National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for rat neth er

  1. Protein folding in the ER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, F. J.; Argon, Y.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    1999-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major protein folding compartment for secreted, plasma membrane and organelle proteins. Each of these newly-synthesized polypeptides folds in a deterministic process, affected by the unique conditions that exist in the ER. An understanding of protein folding in the ER is a fundamental biomolecular challenge at two levels. The first level addresses how the amino acid sequence programs that polypeptide to efficiently arrive at a particular fold out of a multitude of alternatives, and how different sequences obtain similar folds. At the second level are the issues introduced by folding not in the cytosol, but in the ER, including the risk of aggregation in a molecularly crowded environment, accommodation of post-translational modifications and the compatibility with subsequent intracellular trafficking. This review discusses both the physicochemical and cell biological constraints of folding, which are the challenges that the ER molecular chaperones help overcome.

  2. Osmotic Regulation of Estrogen Receptor-in Rat Vasopressin and Oxytocin Neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, William J.

    Osmotic Regulation of Estrogen Receptor- in Rat Vasopressin and Oxytocin Neurons Suwit J. Somponpun)- . In contrast, only 7.5% of oxytocin (OT) MNCs express ER- . We examined the osmotic regulation of ER- mMNCs.ImmunocytochemistrydemonstratedthatthedecreaseinER- mRNAwastranslatedintodepletionof receptor protein content in hyper-osmotic animals. Numerous MNCs

  3. BIOENERGI ER BLEVET MODERNE 4DECEMBER 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at bruge biomasse til energi. Opfyring med brænde og opvarmning med halmfyr eller biogas er kendte, biogas og bioethanol. Bioenergi er den eneste vedvarende energikilde, der findes i fast, flydende og

  4. 2. september 2013 Hvad er en algoritme?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyar, Joan

    Algoritmer 2. september 2013 Hvad er en algoritme? Følgende er en kort børnehistorie der beskriver hvad en algoritme er: "I'm looking for an algorithm to draw a circle, Tinker said. "It's a tough one sixty times." Opgave I skal lave en algoritme til at handle nogle bestemte varer ind i Fupta. I har fået

  5. Tank 241-ER-311, grab samples, ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2, ER311-98-3 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FULLER, R.K.

    1999-02-24

    This document is the final report for catch tank 241-ER-311 grab samples. Three grab samples ER311-98-1, ER311-98-2 and ER311-98-3 were taken from East riser of tank 241-ER-311 on August 4, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on August 4, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998)and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1997). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). No notification limits were exceeded.

  6. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, nuclear, fracking, LCA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, nuclear, fracking, LCA and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, nuclear, fracking, LCA Due Nov. 6

  7. er 1, 2012 (v ctrical Engi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    digital c one or m above a dependin Deadline Contac er 1, 2012 (v searc Post-Doct ctrical Engi y invites

  8. Energy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    countries with average annual per capita energy consumption rates under 1 TOE)? [5 points] 2. Exponential, poverty and gender The chapter "Energy and Poverty" from the 2002 World Energy Outlook, states "...theEnergy and Society ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Problem Set #2 Total Points: 100 for ER100

  9. Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

    1995-07-25

    A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant. 29 figs.

  10. The distributions of the duplicate oestrogen receptors ER-ba and ER-bb in the forebrain of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, David

    lineage. Here, we describe the distribution of the three ER mRNAs in the hypothalamus and cerebellum) and hypothalamus previously shown to possess ER-as in teleosts. AcER-bb, but not ER-ba, labelling was detected hypothalamus, and periventricular dorsal hypothalamus. The differences we observed in ER subtype m

  11. Characterization of the ER stress checkpoint in mammalian cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Meifan

    2011-01-01

    role in oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmiccellular demand for protein folding and ER capacity has beenlipids. To ensure proper protein folding within the ER, the

  12. Local compositional environment of Er in ZnS:ErF(3) thin film electroluminescent phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVito, David M [ORNL; Neal, John S [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    ZnS:Er thin film electroluminescent phosphors have been shown to exhibit a marked maximum in the near infrared emission (NIR) after a 425 C post-deposition anneal with a very narrow temperature window of {+-} 25 C for optimal NIR emission. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been obtained from both the Zn and Er edges in order to examine the local structure of the host and dopant in this NIR phosphor material. Interestingly, the addition of only {approx}0.5 mol. % of Er as ErF{sub 3} into the host is found to reduce the Zn-S bond length of one of the two nearest Zn-S shells by 0.6 {angstrom} relative to high-quality, atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) grown, pure ZnS. The coordination number of this shorter Zn-S bond increases after the optimal 425 C anneal. Longer range fits indicate a highly disordered structure, overall, consistent with earlier TEM results. Erbium-L{sub 3} EXAFS data from the second and third shells show increasing crystallinity with increasing annealing temperature in the vicinity of the Er dopant. Data from the first shell cannot be fit with S atoms, but are fit equally well with either O or F. Comparison with earlier analyses indicates that the Er is most likely surrounded by F in the first shell. Based on these data and previous studies, we develop a model in which the Er dopant is present as an Er:F{sub x} complex with associated S vacancies, which may include one sulfur atom remaining in the Er nearest shell. Upon annealing, there is a reduction in the F present and a rearrangement of the crystal structure in the vicinity of the Er atom. Optimum annealing conditions occur when optimal crystalline environment is achieved prior to the loss of too much F from the Er:F{sub x} complex.

  13. ARM CLASIC ER2 CRS/EDOP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Heymsfield

    2010-12-20

    Data was taken with the NASA ER-2 aircraft with the Cloud Radar System and other instruments in conjunction with the DOE ARM CLASIC field campaign. The flights were near the SGP site in north Central Oklahoma and targeted small developing convection. The CRS is a 94 GHz nadir pointing Doppler radar. Also on board the ER-2 was the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Seven science flights were conducted but the weather conditions did not cooperate in that there was neither developing convection, or there was heavy rain.

