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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Coating and Surface Technologies for Turbine Airfoils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

more difficult, coatings and other surface technologies are becoming more ... to developing higher strength single crystal superalloys. Although it has been ...

2

ADVANCES IN COATINGS TECHNOLOGIES II: I - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DARPA program in advanced thin film coatings is developing innovative technologies to eliminate volatile organic compounds, heavy metals and other ...

3

Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon anodes in lithium-ion batteries Title Increased cycling efficiency and rate capability of copper-coated silicon...

4

ORNL’s Suppy p g gyerhydrophobic Coatings Technology and ...  

ORNL’s Suppy p g gyerhydrophobic Coatings Technology and Some Potential Applications ... (e gicing coatings on power lines, insulators, infrastructure (e.g.

5

Low Pressure Plasma Technologies for Multifunctional Coatings and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Low Pressure Plasma Technologies for Multifunctional Coatings and ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low ...

6

Frying Technology and PracticesChapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frying Technology and Practices Chapter 9 Technology of Coating and Frying Food Products Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadab

7

Advances in Coatings Technologies for Corrosion and Wear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

N.R. Sorensen and F.M. Hosking. Pulsed Ion Beam ... Chromate-Free Corrosion Resistant Conversion Coatings for Aluminum Alloys R.G. Buchhiet ... Corrosion Inhibition Mechanisms in Polymer Systems for Compliant Coatings Technologies ... C.R. Aita. High Energy Ion Processing of Materials for Improved Hardcoatings

8

Science & Technology Principal Directo rate – Industrial ...  

Erik Stenehjem Science & Technology Principal Directo rate – Industrial Partnerships Office Erik Stenehjem Director----Roger Werne Deputy Director

9

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

Plastron Shielding Technologies Liquid Repellent Surface Coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

elastic materials such as polymers, carbon nanotubes or ceramic nanofibers. The surfaces repel dirt recognize neither international sales nor expansion into the many other signifi- cant industrial for raising money from targeted industry companies and customizing the technology for its industry market

Jawitz, James W.

11

High removal rate laser-based coating removal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact laser system is disclosed that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1,000 ft{sup 2}/hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

Matthews, D.L.; Celliers, P.M.; Hackel, L.; Da Silva, L.B.; Dane, C.B.; Mrowka, S.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition of YSZ for Use in Thermal Barrier Coatings - Faraday Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition FARADAYIC ElectroPhoretic Deposition of YSZ for Use in Thermal Barrier Coatings-Faraday Technology Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are employed to protect gas turbine engine components. These coating systems provide thermal, oxidation, and mechanical protection; reduce thermal gradients; and lower the metal substrate surface temperature, extending the life of the engine components. Faraday Technology, Inc. (Faraday) is developing a new manufacturing process, the

13

Controlling the Lithiation-Induced Strain and Charging Rate in Nanowire Electrodes by Coating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithiation-induced-strain (LIS) in electrode materials plagues the performance and lifetime of lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Controlling the LIS is one of the ultimate goals for making better LIBs. Here we report that by carbon or aluminum coating, the charging rate and LIS of individual SnO2 nanowire electrodes can be altered dramatically: namely the carbon or aluminum coated nanowires can be charged about 10 times faster than the non-coated nanowires, and the radial expansion of the coated nanowires was completely suppressed, resulting little or no mismatch strain at the reaction front, as evidenced by the lack of dislocations near the reaction front. The improved charging rate and the suppression of the radial expansion were attributed to the mechanical confinement of the coatings. These studies demonstrate an effective route to control the charging rate and LIS, enabling the design of better LIBs.

Zhang, Li Q.; Liu, Xiao H.; Liu, Yang; Huang, Shan; Zhu, Ting; Gui, Liangjin; Mao, Scott X.; Ye, Zhi Zhen; Wang, Chong M.; Sullivan, J. P.; Huang, Jian Yu

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

14

Quantifying the Impacts of Time-based Rates, Enabling Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Impacts of Time-based Rates, Enabling Technology, and Other Treatments in Consumer Behavior Studies: Protocols and Guidelines Title Quantifying the Impacts of Time-based Rates,...

15

Mechanical Behavior of Technological Coatings and Thin Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New “green” coatings made from renewable materials or using green manufacturing processes are sought in addition to traditional ... Just click on the button.

16

Available Technologies: Super High Rate Sputter Deposition  

Andre’ Anders of Berkeley Lab has developed a very high deposition rate magnetron sputtering wherein the surface of a target and the race track zone area of the ...

17

Steel Penstock Coating and Lining Rehabilitation: A Hydropower Technology Roundup Report, Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steel penstocks and the coating and lining systems that enhance their structural integrity and serviceability are part of the infrastructure for a majority of the world's hydroelectric projects. This Hydropower Technology Roundup report aims to provide managers and technical staff responsible for hydropower plants with up-to-date information to enable them to assess the need for and implement the cost-effective rehabilitation of steel penstock coatings and linings.

2000-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

18

Turbine Cycle Heat Rate Monitoring: Technology and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research has been completed on available technology for monitoring turbine cycle heat rate and factors affecting the successful deployment of this technology in fossil generating plants. Information has been gathered from interviews with experienced industry plant staff and vendors. Trends were noted and are described in this report. The report is recommended as guidance for power generation fleets and individual plants seeking to establish a successful program for heat rate reduction.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Title Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-50626 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Herter, Karen, Roger Levy, John Wilson, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Conference Name 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

20

Development of wear-resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components. Volume 1, Coating development and tribological testing: Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribological properties of a variety of advanced coating materials have been evaluated under conditions which simulate the piston ring -- cylinder liner environment near top ring reversal in a heavy duty diesel engine. Coated ``ring`` samples were tested against a conventional pearlitic grey cast iron liner material using a high temperature reciprocating wear test rig. Tests were run with a fresh CE/SF 15W40lubricant at 200 and 350{degrees}C, with a high-soot, engine-tested oil at 200{degrees}C and with no lubrication at 200{degrees}C. For lowest wear under boundary lubricated conditions, the most promising candidates to emerge from this study were high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) Cr{sub 3} C{sub 2} - 20% NiCr and WC - 12% Co cermets, low temperature arc vapor deposited (LTAVD) CrN and plasma sprayed chromium oxides. Also,plasma sprayed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and A1{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} materials were found to give excellent wear resistance in unlubricated tests and at extremely high temperatures (450{degrees}C) with a syntheticoil. All of these materials would offer substantial wear reductions compared to the conventional electroplated hard chromium ring facing and thermally sprayed metallic coatings, especially at high temperatures and with high-soot oils subjected to degradation in diesel environments. The LTAVD CrN coating provided the lowest lubricated wear rates of all the materials evaluated, but may be too thin (4 {mu}m) for use as a top ring facing. Most of the coatings evaluated showed higher wear rates with high-soot, engine-tested oil than with fresh oil, with increases of more than a factor of ten in some cases. Generally, metallic materials were found to be much more sensitive to soot/oil degradation than ceramic and cermet coatings. Thus, decreased ``soot sensitivity`` is a significant driving force for utilizing ceramic or cermet coatings in diesel engine wear applications.

Naylor, M.G.S. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: May 13, 2013 9: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #779: May 13, 2013 EPA's Top Ten Rated Vehicles List for Model Year 2013 is All Electric on Digg

22

Energy Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Surface Engineered Coating Systems for Aluminum Pressure Die Casting Dies: Towards a 'Smart' Die Coating  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this research program was to design and develop an optimal coating system that extends die life by minimizing premature die failure. In high-pressure aluminum die-casting, the die, core pins and inserts must withstand severe processing conditions. Many of the dies and tools in the industry are being coated to improve wear-resistance and decrease down-time for maintenance. However, thermal fatigue in metal itself can still be a major problem, especially since it often leads to catastrophic failure (i.e. die breakage) as opposed to a wear-based failure (parts begin to go out of tolerance). Tooling costs remain the largest portion of production costs for many of these parts, so the ability prevent catastrophic failures would be transformative for the manufacturing industry.The technology offers energy savings through reduced energy use in the die casting process from several factors, including increased life of the tools and dies, reuse of the dies and die components, reduction/elimination of lubricants, and reduced machine down time, and reduction of Al solder sticking on the die. The use of the optimized die coating system will also reduce environmental wastes and scrap parts. Current (2012) annual energy saving estimates, based on initial dissemination to the casting industry in 2010 and market penetration of 80% by 2020, is 3.1 trillion BTU's/year. The average annual estimate of CO2 reduction per year through 2020 is 0.63 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Equivalent (MM TCE).

Dr. John J. Moore; Dr. Jianliang Lin,

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Polymers and Coatings:Materials Science & Technology, MST-7: Los Alamos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymers and Coatings (MST-7) Polymers and Coatings (MST-7) Home About Us MST Related Links Research Highlights Focus on Facilities MST e-News Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas MaRIE: Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes MST Division Home CONTACTS Polymers and Coatings Group Leader, Ross E. Muenchausen Deputy Group Leader Dominic S. Peterson Point of Contact, Group Office 505-667-6887 foam voids Foam Void Image Using X-ray Micro Tomography About MST Polymers and Coatings (MST-7) Our mission is to provide World-class design, fabrication, assembly, characterization, and field support for the wide range of targets in support of national science programs that include energy, nuclear weapons, conventional defense, industrial collaborations, nonproliferation, and the environment; Outstanding polymer science and engineering solutions in support of

24

Failure Rate Data Analysis for High Technology Components  

SciTech Connect

Understanding component reliability helps designers create more robust future designs and supports efficient and cost-effective operations of existing machines. The accelerator community can leverage the commonality of its high-vacuum and high-power systems with those of the magnetic fusion community to gain access to a larger database of reliability data. Reliability studies performed under the auspices of the International Energy Agency are the result of an international working group, which has generated a component failure rate database for fusion experiment components. The initial database work harvested published data and now analyzes operating experience data. This paper discusses the usefulness of reliability data, describes the failure rate data collection and analysis effort, discusses reliability for components with scarce data, and points out some of the intersections between magnetic fusion experiments and accelerators.

L. C. Cadwallader

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Program on Technology Innovation: State of Knowledge Review of Nanostructured Coatings for Boiler Tube Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the adoption of low-NOx emission controls with staged burner systems, severe waterwall corrosion has been experienced in many utility boilers. Protective coatings applied by thermal spray processes have reduced the adverse effects of corrosion to some degree, especially in sub-critical boilers. However, the corrosion intensity observed in super-critical boilers, and foreseen in ultra super-critical units, requires coatings with protective capabilities beyond what has been achievable with convention...

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Hydrophobic Nano Coating on Solar Photovoltaic Panels, Polaris Initiative Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project evaluated the effects of a hydrophobic nano coating on photovoltaic panels. Variables studied were hydrophobicity, changes in cleanliness of the surfaces, and changes in ice and snow accumulation.BackgroundThe nano coating evaluated was being marketed commercially as a vehicle windshield treatment that was meant to keep the windshield glass clean and repel water from the windshield. The treatment claimed to last for up to 1 year in automotive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

27

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorlycrafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisissubsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared whenthe next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate theevent-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demandresponsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such,demand response can be required as a condition of service, and theoffering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities asan element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore thecosts and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response systemcapable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operatorcontrolled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customercontrolled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Anydemand response program based on this system could consist of either orboth of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled,providing automatic load management through customer-programmed priceresponse, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability inCalifornia. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers toimplementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

SciTech Connect

Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

Herter, Karen; Levy, Roger; Wilson, John; Rosenfeld, Arthur

2002-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 18, 6: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety

30

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

UT-B ID 201002370 06.2012 Technology Summary Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and ...

31

Analysis of failed and nickel-coated 3093 beam clamp components at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and its contractor, Bechtel Jacobs Company (BJC), are undertaking a major effort to clean up the former gaseous diffusion facility (K-25) located in Oak Ridge, TN. The decontamination and decommissioning activities require systematic removal of contaminated equipment and machinery followed by demolition of the buildings. As part of the cleanup activities, a beam clamp, used for horizontal life lines (HLLs) for fall protection, was discovered to be fractured during routine inspection. The beam clamp (yoke and D-ring) was a component in the HLL system purchased from Reliance Industries LLC. Specifically, the U-shaped stainless steel yoke of the beam clamp failed in a brittle mode at under less than 10% of the rated design capacity of 14,500 lb. The beam clamp had been in service for approximately 16 months. Bechtel Jacobs approached Argonne National Laboratory to assist in identifying the root cause of the failure of the beam clamp. The objectives of this study were to (1) review the prior reports and documents on the subject, (2) understand the possible failure mechanism(s) that resulted in the failed beam clamp components, (3) recommend approaches to mitigate the failure mechanism(s), and (4) evaluate the modified beam clamp assemblies. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis and chemical analysis of the corrosion products on the failed yoke and white residue on an in-service yoke indicated the presence of zinc, sulfur, and calcium. Analysis of rainwater in the complex, as conducted by BJC, indicated the presence of sulfur and calcium. It was concluded that, as a result of galvanic corrosion, zinc from the galvanized components of the beam clamp assembly (D-ring) migrated to the corroded region in the presence of the rainwater. Under mechanical stress, the corrosion process would have accelerated, resulting in the catastrophic failure of the yoke. As suggested by Bechtel Jacobs personnel, hydrogen embrittlement as a consequence of corrosion was also explored as a failure mechanism. Corroded and failed yoke samples had hydrogen concentrations of 20-60 ppm. However, the hydrogen content reduced to 4-11 ppm (similar to baseline as-received yoke samples) when the corrosion products were polished off. The hydrogen content in the scraped off corrosion product powders was >7000 ppm. These results indicate that hydrogen is primarily present in the corrosion products and not in the underlying steel. Rockwell hardness values on the corroded yoke and D-rings were R{sub c} {approx} 41-46. It was recommended to the beam clamp manufacturer that the beam clamp components be annealed to reduce the hardness values so that they are less susceptible to brittle failure. Upon annealing, hardness values of the beam clamp components reduced to R{sub c} {approx} 25. Several strategies were recommended and put in place to mitigate failure of the beam clamp components: (a) maintain hardness levels of both yokes and D-rings at R{sub c} < 35, (b) coat the yoke and D-rings with a dual coating of nickel (with 10% phosphorus) to delay corrosion and aluminum to prevent galvanic corrosion since it is more anodic to zinc, and (c) optimize coating thicknesses for nickel and aluminum while maintaining the physical integrity of the coatings. Evaluation of the Al- and Ni-coated yoke and D-ring specimens indicated they appear to have met the recommendations. Average hardness values of the dual-coated yokes were R{sub c} {approx} 25-35. Hardness values of dual-coated D-ring were R{sub c} {approx} 32. Measured average coating thicknesses for the aluminum and nickel coatings for yoke samples were 22 {micro}m (0.9 mils) and 80 {micro}m (3 mils), respectively. The D-rings also showed similar coating thicknesses. Microscopic examination showed that the aluminum coating was well bonded to the underlying nickel coating. Some observed damage was believed to be an artifact of the cutting-and-polishing steps during sample preparation for microscopy.

Singh, D.; Pappacena, K.; Gaviria, J.; Burtsteva, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Comparative Studies on C-coated and Uncoated LiFePO4 Cycling at Various Rates and Temperatures using Synchrotron Based in situ X-ray Diffraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structural changes of LiFePO{sub 4} and C-coated LiFePO{sub 4} during charging at various C-rates and temperatures are investigated using synchrotron based in situ X-ray diffraction technique. The XRD patterns collected during cycling show the structural evidence of the positive effects of carbon coating on LiFePO{sub 4} for the electrochemical performance improvements at different temperatures, especially at low temperatures. At -10 C, the C-coated LiFePO{sub 4} shows comparable capacities with the sample cycled at room temperature when cycled at C/5 rate with a slight shift of the plateau to a higher voltage during charging. The in situ XRD patterns collected simultaneously show a complete phase transformation from triphylite to heterosite. At -20 C, the C-coated LiFePO{sub 4} delivers 55.6% of its theoretical capacities at C/5 rate. However, the plateau in the charging curve becomes sloppy and shifts to a higher voltage. The in situ XRD patterns show that the phase transformation from triphylite to heterosite is not completed when charged to 4.5 V due to the larger polarization when charged at -20 C.

H Shin; K Nam; W Chang; B Cho; W Yoon; X Yang; K Chung

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Superhydrophobic Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary ORNL researchers have developed a variety of materials and processes to produce coatings with superhydrophobic properties ...

34

Thermal Barrier Coatings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States...

35

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 5. Optical materials. Part 3. Applications, coatings, and fabrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book describes the uses, coatings, and fabrication of laser materials. Topics considered include: optical waveguide materials; optical storage materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; holographic recording materials; phase conjunction materials; laser crystals; laser glasses; quantum counter materials; thin films and coatings; multilayer dielectric coatings; graded-index surfaces and films; optical materials fabrication; fabrication techniques; fabrication procedures for specific materials.

Weber, M.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Utility rates and service policies as potential barriers to the market penetration of decentralized solar technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, economic and institutional concerns dictate that decentralized solar technologies generally require an auxiliary energy source to assure continuous service through periods of adverse weather. Utility rates and service policies regarding auxiliary energy service have a significant impact upon solar system economics, and thus the commercialization of solar energy. The scope of this paper evaluates three basic issues: (1) whether a utility can refuse to provide auxiliary service to solar users, (2) whether a utility can charge higher or lower than traditional rates for auxiliary service, and (3) whether a utility can refuse to purchase excess power generated by small power producers utilizing electricity-producing solar technologies. It appears that a utility cannot refuse to provide auxiliary service to a solar user unless the company can demonstrate that to provide such service, substantial harm would result to its existing customers. Statutes or case decisions also provide that utilities cannot unreasonably discriminate in rates charged to customers for the same service under like conditions. The ability of a utility to provide solar users lower than traditional rates may depend upon the jurisdiction's view of promotional rates. 681 references.

Feuerstein, R. J.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Development of adherent ceramic coatings to reduce contact stress damage of ceramics. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Strongly adherent coatings were deposited on reaction bonded Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (RBSN), sintered SiC (SSC), and HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (HSN) and using a newly developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Performance of the coating was assessed by oxidation, strength and contact stress testing. A new method was developed to experimentally determine the strength and Weibull modulus of thin brittle films on ceramic substrates. A significant portion of the study was devoted to numerical modeling of the coatings in order to understand the contributions of residual stress as different coating materials and thicknesses were combined. Coating designs were further analyzed by simulating the crack growth behavior in multilayer films while accounting for the interface fracture mechanics. This work has shown that the Al{sub 2}0{sub 3+}ZrO{sub 2} composite coating developed in this program can provide resistance to oxidation and contact stress. Commercial application of the composite coating has been successfully demonstrated by useof the Al{sub 2}0{sub 3+}ZrO{sub 2} composite as a protective coating on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} cutting tool.

Wayne, S.F.; Selverian, J.H.; O`Neil, D. [GTE Labs., Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Program on Technology Innovation: State-of-Knowledge Review of Erosion-Resistant Coatings for Steam and Gas Turbine Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid particle erosion (SPE) and liquid droplet erosion (LDE) cause severe damage to turbine components, such as gas turbine compressor blades and vanes as well as steam turbine control stage and later stage low-pressure blades. This report will provide a comprehensive knowledge base to turbine users on erosion coating properties, methods of application, details about the various vendors and their experience as well as the tests conducted to evaluate and qualify erosion-resistant coatings.

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

40

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

Wei-Kao Lu

2002-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

43

HOW THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE DEVELOPED A NEW WASTE PACKAGE USING A POLYUREA COATING THAT IS SAFELY AND ECONOMICALLY ELIMINATING SIZE REDUCTION OF LARGE ITEMS  

SciTech Connect

One of the major challenges involved in closing the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is the disposal of extremely large pieces of contaminated production equipment and building debris. Past practice has been to size reduce the equipment into pieces small enough to fit into approved, standard waste containers. Size reducing this equipment is extremely expensive, and exposes workers to high-risk tasks, including significant industrial, chemical, and radiological hazards. RFETS has developed a waste package using a Polyurea coating for shipping large contaminated objects. The cost and schedule savings have been significant.

Dorr, Kent A.; Hogue, Richard S.; Kimokeo, Margaret K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

44

Coatings for gas turbines; Specialized coatings boost, maintain turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Airlines have been coating their jet engines for the past 30 years, thereby avoiding corrosion, erosion and wear. More recently, operators of mechanical-drive gas turbines have come to realize the value of coatings as a way to keep down costs. This paper describes specialized coatings technology which has evolved for gas turbines. Coatings have been designed for specific areas and even specific components within the turbine. Because operators must often request these coatings when buying new equipment or at overhaul, a basic understanding of the technology is presented.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced turbine systems - research and development of thermal barrier coatings technology: 2nd bimonthly report, February 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective of the ATS program is the development of ultra-highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive gas turbine systems, with long, less cyclic operating profiles than aircraft gas turbine engines. Durability and performance demands of ATS can be achieved by means of thermal barrier coatings. Phase I (program plan) is complete. Phase II is in progress.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

SciTech Connect

Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to advance the knowledge of ceramic coatings for components in the hot gas-path of advanced, low-emission gas-fired turbine engines. The ceramic coating systems being studied by NDE include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades and combustor liners to allow hotter gas path temperatures and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Data provided by NDE methods will be used to: (a) provide data to assess reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages (c) track growth rates of defects during use in engines and (d) allow rational judgement for replace/repair/re-use decisions of components.

Sun, J. G. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

48

Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanolens Window Coatings for Nanolens Window Coatings for Daylighting Kyle J. Alvine Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kyle.alvine@pnnl.gov / (509) - 372 - 4475 April 4 th , 2013 Demonstration of the effect To develop a novel, low-cost window coating to double daylight penetration to offset lighting energy use 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: PNNL is developing a novel, low-cost window coating to redirect daylight deeper into buildings to significantly offset lighting energy.

49

Protective Coatings Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes assessments of ceramic and thermal spray coatings that have advanced significantly or recently been marketed for use in the utility boiler industry to reduce slagging, mitigate fireside corrosion and potentially, circumferential cracking due to cyclic temperature variations. These innovations promise to enhance coating quality as well as reduce time and labor required to protect large areas of the boiler waterwalls. Coatings may also enable plants to improve production rates; thereb...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Using hybrid data mining and machine learning clustering analysis to predict the turnover rate for technology professionals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study applies clustering analysis for data mining and machine learning to predict trends in technology professional turnover rates, including the hybrid artificial neural network and clustering analysis known as the self-organizing map (SOM). This ... Keywords: Clustering analysis, Neural network clustering, Self-organizing map, Turnover trend

Chin-Yuan Fan; Pei-Shu Fan; Te-Yi Chan; Shu-Hao Chang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

First-class technology - third-rate bureaucracy: the case of Israel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using Israel as a case study, the article argues that politics rather than technology accounts for the inefficient and wasteful state of technology in the public sector in countries where one finds ample endogenous first-class high tech manpower. In ...

