause significant changes in the earth`s climate. If there is to be a solution, technology must play a central role. This paper presents the results of an assessment of the potential for cost-effective technological changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. transportation sector by the year 2010. Other papers in this session address the same topic for buildings and industry. U.S.transportation energy use stood at 24.4 quadrillion Btu (Quads) in 1996, up 2 percent over 1995 (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1997, table 2.5). Transportation sector carbon dioxide emissions amounted to 457.2 million metric tons of carbon (MmtC) in 1995, almost one third of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions (U.S. DOE/EIA,1996a, p. 12). Transport`s energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions are growing, apparently at accelerating rates as energy efficiency improvements appear to be slowing to a halt. Cost-effective and nearly cost-effective technologies have enormous potential to slow and even reverse the growth of transport`s CO{sub 2} emissions, but technological changes will take time and are not likely to occur without significant, new public policy initiatives. Absent new initiatives, we project that CO{sub 2} emissions from transport are likely to grow to 616 MmtC by 2010, and 646 MmtC by 2015. An aggressive effort to develop and implement cost-effective technologies that are more efficient and fuels that are lower in carbon could reduce emissions by about 12% in 2010 and 18% in 2015, versus the business-as- usual projection. With substantial luck, leading to breakthroughs in key areas, reductions over the BAU case of 17% in 2010 and 25% in 2015,might be possible. In none of these case are CO{sub 2} emissions reduced to 1990 levels by 2015.

  1. Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Overview Growing Hawaii's agriculture industry, one business at a time Website: http-3547 agincubator@ctahr.hawaii.edu Grow Your Business If you are looking to start an agriculture-related business with our program · Positively impact the agriculture industry in Hawaii with their success

  2. Geothermal industry assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the geothermal industry is presented, focusing on industry structure, corporate activities and strategies, and detailed analysis of the technological, economic, financial, and institutional issues important to government policy formulation. The study is based principally on confidential interviews with executives of 75 companies active in the field. (MHR)

  3. Industrial Optimization Compact Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirches, Christian

    Industrial Optimization Compact Course and Challenge Workshop Optimization plays a crucial role of the processes are typically nonlinear and dyna- mic. Thus, complex dynamic optimization or optimal control in industrial optimization. February 17­20, 2014 ·9.00­17.00 IWR ·Im Neuenheimer Feld 368 ·69120 Heidelberg www

  4. Reliability worth assessment in a developing country - commercial and industrial survey results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, M.; Billinton, R.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the costs of electric service interruptions in the commercial and industrial sectors of a developing country. The investigation used in-person interviews of 800 businesses and 300 industries in Nepal. The results indicate the customer implications of service reliability, and show that electric service reliability worth can be assessed in a developing country.

  5. Energy-Efficiency Improvement Opportunities for the Textile Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    China Energy Group; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The textile industry is one of the most complicated manufacturing industries because it is a fragmented and heterogeneous sector dominated by small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Energy is one of the main cost factors in the textile industry. Especially in times of high energy price volatility, improving energy efficiency should be a primary concern for textile plants. There are various energy-efficiency opportunities that exist in every textile plant, many of which are cost-effective. However, even cost-effective options often are not implemented in textile plants mostly because of limited information on how to implement energy-efficiency measures, especially given the fact that a majority of textile plants are categorized as SMEs and hence they have limited resources to acquire this information. Know-how on energy-efficiency technologies and practices should, therefore, be prepared and disseminated to textile plants. This guidebook provides information on energy-efficiency technologies and measures applicable to the textile industry. The guidebook includes case studies from textile plants around the world and includes energy savings and cost information when available. First, the guidebook gives a brief overview of the textile industry around the world, with an explanation of major textile processes. An analysis of the type and the share of energy used in different textile processes is also included in the guidebook. Subsequently, energy-efficiency improvement opportunities available within some of the major textile sub-sectors are given with a brief explanation of each measure. The conclusion includes a short section dedicated to highlighting a few emerging technologies in the textile industry as well as the potential for the use of renewable energy in the textile industry.

  6. Partnership with Industries- A Successful "Conservation and Load Management Program" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, W. E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ARE: 1. INDUSTRIAL ENERGY AUDIT 2. TIME OF USE RATES 3. ENERGY-EFFICENT INDUSTRIAL PLANTS FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF THE INDUS~RIAL AUDITS ACCOMPLISHED TO DATE IN 1984. THIS GIVES AN INDICATION OF THE EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITIES THAT EXIST...