  14. Low temperature properties of some Er-rich intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.A. Gshneidner,jr; A.O. Pecharsky; L.Hale; V.K. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30

    The low temperature volumetric heat capacity ({approx}3.5 to 350 K) and magnetic susceptibility ({approx}4 to 320 K) of Er{sub 3}Rh, Er{sub 3}Ir, Er{sub 3}Pt, Er{sub 2}Al, and Er{sub 2}Sn have been measured. All of the compounds order antiferromagnetically (or ferrimagnetically), and most exhibit more than one magnetic ordering transition. The volumetric heat capacities in general are smaller than those of the prototype magnetic regenerator materials, except for Er{sub 3}Ir in the 12 to 14 K temperature range.

  15. DOE/ER-0214 February 1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE/ER-0214 Magnetic Program Fusion Plan February 1985 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Washington, D.C. 20585 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research February 1985, available resources, and the nation's need for future energy sources. #12;PREFACE During the past few years

  16. Correlations in Multiparticle Markus Ringn' er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringnér, Markus

    . With this model the consequences for the Bose­Einstein effect are investigated in detail. What happens at the end fragmentation, Bose­Einstein interference, Colour interference, Correlations. English 91­628­3190­9 128 Markus­15 (accepted for publication in the European Physical Journal C) ii B. Andersson and M. Ringn'er Bose--Einstein

  17. Ecuaciones Diferenciales Ordinarias 1er semestre 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    generales para las siguientes ecuaciones diferenciales (las primas denotan derivadas con respecto a x) (aEcuaciones Diferenciales Ordinarias 1er semestre 2003 Pr´actica 3 (1) Encontrar soluciones + 3 sen2 y (j) (x + ey )y = xe-y - 1 (2) Mostrar que la sustituci´on v = ln y transforma la ecuaci´on

  18. n er a Notable Research Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F Fiber Reinforced Polymers n er a·········· Notable Research Activity u.s."-I C "au' [;1 tit R eli(Mllposite COIlS'ruclion elements uSing lemma~nel(; ;nj ITWllnetostrictive tagS. · Recycled plasticGOO'4losite

  19. An Improved Algorithm for Quanti er Elimination Over Real Closed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-10-15

    problem, which we call the uniform quanti er elimina- ... The quanti er elimination problem is to construct ..... T 1];:::;T m] be a partition of the variables, T1;:::;Tl.

  20. Ecuaciones Diferenciales Ordinarias 1er semestre 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    Cada soluci´on satisface la ecuaci´on en R - {0} Cada soluci´on tiene derivada continua en x = 0 y1Ecuaciones Diferenciales Ordinarias 1er semestre 2003 Pr´actica 6 (1) Determinar si los siguientes de la ecuaci´on x2 y - 3xy + 3y = 0. (b) Verificar que W(y1, y2) es id´enticamente cero. ¿Por qu

  1. ER-12-1 completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L.

    1996-12-01

    The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

  2. On the Use of an ER-213 Detonator to Establish a Baseline for the ER-486

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Keith A.; Liechty, Gary H.; Jaramillo, Dennis C.; Munger, Alan C.; McHugh, Douglas C.; Kennedy, James E.

    2014-08-19

    This report documents a series of tests using a TSD-115 fireset coupled with an ER-213, a gold exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonator. These tests were designed to fire this EBW with a smaller fireset to obtain current and voltage data as well as timing information at voltage levels below, above, and throughout the threshold firing region. This study could then create a database for comparison to our current ER-486 EBW development, which is designed to be a lower voltage (<500V) device.

  3. DOE/ER--0547T DE92

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractorEnergy,DEC03t933 OSTlandFinalReportER--0547T

  4. FinalReport_01ER41190.dvi

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting FINALDE-FG02-05ER64124

  5. ER85773 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010Mesoscopy and thermodynamics L. G.About UsER85773

  6. Ozone induces glucose intolerance and systemic metabolic effects in young and aged brown Norway rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, V.; Gordon, C.J.; Jarema, K.A.; MacPhail, R.C.; Cascio, W.E.; Phillips, P.M.; Ledbetter, A.D.; Schladweiler, M.C.; Andrews, D.; Miller, D.; Doerfler, D.L.; Kodavanti, U.P.

    2013-12-15

    Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. We hypothesized that ozone would impair glucose homeostasis by altering insulin signaling and/or endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress in young and aged rats. One, 4, 12, and 24 month old Brown Norway (BN) rats were exposed to air or ozone, 0.25 or 1.0 ppm, 6 h/day for 2 days (acute) or 2 d/week for 13 weeks (subchronic). Additionally, 4 month old rats were exposed to air or 1.0 ppm ozone, 6 h/day for 1 or 2 days (time-course). Glucose tolerance tests (GTT) were performed immediately after exposure. Serum and tissue biomarkers were analyzed 18 h after final ozone for acute and subchronic studies, and immediately after each day of exposure in the time-course study. Age-related glucose intolerance and increases in metabolic biomarkers were apparent at baseline. Acute ozone caused hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance in rats of all ages. Ozone-induced glucose intolerance was reduced in rats exposed for 13 weeks. Acute, but not subchronic ozone increased ?{sub 2}-macroglobulin, adiponectin and osteopontin. Time-course analysis indicated glucose intolerance at days 1 and 2 (2 > 1), and a recovery 18 h post ozone. Leptin increased day 1 and epinephrine at all times after ozone. Ozone tended to decrease phosphorylated insulin receptor substrate-1 in liver and adipose tissues. ER stress appeared to be the consequence of ozone induced acute metabolic impairment since transcriptional markers of ER stress increased only after 2 days of ozone. In conclusion, acute ozone exposure induces marked systemic metabolic impairments in BN rats of all ages, likely through sympathetic stimulation. - Highlights: • Air pollutants have been associated with increased diabetes in humans. • Acute ozone exposure produces profound metabolic alterations in rats. • Age influences metabolic risk factors in aging BN rats. • Acute metabolic effects are reversible and repeated exposure reduces these effects. • Ozone metabolic effects are only slightly exacerbated in geriatric rats.