Alon Peled

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Nontoxic foul-release coatings  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) under project RP-1689-9 evaluated 30 non-toxic coatings for biofouling control on steel and concrete surfaces of cooling water intakes and piping. Seven coatings were evaluated at seven sites for 2 year. The remaining 23 coatings were exposed for a variety of time lengths at the Battelle Marine Laboratory at Daytona Beach, Florida. Accelerated corrosion tests and inspection of the test panels to determine coating life were also conducted. Results of several utility conducted tests were also solicited. Silicone-based coatings performed the best with predicted lives of 2 to 4 year. Although the non-toxic coatings can be fouled by biogrowth, the rate of fouling is less and the coating can be easily cleaned. A cost-benefit methodology is presented to aid utilities to assess the potential use of non-toxic foul-release coatings at power plant cooling systems. 12 refs., 16 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Catalytic thermal barrier coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Quantifying the Impacts of Time-Based Rates, Enabling Technology, and Other Treatments in Consumer Behavior Studies: Protocols and Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers guidelines and protocols for measuring the effects of time-based rates, enabling technology, and various other treatments on customers’ levels and patterns of electricity usage. Although the focus is on evaluating consumer behavior studies (CBS) that involve field trials and pilots, the methods can be extended to assessing the large-scale programs that may follow. CBSs are undertaken to resolve uncertainties and ambiguities about how consumers respond to inducements to ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

56

Chromium-free Conversion Coatings for Aerospace Aluminum Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Predicting and Combating Corrosion and Degradation of New Coating and ...

57

Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine ...  

Wind Energy Industrial Technologies Advanced Materials Deposition of Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Blades Sandia National ...

58

RAPID-CURE COATINGS SYSTEM - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary The Naval Research Laboratory has developed a durable, rapid cure coatings system that is designed for harsh ...

59

High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Corrosion Protection through Metallic and Non-Metallic Coatings. Presentation ...

60

Superhydrophobic Coatings Using Double-Silane Treated Silica ...  

Disclosure Number 201202928 Technology Summary This invention relates to superhydrophobic coatings and more specifically to durability improvements. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Spin coating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

Torczynski, John R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Impact of Time Resolution on the Projected Rates of System Penetration by Intermittent Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

To hedge against the limited resources of fossil fuels and to reduce the emissions of green house gases, it is expected that our future electricity system will include more intermittent technologies, including wind and PV. To better understand how to develop energy systems that rely on intermittents, systems models are used to assess the cost at which intermittents become competitive, the degree of penetration as their costs are reduced, their impact on the optimal structure of the balance of the system, and their affect on total system costs. Modeling approaches designed for dispatchable technologies are not entirely appropriate for modeling intermittent technologies, since they, naturally, assume that generation can always be dispatched to meet demand. Intermittent generation cannot be dispatched--its output varies from hour to hour and from day to day on its own schedule, heedless to system needs. This research assesses the difference in results associated with the different approaches to modeling intermittency. The analyses compare cases using the hourly loads and intermittent generation patterns, cases in which the loads and generation were averaged over several hours, and cases in which the loads and/or the generation were represented by the annual averaging scheme used in the National Energy Modeling System developed by the Energy Information Administration. Three significant characteristics of an intermittent generator are the average power production (capacity factor), the coincidence of its power production and loads, and the variation in the magnitude of its power production. Economic models of the energy system represent these characteristics with differing degrees of accuracy. It is expected that different representations of the characteristics of an intermittent generator will give different answers to the sorts of questions posed above. This research assesses the magnitude and types of errors that are introduced by not representing the characteristics of the intermittents accurately. The most accurate representation of an intermittent generator uses its actual output from moment to moment. Here we use a one hour resolution over a full year of generation as the base case. This captures the variations from hour to hour and day-to-day. However, some energy modeling systems are based on a load duration curve approach for characterizing the variation in energy demand. This is quite suitable for dispatchable technologies since the generators can always be dispatched to meet the load whenever it occurs. When an intermittent generator is represented in this structure, it is represented as having a constant output equal to its capacity factor over long intervals (many hours). This approach captures the capacity factor of the intermittent and to some extent it can capture the coincidence of generation and demand, but does not capture the effect of the short term variations in output. In this paper, we evaluate the impacts of time resolution on the economic evaluation of wind and solar PV within a simple energy system. We assess the penetration of each intermittent generator as its cost is decreased. At the same time, the model optimally readjusts the capacities and dispatch of the conventional generators as the intermittent technology penetrates. This investigation compares the trajectories of intermittent penetration under a several different representations of intermittent generation and demand. In the following sections, we first discuss the approach to analysis, for both the load duration curve approach to representing intermittent generation and several averaging schemes. We then present results and conclusions.

Lamont, A; Wu, T

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

65

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

66

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

67

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

68

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

69

Bioactive Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Tailoring the Surface Properties of Parylene Biocompatible Coating: Martina Cihova1; Quoc Nguyen2; Varshni Singh2; 1Karlsruhe Institute of ...

70

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

71

FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

73

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

74

Environmental Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009... thermal cycle lifetime when compared to conventional EB-PVD coatings. ... widely used on turbine engine blades/vanes as stand-alone overlayers. .... thin film provides a flexible, low-cost platform for surface engineering.

75

Advanced Coating Development for Gas Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sacrificial, oxidation-resistant coatings on turbine blades in high-firing temperature gas turbines are wearing out at an unacceptably rapid rate, resulting in excessive downtime and repair costs for turbine operators. This report summarizes the results of an exploratory development project that assessed the feasibility of decelerating the degradation rate of an MCrAlY coating on several turbine blade alloys.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Effect of High Cooling Rate and Powder Composition on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coatings were deposited by applying different types of thermal spray systems. Influence of the heating and cooling rates on coating microstructure and ...

77

Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for ...  

For Industry; For Researchers; Success Stories; About Us; Available Technologies. ... Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone ...

78

Superhydrophobic Coating for Evaporative Purification and Minerals Extraction  

Researchers at ORNL are using their superhydrophobic coating technology to tackle the age-old problem of obtaining potable water. In the process, they ...

79

Sandia National Laboratories : Licensing/Technology Transfer ...  

Technology Summary Hybrid polymer-nanocrystal optical coatings are a platform technology in the field of multilayered films, and are seen in a variety of consumer ...

80

Program on Technology Innovation: Liquid Precursor High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray Process for Making Fine Structured and Highly Bonded Alloy Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray processes are used in applications requiring the highest density and adhesion strength, which is not achievable in most other thermal spray processes. Like other thermal spray processes, however, a normal HVOF process is not able to apply fine powders less than 10m via a conventional powder feeder like other thermal spray processes. The advantages of using smaller nano-sized particles in a HVOF process include uniform coating, uniform microstructure, higher ...

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings were determined using composite specimens of ceramic coated onto stainless steel substrates, tested with the coating in compression and the steel in tension. The strength of the coating was determined from an elastic bi-material analysis of the resulting failure of the coating in compression.(3) Altough initial comparisons of the materials would appear to be straight forward from these results, the results of the aging tests of the materials are necessary to insure that trends in properties remain after long term exposure to a diesel environment. Some comparisons can be made, such as the comparison between for lot-to-lot variation. An axial fatigue test to determine the high cycle fatigue behavior of TTBCs was developed at the University of Illinois under funding from this program.(4) A fatigue test apparatus has been designed and initial work performed which demonstrates the ability to provide a routine method of axial testing of coating. The test fixture replaces the normal load frame and fixtures used to transmit the hydraulic oil loading to the sample with the TTBC specimen itself. The TTBC specimen is a composite metal/coating with stainless steel ends. The coating is sprayed onto a mild steel center tube section onto which the stainless steel ends are press fit. The specimen is then machined. After machining, the specimen is placed in an acid bath which etches the mild steel away leaving the TTBC attached to the the stainless steel ends. Plugs are then installed in the ends and the composite specimen loaded in the test fixture where the hydraulic oil pressurizes each end to apply the load. Since oil transmits the load, bending loads are minimized. This test fixture has been modified to allow piston ends to be attached to the specimen which allows tensile loading as well as compressive loading of the specimen. In addition to the room temperature data, specimens have been tested at 800 Degrees C with the surprising result that at high temperature, the TTBC exhibits much higher fatigue strength. Testing of the TTBC using tension/compression cycling has been con

M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

82

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test test Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Energy ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES Aerosol Sealing Aerosol Remote Sealing System Clog-free Atomizing and Spray Drying Nozzle Air-stable Nanomaterials for Efficient OLEDs Solvent Processed Nanotube Composites OLEDS with Air-stable Structured Electrodes APIs for Online Energy Saving Tools: Home Energy Saver and EnergyIQ Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost Dynamic Solar Glare Blocking System Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Electrochromic Windows with Multiple-Cavity Optical Bandpass Filter Electrochromic Window Technology Portfolio Universal Electrochromic Smart Window Coating

83

Evaluation of the Performance of the PVUSA Rating Methodology Applied to Dual Junction PV Technology: Preprint (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PVUSA (Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications) project in the 1990's developed a rating methodology for PV performance evaluation which has become popular, and even incorporated into concentrating PV rating standards This report apply that method to rack-mounted dual-junction PV system, and produces a system rating.

Myers, D. R.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project Bio-based Thermochromic Intelligent Roof Coating Research Project The Department of Energy is conducting research into bio-based thermochromic intelligent roof coatings. The coatings are developed from waste cooking oil. Project Description This project seeks to develop and demonstrate a waste cooking oil-based thermochromic smart roof coating technology that will adjust light transmission in response to temperature changes. This will reduce energy demands for temperature regulation. The project will also study the effects of different oil sources on coating properties. Project Partners This project is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and United Environment & Energy. Project Goals

85

An evaluation of three commercially available technologies for real-time measurement of rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RATES OF OUTDOOR AIRFLOW INTO HVAC SYSTEMS William J. Fisk,determine flow resistance of hvac ducts and fittings. A S H

Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Request for Comments Regarding Rates, Accounting and Financial Reporting for New Electric Storage Technologies Docket No. AD10-13-000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovation, under 18 C.F.R. § 375.315, comments are requested in the above-referenced docket regarding rates, accounting and financial reporting associated with services provided by electric storage technologies. 1 Commission staff has been considering the growing interest in the use of nontraditional technologies to help meet the Nation’s electricity needs. In particular, newer storage technologies like flywheels and chemical batteries have recently achieved technological maturity and are well into successful pilot stages and, in some cases, commercial operation. The roles of traditional generation, transmission, and distribution assets within the electric system are well understood and each has set method(s) of rate recovery, accounting and financial reporting. However, the same is not necessarily true of electric storage. Under appropriate circumstances, storage can act like any of the traditional asset categories, and also like load. The only electricity storage technology that has been widely adopted to date, pumped storage hydropower, was generally built at a time when the majority of utility assets were constructed by vertically integrated load-serving utilities at retail ratepayer expense. In many parts of the country today, entities other than vertically integrated load-serving utilities have expressed interest in building and owning electric storage assets of varying sizes. Suggested business models range from traditional cost-of-service rates to competing in wholesale commodity trading; some are considering the possibility of multiple revenue streams which may blend both cost-of-service recovery for some costs with other costs being at risk in competitive wholesale market Commission. 1 The statements herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the20100611-3032 FERC PDF (Unofficial) 06/11/2010

Washington D. C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Coating Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 14 Compositions of unmelted frit batches for high-temperature service silicate-based coatings...Sodium nitrate 5.0 4.0 4.4 . . . 3.8 . . . . . . Fluorspar 4.5 3.2 2.8 . . . 3.0 . . . . . . Tricobalt tetroxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.5 . . . . . . Nickel oxide 0.6 . . . 0.4 . . . 0.6 . . . . . . Manganese dioxide 1.8 . . . 1.1 . . . 1.1 . . . . . . Barium carbonate . . . . . . . . . 26.3 . . . 56.6 56.6...

88

Levelized cost of coating (LCOC) for selective absorber materials.  

SciTech Connect

A new metric has been developed to evaluate and compare selective absorber coatings for concentrating solar power applications. Previous metrics have typically considered the performance of the selective coating (i.e., solar absorptance and thermal emittance), but cost and durability were not considered. This report describes the development of the levelized cost of coating (LCOC), which is similar to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) commonly used to evaluate alternative energy technologies. The LCOC is defined as the ratio of the annualized cost of the coating (and associated costs such as labor and number of heliostats required) to the average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. The baseline LCOC using Pyromark 2500 paint was found to be %240.055/MWht, and the distribution of LCOC values relative to this baseline were determined in a probabilistic analysis to range from -%241.6/MWht to %247.3/MWht, accounting for the cost of additional (or fewer) heliostats required to yield the same baseline average annual thermal energy produced by the receiver. A stepwise multiple rank regression analysis showed that the initial solar absorptance was the most significant parameter impacting the LCOC, followed by thermal emittance, degradation rate, reapplication interval, and downtime during reapplication.

Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Pacheco, James Edward

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Corrosion resistant coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

A technical and marketing analysis of nanocrystalline Ni-W coating for oil and gas industry applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten is a new metallic coating technology developed at MIT in the laboratory of Professor Christopher Schuh in 2005. The new coating technology utilizes a special electrodeposition process to ...

Alotaibi, Waleed L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Produced Conversion Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical conversion coatings are commonly applied to Mg alloys as paint bases and in some cases as stand-alone protection. Traditional conversion coatings ...

92

Self-assembled nanolaminate coatings (SV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) are collaborating to develop affordable, self-assembled, nanocomposite coatings and associated fabrication processes that will be tailored to Lockheed Martin product requirements. The purpose of this project is to develop a family of self-assembled coatings with properties tailored to specific performance requirements, such as antireflective (AR) optics, using Sandia-developed self-assembled techniques. The project met its objectives by development of a simple and economic self-assembly processes to fabricate multifunctional coatings. Specifically, materials, functionalization methods, and associated coating processes for single layer and multiple layers coatings have been developed to accomplish high reflective coatings, hydrophobic coatings, and anti-reflective coatings. Associated modeling and simulations have been developed to guide the coating designs for optimum optical performance. The accomplishments result in significant advantages of reduced costs, increased manufacturing freedom/producibility, improved logistics, and the incorporation of new technology solutions not possible with conventional technologies. These self-assembled coatings with tailored properties will significantly address LMC's needs and give LMC a significant competitive lead in new engineered materials. This work complements SNL's LDRD and BES programs aimed at developing multifunctional nanomaterials for microelectronics and optics as well as structure/property investigations of self-assembled nanomaterials. In addition, this project will provide SNL with new opportunities to develop and apply self-assembled nanocomposite optical coatings for use in the wavelength ranges of 3-5 and 8-12 micrometers, ranges of vital importance to military-based sensors and weapons. The SANC technologies will be applied to multiple programs within the LM Company including the F-35, F-22, ADP (Future Strike Bomber, UAV, UCAV, etc.). The SANC technologies will establish LMA and related US manufacturing capability for commercial and military applications therefore reducing reliance on off-shore development and production of related critical technologies. If these technologies are successfully licensed, production of these coatings in manufactory will create significant technical employment opportunities.

Fan, H.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Colloidal spray method for low cost thin coating deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. Using this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred microns can be obtained. By using a plurality of compounds in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. By using a plurality of solutions and separate pumps and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s), and varying the individual pumping rates and/or the concentrations of the solutions, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded (e.g., stepped) or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high power density solid oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by the invention are also useful for gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, steam electrolyzers, etc. The invention has general use in preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings, or coatings having other specific chemical or physical properties.

Pham, Ai-Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Tae H. (Naperville, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Paint Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Test requirements and time to failure of various coatings...20â??30 0.8â??1.2 150 200â??500 Light zinc phosphate+lacquer paint 23â??28 0.9â??1.1 120 150â??250 Dry film lubrication, air cured 8â??13 0.3â??0.5 â?¦ 50â??100 Heavy zinc phosphate+dry film lubrication, baked 12â??25 0.5â??1.0 100 500â??1000 CARC topcoat 46â??56 1.8â??2.2 â?¦ 25â??50 Light zinc phosphate+CARC primer+topcoat 76â??127 3â??5...

95

Role of surface coating on cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface coating of cathode materials has been widely investigated to enhance the life and rate capability of lithium-ion batteries. The surface coating discussed here was divided into three different configurations which are rough coating, core shell structure coating and ultra thin film coating. The mechanism of surface coating in achieving improved cathode performance and strategies to carry out this surface modification is discussed. An outlook on atomic layer deposition for lithium ion battery is also presented.

Chen, Z.; Qin, Y.; Amine, K.; Sun, Y.-K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Hanyang Univ.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Superoleophilic Particles and Coatings  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a superoleophilic coating that pins a layer of oil to a specially coated substrate and particularly to the surface of the coating. The pinning action keeps the oil from leeching out of the coating, even when the ...

97

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: National Energy Technology Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-003766: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of High Rate Coating Technology for Low Cost Electrochemical Dynamic Windows CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Berkeley, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 3, 2010 CX-003761: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ramgen Supersonic Shock Wave Compression and Engine Technology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Redmond, Washington Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory September 3, 2010 CX-003759: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geological Sequestration Fundamental Research Lab Move CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

98

Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol-Gel Glasses Sol-Gel Glasses PDF format (74 kb) Sol Gel Sol Gel Coating with Sol-Gel Glasses Coating with Sol-Gel Glasses The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center conducts process development and scale-up of ceramic and glass materials prepared by the sol-gel process. Sol-gel processing uses solutions prepared at low temperature rather than high temperature powder processing to make materials with controlled properties. A precursor sol-gel solution (sol) is either poured into a mold and allowed to gel or is diluted and applied to a substrate by spinning, dipping, spraying, electrophoresis, inkjet printing or roll coating. Controlled drying of the wet gel results in either a ceramic or glass bulk part or a thin film on a glass, plastic, ceramic or metal substrate.

100

On Coating Durability of Polymer Coated Sheet Metal under Plastic Deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer coated sheet metal components find diverse applications in many industries. The manufacturing of the components generally involves forming of sheet metal into the desired shape and coating of the formed part with organic coating. An alternative manufacturing route is to coat the sheet metal first before forming. The change in the manufacturing sequence can potentially improve cost and reduce environmental impact. This approach, however, requires the coating to survive the deformation process. Thus, the effect of plastic deformation on coating adhesion is of primary interest to many engineers and researchers. This research aims at developing a methodology to predict the adhesion of coating after metal forming processes. A pull-off apparatus that measures the coating pull-off stress was used to indicate the coating adhesion strength. Several types of specimen were designed to obtain uniaxial tension, biaxial tension, and tension-compression deformation modes on pre-coated sheet by using a uniaxial tensile tester. Experimental results from two selected polymer coated sheet metals show that coating adhesion was affected by plastic deformation. An analytical model based on a virtual interface crack concept was developed to indicate the adhesion potential of the coating-substrate interface. From interfacial fracture mechanics, the initial adhesion potential is defined as the energy release rate characterized by the virtual interface crack and the initial pull-off stress. The analytical model was used to predict coating adhesion loss after deformation in uniaxial tension mode. The analytical model predictions agreed well with experimental results. Finite element analysis tool was applied to simulate more complex deformation modes in stamping of coated sheet meals. The stress field near the interface crack tip was used to calculate the energy release rate and predict the adhesion loss under different deformation modes. The predictions obtained from numerical method are also in good agreements with the experimental results in biaxial tension and tension-compression modes. The research has led to a better understanding of the effects of plastic deformation on coating adhesion. The developed adhesion test methods can be used to generate useful information on coating durability for diverse practical use. It is also expected that the results of the research will facilitate the development of better polymer coated sheet metal to be used in sheet metal forming processes.

Huang, Yu-Hsuan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Apparatus for coating powders  

SciTech Connect

A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and resistant to environmental damage from ingested sand particles ( categorized ... A Study on the Hot Corrosion Resistance of Metal-cemet-glass Coating on ...

103

Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for ceramic coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are being developed to study the use of ceramic coatings on components in the hot-gas path of advanced low-emission gas-fired turbines. The types of ceramic coatings include thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). TBCs are under development for vanes, blades, and combustor liners to allow hotter gas-path temperatures, and EBCs are under development to reduce environmental damage to high-temperature components made of ceramic matrix composites. The NDE methods will be used to (a) provide data to assess the reliability of new coating application processes, (b) identify defective components that could cause unscheduled outages, (c) track growth rates of defects during component use in engines, and (d) allow rational judgment for replace/repair/re-use decisions regarding components. Advances in TBC application, both electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spraying (APS), are allowing higher temperatures in the hot-gas path. However, as TBCs become ''prime reliant,'' their condition at scheduled or unscheduled outages must be known. NDE methods are under development to assess the condition of the TBC for pre-spall conditions. EB-PVD test samples with up to 70 thermal cycles have been studied by a newly developed method involving polarized laser back-scatter NDE. Results suggest a correlation between the NDE laser data and the TBC/bond-coat topography. This finding is important because several theories directed toward understanding the pre-spall condition suggest that the topography in the thermally grown oxide layer changes significantly as a function of the number of thermal cycles. Tests have also been conducted with this NDE method on APS TBCs. Results suggest that the pre-spall condition is detected for these coatings. One-sided, high-speed thermal imaging also has shown promise for NDE of APS coatings. Testing of SiC/SiC composites for combustor liners has demonstrated that environmental EBCs are required to reduce oxidation-induced recession rates. NDE technologies, primarily one-sided and through-thickness thermal imaging, are under development to detect delaminations and degradation of EBCs. Recent results have demonstrated that NDE thermal image data correctly detected pre-spall regions of a barium-strontium-alumino-silicate coating on melt-infiltrated SiC/SiC. The NDE data were verified with field test data from a combustor liner in a 4.5 MW(e) natural-gas-fired turbine. The shape of the spalled EBC region and the growth of the spalled EBC region after various engine run times were correlated with boroscope image data from field tests. An effort has recently been started to address NDE development for oxide/oxide ceramic composites with an EBC. We will discuss the NDE methods under development for TBCs, recent NDE test results from thermally cycled TBCs, NDE results from EBCs on SiC/SiC, and the new effort directed toward oxide/oxide materials.

Ellingson, W. A.; Deemer, C.; Sun, J. G.; Erdman, S.; Muliere, D.; Wheeler, B.

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Manufacturing technology  

SciTech Connect

The specific goals of the Manufacturing Technology thrust area are to develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes, to construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability, to document our findings and models in journals, to transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues, and to develop continuing relationships with industrial and academic communities to advance our collective understanding of fabrication processes. Advances in four projects are described here, namely Design of a Precision Saw for Manufacturing, Deposition of Boron Nitride Films via PVD, Manufacturing and Coating by Kinetic Energy Metallization, and Magnet Design and Application.

Blaedel, K.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermal Spray Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 35   Thermal spray coatings used for hardfacing applications...piston ring (internal combustion);

107

Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

108

Coating Surfaces with Superhydrophobic Powder  

Researchers at ORNL have developed a method of modifying existing coating techniques to include a bonded superhydrophobic outer coating layer. ...

109

Spin coating of electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for spin coating electrolytic materials onto substrates are disclosed. More particularly, methods for depositing solid coatings of ion-conducting material onto planar substrates and onto electrodes are disclosed. These spin coating methods are employed to fabricate electrochemical sensors for use in measuring, detecting and quantifying gases and liquids.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

Rajendra Bordia

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Coating crystalline nuclear waste forms to improve inertness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crystalline waste forms of high simulated waste loading were successfully coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Sol-gel technology was used to produce microspheres that contained simulated waste. A separate process for cesium immobilization was developed, which loads 5 wt % Cs onto zeolite particles for subsequent coating. The chemical vapor deposition process was developed for depositing thin layers of carbon and silicon carbide onto particles in a fluidized-bed coater. Pyrolytic carbon-coated particles were extremely inert in numerous leach tests. Aqueous leach test results of coated waste forms were below detection limits of such sensitive analytical techniques as atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission.