  7. AIJ in the Non-Energy Sector in India: Opportunities and Concerns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindranath, N.H.; Meili, A.; Anita, R.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) has been signed and ratified by 168 countries, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have increased substantially since the 1992 Rio Summit. In both developing countries (DCs) and industrialized countries (ICs), there has been a need to find mechanisms to facilitate environmentally sound mitigation strategies. This need led to the formation of Activities Implemented Jointly (AIJ) at the first Conference-of the Parties (COP) in 1995. In Article 4A, para 2D, the COP established an AIJ pilot phase in which Annex I (IC) countries would enter into agreements to implement activities jointly with non-Annex I parties. DCs would engage in AIJ on a purely voluntary basis and all AIJ projects should be compatible with and supportive of national environment and development goals. AIJ does not imply GHG reduction commitments by DCs. Neither do all projects undertaken during the pilot phase qualify as a fulfillment of current commitment s of Annex I parties under the COP. The current pilot phase for AIJ ends in the year 2000, a date which may be extended. Current AIJ activities are largely focused on the energy sector. The Nordic countries, for example, feel that the most important potential areas for cooperation in AIJ are fuel conversion, more effective energy production, increased energy efficiency, and reforms in energy-intensive industry (Nordic Council of Ministers, 1995). Denmark does not want to include non-energy sector projects such as carbon sink enhancement projects in the pilot phase (Nordic Council of Ministers, 1995). However, other countries, including the US, have already funded a number of forestry sector projects (Development Alternatives, 1997). Moreover, energy-sector projects involving high technology or capital-intensive technology are often a source of controversy between DCs and ICs regarding the kind of technology transferred and sharing of costs and benefits. Further, the pilot phase provide s an opportunity for capacity-building and learning about methods of planning, implementation, and monitoring of GHG abatement in land-based non-energy sector projects.

  8. An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed...

  9. Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program (New Brunswick)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning January 1, 2012 the Large Industrial Renewable Energy Purchase Program allows NB Power to purchase renewable energy generated by its largest customers at a rate of $95/MWh. This...

  10. Energy Responsibility Accounting - An Energy Conservation Tool for Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, R. L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As energy costs continue to rise faster than the rate of inflation, industrial energy management becomes a more important issue in the control of manufacturing costs. Energy Responsibility Accounting (ERA) is a tool which improves management...

  11. Mitigating security issues in the evolving DNA synthesis industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turlington, Ralph Donald, III

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA synthesis technologies are advancing at exponential rates, with production of ever longer, more complex, and less expensive sequences of double stranded DNA. This has fostered development of industrial scale design, ...

  12. An Assessment of Industrial Cogeneration Potential in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkle, B. K.; Qasim, S.; Ludwig, E. V., Jr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as atmospheric fluidized bed combustion, coal-gasification combined cycles, fuel cells and bottoming cycles were analyzed in addition to the economic assessment of conventional cogeneration systems; Industry-specific rates of market penetration were developed...

  13. Data:Db814db1-deec-4487-a61c-9e93a5c0ae6f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    date: 20110930 End date if known: Rate name: Industrial Compressed Air Program Sector: Industrial Description: The Industrial Advanced Compressed Air Program is a...

  14. Data:2dece29a-0563-42eb-ad62-d22aa17871eb | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industrial General Service Single-Phase Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable:To commercial, industrial, public buildings and other services not eligible under other rate...

  15. Data:9ee663ec-1aea-48f7-b46e-0bd579f6f55b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Industrial General Service Multi-Phase Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable:To commercial, industrial, public buildings and other services not eligible under other rate...

  16. Review of tribological sinks in six major industries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imhoff, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Hane, G.J.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Erickson, R.; Merriman, T.; Gruber, T.; Barber, S.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction and material wear occur throughout all industries and are involved in many processes within each industry. These conditions make assessing tribological activity overall in industry very complex and expensive. Therefore, a research strategy to obtain preliminary information on only the most significant industrial tribological sinks was defined. The industries examined were selected according to both the magnitude of overall energy consumption (particularly machine drive) and the known presence of significant tribological sinks. The six industries chosen are as follows: mining, agriculture, primary metals, chemicals/refining, food, and pulp and paper. They were reviewed to identify and characterize the major tribology sinks. It was concluded that wear losses are greater than friction losses, and that reducing wear rates would improve industrial productivity.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  18. INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    78 INDUSTRIAL&SYSTEMS Industrial and Systems engineers use engineering and business principles companies compete in today's global marketplace. The Industrial and Systems engineer's task is to take · Industrial and Systems Engineering Bachelor of Science 128 units · Industrial and Systems Engineering

  19. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  20. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, J.; Cory, K.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the information that homeowners and policy makers need to facilitate PV financing at the residential level. The full range of cash payments, bill savings, and tax incentives is covered, as well as potentially available solar attribute payments. Traditional financing is also compared to innovative solutions, many of which are borrowed from the commercial sector. Together, these mechanisms are critical for making the economic case for a residential PV installation, given its high upfront costs. Unfortunately, these programs are presently limited to select locations around the country. By calling attention to these innovative initiatives, this report aims to help policy makers consider greater adoption of these models to benefit homeowners interested installing a residential PV system.