  7. RATS VERSUS PEOPLE Rats equal twice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ----= -, - paper car ton s, and wooden containers are easily damaged. #12;By Starting Fires Rats start fires their sewer homes over their travel routes. These filthy rats may run over and contaminate your food, table

  8. Environmental and Resource Studies (ERS) Program Formal Degree Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    major, or minor B.Sc. in Water Sciences 4 years; single major B.Sc. in Environmental Chemistry 3 or 4Environmental and Resource Studies (ERS) Program Formal Degree Options Bachelor of Environmental-University DegreesOffered through the ERS Program B.Sc. in Environmental & Resource Science 4 years; single/joint1

  9. DOE/ER/40762-521 THEORETICAL STUDIES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    DOE/ER/40762-521 THEORETICAL STUDIES IN HADRONIC AND NUCLEAR PHYSICS Annual Progress Report and Advancement 3112 Lee Building College Park, Maryland 20742-5141 DOE Award No.: DE-FG02-93ER-40762 Budget and the Evolving History of the TQHN 4 B. Research Environment 5 C. Visitors Program 5 II. Recent Research

  10. Final Technical Report for Award # ER64999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metcalf, William W.

    2014-10-08

    This report provides a summary of activities for Award # ER64999, a Genomes to Life Project funded by the Office of Science, Basic Energy Research. The project was entitled "Methanogenic archaea and the global carbon cycle: a systems biology approach to the study of Methanosarcina species". The long-term goal of this multi-investigator project was the creation of integrated, multiscale models that accurately and quantitatively predict the role of Methanosarcina species in the global carbon cycle under dynamic environmental conditions. To achieve these goals we pursed four specific aims: (1) genome sequencing of numerous members of the Order Methanosarcinales, (2) identification of genomic sources of phenotypic variation through in silico comparative genomics, (3) elucidation of the transcriptional networks of two Methanosarcina species, and (4) development of comprehensive metabolic network models for characterized strains to address the question of how metabolic models scale with genetic distance.

  11. Audit Report: ER-B-95-05 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ER-B-95-05 Audit Report: ER-B-95-05 July 14, 1995 Audit of Acquisition of Scientific Research at Ames Laboratory Audit Report: ER-B-95-05 More Documents & Publications Audit...

  12. Audit Report: ER-B-96-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ER-B-96-02 Audit Report: ER-B-96-02 June 11, 1996 Audit of Groundwater Remediation Plans at Savannah River Audit Report: ER-B-96-02 More Documents & Publications EIS-0120: Wetland...

  13. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, the grid, nuclear, fracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    , fracking Due Nov. 7, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Fall 2013 Problem Set #5 Total Points: 100 and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: Personal energy audit, the grid, nuclear, fracking Due Nov. 7

  14. Balanced Ero1 activation and inactivation establishes ER redox homeostasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sunghwan

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provides an environment optimized for oxidative protein folding through the action of Ero1p, which generates disulfide bonds, and Pdi1p, which receives disulfide bonds from Ero1p and transfers ...

  15. 10/2/2014 ER Advertising Information http://uwpress.wisc.edu/journals/journals/er_ads.html 1/2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    10/2/2014 ER Advertising Information http://uwpress.wisc.edu/journals/journals/er_ads.html 1 in the Native Plants Directory. Print Ad Rates Cost Width Height Full page (B&W) $415 63/4" 91/2" Half page/4" 91/2" Cover 2 or 3 (Full page, 4 Color) $695 63/4" 91/2" Online Ad Rates Cost Width Height

  16. Controlling Rats and Mice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13

    House rats and mice eat and contaminate human and animal food, and they damage and destroy property. This leaflet explains how to identify rats and mice by their droppings, runways, food crumbs and noises. Various control methods are discussed....

  17. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  18. Exposure of Jurkat cells to bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) induces transcriptomics changes indicative for ER- and oxidative stress, T cell activation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2011-08-01

    Tributyltin oxide (TBTO) is an organotin compound that is widely used as a biocide in agriculture and as an antifouling agent in paints. TBTO is toxic for many cell types, particularly immune cells. The present study aimed to identify the effects of TBTO on the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat. Cells were treated with 0.2 and 0.5 {mu}M TBTO for 3, 6, 12 and 24 h and then subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. The biological interpretation of the gene expression profiles revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is among the earliest effects of TBTO. Simultaneously or shortly thereafter, oxidative stress, activation of NFKB and NFAT, T cell activation, and apoptosis are induced. The effects of TBTO on genes involved in ER stress, NFAT pathway, T cell activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Activation and nuclear translocation of NFATC1 and the oxidative stress response proteins NRF2 and KEAP1 were confirmed by immunocytology. Taking advantage of previously published microarray data, we demonstrated that the induction of ER stress, oxidative stress, T cell activation and apoptosis by TBTO is not unique for Jurkat cells but does also occur in mouse thymocytes both ex vivo and in vivo and rat thymocytes ex vivo. We propose that the induction of ER stress leading to a T cell activation response is a major factor in the higher sensitivity of immune cells above other types of cells for TBTO. - Research Highlights: > The human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat was exposed to TBTO. > Whole-genome microarray experiments were performed. > Data analysis revealed the induction of ER stress and activation of NFAT and NFKB. > Exposure to TBTO also led to T cell activation, oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  19. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  20. PROC. NETH. ENTOMOL. SOC. MEET. -VOLUME 19 -2008 31 Denis Michez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmont, Pierre

    of different wild bees. Bees constitute a monophyletic group including 16,000 species in seven families a monophyletic group including more than 16,000 described species and seven families currently acknowledged. In this presentation, we propose an overview of one key group in the bee phylogeny: the Melittidae s.l. We show

  1. Velocity-Dependent Dynamic Curvature Gain for Redirected Walking Christian T. Neth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University Betty J. Mohler Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics 8 m Institute for Biological Cybernetics; Reutlingen University Jan L. Souman Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics David Engel Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics Uwe Kloos Reutlingen