Stinton, D.P.; Angelini, P.; Caputo, A.J.; Lackey, W.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

CORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the following six RD&D program areas: · Residential and Commercial Building End-Use Energy EfficiencyCORROSION-RESISTANT COATING FOR CARBONATE FUEL CELL COMPONENTS Prepared For: California Energy · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Environmentally

114

Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coatings: Interplay Among Coating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cold Sprayed Aluminum Based Glassy Coatings for Improved Corrosion and Wear ... Effect of Thermal Cycling and Sliding on the Structure of Cu-Nb Nanolaminates ... Based on Oscillatory Voltage Wave Forms for Insulating Film Depositions.

115

Recent Approaches and Challenges in Smart Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-healing coatings -Self-cleaning and superhydrophobic coatings - Chemical Conversion Coatings - Nano- and Micro-capsules Based Polymer Coatings

116

Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game Shirley Coates Brostmeyer: Changing the (Engineering) Game March 22, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT’s twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio Shirley Coates Brostmeyer holds FTT's twin-spool turbofan, the most efficient micro-turbine of its size | credit Frank Serio April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs In honor of Women's History Month, we've brought you the stories of several women in the energy and science industries -- past, present and future. This week we spoke with Shirley Coates Brostmeyer, co-founder, CEO and owner of Florida Turbine Technologies, to find out what it takes to run

117

Tag: coat drive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9/all en Warm coats, big thanks 9/all en Warm coats, big thanks http://www.y12.doe.gov/community/warm-coats-big-thanks

Y-12 employees help people face some of the coldest temperatures East Tennessee has seen in a long time.
  • coats-big-thanks" rel="tag" title="Warm coats, big thanks">Read more about Warm coats, big thanks Thu, 09 Jan 2014 19:23:39 +0000 pam

  • 118

    Review of technology for 157-nm lithography  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This paper outlines the critical issues facing the implementation of 157-nm lithography as a sub-100-nm technology. The status of the present technology for mask materials, pellicles, optical materials, coatings, and resists is presented.

    A. K. Bates; M. Rothschild; T. M. Bloomstein; T. H. Fedynyshyn; R. R. Kunz; V. Liberman; M. Switkes

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    119

    Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys  

    SciTech Connect

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    120

    ADVANCES IN COATINGS TECHNOLOGIES II: IV - TMS  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This protein exhibits high affinity for metals and acts as a substrate for the enzyme catechol oxidase, which catalyzes the two electron oxidation of catechol to ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    121

    ADVANCES IN COATINGS TECHNOLOGIES II: Session III  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Recent applications of PLD include high temperature superconductors, ferroelectrics, magnetoresistive materials and ferrites. Ferroelectric thin films grown by ...

    122

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    123

    Solar selective absorption coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

    Mahoney, Alan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, F. Edward (Horseheads, NY)

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    124

    Field Guide: Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has numerous products to help plant personnel meet the challenges of working with aging systems, structures, and components, but none that comprehensively address protective coatings and linings. This field guide provides a compilation of protective coating and lining information in a form that allows the user to have a ready reference available during condition assessment of the various protective coatings and linings used in the plant.

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    125

    Polymeric and Conversion Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 19, 2011 ... Ongoing research reveals that the search for appropriate conversion ... of the coated alloy was ~ 250 mV more noble compared to bare alloy.

    126

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    127

    COPPER COATED URANIUM ARTICLE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Various techniques and methods for obtaining coppercoated uranium are given. Specifically disclosed are a group of complex uranium coatings having successive layers of nickel, copper, lead, and tin.

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    128

    Alternate Coating Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 28, 2009 ... The cold spray process can prepare thick coatings (> 1 cm) with many ... protection, thermal insulation, thermal dissipation, wear resistance, ...

    129

    Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report  

    SciTech Connect

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    130

    Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

    Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    131

    Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    132

    Thermal barrier coating  

    SciTech Connect

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    133

    Chemical Conversion Coating  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 16   Applications of aluminum using chemical conversion coatings...doors 6063 Acrylic paint (b) Cans 3004 Sanitary lacquer Fencing 6061 None applied Chromate conversion coatings Aircraft fuselage skins 7075 clad with 7072 Zinc chromate primer Electronic chassis 6061-T4 None applied Cast missile bulkhead 356-T6 None applied Screen 5056 clad with 6253 Clear varnish...

    134

    On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

    SciTech Connect

    Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    135

    Thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    136

    LEVELING METAL COATINGS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for applying metallic coatings to a cylinder of uranium. An aluminum-silicon coat is applied by a process consisting of first cleaning the article by immersion for 5 minutes in 50% nitric acid at 65 C. The article then is dipped through a flux, prepared by adding 10% sodium fluoride to 90% of a flux comprising 53% potassium chloride, 42% lithium chloride, and 5% sodium chloride at 560 for 2 minutes and then directly into a molten metal bath comprising 99% aluminun and 12% silicon at 620 C for 3 minutes. While the coating is yet molten the article is transferred to a pair of steel rollers and rolled until the coating solidifies. By varying the composition of the flux other metals such as zinc, lead or the like may be coated on uranium in a similar manner.

    Gage, H.A.

    1959-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    137

    Laser Processing and Hard Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013 ... Advances in Surface Engineering: Alloyed and Composite Coatings II: Laser Processing and Hard Coatings Sponsored by: TMS Materials ...

    138

    Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Molding, Thermoforming & Compounding Molding, Thermoforming & Compounding PDF format (89 kb) The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center helps customers choose the best materials and techniques for their product by providing a variety of conformal coatings, thermoforming, and compounding materials using established or custom designed processes. The department provides consulting services for injection molding and rubber compounding projects. Capabilities: Thermoforming: Processing thermoplastics such as polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, polypropylene polystyrene, and ABS; producing holding trays, protective caps, and custom covers Injection Molding Consultation: Designing your part to be injection molded, helping you choose the best material for your application, and supporting your interface with injection molding companies

    139

    High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOE’s coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

    Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    140

    Technological assessment of light-trapping technology for thin-film Si solar cell  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    The proposed light trapping technology of Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) with Diffraction Grating (DG) and Anti-Reflection Coating (ARC) for thin film Si solar cell was analyzed from the technology, market, and ...

    Susantyoko, Rahmat Agung

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    141

    Wear-resistant coatings for cobalt-base alloys  

    SciTech Connect

    High interfacial stresses and coating failure are expected when a hard coating protects a more-compliant substrate in applications involving high-stress wear contact. Assuming that small differences in stiffness (or modulus) between the coating and substrate are required for a wear-resistant coating in such applications, four approaches have been taken to develop such coatings for cobalt-base alloys. Hardness, scratch adhesion, and nano-indentation testing identified the most promising candidates for cobalt-base alloys: A thin coating with hard Cr{sub 2}N and less-stiff Cr-N(ss) layers; a thick, four-layered coating with a 4{mu}m inner layer of Cr-N(ss)/ 1 {mu}m layer of Cr{sub 2}N/4 {micro}m layer of Cr-N(ss)/1 {micro} outer layer of Cr{sub 2}N; a duplex approach of ion nitriding to harden the subsurface,followed by application of a dual-layered Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating; and ion nitriding alone. The low scratch adhesion values and high modulus/hardness values indicate that ZrN, TiN, and plasma carburized coatings represent less beneficial approaches. Two different cobalt-base alloys were studied in this work: Haynes 25 and Stellite 3 (Stoody Deloro Stellite). Based on weight change, profilometry measurements, and metallographic and SEM examinations after four-ball wear testing, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/CrN(ss) coated coupons exhibited a significantly lower wear rate than the uncoated Haynes 25 coupons. Of greater importance, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coatings were adherent on the Stellite 3 intermediate balls and Haynes 25 cups, and prevented the wear of the cobalt-base substrate. based on these results, the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coating was the best coating candidate, and this coating could result in a reduced wear rate and less cobalt wear debris. The ion nitrided coupons exhibited slightly higher wear than the thin Cr{sub 2}N/Cr-N(ss) coated coupons, while the wear of the thin duplex coated coupons was the highest. However, the nitride layer was adherent and protected the Haynes 25 substrate. Therefore, modification of the ion nitriding conditions or surface lapping after nitriding are approaches that may improve the wear resistance of the ion nitriding and duplex coatings.

    Cockeram, B.V.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    142

    Highly Insulating Window Technology  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Window Technology Window Technology Temperature differentials across a window, particularly with cold exterior environments in residential buildings, can lead to significant energy losses. Currently available low-emissivity coatings, gas-fills, and insulating frames provide significant energy savings over typical single or double glazed products. The EWC website provides information on how double glazed low-e gas-filled windows work as well as information on commercially available superwindows (three layer, multiple low-e coatings, high performance gas-fills). The next generation of highly insulating window systems will benefit from incremental improvements being made to current components (i.e. more insulating spacers and frame materials/designs, low-e coatings with improved performance properties). LBNL uses its experimental facilities and software tools to collaborate with window and glass industry representatives to better understand the impacts of new components on overall product performance.

    143

    Superhydrophic Coatings - ORNL  

    The result is a coating which causes liquids to “bead up” on the surface of a ... Brian R. D’Urson and John T. Simpson, ... Materials Science UT-Battelle, LLC

    144

    Coating Manufacturing Methods  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 30, 2013 ... Examples will include energy saving (smart radiators for satellites, low emissivity ... Finally, specific functional applications such as electrical contact and coatings on ... The study is supported by RFBR, research project No.

    145

    Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    146

    METAL COATING BATHS  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    147

    Comparison of HVOF Sprayed MCrAlY Coating and Nickel ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... coatings based on the application requirements and not on substrate physical properties such as thermal expansion rate Esp. within the same class of alloys.

    148

    Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    149

    Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion  

    SciTech Connect

    Wear and corrosion of structures cuts across industries and continues to challenge materials scientists and engineers to develop cost effective solutions. Industries typically seek mature technologies that can be implemented for production with rapid or minimal development and have little appetite for the longer-term materials research and development required to solve complex problems. The collaborative work performed in this project addressed the complexity of this problem in a multi-year program that industries would be reluctant to undertake without government partnership. This effort built upon the prior development of Advanced Abrasion Resistant Materials conduct by Caterpillar Inc. under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41054. In this referenced work, coatings were developed that exhibited significant wear life improvements over standard carburized heat treated steel in abrasive wear applications. The technology used in this referenced work, arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings, was one of the primary technical paths in this work effort. In addition to extending the capability of the coating technology to address corrosion issues, additional competitive coating technologies were evaluated to insure that the best technology was developed to meet the goals of the program. From this, plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding was selected as the second primary technology that was investigated. Specifically, this project developed improved, cost effective surfacing materials and processes for wear and corrosion resistance in both sliding and abrasive wear applications. Materials with wear and corrosion performance improvements that are 4 to 5 times greater than heat treated steels were developed. The materials developed were based on low cost material systems utilizing ferrous substrates and stainless steel type matrix with hard particulates formed from borides and carbides. Affordability was assessed against other competing hard surfacing or coating techniques, balanced with overall materials performance. State-of-the-art design and simulation capabilities were used to guide materials and process refinement. Caterpillar was the lead of the multi-partner collaborative project. Specific tasks were performed by the partners base on their unique capabilities. The project team was selected to include leaders in the field of material development, processing, modeling, and material characterization. Specifically, industrial members include the suppliers Deloro Stellite and Powder Alloy Corporation., who provided the experimental alloys and who aided in the development of the costs for the alloys, the Missouri University of Science and Technology and Iowa State University, who provided help in the alloy development and material characterization, QuesTek Innovations, a small company specializing the microstructural modeling of materials, and the DOE laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and National Energy Technology Laboratory (Albany), who provided unique coating process capability and wear characterization testing. The technologies developed in this program are expected to yield energy savings of about 50% over existing technologies, or 110 trillion BTUs per year by 2020 when fully implemented. Primary applications by Caterpillar are to replace the surface of machine components which are currently carburized and heat treated with new cladding materials with double the wear life. The new cladding technologies will consume less energy than carburizing. Thus, nearly 50% energy savings can be expected as a result from elimination of the heat treat process and the reduce wear of the materials. Additionally, when technologies from this project are applied on titanium or other non-ferrous substrates to make lighter weight, more wear resistant, and more efficient structures, significant fuel savings can be realized. With the anticipated drastic reduction in cost for refining titanium-containing ores, the usage of titanium alloys in earthmoving and related machinery is expected to increase multiple folds in the next d

    Beardsley, M. Brad; Sebright, Jason L.

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    150

    Development of insulating coatings for liquid metal blankets  

    SciTech Connect

    It is shown that self-cooled liquid metal blankets are feasible only with electrically insulating coatings at the duct walls. The requirements on the insulation properties are estimated by simple analytical models. Candidate insulator materials are selected based on insulating properties and thermodynamic consideration. Different fabrication technologies for insulating coatings are described. The status of the knowledge on the most crucial feasibility issue, the degradation of the resisivity under irradiation, is reviewed.

    Malang, S.; Borgstedt, H.U. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany); Farnum, E.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Vitkovski, I.V. [Efremov Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation). MHD-Machines Lab.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    151

    Coated Fiber Neutron Detector Test  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. The currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) from Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large neutron detector. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Reported here are the results of tests of the 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated non-scintillating plastic fibers option. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Innovative American Technology (IAT).

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Stromswold, David C.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    152

    Workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry  

    SciTech Connect

    New lightweight materials continue to be of great interest to the automotive industry. Compared to 20 years ago, the average vehicle weight has been reduced by almost a fourth, and fuel economy has nearly doubled. While continued improvements are both desirable and possible, materials choices are narrowing and the manufacturing methods needed to produce advanced materials systems are much more costly. The incentives remain high, however; particularly in view of large payoffs associated with minimizing structural weight in electric and hybrid-type vehicles. One generic solution is to develop coatings that will enable the use of lower cost materials. A workshop on coatings needs in the auto industry was held in Detroit, Michigan on October 27 and 28, 1992 with the objective of identifying research needs where coatings could enhance the use of energy efficient lightweight materials for automotive applications. Four generic areas had previously been identified auto manufacturers and industry suppliers. These were: Wear Coatings, Hard Protective Coatings for Plastics, Solar Control Coatings, and Process Manufacturing Issues. The development of coatings and coating technologies for lightweight metals and metal matrix composites emerged as the number one research needs. This need underscores the interest in making better use of existing lightweight metals, e.g. magnesium, aluminum, and their alloys. Coatings to protect plastics and reinforced plastic composites were also identified as a major area of importance. Protection from automotive liquids and gases. Coatings that will improve mar resistance, resist UV degradation, or eliminate degradation due to moisture absorption are also needed. Accordingly, manufacturability issues associated with coating light metals, e.g. aluminum, magnesium, and metal matrix composites with wear and corrosion resistant materials, were identified as a high priority research need.

    Courtright, E.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    153

    Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to be applied by divers after scrubbing loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuuming up the sludge. A special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pool with no airborne contamination problems.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    154

    METHOD OF PROTECTIVELY COATING URANIUM  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is described for protectively coating uranium with zine comprising cleaning the U for coating by pickling in concentrated HNO/sub 3/, dipping the cleaned U into a bath of molten zinc between 430 to 600 C and containing less than 0 01% each of Fe and Pb, and withdrawing and cooling to solidify the coating. The zinccoated uranium may be given a; econd coating with another metal niore resistant to the corrosive influences particularly concerned. A coating of Pb containing small proportions of Ag or Sn, or Al containing small proportions of Si may be applied over the zinc coatings by dipping in molten baths of these metals.

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    155

    Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Materials Biofuels Biofuels Biotechnology and Medecine Biotechnology & Medicine Chemistry Developing World Energy Efficient Technologies Energy Environmental Technologies...

    156

    Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. [Quarterly report, July--September 1993  

    SciTech Connect

    In the previous period of work, twelve overlay hardfacing alloys were selected for erosion testing based upon a literature review. All twelve coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. The coating deposition and sample preparation procedures were described in the previous quarterly report. During the past quarter, all the coatings were erosion tested at 400 C. The erosion resistance of each coating was evaluated by determining the steady state erosion rate. In addition, the microstructure of each coating was characterized before and after the erosion tests. This progress report describes the erosion test results and coating microstructures. Also, a preliminary analysis on the relationships, between weld overlay coating hardness, microstructure, and erosion resistance will be discussed.

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    157

    Radiation Control Coatings Installed on Federal Buildings at Tyndall Air Force Base  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The technical objectives of this CRADA comprise technology deployment and energy conservation efforts with the radiation control coatings industry and the utility sector. The results of this collaboration include a high-level data reporting, analysis and management system to support the deployment efforts. The technical objectives include successfully install, commission, operate, maintain and document the performance of radiation control coatings on roofs at Tyndall AFB and the Buildings Technology Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory; determine the life cycle savings that can be achieved by using radiation control coatings on entire roofs at Tyndall AFB, based on documented installed cost and operating maintenance costs with and without the coatings; determine if any specific improvements are required in the coatings before they can be successfully deployed in the federal sector; determine the most effective way to facilitate the widespread and rapid deployment of radiation control coatings in the federal sector; and clearly define any barriers to deployment.

    Kaba, R.L.; Petrie, T.W.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    158

    Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    159

    Ceramic Coatings for Corrosion Resistant Nuclear Waste Container Evaluated in Simulated Ground Water at 90?C  

    SciTech Connect

    Ceramic materials have been considered as corrosion resistant coatings for nuclear waste containers. Their suitability can be derived from the fully oxidized state for selected metal oxides. Several types of ceramic coatings applied to plain carbon steel substrates by thermal spray techniques have been exposed to 90 C simulated ground water for nearly 6 years. In some cases no apparent macroscopic damage such as coating spallation was observed in coatings. Thermal spray processes examined in this work included plasma spray, High Velocity Oxy Fuel (HVOF), and Detonation Gun. Some thermal spray coatings have demonstrated superior corrosion protection for the plain carbon steel substrate. In particular the HVOF and Detonation Gun thermal spray processes produced coatings with low connected porosity, which limited the growth rate of corrosion products. It was also demonstrated that these coatings resisted spallation of the coating even when an intentional flaw (which allowed for corrosion of the carbon steel substrate underneath the ceramic coating) was placed in the coating. A model for prediction of the corrosion protection provided by ceramic coatings is presented. The model includes the effect of the morphology and amount of the porosity within the thermal spray coating and provides a prediction of the exposure time needed to produce a crack in the ceramic coating.

    Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    160

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    161

    New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

    162

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    163

    Fiber coating method  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

    Corman, Gregory Scot (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    164

    Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a coating system meeting the requirements for photovoltaic module encapsulation.

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    165

    Thermal barrier coating for alloy systems  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An alloy substrate is protected by a thermal barrier coating formed from a layer of metallic bond coat and a top coat formed from generally hollow ceramic particles dispersed in a matrix bonded to the bond coat.

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); White, Rickey L. (Harriman, TN); Dinwiddie, Ralph B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    166

    High-R window technology development. Phase 2, Final report  

    SciTech Connect

    Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 ``super`` windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

    Arasteh, D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    167

    Understanding Compatibilities between Advanced Coatings and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    168

    PNNL wins Four Technology Transfer Awards  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    PNNL wins 4 Technology Transfer Awards Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has received four 2006 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium - a nationwide network of more than 700 major federal laboratories and centers as well as their parent departments and agencies that provides a forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking technology with the mission and the marketplace. The FLC presents its Awards for Excellence in Technology Transfer to federal laboratory employees who have done outstanding work in transferring U.S. government-sponsored technologies to the public and private sectors. Since 1984, when the awards program was established, Pacific Northwest has earned 62 of these awards, far more than any other national laboratory. This year, PNNL won all four of the nominations that were submitted--the most that any laboratory can submit. PNNL was recognized for transferring technologies that treat and cure cancer, uniquely analyze massive sets of data, increase surgical implant success rates, and neutralize toxic chemicals from the environment. Through collaboration with PNNL researchers and access to facilities at PNNL, IsoRay Medical, Inc. (http://www.isoray.com), expanded its brachytherapy technology for treating prostate and other cancers. The medical isotope ?seed? products are available at more than 17 implant centers nationwide. More than 40 organizations, including Fortune 500 companies, are using the Starlight information visualization software to mine and interpret massive amounts of data. Bacterin International licensed bioactive thin-film coatings which reduce infection rates associated with surgical implants. Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Silica (SAMMS), a process for removing mercury and other toxic chemicals from the environment, was licensed to Steward Advanced Materials for use in coal-fired power plants, municipal incinerators, and other plants.

    Fisher, Julie A.; McMakin, Andrea H.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    169

    Coating method for graphite  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of limiting carbon contamination from graphite ware used in induction melting of uranium alloys is provided. The graphite surface is coated with a suspension of Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles in water containing about 1.5 to 4 percent by weight sodium carboxymethylcellulose.

    Banker, J.G.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1975-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    170

    Proceedings of the 1987 coatings for advanced heat engines workshop  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This Workshop was conducted to enhance communication among those involved in coating development for improved heat engine performance and durability. We were fortunate to have Bill Goward review the steady progress and problems encountered along the way in the use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in aircraft gas turbine engines. Navy contractors discussed their work toward the elusive goal of qualifying TBC for turbine airfoil applications. In the diesel community, Caterpillar and Cummins are developing TBC for combustion chamber components as part of the low heat rejection diesel engine concept. The diesel engine TBC work is based on gas turbine technology with a goal of more than twice the thickness used on gas turbine engine components. Adoption of TBC in production for diesel engines could justify a new generation of plasma spray coating equipment. Increasing interests in tribology were evident in this Workshop. Coatings have a significant role in reducing friction and wear under greater mechanical loadings at higher temperatures. The emergence of a high temperature synthetic lubricant could have an enormous impact on diesel engine design and operating conditions. The proven coating processes such as plasma spray, electron-beam physical vapor deposition, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition have shown enhanced capabilities, particularly with microprocessor controls. Also, the newer coating schemes such as ion implantation and cathodic arc are demonstrating intriguing potential for engine applications. Coatings will play an expanding role in higher efficiency, more durable heat engines.

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    171

    Overview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    -scale composite structures Advanced coatings Laser processing Distributed Generation & Smart Grid Broad in technology demonstration and transition to application. Modeling and control architecture of the SmartGrid - Condition Based Maintenance - Integrated Health Management System Design & Optimization - Automated

    Lee, Dongwon

    172

    Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials  

    SciTech Connect

    A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO{sub 4} and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO{sub 4} suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10{sup -9} S cm{sup -1}). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (<800 C) required to make LiFePO{sub 4}, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density.

    Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

    2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    173

    ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    , Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four origin, gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, status as a Vietnam-era veteran, or disability

    174

    Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

    175

    U-11: Nanotechnology Coating of Buildings with Sol–Gel Method  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    With this coating technology, the surface building maintenance, especially for ... Energy Generation and Storage Applications of TiO2 Nanotubular Arrays by ... Interface Engineering as a Tool to Enhance Efficiencies of Carbon Nanotube ...

    176

    Thermal barrier and overlay coating systems comprising composite metal/metal oxide bond coating layers  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention generally describes multilayer coating systems comprising a composite metal/metal oxide bond coat layer. The coating systems may be used in gas turbines.

    Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL); Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    177

    Materials - Coatings & Lubricants  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coatings and Lubricants: Coatings and Lubricants: Super-Hard and Ultra-Low-Friction Films for Friction and Wear Control Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. Ali Erdemir researches nanolubricants. The many rolling, rotating and sliding mechanical assemblies in advanced transportation vehicles present friction and wear challenges for automotive engineers. These systems operate under severe conditions-high loads, speeds and temperatures-that currently available materials and lubricants do not tolerate well. Improving the surface friction and wear characteristics of the mechanical system components is an opportunity for engineers, and the use of super-hard, slippery surface films offers promise. Argonne scientists have developed a number of smooth, wear-resistant, low-friction nanocomposite nitride and diamond-like carbon films that have

    178

    Antithrombogenic Polymer Coating.  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An article having a non-thrombogenic surface and a process for making the article are disclosed. The article is formed by (i) coating a polymeric substrate with a crosslinked chemical combination of a polymer having at least two amino substituted side chains, a crosslinking agent containing at least two crosslinking functional groups which react with amino groups on the polymer, and a linking agent containing a first functional group which reacts with a third functional group of the crosslinking agent, and (ii) contacting the coating on the substrate with an antithrombogenic agent which covalently bonds to a second functional group of the linking agent. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone, the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl, the linking agent is a polyhydrazide and the antithrombogenic agent is heparin.

    Huang, Zhi Heng (San Ramon, CA); McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    179

    Protective Coatings Assessment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    It is well known that fireside corrosion of waterwall panels in coal-fired boilers increased with the introduction of low NOx combustion systems since the early 1980s. This report describes ongoing work to evaluate protective coating solutions used to mitigate the wastage due to corrosion, and to determine which provide the greatest resistance to the circumferential cracking phenomena. It includes recent laboratory corrosion assisted thermal fatigue tests and analyses of field-exposed samples of ...

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    180

    Microsoft Word - 41231_EPRI_Hot Section Coating Life Mgmt_Factsheet_Rev01_10-03.doc  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Prepared 2/6/03 Prepared 2/6/03 Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management EPRI FACT SHEET I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS 1. Prime Participant: EPRI A. Sub-Award Participants: Southwest Research Institute Turbine Technology International II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objectives The objective of this project is to improve the reliability, availability and maintainability (RAM) of combustion turbines (CTs) by developing advanced technology for assessing and managing the life of protective coatings on CT blades and vanes. B. Background Degradation of protective coatings represents a major profitability challenge for combustion turbine owners. Coating life dictates blade refurbishment intervals and the need for costly replacement. A proper life management

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    181

    Effect of porosity on resistance of epoxy coatings to cold-wall blistering  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Electric utilities use polymer coatings for corrosion protection in a variety of locations, such as cooling towers, water boxes, and tubesheets. In some cases, these coatings are vulnerable to failure in areas where a temperature gradient exists between a cold substrate and relatively warm fluid (cold-wall blistering). Six epoxy-based coating systems were tested for their resistance to degradation in the form of cold wall blistering. The coatings were applied to type 1010 steel substrates and exposed to heated water for up to 10 months in Atlas test cells as a modified version of NACE Standard TM0174. The performance of the coatings was measured by the exposure time for the coatings to start blistering, the time for the corrosion potential of the coating substrates to shift toward active values, and the delamination rate of the coatings. Good cold-wall blistering resistance was observed for two polyamine-cured epoxy coating systems with porosity levels 1 vol%. Poor cold-wall blistering resistance was shown by a polyamide epoxy system, an amine adduct epoxy system, and an amido-amine epoxy system, all of which had porosity levels > 1 vol%. Most of the coating samples exhibited linear blistering rates, which indicated that the kinetics of cold-wall blistering were diffusion controlled. The two coating systems that showed the best resistance to cold-wall blistering also showed the lowest blistering rates, indicating that these coatings may have had lower permeabilities and/or better adherences than the poorer performing coatings, probably as a result of their lower porosity levels and similar compositions.

    Kosek, J.R.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    182

    Characterization of Environmental Stability of Pulsed Laser Deposited Oxide Ceramic Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    A systematic investigation of candidate hydrogen permeation materials applied to a substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition has been performed. The investigation focused on application of leading permeation-resistant materials types (oxide, carbides, and metals) on a stainless steel substrate. and evaluation of the stability of the applied coatings. Type 304L stainless steel substrates were coated with aluminum oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum. Characterization of the coating-substrate system adhesion was performed using scratch adhesion testing and microindentation. Coating stability and environmental susceptibility were evaluated for two conditions-air at 350 degrees Celsius and Ar-H2 at 350 degrees Celsius for up to 100 hours. Results from this study have shown the pulsed laser deposition process to be an extremely versatile technology that is capable of producing a sound coating/substrate system for a wide variety of coating materials.

    ADAMS, THADM

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    183

    DEVELOPMENT AND ASSESSMENT OF COATINGS FOR FUTURE POWER GENERATION TURBINES  

    SciTech Connect

    The NETL-Regional University Alliance (RUA) continues to advance technology development critical to turbine manufacturer efforts for achieving DOE Fossil Energy (FE's) Advanced Turbine Program Goals. In conjunction with NETL, Coatings for Industry (CFI), the University of Pittsburgh, NASA GRC, and Corrosion Control Inc., efforts have been focused on development of composite thermal barrier coating (TBC) architectures that consist of an extreme temperature coating, a commercially applied 7-8 YSZ TBC, a reduced cost bond coat, and a diffusion barrier coating that are applied to nickel-based superalloys or single crystal airfoil substrate materials for use at temperatures >1450 C (> 2640 F). Additionally, construction of a unique, high temperature ({approx}1100 C; {approx}2010 F), bench-scale, micro-indentation, nondestructive (NDE) test facility at West Virginia University (WVU) was completed to experimentally address in-situ changes in TBC stiffness during extended cyclic oxidation exposure of coated single crystal coupons in air or steam containing environments. The efforts and technical accomplishments in these areas are presented in the following sections of this paper.

    Alvin, Maryanne; Klotz, K.; McMordie, B.; Gleeson, B.; Zhu, D.; Warnes, B.; Kang, B.; Tannenbaum, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    184

    Hard, infrared black coating with very low outgassing  

    SciTech Connect

    Infrared astronomical instruments require absorptive coatings on internal surfaces to trap scattered and stray photons. This is typically accomplished with any one of a number of black paints. Although inexpensive and simple to apply, paint has several disadvantages. Painted surfaces can be fragile, prone to shedding particles, and difficult to clean. Most importantly, the vacuum performance is poor. Recently a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was developed to apply thick (30 {micro}m) diamond-like carbon (DLC) based protective coatings to the interior of oil pipelines. These DLC coatings show much promise as an infrared black for an ultra high vacuum environment. The coatings are very robust with excellent cryogenic adhesion. Their total infrared reflectivity of < 10% at normal incidence approaches that of black paints. We measured outgas rates of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec cm{sup 2}, comparable to bare stainless steel.

    Kuzmenko, P J; Behne, D M; Casserly, T; Boardman, W; Upadhyaya, D; Boinapally, K; Gupta, M; Cao, Y

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    185

    UV Curable Coatings -- Marketing Kit  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Ultra violet (UV) curable coatings are being successfully applied to electric motors, metal shafts, cell phones, printing, plastic packaging, and wood laminates. Demand is expected to expand to an even greater number of end products as issues related to environmental well-being, finish quality, cost reductions, and manufacturing efficiencies drive this market. This UV Curable Coatings-Marketing Kit is designed to help utility sales and marketing personnel present UV curable coating opportunities to custo...

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    186

    Thermal and Cold Sprayed Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Mar 5, 2013... Coating Evaluated by Micro and Nano Indentation: Meysam Keshavarz1; Mohd Hasbullah bin Hj.Idris1; 1UTM,Universiti Teknologi Malaysia

    187

    Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods  

    SciTech Connect

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

    Seabaugh, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH); Swartz, Scott L. (Columbus, OH); Dawson, William J. (Dublin, OH); McCormick, Buddy E. (Dublin, OH)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    188

    Carbonaceous film coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method of making a carbonaceous film comprising heating tris(1,3,2-benzodiazaborolo)borazine or dodecahydro tris(1,3,2)diazaborine(1,2-a:1'2'-c:1''2''-e)borazine in an inert atmosphere in the presence of a substrate to a temperature at which the borazine compound decomposes, and the decomposition products deposit onto the substrate to form a thin, tenacious, highly reflective conductive coating having a narrow band gap which is susceptible of modification and a relatively low coefficient of friction.

    Maya, L.

    1988-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    189

    Technology Search  

    home \\ technologies \\ search. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: Software: Patents: Technology Search. ... Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, ...

    190

    Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)  

    SciTech Connect

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    191

    Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design.

    192

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Element One, Inc. Element One, Inc. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 191524 likes Element One, based in Boulder, Colorado, has created the only available coatings that change color when detecting hydrogen and other hazardous gas leaks, either reversibly or non-reversibly, to provide both current and historical information about leaks. Element One's patented gas indicators and sensors use catalyzed thin films or nanoparticles of a transition metal oxide to create very low cost sensors for use in industrial and consumer environments, greatly reducing the potential for undetected leaks and their cost and safety implications. This technology is also being integrated for use in refineries, industry gas and fuel cells systems and was developed using technology from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

    193

    Rate Schedules  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

    194

    Advanced Lost Foam Casting Technology  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes the research done under the six tasks to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. Task 1: Pattern Pyrolysis Products and Pattern Properties Task 2: Coating Quality Control Task 3: Fill and Solidification Code Task 4: Alternate Pattern Materials Task 5: Casting Distortion Task 6: Technology Transfer

    Charles E. Bates; Harry E. Littleton; Don Askeland; Taras Molibog; Jason Hopper; Ben Vatankhah

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    195

    Coated ceramic breeder materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A lithium containing ceramic breeder material is described which is coated with a neutron multiplier such as Beryllium (Be), Beryllium Oxide (BeO), or other material having a higher thermal conductivity than the lithium ceramic material itself. In addition to exhibiting certain thermal conductivity properties, the neutron multiplier must be capable of withstanding the high temperatures (700/sup 0/ to 1300/sup 0/K) experienced in a breeder blanket of a fusion reactor. State of the art considerations have indicated several possible configurations for the lithium containing ceramic breeders, including a sphere-pac arrangement or sintered pellets or blocks. When one adds a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO into a sphere-pac bed of lithium containing ceramic breeders, current concepts include mixing the neutron multiplier randomly into the sphere-pac bed in the form of small spheres of a size comparable to that of the lithium ceramic particles. The present invention shows that a sphere-pac bed of breeder particles coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be and BeO has an improved thermal conductivity when compared with that of a bed of uncoated breeder particles randomly mixed with Be or BeO spheres having the same breeder/multiplier composition ratio.

    Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1986-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    196

    Thin film ion conducting coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Durable thin film ion conducting coatings are formed on a transparent glass substrate by the controlled deposition of the mixed oxides of lithium:tantalum or lithium:niobium. The coatings provide durable ion transport sources for thin film solid state storage batteries and electrochromic energy conservation devices.

    Goldner, Ronald B. (Lexington, MA); Haas, Terry (Sudbury, MA); Wong, Kwok-Keung (Watertown, MA); Seward, George (Arlington, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    197

    Technology Performance Exchange  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Technology Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem: Perceived fiscal risk associated with the installation of unfamiliar technologies impedes adoption rates for cost-effective, energy-saving products. Impact of Project: Enable end users to quickly and

    198

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings | Department...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings August 19, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV)...

    199

    Abradable Coatings Increase Gas Turbine Engine Efficiency  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 11, 2007 ... This brief article covers the uses of abradable coatings, their development and their function. Wear at high speed, effect of tip width and coating ...

    200

    Solar selective absorption coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    201

    Sodium compatibility studies of low friction carbide coatings for reactor application  

    SciTech Connect

    Design requirements for low friction materials in FFTF have led to an experimental sodium compatibility program, the objective of which is to select and qualify a low friction coating for the fuel assembly duct load pad. Results are given for chromium carbide and titanium carbide-based coatings on stainless steel exposed to 1160 deg F sodium for several thousand hours. A chromium carbide coating (with a nichrome binder) having an average corrosion rate of approximately 0.25 mpy exhibits optimum sodium compatibility behavior of the materials examined. Both plasma-sprayed chromium carbide and titanium carbide based coatings were found to be unstable when exposed to sodium. (auth)

    Whitlow, G.A.; Miller, R.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Wu, P.C.S.

    1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    202

    Tribology Coatings I  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 27, 2009... Malahat Niki Nushari1; Nader Shakib1; A. Shokuhfar2; 1R&D Department of Iran Radiator Company; 2K.N. Toosi University of Technology

    203

    Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

    204

    STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC.  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. OPTICAL COATING LABORATORY, INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER-OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO. DE-FC36-94GO 10029 W(A)-95-018; CH-0863 The Petitioner, Optical Coating Laboratory, Inc. has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled "Electrochromics Windows Program." The objective of the cooperative agreement is to develop and demonstrate a thin-film electrochronic switching technology suitable for commercialization in the fenestration industry. The agreement comprises three phases including, respectively, development, demonstration, and market deployment. In Phase I, a viable electrochromic window system wilh a transmittance

    205

    Technology Capabilities  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Homeland Security & Defense Homeland Security & Defense Information Technology & Communications Information Technology & Communications Sensors, Electronics &...

    206

    Impact of ALD Coating on Mn-rich Cathode Materials (Presentation)  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    LG Chem Power Inc. (LGCPI) and NREL have collaborated to demonstrate the scalability of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) coating process over the last 6 months, and the benefits of ALD coatings for long-term cycling and calendar life are being quantified. The objectives of this work are two-fold: 1) to evaluate the scalability of the process to coat LGCPI cathodes with alumina using the ALD technique, and 2) to demonstrate improvements in rate capability and life of ALD-coated LGCPI electrodes. NREL received samples of baseline material to be coated from LGCPI. NREL carried out ALD coating of the samples with help from a subcontractor, ALD Nanosolutions. NREL fabricated cells from those samples for quick screening and feedback to ALD Nanosolutions. LGCPI is currently fabricating larger-format cells for further evaluation.

    Santhanagopalan, S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    207

    Ceramic composite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    208

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching metal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, G.G.

    1989-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    209

    Ceramic composite coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A thin, room-temperature-curing, ceramic composite for coating and patching etal substrates comprises a sol gel silica glass matrix filled with finely ground particles or fibers, preferably alumina. The sol gel glass is made by adding ethanol to water to form a first mixture, then separately adding ethanol to tetraethyl orthosilicate to form a second mixture, then slowly adding the first to the second mixture to make a third mixture, and making a slurry by adding the finely ground particles or fibers to the third mixture. The composite can be applied by spraying, brushing or trowelling. If applied to patch fine cracks, densification of the ceramic composite may be obtained to enhance sealing by applying heat during curing.

    Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    210

    SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    211

    Available Technologies Low Defect, High Deposition Rate ...  

    Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. Diagnostics and Therapeutics; Medical Devices; ... allowing free passage of neutrals from the target to the substrate.

    212

    NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.  

    SciTech Connect

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    213

    Energy Rating  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

    Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    214

    Insertion Rates  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    HOME > Insertion Rates. TECH HEADLINES. Research Explores a New Layer in Additive Manufacturin... Grand Opening Slated for Electron Microscopy Facility.

    215

    Mechanisms, Models, and Simulations of Metal-Coated Fiber Consolidation  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of existing contacts as matrix plasticity and/or PLC. When the voids are small the coated fiber bundle shrinks-shaped voids with a shape factor similar to that observed in the experiments. Creep rates were microstructure fractions were introduced into the model using micromechanics-based creep constitutive relationships

    Wadley, Haydn

    216

    Environmental Effects/Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 18, 2011 ... Presence of steam accelerated creep rates and dramatically reduced ... turbine- based power generation and aerospace propulsion systems as ...

    217

    HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    218

    HYDROGEN OUTGASSING AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF TIN COATED STAINLESS STEEL CHAMBERS.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The stainless steel vacuum chambers of the 248m accumulator ring of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are coated with {approx} 100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield. The coating is produced by DC magnetron sputtering using a long cathode imbedded with permanent magnets. The outgassing rates of several SNS half-cell chambers were measured with and without TiN coating, and before and after in-situ bake. One potential benefit of a TiN coating is to serve as hydrogen permeation barrier that reduces the ultimate outgassing rate. By varying the coating parameters, films of different surface roughness were produced and analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to illustrate the dependence of the outgassing on the film structure.

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; MAPES,M.; TODD,R.; WEISS,D.; WILSON,D.

    2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    219

    Glovebox decontamination technology comparison  

    SciTech Connect

    Reconfiguration of the CMR Building and TA-55 Plutonium Facility for mission requirements will require the disposal or recycle of 200--300 gloveboxes or open front hoods. These gloveboxes and open front hoods must be decontaminated to meet discharge limits for Low Level Waste. Gloveboxes and open front hoods at CMR have been painted. One of the deliverables on this project is to identify the best method for stripping the paint from large numbers of gloveboxes. Four methods being considered are the following: conventional paint stripping, dry ice pellets, strippable coatings, and high pressure water technology. The advantages of each technology will be discussed. Last, cost comparisons between the technologies will be presented.

    Quintana, D.M.; Rodriguez, J.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.

    1999-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    220

    Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc.). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

    Banovic, S.W.; Chan, H.M.; Marder, A.R. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    221

    Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Adjustably Inducing Biaxial Strain in Thin Films Bone Replacement and Dental Materials Flexibone: Osteo-mimetic Composites Graded Bioactive Glass and Glass/Ceramic Coatings for Metal Bone Implants Injectable Hydrogel-Based Biodegradable Bone Replacement Materials Mineralization of Biocompatible Scaffolds Peptides for the Controllable Promotion or Inhibition of Bone Growth Remineralization and Repair of Calcified Tissues Using Biomimetic Polymer Boron Nitride Converted Carbon Fibers Catalysts for Reduction of SO2 to Elemental Sulfur Catalyst Exchanges Deuterium or Tritium into Organic and Organometallic Compounds Direct Thin Film Path to Low Cost, Large Area III-V Photovoltaics Easily Assembled Porous Thin Films Full Spectrum Semiconducting Material for Affordable, Highly

    222

    SuperhydrophobicCoatings.indd  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Superhydrophobic Coating Superhydrophobic Coating 1 S S S S S S S S S Su u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u u up p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p pe e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e e er r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r rh h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h hy y y y y y y yd d d d d d d d d dr r r r r r ro o o op p p p ph h h h h h h ho o o o o o o o o ob b b b b bi i i ic c c c C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C Co o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o oa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a at t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t t ti i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i in n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n ng g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g 1 Superhydrophobic Coating 2 Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1349 Albuquerque, NM 87106 C. Jeffrey Brinker Phone: 505-272-7627 Fax: 505-272-7336 cjbrink@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affi rm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate representation of this

    223

    Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Electrodeposited Electrodeposited Mn-Co Alloy Coating For SOFC Interconnects H. McCrabb * , T. Hall * , J. Wu # , H. Zhang # , X. Liu # , E.J. Taylor * * Faraday Technology Inc., 315 Huls Dr., Clayton, OH 45315, USA # West Virginia University, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng.ESB, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA Overall Objective Overall Objective Principal Investigator: Heather McCrabb, Company Name: Faraday Technology, Inc., Address: 315 Huls Drive, Clayton, OH 45315, Phone: 937-836-7749, E-mail: heathermccrabb@faradaytechnology.com, Company website: faradaytechnology.com Previous Work at WVU Results Develop an inexpensive manufacturing process for depositing (Mn,Co) 3 O 4 spinel coatings onto SOFC interconnects. Introduction The decrease in the SOFC operating temperatures from 1000°C to between 650 and 850°C has enabled the use of chromia-forming ferritic stainless steels as interconnects

    224

    Rate schedule  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Firm Power Service Provided by Rate/Charges Rate/Charges Effective Through (or until superceded) Firm Sales (SLIP-F9) Composite Rate SLIP 29.62 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Demand Charge SLIP $5.18/kW-month 9/30/2015 Energy Charge SLIP 12.19 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) SLIP 0 mills/kWh 9/30/2015 Transmission Service Provided by Current Rates effective10/12 - 9/15 (or until superceded) Rate Schedule Effective Through Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-PTP7) CRSP $1.14 per kW-month $13.69/kW-year $0.00156/kW-hour $0.04/kW-day $0.26/kW-week 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Network Integration Transmission (SP-NW3) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Non-Firm Point-to-Point Transmission (SP-NFT6) CRSP see rate schedule 10/1/2008-9/30/2015 Ancillary Services Provided by Rate Rate Schedule

    225

    Vendor / Technology  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

    226

    Vendor / Technology  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

    227

    Faience Technology  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    228

    Corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of forming a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising the steps of spray or deposition or sputtering or welding processing to form a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material. Also a corrosion resistant neutron absorbing coating comprising a composite material made of a spray or deposition or sputtering or welding material, and a neutron absorbing material.

    Choi, Jor-Shan (El Cerrito, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Lee, Chuck K. (Hayward, CA); Walker, Jeffrey (Gaithersburg, MD); Russell, Paige (Las Vegas, NV); Kirkwood, Jon (Saint Leonard, MD); Yang, Nancy (Lafayette, CA); Champagne, Victor (Oxford, PA)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    229

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    230

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

    Fontana, Jack J. (Shirley, NY); Elling, David (Centereach, NY); Reams, Walter (Shirley, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    231

    Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    232

    Effect of SOFC Interconnect-Coating Interactions on Coating Properties and Performance  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The high operating temperature of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) provides good fuel flexibility which expands potential applications, but also creates materials challenges. One such challenge is the interconnect material, which was the focus of this project. In particular, the objective of the project was to understand the interaction between the interconnect alloy and ceramic coatings which are needed to minimize chromium volatilization and the associated chromium poisoning of the SOFC cathode. This project focused on coatings based on manganese cobalt oxide spinel phases (Mn,Co)3O4, which have been shown to be effective as coatings for ferritic stainless steel alloys. Analysis of diffusion couples was used to develop a model to describe the interaction between (Mn,Co)3O4 and Cr2O3 in which a two-layer reaction zone is formed. Both layers form the spinel structure, but the concentration gradients at the interface appear like a two-phase boundary suggesting that a miscibility gap is present in the spinel solid solution. A high-chromium spinel layer forms in contact with Cr2O3 and grows by diffusion of manganese and cobalt from the coating material to the Cr2O3. The effect of coating composition, including the addition of dopants, was evaluated and indicated that the reaction rate could be decreased with additions of iron, titanium, nickel and copper. Diffusion couples using stainless steel alloys (which form a chromia scale) had some similarities and some differences as compared to those with Cr2O3. The most notable difference was that the high-chromium spinel layer did not form in the diffusion couples with stainless steel alloys. This difference can be explained using the reaction model developed in this project. In particular, the chromia scale grows at the expense of the alloy, the high-chromia layer grows at the expense of chromia scale and the high-chromia layer is consumed by diffusion of chromium into the coating material. If the last process (dissolution of high-chromium spinel phase) is faster than the second process (formation of high-chromium spinel phase), the high-chromium layer may be consumed. The other important result of this mechanism is that it could result in a constant scale thickness if the scale forms at the same rate as it is consumed. This helps to explain the unexpected observation that the area specific resistance (ASR) of a SOFC with a (Mn,Co)3O4-coated ferritic stainless steel cathode becomes constant after long exposures. The project also evaluated the possibility of reducing the chromium content in a stainless steel alloy using experimental alloys. The conclusion of this evaluation is that at least 17-18% chromium is needed for good oxidation resistance is needed even if the alloy is coated with a spinel coating. Additional details on these findings are provided in a later section of this report and in the publications listed below.

    Jeffrey W. Fergus

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    233

    Transition-Metal Switchable Mirrors : Future Technologies : From...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Division with assistance from Jonathan Slack. This dynamic window technology consists of thin-film coatings on glass that can be converted from a transparent to a reflecting state...