  2. DOE/ER/3072-56 February 15, 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    mechanism, of temperature dependence of gas gain, and of electrostatic stability of a long straw tube which best fits our straw-tube data. A prototype module of straw tubes has been used for this studyDOE/ER/3072-56 February 15, 1990 PROTOTYPE STUDY OF THE STRAW TUBE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER C. Lu, K

  3. DOE/ER/3072-56 December 7, 1989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    mechanism, of temperature dependence of gas gain, and of electrostatic stability of a long straw tube which best fits our straw-tube data. A prototype module of straw tubes has been used for this studyDOE/ER/3072-56 December 7, 1989 PROTOTYPE STUDY OF THE STRAW TUBE PROPORTIONAL CHAMBER C. Lu, K

  4. Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Well Cluster ER-20-6 drilling and completion project was conducted during February, March, and April of 1996 in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. This project is part of the DOE`s Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject at the NTS. The primary UGTA tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, and hydrological data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality as well as pathways and rates of groundwater migration at the NTS. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented as part of the UGTA subproject to obtain site-specific data on the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides produced by an underground nuclear explosion. The ER-20-6 near-field drilling project was originally planned to be very similar to that recently conducted at Well Cluster ER-20-5, which was designed to obtain data on the existing hydrologic regime near the site of an underground nuclear explosion (IT, 1995; IT, 1996a). However, after further consideration of the goals of the near-field drilling program and the characteristics of the BULLION site, the TWG recommended that the ER-20-6 project be redesigned to accommodate a forced-gradient experiment. This proposed experiment is expected to yield more realistic estimates of transport parameters than can be deduced from sampling and testing natural groundwater flow systems.

  5. Fron%ers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fron%ers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Visualizing Crystal Growth Department IBM T. J. Watson Research Center Abstract In situ transmission electron microscopy is a unique and exciting technique for visualizing and quantifying crystal growth. Physical and chemical vapour deposition

  6. Conceptual Modelling of Database Applications Using an Extended ER Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogolla, Martin - Fachbereich 3

    Conceptual Modelling of Database Applications Using an Extended ER Model Data and Knowledge is divided into the modelling of admissible database state evolutions by means of temporal integrity184/1) #12; H.2.1 [Database Management] Logical Design -- Data models; Schema and subschema. H.2

  7. Vision and action* Cornelia Fermiill er and Yiannis Aloimonos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daume III, Hal

    for synthesizing an artificial vision system by studying vision competences of increasing complexity andVision and action* Cornelia Fermiill er and Yiannis Aloimonos Our work on active vision has by the idea of approaching vision for behavioural systems in the form of modules that are directly related

  8. Video Entity Resolution: Applying ER Techniques for Smart Video Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalashnikov, Dmitri V.

    buildings, smart grid, and so on. In this paper, we focus on smart surveillance systems wherein video improvements on how the building is used. One of the key challenges in building smart surveillance systemsVideo Entity Resolution: Applying ER Techniques for Smart Video Surveillance Liyan Zhang Ronen

  9. The Effect of Rain on ERS Scatterometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    measurements in rainy conditions [1] [2]. In a raining area, rain striking the water surface creates splashThe Effect of Rain on ERS Scatterometer Measurements Congling Nie and David G. Long Department evidence of rain surface per- turbation in recent studies of surface radar backscatter, the rain effects

  10. Simultaneous Wind and Rain Retrieval for ERS Scatterometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Simultaneous Wind and Rain Retrieval for ERS Scatterometer Measurements Congling Nie and David G on the ESCAT wind-only retrieval has been evaluated. For high incidence angle measurements, the additional scattering of rain causes estimated wind speeds to appear higher than expected. It is also noted

  11. Comparative activation of estrogen receptor alpha (er alpha) by endocrine disruptors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Fei

    2009-05-15

    Estrogen receptor ? (ER?) is a ligand activated transcription factor. Many widely used synthetic compounds and natural chemicals can activate ER?. The compounds investigated in this study include 17?-estradiol (E2), ...

  12. In and Out of the ER: Protein Folding, Quality Control, Degradation, and Related Human Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hebert, Daniel N.

    In and Out of the ER: Protein Folding, Quality Control, Degradation, and Related Human Diseases 1377 C. Protein folding 1378 II. Protein Translocation, Folding, and Quality Control in the Endoplasmic Reticulum 1379 A. Protein targeting to the ER 1379 B. Chaperone-assisted protein folding in the ER 1379 C

  13. Technical Report No. 480 CE: The Classi er Estimator Framework for Data mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalkilic, Mehmet

    Technical Report No. 480 CE: The Classi er Estimator Framework for Data mining Mehmet M. Dalkilic a coherent framework for data mining in the relational model. Observing that data mining depends on two. The classi er indicates the target of the data mining investigation. The classi er may be di cult to express

  14. LE CONSEIL D'ADMINISTRATION -ANNEXES Conseil d'administration au 1er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DSFDME DRV DSS DEV SAJ SAS #12;58 LES UNITÉS DE RECHERCHE ET LES UNITÉS DE SERVICE au 1er juillet 200556 LE CONSEIL D'ADMINISTRATION - ANNEXES Conseil d'administration au 1er juillet 2005 Président;ORGANIGRAMME DES SERVICES CENTRAUXAU 1ER JUILLET 2005 CENTRES RÉGIONAUX EN FRANCE REPRÉSENTATIONS À L

  15. ER Membrane Protein Complex Required for Nuclear Fusion Davis T.W. Ng and Peter Walter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Peter

    ER Membrane Protein Complex Required for Nuclear Fusion Davis T.W. Ng and Peter Walter Department is localized to the luminal (i.e., noncytoplasmic) face of the ER mem- brane, yet nuclear fusion must initiate of Sec63p, Sec71p, and Sec72p plays a central role in mediating nuclear mem- brane fusion and requires ER

  16. Final Report DE-FG02-07ER64416

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, Joseph D.