    234

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    There are no technology records available that match the search query. Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords.

    235

    Substrate recovery of Mo-Si multilayer coated optics  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Imaging optics in a soft x-ray projection lithography (SXPL) system must meet stringent requirements to achieve high throughput and diffraction limited performance. Errors in the surface figure must be kept to less than {approximately}1 nm and the rms surface roughness must be less than 0.1 nm. The ML coatings must provide high reflectivity (> 60%) at wavelengths in the vicinity of 13 nm. The reflectivity bandpasses of the optics must be aligned within 0.05 nm. Each coating must be uniform across the surface of the optic to within 0.5%. These specifications challenge the limits of the current capabilities in optics fabrication and ML deposition. Consequently a set of qualified SXPL imaging optics is expected to be expensive, costing in the range of 100--250 k$. If the lifetime of the imaging optics is short, the replacement cost could significantly impact the economic competitiveness of the technology. The most likely failure modes for the imaging optics are mechanisms that degrade the ML coatings, but which leave the substrates intact. A potentially low cost solution for salvaging the imaging optics could be to strip the damaged ML coating to recover the substrate and then deposit a new coating. In this paper the authors report on the use of reactive ion etching (RIE) to remove Mo-Si ML coatings from precision optical substrates. The goal of this work was to characterize the etching process both in the ML film and at the substrate, and to determine the effects of the etching on the surface figure and finish of the substrate.

    Stearns, D.G.; Baker, S.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    236

    Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

    237

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet ...  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet Wire Making Techniques - HTS Coated Conductors - Fact Sheet...

    238

    Sputtering process and apparatus for coating powders  

    SciTech Connect

    A process and apparatus for coating small particles and fibers. The process involves agitation by vibrating or tumbling the particles or fibers to promote coating uniformly, removing adsorbed gases and static charges from the particles or fibers by an initial plasma cleaning, and coating the particles or fibers with one or more coatings, a first coating being an adhesion coating, and with subsequent coatings being deposited in-situ to prevent contamination at layer interfaces. The first coating is of an adhesion forming element (i.e. W, Zr, Re, Cr, Ti) of a 100-10,000 .ANG. thickness and the second coating or final coating of a multiple (0.1-10 microns) being Cu or Ag, for example for brazing processes, or other desired materials that defines the new surface related properties of the particles. An essential feature of the coating process is the capability to deposit in-situ without interruption to prevent the formation of a contaminated interface that could adversely affect the coating adhesion. The process may include screening of the material to be coated and either continuous or intermittent vibration to prevent agglomeration of the material to be coated.

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Alford, Craig S. (Tracy, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    239

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

    240

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    Non-Noble Metal Water Electrolysis Catalysts; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    241

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    BSA 08-04: High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

    242

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    Receive Technology Updates. Get email notifications about new or improved technologies in your area of interest. Subscribe »

    243

    Conservation and renewable energy technologies for buildings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Office of building Technologies (OBT) pursues advanced energy efficiency and renewable technologies and accelerates the rate of adoption of these technologies in the residential and commercial sectors through research, development, and demonstration.

    Not Available

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    244

    National Utility Rate Database: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    245

    Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    1: 1: Vol. 10, No. 2 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Analysis Team Carbon Sequestration Study Materials Genome Project Increased Building Ventilation VOC Cleaning Technology Fort Irwin Lighting Testbed Tracking the Sun IV Cool Coatings for Cars Research Highlights Sources and Credits PDF of EETD News Carbon Cycle 2.0 Energy and Environmental Analysis Team Evaluates Impacts of Technology R&D It's a grand challenge: develop clean, sustainable technologies that deliver a low-carbon energy future, and through innovation create jobs, new markets, and exports while increasing America's energy security. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made it their mission to develop low-carbon and energy-efficient technologies such as advanced materials and information technology for

    246

    Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Biotechnology and Medicine DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPEUTICS CANCER CANCER PROGNOSTICS 14-3-3 Sigma as a Biomarker of Basal Breast Cancer ANXA9: A Therapeutic Target and Predictive Marker for Early Detection of Aggressive Breast Cancer Biomarkers for Predicting Breast Cancer Patient Response to PARP Inhibitors Breast Cancer Recurrence Risk Analysis Using Selected Gene Expression Comprehensive Prognostic Markers and Therapeutic Targets for Drug-Resistant Breast Cancers Diagnostic Test to Personalize Therapy Using Platinum-based Anticancer Drugs Early Detection of Metastatic Cancer Progenitor Cells

    247

    Micro X-ray Radiography for the Coating Thickness Measurement in the Simulated TRISO-coated Fuel Particle  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    TRISO(Tri-Isotropic)-coated fuel particle is utilized owing to its higher stability at a high temperature and its efficient retention capability for fission products in the HTGR(high temperature gas-cooled reactor). The typical spherical TRISO-coated fuel particle with a diameter of about 1 mm is composed of a nuclear fuel kernel and outer coating layers. The outer coating layers consist of a buffer PyC (pyrolytic carbon) layer, an inner PyC(I-PyC) layer, a SiC layer, and an outer PyC(O-PyC) layer. Most of the inspection items for the TRISO-coated fuel particle depend on the destructive methods. Recently, X-ray radiography or X-ray CT methods are being applied to nondestructively measure the thickness of the coating layers at the relevant research organizations in the world. The destructive method is very accurate, but it is difficult to prepare test samples. Above all, the number of destructive test samples must be minimized during the fabrication process due to the generation of radioactive wastes during the test procedures. The thickness of the coating layers of the TRISO fuel particle can be nondestructively measured by the X-ray radiography without generating radioactive wastes. In this study, the thickness of coating layers for a simulated TRISO-coated fuel particle with a ZrO{sub 2} kernel instead of a UO{sub 2} kernel was measured by using micro-focus X-ray radiography. The used X-ray system is the Harmony 130 developed at DRGEM Corporation in Korea. The maximum tube voltage/current of the X-ray generator is 130 kV/400 {mu}A. The focus spot size of the X-ray generator is 5 {mu}m. The resolution of the used electronic X-ray detector is 48 {mu}m. The number of pixels is 1024 x 1024. And, the intensity resolution of a pixel is 12 bit (4096 gray levels). The tube voltage/current was 40 kV/100 {mu}A under the inspection condition. Here, the distance from the source to the detector was 397 mm, and the distance from the source to the center of the object ranged from 10 to 50 mm. The exposure time was adjusted to acquire images with a good quality of the boundaries. The radiographic image was also enhanced by an image processing technique to acquire clear boundary lines between the coating layers. The boundary lines were detected on the enhanced image. The thickness of the coating layers was computed by measuring the distance between the boundary lines. The thickness of the coating layers was effectively measured by applying the micro-focus X-ray radiography by using the precise X-ray generator and the electronic detector with a high resolution. The inspection process for the TRISO-coated fuel particles will be improved by the developed micro-focus X-ray radiography technology. (authors)

    Woong Ki, Kim; Young Woo, Lee; Ji Yeon, Park [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Duk-jin Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwan Woo, Lee; Jung Byung, Park [DRGEM Corp. 388-1, Asan Medical Center, Songpa, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung Woong, Ra [Chungnam National University, 220 Goong Dong, Yusong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    248

    Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Software and Information Technologies Software and Information Technologies Algorithm for Correcting Detector Nonlinearites Chatelet: More Accurate Modeling for Oil, Gas or Geothermal Well Production Collective Memory Transfers for Multi-Core Processors Energy Efficiency Software EnergyPlus:Energy Simulation Software for Buildings Tools, Guides and Software to Support the Design and Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings Flexible Bandwidth Reservations for Data Transfer Genomic and Proteomic Software LABELIT - Software for Macromolecular Diffraction Data Processing PHENIX - Software for Computational Crystallography Vista/AVID: Visualization and Allignment Software for Comparative Genomics Geophysical Software Accurate Identification, Imaging, and Monitoring of Fluid Saturated Underground Reservoirs

    249

    Evaluation of End Mill Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    Milling tests were run on families of High Speed Steel (HSS) end mills to determine their lives while machining 304 Stainless Steel. The end mills tested were made from M7, M42 and T15-CPM High Speed Steels. The end mills were also evaluated with no coatings as well as with Titanium Nitride (TiN) and Titanium Carbo-Nitride (TiCN) coatings to determine which combination of HSS and coating provided the highest increase in end mill life while increasing the cost of the tool the least. We found end mill made from M42 gave us the largest increase in tool life with the least increase in cost. The results of this study will be used by Cutting Tool Engineering in determining which end mill descriptions will be dropped from our tool catalog.

    L. J. Lazarus; R. L. Hester,

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    250

    Dielectric Coatings for IACT Mirrors  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes for very-high energy gamma-ray astronomy need mirror with high reflectance roughly in the wavelength between 300 and 550 nm. The current standard reflective layer of such mirrors is aluminum. Being permanently exposed to the environment they show a constant degradation over the years. New and improved dielectric coatings have been developed to enhance their resistance to environmental impact and to extend their possible lifetime. In addition, these customized coatings have an increased reflectance of over 95% and are designed to significantly lower the night-sky background contribution. The development of such coatings for mirrors with areas up to 2 m2 and low application temperatures to suite the composite materials used for the new mirror susbtrates of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and the results of extensive durability tests are presented.

    Förster, A; Chadwick, P; Held, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    251

    Rates and Repayment Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Tariff Rates FY 2014 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2013 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2012 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2011 Rates and Rate Schedules FY 2010 Rates and Rate Schedules FY...

    252

    DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

    Amarendra K. Rai

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    253

    Survey of innovative rates, 1991  

    SciTech Connect

    Current innovative rate data from 135 major utilities throughout the United States were gathered and analyzed. Over 1000 innovative rates that were in use by the utilities in 1990 and 1991 were identified, abstracted and entered into a database. Survey results indicate that over 616 million MWh were sold to the nearly five million customers using the innovative rates offered. From an annual sales perspective, the most widely used rates are demand-side management rates -- rates intended to change customer energy use -- and rates that are market-driven.'' The survey identified 525 demand-side management rates serving our four million customers with reported sales of approximately 520 million MWh. These rates serve over 80% of the total innovative rate customers and account for 84% of the total MWh sales. Also important in terms of MWh sales they represent are market-driven rates, which accounted for sales of 48 million MWh in 1990. Both demand-side management and market-driven rates show a 20% customer growth rate between 1988 and 1990. Other innovative rates examined in the survey included: prepaid service; load retention incentive rates; technology specific rates; and those rates related expressly to non-utility generators -- namely buy-back and standby rates.

    White, L.J.; Wakefield, R.A.; McVicker, C.M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    254

    Survey of innovative rates, 1991  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Current innovative rate data from 135 major utilities throughout the United States were gathered and analyzed. Over 1000 innovative rates that were in use by the utilities in 1990 and 1991 were identified, abstracted and entered into a database. Survey results indicate that over 616 million MWh were sold to the nearly five million customers using the innovative rates offered. From an annual sales perspective, the most widely used rates are demand-side management rates -- rates intended to change customer energy use -- and rates that are market-driven.'' The survey identified 525 demand-side management rates serving our four million customers with reported sales of approximately 520 million MWh. These rates serve over 80% of the total innovative rate customers and account for 84% of the total MWh sales. Also important in terms of the MWh sales they represent are market-driven rates, which accounted for sales of 48 million MWh in 1990. Both demand-side management and market-driven rates show a 20% customer growth rate between 1988 and 1990. Other innovative rates examined in the survey included: prepaid service; load retention incentive rates; technology specific rates; and those rates related expressly to non-utility generators -- namely buy-back and standby rates.

    White, L.J.; Wakefield, R.A.; McVicker, C.M.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    255

    Navy Technology Validation (Techval)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Technology Technology Validation (Techval) FUPWG Spring Meeting 2008 April 15, 2008 Destin, FL Paul Kistler, PE CEM NAVFAC Engineering Service Center Port Hueneme CA Navy Techval CURRENT PROJECTS * Cool Roof reflective roof coating  NS Pearl Harbor HI * Thermal Destratifiers  NAS Oceana VA * Boiler Combustion Controls  USNA Annapolis MD * Sand Filters  NAS Lemoore CA * Spectrally Enhanced Lighting  Navy Yard Washington DC * Desuperheater  NS Norfolk VA  NAS North Island CA * HVAC CO2 Controls  NAB Little Creek VA  NAVSUPPACT Mid-South TN  NB Kitsap Bremerton WA *HVAC Occupancy Controls NAS Oceana VA *Electromagnetic Pulse Water Treatment NADEP San Diego CA NSY Puget Sound WA *LED Parking Lot Lighting NBVC Port Hueneme CA Techval

    256

    Thermal spray coatings: New materials, processes and applications; Proceedings of the Second National Conference on Thermal Spray, Long Beach, CA, October 31-November 2, 1984  

    SciTech Connect

    Thermal-spray-coating techniques and their applications are discussed in reviews and reports of laboratory experiments and industrial experience. Topics explored include the future of thermal spraying, plasma-sprayed bonding coats for plastic substrates, plasma-spray deposition of hollow-particle ceramic powders, volumetric-feed-back powder-feed controllers, metal sprayed coating systems onboard U.S. Navy ships, high-performance plasma-sprayed coatings, and arc-coating technology and equipment. Consideration is given to cavitation-erosion of plasma-sprayed alloys, statistical methods of plasma-spray parameter testing, NDE of surface coatings by photothermal imaging, NDE of thermal-spray-coating bonds, and diamond-wheel grinding of thermal-spray materials.

    Longo, F.N.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    257

    Performance of "Moth Eye" Anti-Reflective Coatings for Solar Cell Applications  

    SciTech Connect

    An inexpensive, effective anti-reflective coating (ARC) has been developed at the University of Florida to significantly enhance the absorption of light by silicon in solar cells. This coating has nano-scale features, and its microstructure mimics that of various night active insects (e.g. a moth's eye). It is a square array of pillars, each about 700 nm high and having a diameter of about 300 nm. Samples of silicon having this coating were exposed either to various combinations of either elevated temperature and humidity or to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co) at the Savannah River National Laboratory, or to a broad spectrum ultraviolet light and to a 532 nm laser light at the University of Florida. The anti-reflective properties of the coatings were unaffected by any of these environmental stresses, and the microstructure of the coating was also unaffected. In fact, the reflectivity of the gamma irradiated ARC became lower (advantageous for solar cell applications) at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. These results show that this coating is robust and should be tested in actual systems exposed to either weather or a space environment. Structural details of the ARCs were studied to optimize their performance. Square arrays performed better than hexagonal arrays - the natural moth-eye coating is indeed a square array. The optimal depth of the templated nanopillars in the ARC was investigated. A wet etching technology for ARC formation was developed that would be less expensive and much faster than dry etching. Theoretical modeling revealed that dimple arrays should perform better than nipple arrays. A method of fabricating both dimple and nipple arrays having the same length was developed, and the dimple arrays performed better than the nipple arrays, in agreement with the modeling. The commercial viability of the technology is quite feasible, since the technology is scalable and inexpensive. This technology is also compatible with current industrial fabrication of solar cells.

    Clark, E.; Kane, M.; Jiang, P.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    258

    Performance of "Moth Eye" Anti-Reflective Coatings for Solar Cell Applications  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    An inexpensive, effective anti-reflective coating (ARC) has been developed at the University of Florida to significantly enhance the absorption of light by silicon in solar cells. This coating has nano-scale features, and its microstructure mimics that of various night active insects (e.g. a moth's eye). It is a square array of pillars, each about 700 nm high and having a diameter of about 300 nm. Samples of silicon having this coating were exposed either to various combinations of either elevated temperature and humidity or to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co) at the Savannah River National Laboratory, or to a broad spectrum ultraviolet light and to a 532 nm laser light at the University of Florida. The anti-reflective properties of the coatings were unaffected by any of these environmental stresses, and the microstructure of the coating was also unaffected. In fact, the reflectivity of the gamma irradiated ARC became lower (advantageous for solar cell applications) at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm. These results show that this coating is robust and should be tested in actual systems exposed to either weather or a space environment. Structural details of the ARCs were studied to optimize their performance. Square arrays performed better than hexagonal arrays - the natural moth-eye coating is indeed a square array. The optimal depth of the templated nanopillars in the ARC was investigated. A wet etching technology for ARC formation was developed that would be less expensive and much faster than dry etching. Theoretical modeling revealed that dimple arrays should perform better than nipple arrays. A method of fabricating both dimple and nipple arrays having the same length was developed, and the dimple arrays performed better than the nipple arrays, in agreement with the modeling. The commercial viability of the technology is quite feasible, since the technology is scalable and inexpensive. This technology is also compatible with current industrial fabrication of solar cells.

    Clark, E.; Kane, M.; Jiang, P.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    259

    Performance of Ultra Hard Carbon Wear Coatings on Microgears Fabricated by Liga  

    SciTech Connect

    Stiction and friction are of concern for the reliable, long-term application of Ni-alloy micromachines. We have found that the application of a 30-70 nm hard carbon coating produces a significant reduction in the friction coefficient and wear rate of electroformed Ni substrates in reciprocating sliding contact under simulated MEMS operating conditions. To evaluate the performance of coated components, a series of 70-pm-thick microgears ranging in diameter from 0.2 to 2.2 mm were fabricated from electroformed Ni via standard LIGA processes and fixtured on posts in preparation for the coating procedure. A pulsed vacuum- arc deposition process was used to deposit a carbon coating on the gears with the plasma incident at a shallow angle to the gears' top surface. A sample bias of -2 keV was used in order to produce a coating with relatively low stress and good adhesion while maintaining high hardness. This coating process is known to be somewhat comformal to the component surfaces. The coating uniformity, particularly in the high-aspect-ratio areas between the gear teeth, was evaluated with micro-Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that the coating can be applied uniformly on the top gear surface. Between the gear teeth the coating was the same thickness as on top of the gear down to a point 50 ~m below the top surface. Below that point (i.e. between 50 and 70 Lm), the coating thickness is somewhat thinner, but is still present. These results demonstrate that it is possible to a deposit hard carbon coating on microgears to reduce friction and wear in micromachines.

    Ager III, J.W.; Brown, I.G.; Christenson, T.R.; Dugger, M.T.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    260

    Thermal Spraying Coatings Assisted by Laser Treatment  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Coatings produced by air plasma spraying (APS) are widely used to protect components against abrasive wear and corrosion. However, APS coatings contain porosities and the properties of these coatings may thereby be reduced. To improve these properties, various methods could be proposed, including post-laser irradiation [1-4]. Firstly, PROTAL process (thermal spraying assisted by laser) has been developed as a palliative technique to degreasing and grit-blasting prior to thermal spraying. Secondly, thermal spray coatings are densified and remelted using Laser treatment. In this study, a review of microstructure coatings prepared by laser-assisted air plasma spraying will be presented. Mechanical and magnetic properties will be evaluated in relation to changes in the coating microstructure and the properties of such coatings will be compared with those of as-sprayed APS coatings.

    Fenineche, N. E.; Cherigui, M. [LERMPS-UTBM (Site de Sevenans), 90010 Belfort Cedex (France)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    261

    Cathode Coating (IN-09-061)  

    A team of scientists at Argonne National Laboratory has developed a special coating for the cathodes used in lithium batteries. With the coating, batteries charge and discharge more quickly, without a loss in performance.

    262

    Superhydrophobic Metal-Oxide Thin Film Coatings  

    Because of their numerous advantages and applications, considerable efforts have been expended to develop superhydrophobic (water repellant) coatings. However, traditional superhydrophobic coatings are soft in nature, with a Teflon-like surface ...

    263

    Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    264

    Evaluation of boride diffusion coatings to alleviate erosion of steam turbine components  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report describes a research program to evaluate boride diffusion coatings for protection on Types 403 and 422 martensitic stainless steel turbine components against solid particle erosion. Several commercial coating vendors supplied stainless steel specimens with simple iron boride, chromium enriched iron boride, and silicon-enriched iron boride coatings. These specimens were characterized as to microstructure, composition, and hardness. They were then exposed in a stream of abrasive particulates at 1000{degrees}F and 500 ft/sec for up to 100 hours with intermediate specimen weighing and examination at 20 hour intervals. After the tests the microstructures and thickness of the remaining coating and substrate of each specimen were determined and measured. The tests showed that the chromium- and silicon-enriched iron boride coatings had erosion rates up to 2 to 4 times lower than those of simple iron borides. Coating microstructures was found to be an important factor influencing erosion resistance; while through thickness microcracking had no apparent effect on coating performance, fine networks of surface cracking were observed to make a coating much more susceptible to loss.

    Christman, T.K.; Martin, C.J.; Wright, I.G (Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)); Shalvoy, R.S. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, New York (USA). General Eletric Power Generation)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    265

    elevated temperature coatings:science and technology iv  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Vladamir K. Tolpygo and David R. Clarke. MODELING .... R. Keith Bird, Terryl A. Wallace and. Sankara N. ... Narendra B. Dahotre and Lalitha R. Katipelli.

    266

    Coke resistant coating technology for applications in ethylene pyrolysis heaters.  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    ?? This dissertation begins with a description of the history of the events leading to ethylene pyrolysis tube failure. During service, hydrocarbons pass through the… (more)

    Chauhan, Alok Pratap Singh

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    267

    Development and Testing of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Solar Energy Technologies Program is working to reduce the cost of parabolic trough solar power technology. System studies show that increasing the operating temperature of the solar field from 390 to >450 C will result in improved performance and cost reductions. This requires the development of new more-efficient selective coatings that have both high solar absorptance (>0.96) and low thermal emittance (<0.07) and are thermally stable above 450 C, ideally in air. Potential selective coatings were modeled, identified for laboratory prototyping, and manufactured at NREL. Optimization of the samples and high-temperature durability testing will be performed. Development of spectrally selective materials depends on reliable characterization of their optical properties. Protocols for testing the thermal/optical properties of selective coatings were developed and a round-robin experiment was conducted to verify and document the reflectance and high-temperature emittance measurements. The development, performance, and durability of these materials and future work will be described.

    Kennedy, C.; Price, H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    268

    Method of forming metallic coatings on polymeric substrates and of forming graded polymeric coatings or films  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The invention described herein relates to methods of forming graded polymeric coatings or films on a desired substrate and of forming metallic coatings on polymeric or other nonmetallic substrates. In particular, it relates to methods of forming such coatings or films by sorption and/or diffusion of metals into coatings or films of polymeric material deposited by conventional techniques on a desired substrate.

    Liepins, R.

    1981-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    269

    Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

    SciTech Connect

    Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

    Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    270

    Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Presentation Title, Environmental Coatings For Gas Turbine Engine Applications. Author(s), Ming Fu, Roger Wustman, Jeffrey Williams, Douglas Konitzer.

    271

    Coatings for SOFC Interconnects: Design, Deposition and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Engineering effective combinations of oxidation resistance, electronic conductivity and SOFC component compatibility has proven challenging for coating ...

    272

    Coatings for Corrosion and Wear Resistance Applications  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Apr 2, 2012 ... Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing ...

    273

    Polysilazane Based Corrosion Coatings for Magnesium  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

    274

    Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation  

    SciTech Connect

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simultaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure 12 comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets 16 is machined out to form a dimple 11. Glass microballoons, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

    Lowe, Arthur T. (Tempe, AZ); Hosford, Charles D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    275

    Comparision of Stellite Coatings on Valve Steel Material Prepared ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    276

    Preparing of High Silicon Coating by Composite Electrodeposition in ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    277

    Improved Mechanical Properties of Cermet Coatings as a Function ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oxidation Studies of HVAS-sprayed Nanostructured Coatings at Elevated Temperature · Oxide Based Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Metal Dusting Applications.