    2014-02-01

    The document provides the Final Report for DE-FG02-07ER64416 on the use of magnetic resonance (MR) methods to quantify transport in porous media impacted by biological and chemical processes. Products resulting from the research in the form of peer reviewed publications and conference presentations are presented. The research correlated numerical simulations and MR measurements to test simulation methodology. Biofilm and uranium detection by MR was demonstrated.

  17. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  18. Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2005-02-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

  19. COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01

    Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012 [DataJulyMarch 27,5 Southern2govCampaignsAERI-ER

  1. Final_report_DE-FG02-07ER64389

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street Lighting FINALDE-FG02-05ER64124Final R eport

  2. Final Report: DOE award: ER64516-1031199-0013966 2007-2011 Genomic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Final Report: DOE award: ER64516-1031199-0013966 2007-2011 Genomic Structure, Metagenomics, Horizontal Gene Transfer, and Natural Diversity of Prochlorococcus and...

  3. Opgave 1 (20%) En hjulgraf er en orienteret graf af f lgende type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    , hvis ingen anden B-vektor bruger f#26;rre m#28;nter. For eksempel er (0; 3; 2; 0) og (0; 1; 3; 0) begge

  4. Completion Report for Well ER-2-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01

    Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

  5. Completion Report for Well ER-8-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01

    Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

  6. Electrical properties of Er-doped In0.53Ga0.47As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Peter G.; Lu, Hong; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Gossard, Arthur G.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-01-01

    03C117-3 Burke et al. : Electrical properties of Er-doped InElectrical properties of Er-doped In 0.53 Ga 0.47 As PeterBahk and John E. Bowers Electrical and Computer Engineering

  7. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M.J.

    2000-12-01

    Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  8. Super Rat Poison Man

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-04-04

    Bob Square Tie. But Zheng Xiaoyu, the deposed head of China's State Food and Drug Administration begs to be excused. A rat poison manufacturer here in China applied for permission to name some of its products after him, partly because he's corrupt...

  9. The Metabolism of Americium in the Rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, K.G.

    2010-01-01

    A. J. Barber, J. G Hamilton, Metabolism of Plutonium inRats, Plutonium Project Record of the National Nuclearin the Rat (CH 3606) Plutonium Project Record of the

  10. Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-02-28

    Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

  11. FUNDRAISING AND GIFT ACCEPTANCE University Policy No: ER4105 Classification: External Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 FUNDRAISING AND GIFT ACCEPTANCE University Policy No: ER4105 Classification: External Relations.01 For Gifts-in-kind to the Library or to the University of Victoria Art Collection, authority may be delegated

  12. New Results on Quanti er Elimination Over Real Closed Fields and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    obtain a new algorithm for a variant of the quanti er elimination problem. We give an ..... Let R1;:::;Rm 2 f9;8g; Ri 6= Ri+1 ; and let T [1];:::;T[m] be a partition.

  13. Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 October 24, 1997 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site The Environmental Monitoring and Health...

  14. Magnetocaloric effects in Er1?xTbxAl2 alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Mahmud; Gschneidner, Jr., K.A.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2010-04-21

    The magnetocaloric properties of the (Er{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x})Al{sub 2} alloys have been evaluated by magnetization and heat capacity measurements. It is shown that by partial substitution of Er by Tb the ferromagnetic ordering temperature of (Er{sub 1-x}Tb{sub x})Al{sub 2} can be tuned over a wide range of temperatures, that is from 13 K (ErAl{sub 2}) to 110 K (TbAl{sub 2}). Over the entire temperature range the alloy system exhibits large magnetocaloric effect. For a field change of 5 T, the observed magnetic entropy changes peaks from -18 J/kg K (x = 0.20) to -12 J/kg K (x = 0.90). The adiabatic temperature changes measured for selected alloys in the series show a maximum value of 6 K when the magnetic field is changed from 0 to 5 T.

  15. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Chunyang; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Aiguo

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: • We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. • Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress. • Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in testis disorder and germ cell apoptosis. • Inflammatory response is implicated in impaired spermatogenesis and germ cell loss.

  16. IMG ER: A System for Microbial Genome Annotation Expert Review and Curation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Chen, I-Min A.; Chu, Ken; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-05-25

    A rapidly increasing number of microbial genomes are sequenced by organizations worldwide and are eventually included into various public genome data resources. The quality of the annotations depends largely on the original dataset providers, with erroneous or incomplete annotations often carried over into the public resources and difficult to correct. We have developed an Expert Review (ER) version of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system, with the goal of supporting systematic and efficient revision of microbial genome annotations. IMG ER provides tools for the review and curation of annotations of both new and publicly available microbial genomes within IMG's rich integrated genome framework. New genome datasets are included into IMG ER prior to their public release either with their native annotations or with annotations generated by IMG ER's annotation pipeline. IMG ER tools allow addressing annotation problems detected with IMG's comparative analysis tools, such as genes missed by gene prediction pipelines or genes without an associated function. Over the past year, IMG ER was used for improving the annotations of about 150 microbial genomes.

  17. Completion Report for Well ER-12-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01

    Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

  18. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

    2012-09-01

    Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A’, B-B’, C-C’, and D-D’ are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

  19. Bisphenol-A rapidly enhanced passive avoidance memory and phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus of young rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxh63@zjnu.cn; Li Tao; Luo Qingqing; Hong Xing; Xie Lingdan; Tian Dong

    2011-09-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is found to influence development of brain and behaviors in rodents. The previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to BPA impaired learning-memory and inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits expressions in hippocampus during the postnatal development in rats; and in cultured hippocampal neurons, BPA rapidly promotes dynamic changes in dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit NR2B. In the present study, we examined the rapid effect of BPA on passive avoidance memory and NMDAR in the developing hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of postnatal day 18. The results showed that BPA or estradiol benzoate (EB) rapidly extended the latency to step down from the platform 1 h after footshock and increased the phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampus within 1 h. While 24 h after BPA or EB treatment, the improved memory and the increased phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, ERK disappeared. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an estrogen receptors (ERs) antagonist, ICI182,780, or an ERK-activating kinase inhibitor, U0126, significantly attenuated EB- or BPA-induced phosphorylations of NR1, NR2B, and ERK within 1 h. These data suggest that BPA rapidly enhanced short-term passive avoidance memory in the developing rats. A non-genomic effect via ERs may mediate the modulation of the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B through ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: > BPA rapidly extended the latency to step down from platform 1 h after footshock. > BPA rapidly increased pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK in hippocampus within 1 h. > ERs antagonist or MEK inhibitor attenuated BPA-induced pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK.