    278

    APPLIEDPHYSICAL Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    that competes with the energy- consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy-consuming desorption of coat proteins, until on the membrane into elementary coat-building units, called monomers. The membrane-bound monomers then polymerize

    Sens, Pierre

    279

    Chemical vapor deposition of mullite coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    This invention is directed to the creation of crystalline mullite coatings having uniform microstructure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The process comprises the steps of establishing a flow of reactants which will yield mullite in a CVD reactor, and depositing a crystalline coating from the reactant flow. The process will yield crystalline coatings which are dense and of uniform thickness.

    Sarin, Vinod (Lexington, MA); Mulpuri, Rao (Boston, MA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    280

    Multilayer Nanoscale Thermal Barrier Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Advanced high-efficiency gas turbines require thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) with low thermal conductivity and excellent thermal-cycling resistance. The multilayer TBC developed in this project has a thermal conductivity about half that of conventional TBCs and also rejects up to 70 percent of incoming radiant energy.

    1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    281

    Tools & Technologies  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    We provide leadership for transforming workforce development through the power of technology. It develops corporate educational technology policy and enables the use of learning tools and...

    282

    Available Technologies  

    The technology’s subnanometer resolution is a result of superior ... Additional R&D will be required ... U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY • OFFICE OF SCIENCE ...

    283

    Effects of volatile coatings on the morphology and optical detection of combustion-generated black carbon particles.  

    SciTech Connect

    We have measured time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) from combustion-generated mature soot extracted from a burner and (1) coated with oleic acid or (2) coated with oleic acid and then thermally denuded using a thermodenuder. The soot samples were size selected using a differential mobility analyser and characterized with a scanning mobility particle sizer, centrifugal particle mass analyser, and transmission electron microscope. The results demonstrate a strong influence of coatings particle morphology and on the magnitude and temporal evolution of the LII signal. For coated particles higher laser fluences are required to reach LII signal levels comparable to those of uncoated particles. This effect is predominantly attributable to the additional energy needed to vaporize the coating while heating the particle. LII signals are higher and signal decay rates are significantly slower for thermally denuded particles relative to coated or uncoated particles, particularly at low and intermediate laser fluences.

    Bambha, Ray P.; Dansson, Mark Alex; Schrader, Paul E.; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    284

    Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom (Savannah River National Labs, Aiken, SC)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    285

    Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

    286

    Super Hard and Slick Coatings Win R&D 100 Award  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Super Hard and Slick Coatings Win R&D 100 Award Super Hard and Slick Coatings Win R&D 100 Award Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory received a R&D 100 award, as judged by R&D Magazine, in July 2009 for developing super hard and slick coating (SSC) for increased engine efficiency and component reliability. SSC is an important step towards increasing fuel efficiency in vehicles, which helps meet the administration's goals of reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil and decreasing greenhouse gas emissions. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began researching super slick coatings in 2005. The awards recognize the top scientific and technological innovations of the past year. ANL scientists have won 105 R&D 100 awards since they were first introduced in 1964.

    287

    Ceramic Technology Project  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

    Not Available

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    288

    UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL  

    SciTech Connect

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    289

    Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    290

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Organization...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Organization and Contacts Organization Chart for the Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Technologies and Deployment, Technology Managers Advanced Combustion Engines, Technology...

    291

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Technology Validation Search Search Help Technology Validation EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Technology Validation Printable Version Share this resource...

    292

    Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    293

    Dynamic Behavior of Polymer at High Strain Rate  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Measurement and Modeling of High Strain-rate Deformation. Presentation Title ...

    294

    High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface ...  

    High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface Sampling Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

    295

    Using sputter coated glass to stabilize microstrip gas chambers  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    By sputter coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics, thin-film Pestov glass), microstrip gas chambers (MSGC) of high gain stability, low leakage current, and a high rate capability can be fabricated. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material.

    Gong, Wen G. (Albany, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    296

    Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    0, No. 2 [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/nl37/] 0, No. 2 [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/nl37/] Environmental Energy Technologies Division News [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/] © 2011 Environmental Energy Technologies Division [http://eetd.lbl.gov/] E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [http://www.lbl.gov/] Disclaimer [http://www.lbl.gov/Disclaimers.html] FALL 2011: VOL. 10, NO. 2 Carbon Cycle 2.0 Analysis Team Carbon Sequestration Study Materials Genome Project Increased Building Ventilation VOC Cleaning Technology Fort Irwin Lighting Testbed Tracking the Sun IV Cool Coatings for Cars Research Highlights Sources and Credits Understanding how effectively new technologies can save energy, water, and materials-as well as reduce energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions-is the goal of the Carbon Cycle 2.0 Energy and

    297

    Direct Laser Synthesis of Functional Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The direct laser synthesis of functional coatings employs the irradiation of materials with short intensive laser pulses in a reactive atmosphere. The material is heated and plasma is ignited in the reactive atmosphere. This leads to an intensive interaction of the material with the reactive species and a coating is directly formed on the materials surface. By that functional coatings can be easily produced a fast way on steel, aluminium, and silicon by irradiation in nitrogen, methane, or even hydrogen. The influence of the processing parameters to the properties of the functional coatings will be presented for titanium nitride coating produced on titanium with the free electron laser.

    P. Schaaf; Michelle D. Shinn; E. Carpene; J. Kaspar

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    298

    Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

    Fan, Hongyou

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    299

    PRESERVATION OF H2 PRODUCTION ACTIVITY IN NANOPOROUS LATEX COATINGS OF RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS CGA009 DURING DRY STORAGE AT AMBIENT TEMPERATURES  

    SciTech Connect

    To assess the applicability of latex cell coatings as an "off-the-shelf' biocatalyst, the effect of osmoprotectants, temperature, humidity and O{sub 2} on preservation of H{sub 2} production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coatings was evaluated. Immediately following latex coating coalescence (24 h) and for up to 2 weeks of dry storage, rehydrated coatings containing different osmoprotectants displayed similar rates of H{sub 2} production. Beyond 2 weeks of storage, sorbitol- treated coatings lost all H{sub 2} production activity, whereas considerable H{sub 2} production was still detected in sucrose- and trehalose-stabilized coatings. The relative humidity level at which the coatings were stored had a significant impact on the recovery and subsequent rates of H{sub 2} production. After 4 weeks storage under air at 60% humidity, coatings produced only trace amounts of H{sub 2} (0-0.1% headspace accumulation), whereas those stored at <5% humidity retained 27-53% of their H{sub 2} production activity after 8 weeks of storage. When stored in argon at <5% humidity and room temperature, R. palustris coatings retained full H{sub 2} production activity for 3 months, implicating oxidative damage as a key factor limiting coating storage. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocatalytic latex coatings are an attractive cell immobilization platform for preservation of bioactivity in the dry state.

    Milliken, C.; Piskorska, M.; Soule, T.; Gosse, J.; Flickinger, M.; Smith, G.; Yeager, C.

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    300

    Chemistry - Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

    Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    301

    Technology Analysis - Heavy Vehicle Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    the GPRA benefits estimates for EERE's Vehicle Technologies Program's heavy vehicle technology research activities. Argonne researchers develop the benefits analysis using four...

    302

    Lithium and Zinc Sulfide Coated Plastic Neutron Detector Test  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world, and thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. In addition, a few other companies have detector technologies that might be competitive in the near term as an alternative technology. Reported here are the results of tests of 6Li/ZnS(Ag)-coated scintillator paddles. This testing measured the required performance for neutron detection efficiency and gamma ray rejection capabilities of a system manufactured by Symetrica.

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    303

    Available Technologies  

    APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Thermal management for: microelectronic devices; solar cells and solar energy management systems ; refrigerators

    304

    Available Technologies  

    Energy Storage and Recovery; Renewable Energy; Environmental Technologies. Monitoring and Imaging; Remediation; Modeling; Imaging & Lasers.

    305

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

    306

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    307

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    308

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    SH Coatings SH Coatings LP America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 10147 likes SH Coatings LP Oak Ridge National Laboratory SH Coating protects power lines from inclement weather as well as contamination from salt deposits that often cause flashovers in coastal environments. The coating can be applied to existing power lines and equipment in any field condition. The most important application is coating power lines in ice storm threatened areas. Power lines coated with SHC prevent the ice build-up that come with ice storms by repelling the rain that ordinarily falls on power lines and freezes there forming a wing on the leeward side of the line and causing the lines to gallop during wind events. This action destroys the poles carrying the lines as well as cause lines to short

    309

    Electrical contact arrangement for a coating process  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective coating is applied to the electrically conductive surface of a reflective coating of a solar mirror by biasing a conductive member having a layer of a malleable electrically conductive material, e.g. a paste, against a portion of the conductive surface while moving an electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface. The moving of the electrodepositable coating composition over the conductive surface includes moving the solar mirror through a flow curtain of the electrodepositable coating composition and submerging the solar mirror in a pool of the electrodepositable coating composition. The use of the layer of a malleable electrically conductive material between the conductive member and the conductive surface compensates for irregularities in the conductive surface being contacted during the coating process thereby reducing the current density at the electrical contact area.

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; McCamy, James W; Boyd, Donald W

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    310

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    311

    Armor systems including coated core materials  

    SciTech Connect

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    312

    Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Surface Protection for Enhanced Materials Performance: Science, Technology, and ... In this talk, we highlight results from microstructural and spectroscopic ...

    313

    Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

    314

    Rates and Repayment Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Customer Letter - Preliminary Review of Drought Adder Component for 2011 Firm Power Rates 2010 Rates and Rate Schedule - Current * 2009 Rates and Rate Schedule 2008 Rates and...

    315

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

    316

    Geothermal Today: 2003 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights (Revised)  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This outreach publication highlights milestones and accomplishments of the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program for 2003. Included in this publication are discussions of geothermal fundamentals, enhanced geothermal systems, direct-use applications, geothermal potential in Idaho, coating technology, energy conversion R&D, and the GeoPowering the West initiative.

    Not Available

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    317

    High-R Window Technology Development : Phase II Final Report.  

    SciTech Connect

    Of all building envelope elements, windows always have had the highest heat loss rates. However, recent advances in window technologies such as low-emissivity (low-E) coatings and low- conductivity gas fillings have begun to change the status of windows in the building energy equation, raising the average R-value (resistance to heat flow) from 2 to 4 h-ft{sup 2}-{degrees}F/Btu. Building on this trend and using a novel combination of low-E coatings, gas-fills, and three glazing layers, the authors developed a design concept for R-6 to R-10 super'' windows. Three major window manufacturers produced prototype superwindows based this design for testing and demonstration in three utility-sponsored and -monitored energy-conserving homes in northwestern Montana. This paper discusses the design and tested performance of these three windows and identifies areas requiring further research if these window concepts are to be successfully developed for mass markets.

    Arasteh, Dariush

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    318

    Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Energy-Efficient Window Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Energy-Efficient Window Air Conditioner Ratings Research Project on

    319

    Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In order to form the stable surface film and to further enhance the long-term cycling stability of the graphite anodes of lithium-ion batteries, the surface of graphite powders has been modified by AlF3 coating through chemical precipitation method. The AlF3-coated graphite shows no evident changes in the bulk structure and a thin AlF3-coating layer of about 2 nm thick is found to uniformly cover the graphite particles with 2 wt% AlF3 content. However, it delivers a higher initial discharge capacity and largely improved rate performances compared to the pristine graphite. Remarkably, AlF3 coated graphite demonstrated a much better cycle life. After 300 cycles, AlF3 coated graphite and uncoated graphite show capacity retention of 92% and 81%, respectively. XPS measurement shows that a more conductive solid electrode interface (SEI) layer was formed on AlF3 coated graphite as compared to uncoated graphite. SEM monograph also reveals that the AlF3-coated graphite particles have a much more stable surface morphology after long-term cycling. Therefore, the improved electrochemical performance of AlF3 coated graphite can be attributed to a more stable and conductive SEI formed on coated graphite anode during cycling process.

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chen, Xilin; Yang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jiguang

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    320

    Plant Engineering: Aging Degradation of Coating Service Level 1 Coatings Summary of EPRI Coating Aging Project Activities  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nuclear industry has experienced some instances of degradation of safety-related coating systems applied inside reactor containment. Although degradation has become a concern to the industry, the industry lacked a thoroughly documented history of the degradation and its causes. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) conducted research to understand the coating degradation and evaluate the effects of aging on the qualified coatings used inside containment. This report describes the ...

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    321

    Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

    Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    322

    Processing Technology  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Aug 5, 2013... relevant polymers and hybrid nanocomposite material systems. ... technology to perform lightweight manufacturing of car components.

    323

    Technology Transfer  

    A new search feature has been implemented, which allows searching of technology transfer information across the Department of Energy Laboratories.

    324

    Technology Transfer  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... get started on understanding accessibility in elections and voting technology. ... bibliography was created by the Georgia Tech Research Institute ...

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    325

    Investigation of anti-Relaxation coatings for alkali-metal vapor cells using surface science techniques  

    SciTech Connect

    Many technologies based on cells containing alkali-metal atomic vapor benefit from the use of antirelaxation surface coatings in order to preserve atomic spin polarization. In particular, paraffin has been used for this purpose for several decades and has been demonstrated to allow an atom to experience up to 10?000 collisions with the walls of its container without depolarizing, but the details of its operation remain poorly understood. We apply modern surface and bulk techniques to the study of paraffin coatings in order to characterize the properties that enable the effective preservation of alkali spin polarization. These methods include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, atomic force microscopy, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We also compare the light-induced atomic desorption yields of several different paraffin materials. Experimental results include the determination that crystallinity of the coating material is unnecessary, and the detection of C=C double bonds present within a particular class of effective paraffin coatings. Further study should lead to the development of more robust paraffin antirelaxation coatings, as well as the design and synthesis of new classes of coating materials.

    Seltzer, S. J.; Michalak, D. J.; Donaldson, M. H.; Balabas, M. V.; Barber, S. K.; Bernasek, S. L.; Bouchiat, M.-A.; Hexemer, A.; Hibberd, A. M.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Jaye, C.; Karaulanov, T.; Narducci, F. A.; Rangwala, S. A.; Robinson, H. G.; Shmakov, A. K.; Voronov, D. L.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Pines, A.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    326

    Nanofilm Coatings Improve Battery Performance  

    Recent advances in battery technology are expected to more than double consumer demand for electric vehicles within the next five years. The ...

    327

    PRESERVATION OF H2 PRODUCTION ACTIVITY IN NANOPOROUS LATEX COATINGS OF RHODOPSEUDOMONAS PALUSTRIS CGA009 DURING DRY STORAGE AT AMBIENT TEMPERATURES  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    To assess the applicability of latex cell coatings as an "off-the-shelf' biocatalyst, the effect of osmoprotectants, temperature, humidity and O{sub 2} on preservation of H{sub 2} production in Rhodopseudomonas palustris coatings was evaluated. Immediately following latex coating coalescence (24 h) and for up to 2 weeks of dry storage, rehydrated coatings containing different osmoprotectants displayed similar rates of H{sub 2} production. Beyond 2 weeks of storage, sorbitol- treated coatings lost all H{sub 2} production activity, whereas considerable H{sub 2} production was still detected in sucrose- and trehalose-stabilized coatings. The relative humidity level at which the coatings were stored had a significant impact on the recovery and subsequent rates of H{sub 2} production. After 4 weeks storage under air at 60% humidity, coatings produced only trace amounts of H{sub 2} (0-0.1% headspace accumulation), whereas those stored at production activity after 8 weeks of storage. When stored in argon at production activity for 3 months, implicating oxidative damage as a key factor limiting coating storage. Overall, the results demonstrate that biocatalytic latex coatings are an attractive cell immobilization platform for preservation of bioactivity in the dry state.

    Milliken, C.; Piskorska, M.; Soule, T.; Gosse, J.; Flickinger, M.; Smith, G.; Yeager, C.

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    328

    Technology Strategies  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    From the Book:PrefaceTechnology as the Strategic AdvantageWhen I began writing this book I struggled with the direction I wanted it to take. Is this book to be about business, technology, or even the business of technology? I ...

    Cooper Smith

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    329

    Coated Metal Articles and Method of Making  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The method of protectively coating metallic uranium which comprises dipping the metallic uranium in a molten alloy comprising about 20-75% of copper and about 80-25% of tin, dipping the coated uranium promptly into molten tin, withdrawing it from the molten tin and removing excess molten metal, thereupon dipping it into a molten metal bath comprising aluminum until it is coated with this metal, then promptly withdrawing it from the bath.

    Boller, Ernest R.; Eubank, Lowell D.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    330

    Rates and Repayment Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Rates Loveland Area Project Firm Power Rates Transmission and Ancillary Services Rates 2012 Rate Adjustment-Transmission and Ancillary Services 2010 Rate Adjustment-Firm Power 2009...

    331

    Rates and Repayment Services  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Rates and Repayment Services Consolidated Rate Schedules FY 2014 Rates BCP Annual Rate Process Central Arizona Project Transmission Rate Process DSW Multiple System Transmission...

    332

    The annual news magazine of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories FALL 2010 microsystems technology laboratories  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    , such as graphene, and materials and processes for solar energy and solid state lighting, in addition to the core engineered viruses; long-lasting high-efficiency light bulbs; windows that can double as solar energy technology for concentrating solar energy systems using coated glass. Baldo said Obama was curious and asked

    Culpepper, Martin L.

    333

    Sulfur-Resistant Silicone Conformal Coatings  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    An Overview of Hot Corrosion in Waste to Energy Boiler Environment and Its Remedies · Characterization of Copper Coatings on ASTM B221 Alloy by Low ...

    334

    SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED FOILS FOR SOLAR COLLECTORS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of the University of California, nor any of their employees,of the University of California. The views and opinions ofof the University of California. SELECTIVE ABSORBER COATED

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    335

    Coating Industry Response to Legislative Pressure  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 2   Summary of existing federal regulations affecting the coatings industry...also have their own internal regulations, directives, and guidelines

    336

    Graphitized Conductive Carbon Coatings for Composite Electrodes ...  

    Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... The fast plasma discharge and subsequent rapid pyrolysis of an organic precursor result in a uniform coating of ...

    337

    Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide essential functions to the cell's operation.

    338

    Protective Coatings for Molybdenum – Industrial Processing and ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Symposium, Advanced Protective Coatings for Refractory Metals and Alloys ... In particular molybdenum is a state of the art structural material in glass ...

    339

    Solar Selective Absorption Coatings - Energy Innovation Portal  

    Sandia has developed a new class of solar selective absorber coatings that significantly improve the thermal conversion efficiency of solar units by reducing ...

    340

    Solar-thermal technology  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Solar-thermal technology converts sunlight into thermal energy. It stands alongside other solar technologies including solar-electric and photovoltaic technologies, both of which convert sunlight into electricity. Photovoltaic technology converts by direct conversion, and solar-electric converts by using sunlight`s thermal energy in thermodynamic power cycles. The numerous up-and-running solar energy systems prove solar-thermal technology works. But when is it cost-effective, and how can HVAC engineers and facility owners quickly identify cost-effective applications? This article addresses these questions by guiding the reader through the basics of solar-thermal technology. The first section provides an overview of today`s technology including discussions of collectors and typical systems. The next section presents an easy method for identifying potentially cost-effective applications. This section also identifies sources for obtaining more information on the technology--collector ratings and performance, solar manufacturers, and solar design and analysis tools. The article discusses only those collectors and systems that are most often used. Many others are on the market--the article does not, by omission, mean to infer that one is better than the other.

    Bennett, C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    341

    Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    342

    Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

    Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    343

    Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    344

    Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Bystroff, Roman I. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Dale E. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    345

    Method for Determining Solids Circulation Rate  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Determining Solids Circulation Rate Determining Solids Circulation Rate Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov May 2012 Opportunity Research is currently active on the patented technology "Method for Determining Solids Circulation Rate." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview This invention provides a method to measure the rate of solids circulation, particularly in those applications where the solids are recycled back to pro- cesses for further use. The applications include processes such as circulating fluidized bed gasifiers and combustors, as well as chemical looping. In the above applications, determining solids circulation rates is needed to

    346

    Materials - Coatings & Lubricants - Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology ICAT brochure cover TRI - BOL*O*GY (N) -- the science and technology of friction, wear, and lubrication of interacting surfaces in relative motion. The Illinois Center for Advanced Tribology (ICAT) is a virtual center that brings together the skills and talents of multiple investigators and unique facilities from Argonne National Laboratory and three partnering universities to resolve critical friction, wear, and lubrication issues in biomedical implants, alternative energy technologies, and extreme environments. The Center's tribology experts work closely with industry, and with state and federal agencies through jointly funded research projects, to perform leading-edge research on the impact of materials, coatings, and fluids on

    347

    DIFFUSION COATINGS FOR CORROSION RESISTANT COMPONENTS IN COAL GASIFICATION SYSTEMS  

    SciTech Connect

    Advanced electric power generation systems use a coal gasifier to convert coal to a gas rich in fuels such as H{sub 2} and CO. The gas stream contains impurities such as H{sub 2}S and HCl, which attack metal components of the coal gas train, causing plant downtime and increasing the cost of power generation. Corrosion-resistant coatings would improve plant availability and decrease maintenance costs, thus allowing the environmentally superior integrated gasification combined cycle plants to be more competitive with standard power-generation technologies. A startup meeting was held at the National Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA site on July 28, 2003. SRI staff described the technical approach of the project.

    Gopala N. Krishnan

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    348

    Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

    Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    349

    Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support - Energy Innovation Portal  

    A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a ...

    350

    Process to minimize cracking of pyrolytic carbon coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    Carbon-coated microspheroids useful as fuels in nuclear reactors are produced with a low percentage of cracked coatings and are imparted increased strength and mechanical stability characteristics by annealing immediately after the carbon coating processes.

    Lackey, Jr., Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    351

    Technology '90  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    352

    Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards, and Codes in Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies...

    353

    Rates & Repayment  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Environmental Review-NEPA Financial Data Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Rate Adjustments Transmission Ancillary Services Rates WAPA-137 Rate Order Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current and Historical Rate Information Collbran Power Rates CRSP Power Rates CRSP Transmission System Rates CRSP Management Center interest rates Falcon-Amistad Power Rates Provo River Power Rates Rio Grande Power Rates Seedskadee Power Rates SLCA/IP Power Rates Rate Schedules & Supplemental Rate Information Current Rates for Firm Power, Firm & Non-firm Transmission Service, & Ancillary Services Current Transmission & Ancillary Services Rates Tariffs Components of the SLCA/IP Existing Firm Power Rate Cost Recovery Charge (CRC) Page MOA Concerning the Upper Colorado River Basin

    354

    Study on machined thermal sprayed coatings adherence  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Thermal sprayed coatings represent a modern way of solving real important problems, like repairing worn parts working under severe wearing conditions or, ensuring efficient corrosion protection of parts used in sea, as platform, bridges, or obtaining ... Keywords: adherence, cylindrical turning, metallizing process, sample, thermal sprayed coatings, transducer

    Mihaiela Iliescu; Mihnea Costoiu; Sergiu Tonoiu

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    355

    Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    356

    Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    firing time and temperature on 6P57 coatings on Ti6Al4V and 6P50 on Co-firing time and temperature on the adhesion of coatings manufactured with glass 6P57 on Ti6Al4V and glass 6P50 on Co-

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    357

    SH Coatings LP | Department of Energy  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 333 likes Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., based in Belmont, California, uses Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopes (DTEM) to enable imaging of nanoscale objects, such as proteins, thin films and nanoparticles at unprecedented time scales and frame rates. By utilizing a laser-driven electron source, DTEMs are able to produce short bursts of electrons that can form an image with nanometer resolution in as little as 10 nanoseconds. This enables observation of dynamics in material systems that play an important role in a wide range of energy technologies, including battery electrodes, petroleum catalysts, solar cell materials, and organisms for bio fuel growth. Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions uses technology

    358

    Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    359

    Evaluation of extractant-coated ferromagnetic microparticles for the recovery of hazardous metals from waste solution.  