  20. The EOS is a fundamental descrip5on of nuclear ma7er. For isospin asymmetric ma7er the symmetry energy term is of prime importance. The density dependence of the symmetry energy impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    of the asymmetry term in three sets of calcu- lations provides a contribution to the symmetry energy per nucleonThe EOS is a fundamental descrip5on of nuclear ma7er. For isospin asymmetric ma7er the symmetry energy term is of prime importance. The density dependence

  1. In tobacco leaf epidermal cells, the integrity of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum and of ER export sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In tobacco leaf epidermal cells, the integrity of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum and of ER export sites depends on active COPI machinery Giovanni Stefano1, , Luciana Renna1, , Laurent between COPI and COPII for the maintenance of ER protein export, the mechanisms by which COPI influences

  2. The photoluminescence properties of Er{sup 3+}-doped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays prepared by anodization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xixin; Zhao, Jianling; Du, Peng; Guo, Limin; Xu, Xuewen; Tang, Chengchun

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Er{sup 3+}-doped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization of Zr–Er alloy. ? Small tetragonal zirconia crystallites are tended to be formed due to the doping of Er{sup 3+}. ? Under excitation at 317 nm, the ZrO{sub 2} nantube arrays have strongest photoluminescence intensity. -- Abstract: Er{sup 3+}-doped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays were prepared by anodization of Zr–Er alloy which was obtained by melting zirconium with 1.0 wt% erbium. The morphology, structure and photoluminescence properties were studied through scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analyzer. X-ray diffraction results indicate that doping of Er{sup 3+} affects the crystal structure and grain size obviously and the Er{sup 3+}-doped samples tend to form small tetragonal grains. Photoluminescence analyses show that when Er{sup 3+}-doped zirconia nanotube arrays are excited at 317 nm, there are two strong photoluminescence emission peaks at 373 nm and 415 nm. When the excitation wavelength is 257 nm, a photoluminescence emission peak appears at 363 nm. Under same measurement conditions, emission peaks of the undoped ZrO{sub 2} nanotube arrays are very weak.

  3. Lubiprostone Stimulates Duodenal Bicarbonate Secretion in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mizumori, Misa; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    using a non- absorbable ferrocyanide marker. Some rats wereindomethacin, sodium ferrocyanide ([Fe(CN) 6 ] 4- ), HEPES

  4. N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soromani, Christina; Zeng, Naiyan; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar; Klein, Marie-Christine; Tretter, Thomas; Seaman, Matthew N J; Römisch, Karin

    2012-12-13

    into the ER. A strain deleted for the enzymatically active subunit of the NatA complex, Ard1p (also known as Naa10p), which is re- sponsible for N-acetylation of Sec62p and Sbh1p, showed growth defects that were exacerbated at low and high temperature...

  5. Progress Report from SSX-FRC ER54604 (renewal, year 2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    Progress Report from SSX-FRC ER54604 (renewal, year 2) "Novel CT's: Equilibrium, Stability and temporal resolution ion doppler spectroscopy (IDS) on SSX-FRC (as we originally proposed in the renewal her simulations to experiments at SSX-FRC. Our progress and plans for the coming year are outlined

  6. "Soup"er Soups from Turkey Alice Henneman, MS, RD, Extension Educator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    "Soup"er Soups from Turkey Leftovers Alice Henneman, MS, RD, Extension Educator ahenneman1@unl.edu food.unl.edu Give new life to turkey leftovers with these turkey soup recipes. They start with the same basic ingredients of 1 quart (4 cups) low sodium chicken broth and 2 cups of chopped, cooked turkey

  7. Salt Accumulation in the Loessial Sequence in the Be'er Sheva Basin, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    Salt Accumulation in the Loessial Sequence in the Be'er Sheva Basin, Israel MORDECKAIMAGARr / Evidence of climatic changes is recorded in the salt content of the surface sediments in arid zones, In wetter periods airborne salts are removed downward by leaching to the groundwater, whereas in drier

  8. Environmental and Resource Studies Program Books, Maps & Videos Available For Use in ERS Courses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Michael

    Environmental and Resource Studies Program Books, Maps & Videos Available For Use in ERS Courses find and/or purchase it. We will try to accommodate every request, but resources are generally Bioenergetics 3.0 Focus on Peatlands and Peat Mosses Forest Ecology Forest Ecology- Foundation for Sustainable

  9. Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    Excellent optical thermometry based on short-wavelength upconversion emissions in Er3 Yb3 codoped (Doc. ID 175753); published November 22, 2012 Excited by a 980 nm laser, upconversion emissions coupled levels, which can emit the shortest wavelength emissions for optical thermometry known so far

  10. CW-Pumped Evanescent Amplification Based on Side-Polished Fiber with Heavily Er3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shy,Jow-Tsong

    CW-Pumped Evanescent Amplification Based on Side-Polished Fiber with Heavily Er3þ -Doped Glass) A novel diffractive-pumping scheme is proposed to improve the evanescent amplification using blazed fiber grating for the first time. We also investigate the cw-pumped evanescent amplification at 1.55 mm

  11. That which does not kill me makes me stronger: adapting to chronic ER stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    by activating signal transduction cascades that improve protein folding. One example of such a cascade is the unfolded protein response (UPR), which senses protein folding stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and leads to improvement in the protein folding and proces- sing capacity of the organelle. A central

  12. Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014 8 News Transforming undergraduate education, reopening of the Pacific Museum of Earth, and more 18 New Faculty Three on their latest investigations #12;PhotobyKirstenHodge ii EarthMatters 2014 iii Contents iii From the Editor iv

  13. Y&ffi#rs&.PowER 3628South35th Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .-\\L -qI\\ _\\_ -q\\- Y&ffi#rs&.PowER 3628South35th Street Tacoma,Washington 98409-3192 T A C O M A PPower& ConservationCouncil 851SW 6thAvenue,Suite1100 Portland,OR 97204-1348 DearMr. Walker: Tacoma

  14. 954ER4 Specification 4 ports RS-232 PCI-Express Serial cards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    954ER4 Specification 4 ports RS-232 PCI-Express Serial cards FEATURES 4 independent RS-232 serial ports with communication speeds up to 230 921 ­­­­Kbps Designed to meet PCI-Express Base Specification Revision 1.1 Supports x1,x2,x4,x8,x16 lane ­­­­PCI-Express Bus connector keys High speed 16C950 compatible

  15. Optical ampli ers in broadcast optical networks: A Yatindra Nath Singh, miete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh Yatindra Nath

    Optical ampli ers in broadcast optical networks: A survey Yatindra Nath Singh, miete Department@ee.iitd.ernet.in Abstract Optical data networks are needed to meet ever increasing bandwidth re- quirements. Broadcast optical networks can provide easy and reliable imple- mentation of optical networks, but due to limited

  16. A Be%er Understanding of the Earth System Through Advances in CFD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi Jian "ZJ"

    A Be%er Understanding of the Earth System Through Advances in CFD Paul Ullrich for atmospheric models that can harness these large-scale parallel systems. Higher University of California, Davis June 22nd, 2013 #12;Part 1 Atmospheric Models and the Need for Resolution #12

  17. 108 PostErs EMBnet.journal 18.B Biomedical Text Mining for Disease Gene Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    108 PostErs EMBnet.journal 18.B Biomedical Text Mining for Disease Gene Discovery Sarah ElShal1,2 , Jesse Davis3 , Yves Moreau1,2 1 Dept. of Electrical Engineering (ESAT-SCD) - K.U.Leuven, Leuven, Belgium 2 IBBT-KULeuven Future Health Department, Leuven, Belgium 3 Dept. of Computer Science- K

  18. Propostes temes del treball sobre ER Treball sobre una font d'energia renovable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    'aigua de mar · Cases autosuficients · Cuina solar · Refrigeraci´o solar Energies renovables en un paPropostes temes del treball sobre ER Treball sobre una font d'energia renovable Estudi de l'estat de desenvolupament, la implantaci´o i evoluci´o hist`orica d'u- na font d'energia renovable concreta

  19. Synthesis of multiferroic Er-Fe-O thin films by atomic layer and chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantovan, R., E-mail: roberto.mantovan@mdm.imm.cnr.it; Vangelista, S.; Wiemer, C.; Lamperti, A.; Tallarida, G. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Chikoidze, E.; Dumont, Y. [GEMaC, Université de Versailles St. Quentin en Yvelines-CNRS, Versailles (France); Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio MDM IMM-CNR, I-20864 Agrate Brianza (MB) (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Università di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy)

    2014-05-07

    R-Fe-O (R?=?rare earth) compounds have recently attracted high interest as potential new multiferroic materials. Here, we report a method based on the solid-state reaction between Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe layers, respectively grown by atomic layer deposition and chemical vapor deposition, to synthesize Er-Fe-O thin films. The reaction is induced by thermal annealing and evolution of the formed phases is followed by in situ grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Dominant ErFeO{sub 3} and ErFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases develop following subsequent thermal annealing processes at 850?°C in air and N{sub 2}. Structural, chemical, and morphological characterization of the layers are conducted through X-ray diffraction and reflectivity, time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry, and atomic force microscopy. Magnetic properties are evaluated by magnetic force microscopy, conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer, being consistent with the presence of the phases identified by X-ray diffraction. Our results constitute a first step toward the use of cost-effective chemical methods for the synthesis of this class of multiferroic thin films.

  20. Mechanisms of coactivation of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha)- and ER alpha/Sp-mediated gene transactivation by vitamin D receptor interacting protein 205 (DRIP205) in breast cancer cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qian

    2009-05-15

    Vitamin D interacting protein 205 (DRIP205) is a mediator complex protein that anchors the complex to the estrogen receptor (ER) and other nuclear receptors (NRs). In ZR-75 breast cancer cells treated with 17?-estradiol (E2) ...

  1. Photonic crystal light emitting diode based on Er and Si nanoclusters co-doped slot waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lo Savio, R.; Galli, M.; Liscidini, M.; Andreani, L. C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Franzò, G.; Iacona, F.; Miritello, M. [MATIS-IMM CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Irrera, A. [CNR-IPCF, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d'Alcontres 37, 98158 Messina (Italy); Sanfilippo, D.; Piana, A. [ST Microelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Priolo, F. [MATIS-IMM CNR and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via Valdisavoia 9, 95123 Catania (Italy)

    2014-03-24

    We report on the design, fabrication, and electro-optical characterization of a light emitting device operating at 1.54??m, whose active layer consists of silicon oxide containing Er-doped Si nanoclusters. A photonic crystal (PhC) is fabricated on the top-electrode to enhance the light extraction in the vertical direction, and thus the external efficiency of the device. This occurs if a photonic mode of the PhC slab is resonant with the Er emission energy, as confirmed by theoretical calculations and experimental analyses. We measure an increase of the extraction efficiency by a factor of 3 with a high directionality of light emission in a narrow vertical cone. External quantum efficiency and power efficiency are among the highest reported for this kind of material. These results are important for the realization of CMOS-compatible efficient light emitters at telecom wavelengths.