    SciTech Connect

    A magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process was developed earlier at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This compact process was designed for the separation of transuranics (TRU) and radionuclides from the liquid waste streams that exist at many DOE sites, with an overall reduction in waste volume requiring disposal. The MACS process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractant/ion exchange materials with magnetic separation to provide an efficient chemical separation. Recently, the MACS process has been evaluated with acidic organophosphorus extractants for hazardous metal recovery from waste solutions. Moreover, process scale-up design issues have been addressed with respect to particle filtration and recovery. Two acidic organophosphorus compounds have been investigated for hazardous metal recovery, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 272) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 301). Coated onto magnetic microparticles, these extractants demonstrated superior recovery of hazardous metals from solution, relative to what was expected on the basis of results from solvent extraction experiments. The results illustrate the diverse applications of MACS technology for dilute waste streams. Preliminary process scale-up experiments with a high-gradient magnetic separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have revealed that very low microparticle loss rates are possible.

    Kaminski, M. D.

    1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    360

    Available Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    6 News Stories (and older) 6 News Stories (and older) 12.21.2005___________________________________________________________________ Genzyme acquires gene therapy technology invented at Berkeley Lab. Read more here. 07.19.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Symyx, a start up company using Berkeley Lab combinatorial chemistry technology licensed by the Technology Transfer Department and developed by Peter Schultz and colleagues in the Materials Sciences Division, will be honored with Frost & Sullivan's 2005 Technology Leadership Award at their Excellence in Emerging Technologies Awards Banquet for developing enabling technologies and methods to aid better, faster and more efficient R&D. Read more here. 07.11.2005 _________________________________________________________________ Nanosys, Inc., a Berkeley Lab startup, is among the solar nanotech companies investors along Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park hope that thinking small will translate into big profits. Read more here.

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    361

    Review of encapsulation technologies  

    SciTech Connect

    The use of encapsulation technology to produce a compliant waste form is an outgrowth from existing polymer industry technology and applications. During the past 12 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been researching the use of this technology to treat mixed wastes (i.e., containing hazardous and radioactive wastes). The two primary encapsulation techniques are microencapsulation and macroencapsulation. Microencapsulation is the thorough mixing of a binding agent with a powdered waste, such as incinerator ash. Macroencapsulation coats the surface of bulk wastes, such as lead debris. Cement, modified cement, and polyethylene are the binding agents which have been researched the most. Cement and modified cement have been the most commonly used binding agents to date. However, recent research conducted by DOE laboratories have shown that polyethylene is more durable and cost effective than cements. The compressive strength, leachability, resistance to chemical degradation, etc., of polyethylene is significantly greater than that of cement and modified cement. Because higher waste loads can be used with polyethylene encapsulant, the total cost of polyethylene encapsulation is significantly less costly than cement treatment. The only research lacking in the assessment of polyethylene encapsulation treatment for mixed wastes is pilot and full-scale testing with actual waste materials. To date, only simulated wastes have been tested. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site had planned to conduct pilot studies using actual wastes during 1996. This experiment should provide similar results to the previous tests that used simulated wastes. If this hypothesis is validated as anticipated, it will be clear that polyethylene encapsulation should be pursued by DOE to produce compliant waste forms.

    Shaulis, L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    362

    Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

    Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    363

    Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound. This invention has applications to breeding blankets for fusion reactors as well as to alkali metal thermal to electric converters.

    Park, J.H.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    364

    Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

    Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

    1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    365

    FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer or inhibitor. Comparable metallic alloys such as SAM2X5 and SAM1651 may also experience crevice corrosion under sufficiently harsh conditions. Accelerated crevice corrosion tests are now being conducted to intentionally induce crevice corrosion, and to determine those environmental conditions where such localized attack occurs. Such materials are extremely hard, and provide enhanced resistance to abrasion and gouges (stress risers) from backfill operations, and possibly even tunnel boring. The hardness of Type 316L Stainless Steel is approximately 150 VHN, that of Alloy C-22 is approximately 250 VHN, and that of HVOF SAM2X5 ranges from 1100-1300 VHN. These new materials provide a viable coating option for repository engineers. SAM2X5 and SAM1651 coatings can be applied with thermal spray processes without any significant loss of corrosion resistance. Both Alloy C-22 and Type 316L stainless lose their resistance to corrosion during thermal spraying. Containers for the transportation, storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) with corrosion resistant coatings are envisioned. For example, an enhanced multi-purpose container (MPC) could be made with such coatings, leveraging existing experience in the fabrication of such containers. These coating materials could be used to protect the final closure weld on SNF/HLW disposal containers, eliminate need for stress mitigation. Integral drip shield could be produced by directly spraying it onto the disposal container, thereby eliminating the need for an expensive titanium drip shield. In specific areas where crevice corrosion is anticipated, such as the contact point between the disposal container and pallet, HVOF coatings could be used to buildup thickness, thereby selectively adding corrosion life where it is needed. Both SAM2X5 & SAM1651 have high boron content which enable them to absorb neutrons and therefore be used for criticality control in baskets. Alloy C-22 and 316L have no neutron absorber, and cannot be used for such functions. Borated stainless steel and G

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    366

    The HMDS Coating Flaw Removal Tool  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    In many high energy laser systems, optics with HMDS sol gel antireflective coatings are placed in close proximity to each other making them particularly susceptible to certain types of strong optical interactions. During the coating process, halo shaped coating flaws develop around surface digs and particles. Depending on the shape and size of the flaw, the extent of laser light intensity modulation and consequent probability of damaging downstream optics may increase significantly. To prevent these defects from causing damage, a coating flaw removal tool was developed that deploys a spot of decane with a syringe and dissolves away the coating flaw. The residual liquid is evacuated leaving an uncoated circular spot approximately 1mm in diameter. The resulting uncoated region causes little light intensity modulation and thus has a low probability of causing damage in optics downstream from the mitigated flaw site.

    Monticelli, M V; Nostrand, M C; Mehta, N; Kegelmeyer, L; Johnson, M A; Fair, J; Widmayer, C

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    367

    Comparative Study of Aluminide Coatings on Mild Steel by Different ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Corrosion Inhibition of a Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Coating by Release on Demand ... High Energy Density Coating Processing for Oil and Gas Applications .

    368

    Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Coatings for Oxidation ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Our protective coatings were evaluated for thermal-shock performance at the ... that our coatings provide oxidation protection of C-C composites at temperature.

    369

    Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Life Model for Coated Superalloy ...  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    in an aggressive combustion gas environment. Coating ..... M.I. Wood and G.F. Harrison, "Modeling The Deformation Of Coated. Superalloys Under Thermal ...

    370

    Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contacts and Cell Coatings The outermost layers of photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, are the electrical contacts and anti-reflective coating. These layers provide...

    371

    Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    coatings for nickel up to 1,100 C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at...

    372

    Advances in Zinc-Coated Steel Sheet: Processing and Properties  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Influences of Ni-Pretreatments on Galvanized Coatings · Surface Performance of Environment-Friendly Galvanized Sheet for Appliance · Thermal Spray Coating ...

    373

    NETL: Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    projects are designed to: enhance domestic oil and natural gas supplies through advanced exploration and production technology; examine water related concerns; investigate...

    374

    Technology Update  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A Novel Solvent Extraction Process With Bottom Gas Injection for Liquid Waste ... Membrane Technology for Treatment of Wastes Containing Dissolved Metals: ...

    375

    Microwave Technology  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 20, 2011 ... These wastes are found in the market. ... Cherian1; Michael Kirksey1; Sandwip Dey2; 1Spheric Technologies Inc; 2Arizona State University

    376

    Transmission Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    electronically (shift-by-wire) and performed by a hydraulic system or electric motor. In addition, technologies can be employed to make the shifting process smoother than...

    377

    Partnerships and Technology Transfer  

    ... including windshields, eyewear, clothing, building materials, road surfaces, ship hulls and self-cleaning coatings. ... free-living organisms.

    378

    Metering Technology  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Utilities are looking to replace meters that only measure kilowatt-hours with advanced meters with greater features and functions. This White Paper describes the smart metering technology that is already available or will be available in the near future. It also provides a high-level overview of the wired and wireless communication technologies used in the metering industry.

    2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    379

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Technology ...  

    Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. Search Help ... This invention can produce copious quantities of carbon nanotubes at rates near grams per hour.

    380

    FY 2008 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned an "Excellent" rating and 95.3 percent of the possible incentive fee from...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    381

    FY 2010 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned an "Excellent" rating and 95.4 percent of the possible incentive fee from...

    382

    FY 2010 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned an "Excellent" rating and 95.4 percent of the possible incentive fee...

    383

    FY 2009 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned an "Excellent" rating and 95 percent of the possible incentive fee from...

    384

    FY 2012 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned an "Excellent" rating in Program, Operations, and Institutional...

    385

    FY 2008 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned an "Excellent" rating and 95.3 percent of the possible incentive fee...

    386

    FY 2006 Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies, LLC,...  

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    & Technologies, LLC, the management and operating contractor for the Kansas City Plant, earned a "Very Good" rating and 76.1 percent of the possible incentive fee from...

    387

    Making Technology Work in our Favour - CECM  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    While information technologies are changing at a rate far beyond the capacity of individual users to assimilate, it is evident that current levels of sophistication ...

    388

    New Barrier Coating Materials for PV Module Backsheets: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This conference paper describes the high moisture barrier high resistivity coatings on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) have been fabricated and characterized for use in PV module back sheet applications. These thin film barriers exhibit water vapor transmission rates (WVTR) as low as 0.1 g/m2-day at 37.8 C and have shown excellent adhesion (> 10 N/mm) to both ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) and PET even after filtered xenon arc lamp UV exposure. The WVTR and adhesion values for this construction are compared to and shown to be superior to candidate polymeric backsheet materials.

    Barber, G. D.; Jorgensen, G. J.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S. H.; Pern, J.; McMahon, T. J.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    389

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    BSA 11-30: Enhanced Alkane production by Aldehyde Decarbonylase Fusion Constructs; BSA 12-36: Oil Accumulation in Plant Leaves; Find a Technology.

    390

    Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

    There are 9 technologies tagged "cancer". BSA 01-02: ... a limited-liability company founded by the Research Foundation for the State University of ...

    391

    Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Courtesy of ZCorp The Rapid Prototyping Laboratory (RPL) supports internal design, manufacturing, and process development with three rapid prototyping (RP) technologies:...

    392

    Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    parts Brazing large complex parts The joining and heat-treating technologies in the Thin Film, Vacuum, & Packaging department include brazing, heat-treating, diffusion...

    393

    A Successful Cool Storage Rate  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air conditioning load, which is highly coincident with HL&P's system peak, provided a large market for cool storage technologies. Initial market research made it very clear that a special cool storage rate was required to successfully market the technology. Development of the rate required an integrated, multidepartment effort and extensive use of DSManager, an integrated resource planning model. An experimental version of the rate was initially implemented as part of the initial phase of the cool storage program. A permanent rate, incorporating lessons learned from the experimental rate, was then developed for the long term implementation of the program. The permanent rate went through a lengthy regulatory approval process which included intervention by a local natural gas distribution company. The end result is a very successful cool storage program with 52 projects and 31 megawatts of demand reduction in the first three and one-half years of program implementation.

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    394

    PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Reflective window coating Radiant barrier in attic Plantedwindow coating (10) Radiant barrier in attic (11) Planted

    Peters, Jane S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    395

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Deployment Deployment Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) on AddThis.com...

    396

    Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research

    397

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Vehicle Technologies Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Vehicle Technologies Office Recognizes Outstanding Researchers on AddThis.com...

    398

    Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint  

    SciTech Connect

    Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

    Emery, K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    399

    Suspension Plasma Spray Coatings: Promise and Problems  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Surface Protection for Enhanced Materials Performance: Science, Technology, ...

    400

    Superhydrophilic and Superhydrophobic Powder Coated Fabric ...  

    Energy Innovation Portal Technologies. ... Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels;

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    401

    Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Plating and Lithography Plating and Lithography PDF format (76 kb) 450 ft2 Plating Laboratory 450 h2 Plating Laboratory The Plating capabilities in the Thin Film, Vacuum and Packaging department includes both electroless and electro plating. These processes support Multi-Chip Module, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), Weapons Systems (Neutron Tubes) and other miscellaneous projects. Capabilities: Electroplate large areas using cyanide and non-cyanide based chemistries Develop, fabricate, and test coatings and patterns Routinely plate copper, nickel, and gold Expertise in developing plating processes for unusual applications and metals Electroless nickel and copper plating Electrophoretic deposition of photoresist Low volume electro or electroless plating production capabilities

    402

    Advanced Fuels Campaign Cladding & Coatings Meeting Summary  

    SciTech Connect

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) organized a Cladding and Coatings operational meeting February 12-13, 2013, at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), national laboratories, industry, and universities attended the two-day meeting. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss advanced cladding and cladding coating research and development (R&D); review experimental testing capabilities for assessing accident tolerant fuels; and review industry/university plans and experience in light water reactor (LWR) cladding and coating R&D.

    Not Listed

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    403

    METHOD OF PREPARING COATED REFRACTORY WARE  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method is presented for preparing a dense, refractory coating on a vessel adapted to the handling of molten metals such as uranium and plutonium. According to the invention, the inner surface of a heat stable container formed of a refractory metal of either niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, or tungsten is coated with molten thorium within 10 minutes so as to present alloying with the refractory metal and then exposed to a reactive atmosphere of nitrogen at a temperature of about 1750 deg for 30 minutes to form a refractory thorium nitride coating.

    Perlman, M.L.; Lipkin, D.; Weissman, S.I.

    1959-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    404

    Thermal Barrier Coating Systems II  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 26, 2009... on the application requirements and not on substrate physical properties such as thermal expansion rate Esp. within the same class of alloys.

    405

    FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    .eere.energy.gov/informationcenter hydrogen and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially

    406

    Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    2000: 2000: Vol. 2, No. 2 EETD Study Explores Electricity Use of Office and Network Equipment EETD Researchers Form Network to Study Energy Use, Environmental Impacts of Information Technology In Memoriam-Joan Daisey The Fine XAD Sorbent Coating-2000 R&D 100 Award Winner Polymers Take Charge Hotel Survey Illuminates Energy Savings Research Highlights Sources and Credits PDF of EETD News EETD Study Explores Electricity Use of Office and Network Equipment How much electricity is used to power information technology in the U.S.? EETD's End-Use Energy Forecasting Group, led by Jonathan Koomey, has released a new study estimating office and network equipment energy use as of the end of 1999. The last major study examining energy consumption by this group of products was also conducted by this group and was published

    407

    Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    9, No. 4 [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/nl35/] 9, No. 4 [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/nl35/] Environmental Energy Technologies Division News [http://eetd.lbl.gov/newsletter/] © 2011 Environmental Energy Technologies Division [http://eetd.lbl.gov/] E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [http://www.lbl.gov/] Disclaimer [http://www.lbl.gov/Disclaimers.html] SPRING 2011: VOL. 9, NO. 4 Fuel Cell Research Programmable Thermostats A Bright Spot for Solar Saving Electricity in a Hurry Nanostructured Antifogging Coatings Fluorescent Lighting Research Highlights Sources and Credits This month, EETD News highlights some of its research activities in fuel cells; an energy efficiency expert describes how Japan can save energy in a hurry to help offset supply losses from Fukushima; and a lighting expert discusses why fluorescent

    408

    Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Sandia Cooler's innovative, compact design combines a fan and a finned metal heat sink into a single element, efficiently transferring heat in microelectronics and reducing energy use. Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Learn More

    409

    Plant Engineering: Aging Degradation of Coating Service Level I Coatings—Summary of EPRI Coating Aging Project Activities  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The nuclear industry experienced some instances of degradation of safety-related coating systems applied inside the reactor containment. These instances of degradation became a concern to the industry, but the industry did not have a thoroughly documented history of the degradation or its causes. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a project that conducted research to gain an understanding of the coating degradation and evaluate the effects of aging on the qualified ...

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    410

    Measure Guideline: Transitioning from Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco with EPS  

    SciTech Connect

    This Measure Guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The three-coat system uses a base layer, a fill layer, and a finish layer. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

    Brozyna, K.; Davis, G.; Rapport, A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    411

    Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    Fort Devens: Cold Climate Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40 Harvard, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Devens Sustainable Housing Location: Harvard, MA Partners: Metric Construction www.metriccorp.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Size: 1,300 ft 2 plus basement Price: approx. $250,000 Year Completed: 2012 Climate Zone: Cold PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index: 39 (before renewables) Projected Annual Energy Savings: $580 Incremental Cost of Energy Efficiency Measures: $7,804 Incremental Annual Mortgage increase: $503 Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontrac-

    412

    Method for improving the oxidation-resistance of metal substrates coated with thermal barrier coatings  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A method for providing a protective coating on a metal-based substrate is disclosed. The method involves the application of an aluminum-rich mixture to the substrate to form a discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles, followed by the application of a second coating over the discontinuous layer of aluminum-rich particles. Aluminum diffuses from the aluminum-rich layer into the substrate, and into any bond coat layer which is subsequently applied. Related articles are also described.

    Thompson, Anthony Mark (Niskayuna, NY); Gray, Dennis Michael (Delanson, NY); Jackson, Melvin Robert (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    413

    Technology Analysis  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    * Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Heavy Vehicle Technologies * Multi-Path Transportation Futures * Idling Studies * EDrive Vehicle Monthly Sales Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Technology Analysis truck Heavy vehicle techologies are one subject of study. Research Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S. Transportation Heavy Vehicle Technologies Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study Idling Studies Light Duty Electric Drive Vehicles Monthly Sales Updates Lithium-Ion Battery Recycling and Life Cycle Analysis Reports Propane Vehicles: Status, Challenges, and Opportunities (pdf; 525 kB) Natural Gas Vehicles: Status, Barriers, and Opportunities (pdf; 696 kB) Regulatory Influences That Will Likely Affect Success of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles (pdf; 1.02 MB)

    414

    Fabrication Technology  

    SciTech Connect

    The mission of the Fabrication Technology thrust area is to have an adequate base of manufacturing technology, not necessarily resident at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), to conduct the future business of LLNL. The specific goals continue to be to (1) develop an understanding of fundamental fabrication processes; (2) construct general purpose process models that will have wide applicability; (3) document findings and models in journals; (4) transfer technology to LLNL programs, industry, and colleagues; and (5) develop continuing relationships with the industrial and academic communities to advance the collective understanding of fabrication processes. The strategy to ensure success is changing. For technologies in which they are expert and which will continue to be of future importance to LLNL, they can often attract outside resources both to maintain their expertise by applying it to a specific problem and to help fund further development. A popular vehicle to fund such work is the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with industry. For technologies needing development because of their future critical importance and in which they are not expert, they use internal funding sources. These latter are the topics of the thrust area. Three FY-92 funded projects are discussed in this section. Each project clearly moves the Fabrication Technology thrust area towards the goals outlined above. They have also continued their membership in the North Carolina State University Precision Engineering Center, a multidisciplinary research and graduate program established to provide the new technologies needed by high-technology institutions in the US. As members, they have access to and use of the results of their research projects, many of which parallel the precision engineering efforts at LLNL.

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    415

    OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    of Supperalloys for Gas Turbine Engines, 11 J. Metals, Q,OVERLAY COATINGS FOR GAS TURBINE AIRFOILS Donald H. Boone1970, p. 545. R. Krutenat, Gas Turbine Materials Conference

    Boone, Donald H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    416

    Thin film-coated polymer webs  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

    Wenz, Robert P. (Cottage Grove, MN); Weber, Michael F. (Shoreview, MN); Arudi, Ravindra L. (Woodbury, MN)

    1992-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    417

    (Ni-P) Coatings on AISI  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    ... investigation shows that Electroless Nickel coated AISI 1040 steel has high potential to replace hard chrome plated AISI ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray ... New Developments in High Velocity Air-Fuel Spraying.

    418

    Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

    Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    419

    Silica-coated liposomes for insulin delivery  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Liposomes coated with silica were explored as protein delivery vehicles for their enhanced stability and improved encapsulation efficiency. Insulin was encapsulated within the fluidic phosphatidylcholine lipid vesicles by thin film hydration at pH 2.5, ...

    Neelam Dwivedi; M. A. Arunagirinathan; Somesh Sharma; Jayesh Bellare

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    420

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant.

    Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    421

    Strain-tolerant ceramic coated seal  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. An array of discontinuous grooves is laser machined into the outer surface of the solid lubricant surface layer making the coating strain tolerant. 4 figs.

    Schienle, J.L.; Strangman, T.E.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    422

    Thermal sensor with an improved coating  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    423

    Metal alloy coatings and methods for applying  

    SciTech Connect

    A method of coating a substrate comprises plasma spraying a prealloyed feed powder onto a substrate, where the prealloyed feed powder comprises a significant amount of an alloy of stainless steel and at least one refractory element selected from the group consisting of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The plasma spraying of such a feed powder is conducted in an oxygen containing atmosphere and forms an adherent, corrosion resistant, and substantially homogenous metallic refractory alloy coating on the substrate.

    Merz, Martin D. (Richland, WA); Knoll, Robert W. (Kennewick, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    424

    Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating System Development  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase I: Program Planning - Complete; Phase II: Development; and Phase III: Selected Specimen - Bench Test Work is being performed in Phase II and III of the program.

    NONE

    1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    425

    Multidimensional Signal Modulation Method for High Data-Rate ...  

    Multidimensional Signal Modulation Method for High Data-Rate Transmission Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

    426

    Method to Increase Stabilization Rate of Lignin for Carbon ...  

    Method to Increase Stabilization Rate of Lignin for Carbon Fiber Production Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

    427

    Residential Customer Enrollment in Time-based Rate and Enabling...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Customer Enrollment in Time-based Rate and Enabling Technology Programs: Smart Grid Investment Grant Consumer Behavior Study Analysis Title Residential Customer Enrollment in...

    428

    Progress to Develop an Advanced Solar-Selective Coating  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The progress to develop a durable advanced solar-selective coating will be described. Experimental work has focused on modeling high-temperature, solar-selective coatings; depositing the individual layers and modeled coatings; measuring the optical, thermal, morphology, and compositional properties and using the data to validate the modeled and deposited properties; re-optimizing the coating; and testing the coating performance and durability.

    Kennedy, C. E.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    429

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Benchmarking  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Benchmarking Benchmarking Research funded by the Vehicle Technologies Office produces a great deal of valuable data, but it is important to compare those research results with similar work done elsewhere in the world. Through laboratory testing, researchers can compare vehicles and components to validate models, support technical target-setting, and provide data to help guide technology development tasks. Benchmarking activities fall into two primary areas: Vehicle and component testing, in which researchers test and analyze emerging technologies obtained from sources throughout the world. The results are used to continually assess program efforts. Model validation, in which researchers use test data to validate the accuracy of vehicle and component computer models including: overall measures such as fuel economy, state-of-charge energy storage across the driving cycle, and transient component behavior, such as fuel rate and torque.

    430

    HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    431

    Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies...  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review on Facebook Tweet...

    432

    National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

    National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Marketing Summaries. Here you’ll find marketing summaries for technologies available for licensing from the ...

    433

    Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

    Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    434

    Quasi-Dynamic Rating Pilot Projects  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    EPRI's DTCR technology, which encompasses a number of software tools, hardware tools, and methodologies, offers near-term solutions to overhead line rating problems. The Quasi-Dynamic Rating (QDR) concepts and tools developed in the 2004 pilot project are presented in this report.

    2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    435

    Inspection and Assessment of Overhead Transmission Line Hardware: State of Art Technologies and Future Development  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This report provides background on the mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion and the environmental factors that affect it and describes an on-going research effort to develop  new field methods based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and capacitance discharge rate (CDR) to assess the status of coating systems.BackgroundCoating systems provide a highly resistive barrier that prevents the environment from ...

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    436

    Development in wind energy technology: an update  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This paper presents an overview of the development in wind energy technology. Growth in wind technology and components of wind energy conversion systems are provided. Ratings, and system size are included for various applications in addition to power ... Keywords: development, power electronics converters, technology, wind energy

    Faeka M. H. Khater

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    437

    Safety and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    and Security Technologies for and Security Technologies for Radioactive Material Shipments Safety & Security Technologies Study Started in 2005 with OCRWM Funding. OCRWM funding ended in 2009. EM gave CVSA funding to finish the report. CVSA Ad Hoc RAM/Security/ITS Committee Examined current and emerging technologies for safety and security of radioactive material shipments Site visits Product reviews HMCRP HM-04 report on emerging technologies Safety & Security Technologies Study Completed several site visits to look at current technologies being used. Technologies were broken down into five categories. 1. Inspection Technologies 2. Security Technologies 3. Radioactive Material Dose Rate Measurement and

    438

    NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Projects  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Projects The NREL...

    439

    NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Capabilities  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Capabilities The...

    440

    NREL: Geothermal Technologies - News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal News...

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    441

    Building Technologies Office: News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

    442

    Building Technologies Office: About  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Technologies Office: About on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: About on Delicious Rank Building Technologies...

    443

    Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994  

    SciTech Connect

    Research is presently being conducted to develop a criteria for selecting weld overlay coatings for erosion mitigation in Circulated Fluidized Beds. Initially, eleven weld overlay alloys were selected for erosion testing based upon a literature review. All eleven coatings were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process. Ten samples from each coating were prepared for erosion testing. The coating deposition and sample preparation procedures were described in the second quarterly report. All selected coatings were erosion tested at 400{degree}C and their erosion resistance was evaluated by determining the steady state erosion rate. In addition, the microstructure of each coating was characterized before and after the erosion tests. The results of the tests are discussed in the third quarterly report. No correlations were found between room temperature hardness of the weld overlay coatings and their erosion resistance at elevated temperature. During the last quarter tensile tests were performed at 400{degree}C for the Ultimet, Inconel-625, 316L SS, C-22, and Stellite-6 wrought alloys. The erosion tests for these materials at 400{degree}C are in progress. The results of mechanical and erosion tests will be used to correlate mechanical properties of selected wrought alloys such as tensile toughness, ductility, strain hardening coefficient and yield strength to their erosion resistance at 400{degree}C. Also, the erosion behavior of the wrought alloys compared with similar weld alloys will be analyzed. The experimental procedure and results of the tensile tests are presented in this progress report.

    Levin, B.F.; Dupont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    444

    Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    445

    DEVELOPMENT OF CLAD CERAMIC FUEL PLATES BY SPRAY-COATING TECHNIQUES. Final Report, Phase I  

    SciTech Connect

    Activities in a program to develop techniques of plasma spraying clad plate-type UO/sub 2/ fuel elements are reported. The investigation was also directed toward determining the limitations of the process as applied to fuel element fabrication. UO/sub 2/ powder coatings having densities of 90% theoretical were produced. At conditions required for spraying plates, densities of 86% appear to be practical. The rate and efficiency of UO/sub 2/ coating deposition were also determined for various spraying conditions. Gritblasting was found to provide the best surface for coating adherence. The O/U ratio of the UO/sub 2/ was maintained by spraying in an Ar atmosphere. Zircaloy-2 was found to be the most desirable cladding material. Cladding thicknesses of 0.035 in. are required in distortion-free 2-in.-wide plates. (J.R.D.)

    Weare, N.E.

    1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    446

    Dip coating process. Quarterly report No. 3, March 19, 1976--June 18, 1976  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell quality sheet silicon by dip-coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon. Of the various substrate materials dip-coated this reporting period, mullite appears, at this time, to best satisfy the requirements of this research program. Dip-coating experiments continue to demonstrate that layer thickness and grain size are dependent on and can be controlled by pulling rate and melt temperature. Crystalline grains as large as 1 mm wide and 2 cm or more long can consistently be grown in layers 35 to 50 ..mu.. meters thick. (WDM)

    Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Scott, M.W.; Wolner, H.A.; Nelson, L.D.

    1976-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    447

    Composition profiling of solar coating materials. Final report, April 16, 1976-April 15, 1979  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Auger electron composition vs. depth and optical analysis revealed that a very inexpensive-to-produce (15 min. 900/sup 0/C heat treatment in air) Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer on stainless steels provides an excellent diffusion barrier for preventing stainless steel constituents from entering into an IR reflective Mo coating. It was shown that with sputter deposition of Mo at high rate in a clean noble gas plasma, one can obtain Mo coatings of excellent IR reflectance (> 96% between 2.5 and 25 ..mu..m wavelength). The optical properties (..cap alpha.. and epsilon) of various other absorber surfaces such as stacked razor blades, cone or whisker-covered metal surfaces, plasma-sprayed chromic oxide coatings etc. were measured and explored. (MOW)

    Wehner, G.K.

    1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    448

    New and Emerging Inspection Technologies for Service Water Pipelines  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    This document describes the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies that are currently available or under development to help quantify the corrosion state of service water pipelines. The report classifies the technologies into above-ground and below-ground service. Further, it divides the techniques into those that require the pipe to be bare (lightly coated) and those that can measure through insulation or liners. Finally it presents the techniques that are best suited to perform a local metal loss...

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    449

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    at PNNL PNNL has been active in SOFC development since 1987. Major participant in SECA Core Technology coatings to prevent Cr volatility from SS Glycine ­ nitrate powder synthesis of La0.7Ca0.31CrO3 #12;3 PNNL 700-2300 watts, 9 kg, 2.5 L · Transferred SOFC technology to Delphi starting in 1999. · PNNL now

    450

    Plasma Technology  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Table 3   Deposition rates for various compounds...Table 3 Deposition rates for various compounds Compound Deposition rate (D), 10 8 � gm/cm 2 /min D/D 0 Hexamethyldisiloxane 233 = D 0 1.00 Acrylic acid 28 0.12 Styrene 173 0.74 Tetramethyldisiloxane 191 0.82 Divinyltetramethyldisiloxane 641 2.75 Ethylene 42 0.18 Benzene 110 0.47 Source: Ref 49...

    451

    DECISION ANALYSIS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS FOR METAL AND MASONRY DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES  

    SciTech Connect

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative analysis of innovative technologies for the non-aggressive removal of coatings from metal and masonry surfaces and the aggressive removal of one-quarter to one-inch thickness of surface from structural masonry. The technologies tested should be capable of being used in nuclear facilities. Innovative decontamination technologies are being evaluated under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the FIU-HCET technology assessment site in Miami, Florida. This study is being performed to support the OST, the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, and the environmental restoration of DOE facilities throughout the DOE complex by providing objective evaluations of currently available decontamination technologies.

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    452

    Technology Transfer  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Energy Efficiency & Renewable and Energy - Commercialization Deployment SBIR/STTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer USEFUL LINKS Contract Opportunities: FBO.gov FedConnect.net Grant Opportunities DOE Organization Chart Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Feedback Contact us about Tech Transfer: Mary.McManmon@science.doe.gov Mary McManmon, 202-586-3509 link to Adobe PDF Reader link to Adobe Flash player Licensing Guide and Sample License The Technology Transfer Working Group (TTWG), made up of representatives from each DOE Laboratory and Facility, recently created a Licensing Guide and Sample License [762-KB PDF]. The Guide will serve to provide a general understanding of typical contract terms and provisions to help reduce both

    453

    PNNL: Available Technologies - Browse Technologies by Portfolio  

    Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Browse Technologies by Portfolio. Select a technology portfolio to view ...

    454

    Idaho National Laboratory - Technology Transfer - Technologies ...  

    Idaho National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing ... Fossil Energy; Information Technology; Manufacturing ; Materials; National Security; Non-Nuclear ...

    455

    Geothermal Technologies Office: Geothermal Electricity Technology...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

    456

    Geothermal Technologies Office: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologi...  

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

    457

    NETL: Technology Transfer - Available Technologies for Partnership  

    Technology Transfer Available Technologies for Partnership Software and Modeling. Month Posted. Partnership Opportunity. Patent Information. 12/2011: ...

    458

    Insoluble coatings for Stirling engine heat pipe condenser surfaces. Final report  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    The work done by Thermacore, Inc., Lancaster, Pennsylvania, for the Phase 1, 1992 SBIR National Aeronautics and Space Administration Contract, Insoluble Coatings for Stirling Engine Heat Pipe Condenser Surfaces' is described. The work was performed between January 1992 and July 1992. Stirling heat engines are being developed for electrical power generation use on manned and unmanned earth orbital and planetary missions. Dish Stirling solar systems and nuclear reactor Stirling systems are two of the most promising applications of the Stirling engine electrical power generation technology. The sources of thermal energy used to drive the Stirling engine typically are non-uniform in temperature and heat flux. Liquid metal heat pipe receivers are used as thermal transformers and isothermalizers to deliver the thermal energy at a uniform high temperature to the heat input section of the Stirling engine. The use of a heat pipe receiver greatly enhances system efficiency and potential life span. One issue that is raised during the design phase of heat pipe receivers is the potential solubility corrosion of the Stirling engine heat input section by the liquid metal working fluid. This Phase 1 effort initiated a program to evaluate and demonstrate coatings, applied to nickel based Stirling engine heater head materials, that are practically 'insoluble' in sodium, potassium, and NaK. This program initiated a study of nickel aluminide as a coating and developed and demonstrated a heat pipe test vehicle that can be used to test candidate materials and coatings. Nickel 200 and nickel aluminide coated Nickel 200 were tested for 1000 hours at 800 C at a condensation heat flux of 25 W/sq cm. Subsequent analyses of the samples showed no visible sign of solubility corrosion of either coated or uncoated samples. The analysis technique, photomicrographs at 200X, has a resolution of better than 2.5 microns (.0001 in).

    Dussinger, P.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    459

    Healthy technology  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    One of the biggest struggles user experience teams face is breaking through traditional notions of product strategy, planning and development to bring actionable awareness to the bigger picture around delivering full experiences that people really care ... Keywords: design management, design process, ethnography, experience, healthy technology, industry, lifecycle, metaphor, platform, reliability, research, security, strategy, sustainability

    Ashwini Asokan; Michael .J. Payne

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    460

    Technologies Applications  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    evaporation systems n Potential mining applications (produced water) nIndustry applications for which silicaLicensable Technologies Applications: n Cooling tower systems n Water treatment systems n Water needed n Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) n Enables

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
    While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
    they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
    We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
    to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


    461

    Manufacturing technologies  

    SciTech Connect

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    462

    Metallic and Refractory Coatings - Programmaster.org  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Oct 20, 2011... Narendra Chauhan2; Ghanshyamsinh Jhala2; 1Indus Institute of Technology; 2Institute for Plasma Research; 3Indian Institute of Technology ...

    463

    Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    rate measurements and mass spectroscopy of materials and components Machining and welding capability for constructing unique vacuum components for prototype or production...

    464

    Geothermal Today: 2003 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights (Covers Highlights from 2002)  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    This outreach publication highlights milestones and accomplishments of the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program for 2002. Included in this publication are discussions of geothermal fundamentals, enhanced geothermal systems, direct-use applications, geothermal potential in Idaho, coating technology, energy conversion R&D, and the GeoPowering the West initiative.

    Not Available

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465

    Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd IMPT | Open Energy  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Processing Technologies Ltd IMPT Processing Technologies Ltd IMPT Jump to: navigation, search Name Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd (IMPT) Place United Kingdom Zip NG1 1GF Sector Solar Product UK-based manufacturer of non-vacuum coating systems for fuel cells and solar sectors. References Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd (IMPT)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd (IMPT) is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "Innovative Materials Processing Technologies Ltd (IMPT)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Innovative_Materials_Processing_Technologies_Ltd_IMPT&oldid=346972

    466

    Vacuum Technology  

    SciTech Connect

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    467

    DEVELOPMENT OF CLAD CERAMIC FUEL PLATES BY SPRAY-COATING TECHNIQUES. Quarterly Technical Progress Report, January-March 1961  

    SciTech Connect

    The development of plasma-jet spray-coating techniques for producing clad ceramic fuel plates is discussed. Conditions for spraying fused UO/sub 2/ powder were established by depositing cones on stationary substrates. It was found that the arc-gas flow range within which deposition occurs is very narrow. Coatings were made from --200 +325, --270 + 325, and de-slimed -325 mesh fused UO/ sub 2/ powders. To provide data regarding the economics of the process, deposition rates and efficiencies were determined under various conditions. The effects of powder size, power input, arcgas flow rate, spray distance, traverse rate, power feed rate, powder-gas flow rate, and cover-gas flow rate on deposition efficiency are discussed. Oxygen-to-uranium ratios of coatings made for evaluation of density were determined by gravimetric and volumetric methods. Preparation of the surface without distortion for plasma spraying is discussed. Fixturing and instrumentation methods were designed for measuring substrate and coating temperatures during spraying of typical fuel-element-cladding thickesses of stainless steel and Zircaloy-2. (M.C.G.)

    1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    468

    Pervasive Information Technology Homepage  

    Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

    Pervasive Information Technology. Pervasive information technology is the trend towards increasingly ubiquitous connected ...

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    469

    Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    3: March 8, 2010 3: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on AddThis.com... Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed

    470

    Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

    2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    471

    Multilayer ultra-high-temperature ceramic coatings  

    SciTech Connect

    A coated carbon-carbon composite material with multiple ceramic layers to provide oxidation protection from ultra-high-temperatures, where if the carbon-carbon composite material is uninhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then the first layer on the composite material is selected from ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2, onto which is coated a layer of SiC coated and if the carbon-carbon composite material is inhibited with B.sub.4C particles, then protection can be achieved with a layer of SiC and a layer of either ZrB.sub.2 and HfB.sub.2 in any order.

    Loehman, Ronald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Corral, Erica L. (Tucson, AZ)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    472

    Filler Materials for Polyphenylenesulphide Composite Coatings: Preprint  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have tested polymer-based coating systems to reduce the capital equipment and maintenance costs of heat exchangers in corrosive and fouling geothermal environments. These coating systems act as barriers to corrosion to protect low-cost carbon steel tubing; they are formulated to resist wear from hydroblasting and to have high thermal conductivity. Recently, new filler materials have been developed for coating systems that use polyphenylenesulphide as a matrix. These materials include boehmite crystals (orthorhombic aluminum hydroxide, which is grown in situ as a product of reaction with the geothermal fluid), which enhance wear and corrosion resistance, and carbon fibers, which improve mechanical, thermal, and corrosion-resistance properties of the composite.

    Sugama, T.; Gawlik, K.

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    473

    Passivation coating for flexible substrate mirrors  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A protective diffusion barrier for metalized mirror structures is provided by a layer of coating of silicon nitride which is a very dense, transparent, dielectric material that is impervious to water, alkali, and other impurities and corrosive substances that typically attack the metal layers of mirrors and cause degradation of the mirrors' reflectivity. The silicon nitride layer can be deposited on the substrate before metal deposition thereon to stabilize the metal/substrate interface, and it can be deposited over the metal to encapsulate it and protect the metal from corrosion or other degradation. Mirrors coated with silicon nitride according to this invention can also be used as front surface mirrors. Also, the silver or other reflective metal layer on mirrors comprising thin, light-weight, flexible substrates of metal or polymer sheets coated with glassy layers can be protected with silicon nitride according to this invention. 13 figs.

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.K.

    1988-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    474

    Figure correction of multilayer coated optics  

    DOE Patents (OSTI)

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

    Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    475

    Data Center Rating Infrastructure Rating Development  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    in Portfolio Manager on June 7, 2010. The questions below are designed to help data center owners and operators better understand the rating and benchmark their buildings in...

    476

    Thermomechanical behavior of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coatings.  

    SciTech Connect

    The effect of coating porosity and thickness on the resistance to damage of yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings in an oxidizing environment by thermal cycling was evaluated. Hardness and elastic modulus of an as-processed porous coating were lower than those of a dense coating and the porous coating failed after fewer thermal cycles. Similarly, specimen with a thicker coating failed after fewer thermal cycles than specimen with a thinner coating. The earlier failure of the porous coating is due to lower fracture toughness and enhanced oxidation of the coating/substrate interface, whereas, the earlier failure of the thick coating is due to higher thermal transient stresses that developed in the coating during thermal cycling. Generally, an increase in coating density led to initial increase in both hardness and elastic modulus with increasing thermal cycles. However, hardness and density gradually decreased as the number of thermal cycles increase because of microcracks formation and growth. Microscopic observations indicated that the formation of multiple microcracks and their subsequent growth and coalescence led to final coating failure.

    Singh, J. P.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    477

    SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SMART FUNCTIONAL COATINGS BY CHEMICAL SOLUTION DEPOSITION METHODS  

    SciTech Connect

    New coating technology enables the fabrication of low cost structural health monitoring (SHM) and tamper indication devices that can be employed to strengthen national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such innovations could serve the safeguards community by improving both the timeliness of detection and confidence in verification and monitoring. This work investigates the synthesis of functional surface coatings using chemical solutions deposition methods. Chemical solution deposition has recently received attention in the materials research community due to its unique advantages such as low temperature processing, high homogeneity of final products and the ability to fabricate materials with controlled surface properties and pore structures. The synthesis of functional coatings aimed at modifying the materials conductivity and optical properties was investigated by the incorporation of transition element (e.g. Cr{sup +3}) and rare earth (e.g. Er{sup +3}) serving as dopants in a polymer or gel matrix. The structural and morphological investigation of the as-deposited films was carried out using UV/Vis and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The as deposited coating was further investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray microscopy.

    Mendez-Torres, A.

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    478

    MHK Technologies/Trident 1 | Open Energy Information  

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trident 1 Trident 1 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Trident 1.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Trident Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/TE4 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description Own patented permanent magnet tubular linear generators Multiple generators clustered in PowerPod PowerPods rated and tuneable to match specific wave site and climate Mooring Configuration Gravity base Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions Proprietary Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) Proprietary

    479

    Development of wear resistant ceramic coatings for diesel engine components  

    DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

    Improved fuel economy and a reduction of emissions can be achieved by insulation of the combustion chamber components to reduce heat rejection. However, insulating the combustion chamber components will also increase the operating temperature of the piston ring/cylinder liner interface from approximately 150{degree}C to over 300{degree}C. Existing ring/liner materials can not withstand these higher operating temperatures and for this reason, new materials need to be developed for this critical tribological interface. The overall goal of this program is the development of piston ring/cylinder liner material pairs which would be able to provide the required friction and wear properties at these more severe operating conditions. More specifically, this program first selected, and then evaluated, potential d/wear resistant coatings which could be applied to either piston rings an or cylinder liners and provide, at 350{degree}C under lubricated conditions, coefficients of friction below 0.1 and wear rates of less than 25 {times} lO{sup {minus}6} mm/hour. The processes selected for applying the candidate wear resistant coatings to piston rings and/or cylinder liners were plasma spraying, chemical vapor, physical vapor and low temperature arc vapor deposition techniques as well as enameling techniques.

    Haselkorn, M.H. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    480

    TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

    404-NOV. 1, 2000 404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE. This Act may be cited as the ''Technology Transfer Commer- cialization Act of 2000''. SEC. 2. FINDINGS. The Congress finds that- (1) the importance of linking our unparalleled network of over 700 Federal laboratories and our Nation's universities with United States industry continues to hold great promise

    Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rate coating technology" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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    481

    Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

    NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

    Consumers Kept Consumers Kept the Lights On Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Atmospheric Sciences Advanced Technologies Building Technologies Energy Analysis Indoor Environment Vol. 3 No. 4 News 1 California Consumers Kept the Lights On 3 A Quick and Easy Web-Based Assess- ment Tool for Day/Electric Lighting 5 Berkeley Lab Model Tracks Indoor Anthrax Dispersal 7 Rating "Green" Laboratories-Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria 9 Research Highlights The mission of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division is to perform research and development leading to better energy technologies and the reduction of adverse energy- related environmental impacts. Environmental Energy Technologies Division continued on page 2 In this Issue C alifornia consumers-not mild weather or the cooling economy-should get credit

    482

    Manufacturing technology  

    SciTech Connect

    This bulletin depicts current research on manufacturing technology at Sandia laboratories. An automated, adaptive process removes grit overspray from jet engine turbine blades. Advanced electronic ceramics are chemically prepared from solution for use in high- voltage varistors. Selective laser sintering automates wax casting pattern fabrication. Numerical modeling improves performance of photoresist stripper (simulation on Cray supercomputer reveals path to uniform plasma). And mathematical models help make dream of low- cost ceramic composites come true.

    Leonard, J.A.; Floyd, H.L.; Goetsch, B.; Doran, L. [eds.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    483

    Biomass Technologies  

    Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

    There are many types of biomass—organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes—that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007.

    484

    Rubidium dimers in paraffin-coated cells  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Measurements were made to determine the density of rubidium dimer vapor in paraffin-coated cells. The number density of dimers and atoms in similar paraffin-coated and uncoated cells was measured by optical spectroscopy. Due to the relatively low melting point of paraffin, a limited temperature range of 43-80 deg C was explored, with the lower end corresponding to a dimer density of less than 10^7 cm^(-3). With one-minute integration time, a sensitivity to dimer number density of better than 10^6 cm^(-3) was achieved. No significant difference in dimer density was observed between the cells.

    V. M. Acosta; A. Jarmola; D. Windes; E. Corsini; M. P. Ledbetter; T. Karaulanov; M. Auzinsh; S. A. Rangwala; D. F. Jackson Kimball; D. Budker

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    485

    Reactor Shim Control by Coolant Passage Coating  

    SciTech Connect

    Work at North American Aviation in connection with the ReactorSafety Program has suggested the use of a poison-bearing "paint" which would coat reactor coolant channels, and provide a supplement to the control systems of the Hanford reactors. A review of Hanford operating problems indicates that this addition to the present control systems would enable an increase in annual production for each reactor of about 6% or the production equivalent of about 21 days at maximum power level. Installation and maintenance problems for this system would be minor, and development of a suitable coating material appears promising.

    Wheelock, C.W.

    1953-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    486

    Coating thermal noise for arbitrary shaped beams  

    E-Print Network (OSTI)

    Advanced LIGO's sensitivity will be limited by coating noise. Though this noise depends on beam shape, and though nongaussian beams are being seriously considered for advanced LIGO, no published analysis exists to compare the quantitative thermal noise improvement alternate beams offer. In this paper, we derive and discuss a simple integral which completely characterizes the dependence of coating thermal noise on shape. The derivation used applies equally well, with minor modifications, to all other forms of thermal noise in the low-frequency limit.

    Richard O'Shaughnessy

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z