  2. Cw laser action of Er/sup 3 +/ in double sensitized fluoroaluminate glass at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heumann, E.; Ledig, M.; Ehrt, D.; Seeber, W.; Duczynski, E.W.; Heide, H.v.; Huber, G.

    1988-01-25

    cw lasing at 1.6 ..mu..m was obtained for the first time in Cr, Yb, Er:fluoroaluminate glass. Double step pumping via Cr/sup 3 +/ and Yb/sup 3 +/ with a krypton laser yields a threshold pump power of 80 mW. Efficient lasing can be expected using glass samples of optimized dopant concentration and improved optical quality.

  3. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payseur, Bret

    Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution Rat Genome Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality `draft' covering over 90% of the genome

  4. Work Supported by D.o.E. Coop. Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From Stereoscopic Imaging of the Ablation of Injected Li pellets in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. Work Supported by D.o.E. Coop. Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512 Brock Bose, Martin...

  5. Analysis of Well ER-EC-1 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-1 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-1 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  6. Analysis of Well ER-EC-8 testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 testing program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-8 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-8 Data Report for development and Hydraulic Testing.

  7. Analysis of Well ER-EC-4 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-4 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-4 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  8. Analysis of Well ER-EC-5 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-5 during the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-5 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  9. Analysis of Well ER-EC-6 Testing, Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley FY 2000 Testing Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2002-09-30

    This report documents the analysis of the data collected for Well ER-EC-6 during the Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley (WPM-OV) well development and testing program that was conducted during fiscal year (FY) 2000. The data collection for that program is documented in Appendix A, Western Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley, Well ER-EC-6 Data Report for Development and Hydraulic Testing.

  10. Prenatal PCBs disrupt early neuroendocrine development of the rat hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Cunningham, Stephanie L. [Center for Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gore, Andrea C., E-mail: andrea.gore@mail.utexas.edu [Center for Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute for Neuroscience, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Neonatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can interfere with hormone-sensitive developmental processes, including brain sexual differentiation. We hypothesized that disruption of these processes by gestational PCB exposure would be detectable as early as the day after birth (postnatal day (P) 1) through alterations in hypothalamic gene and protein expression. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected twice, once each on gestational days 16 and 18, with one of the following: DMSO vehicle; the industrial PCB mixture Aroclor 1221 (A1221); a reconstituted mixture of the three most prevalent congeners found in humans, PCB138, PCB153, and PCB180; or estradiol benzoate (EB). On P1, litter composition, anogenital distance (AGD), and body weight were assessed. Pups were euthanized for immunohistochemistry of estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) or TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells or quantitative PCR of 48 selected genes in the preoptic area (POA). We found that treatment with EB or A1221 had a sex-specific effect on developmental apoptosis in the neonatal anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a sexually dimorphic hypothalamic region involved in the regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine function. In this region, exposed females had increased numbers of apoptotic nuclei, whereas there was no effect of treatment in males. For ER{alpha}, EB treatment increased immunoreactive cell numbers and density in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of both males and females, while A1221 and the PCB mixture had no effect. PCR analysis of gene expression in the POA identified nine genes that were significantly altered by prenatal EDC exposure, in a manner that varied by sex and treatment. These genes included brain-derived neurotrophic factor, GABA{sub B} receptors-1 and -2, IGF-1, kisspeptin receptor, NMDA receptor subunits NR2b and NR2c, prodynorphin, and TGF{alpha}. Collectively, these results suggest that the disrupted sexual differentiation of the POA by prenatal EDC exposures is already evident as early as the day after birth, effects that may change the trajectory of postnatal development and compromise adult reproductive function.

  11. Water Retrieval by Norway Rats: Behavior as Deduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, R J

    1998-01-01

    1948). Burrows and feeding of the Norway a radial Mammalogy,Object retrieval preferences of Norway rats: An evolutionaryinedible objects by Norway rats: Motivational interactions

  12. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

  13. Electrical Properties of Er-doped In0.53Ga0.47As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Peter G.; Lu, Hong; Rudawski, Nicholas G.; Stemmer, Susanne; Gossard, Arthur C.; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Bowers, John E.

    2011-03-03

    The electrical properties of In0.53Ga0.47As As thin films Er-doped to concentrations of 1.5×1017 –7.2×1020 cm-3 grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 490 °C on (001) InP substrates were studied. Electrical conductivity, carrier density, and carrier mobility as a function of Er doping were measured by Hall effect at temperatures of 20–750 K. Additionally, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy confirmed the presence of epitaxially embedded ErAs nanoparticles at Er concentrations ?8×1019 cm-3. The observed electrical properties are discussed in terms of the dependence of ErAs nanoparticle formation with Er doping.

  14. Absence of exchange interaction between localized magnetic moments and conduction-electrons in diluted Er{sup 3+} gold-nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesseux, G. G. Urbano, R. R.; Iwamoto, W.; García-Flores, A. F.; Rettori, C.

    2014-05-07

    The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) of diluted Er{sup 3+} magnetic ions in Au nanoparticles (NPs) is reported. The NPs were synthesized by reducing chloro triphenyl-phosphine gold(I) and erbium(III) trifluoroacetate. The Er{sup 3+} g-value along with the observed hyperfine splitting indicate that the Er{sup 3+} impurities are in a local cubic symmetry. Furthermore, the Er{sup 3+} ESR spectra show that the exchange interaction between the 4f and the conduction electrons (ce) is absent or negligible in Au{sub 1–x}Er{sub x} NPs, in contrast to the ESR results in bulk Au{sub 1–x}Er{sub x}. Therefore, the nature of this interaction needs to be reexamined at the nano scale range.

  15. Magnetic properties of Er1?xDyxAl2 (0 ? x ? 1) compounds in low applied fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nirmala, R.; Paudyal, Durga; Pecharsky, V.K.; Gschneidner, Jr., K.A.

    2010-04-21

    Low field magnetic properties of the Laves phase RAl{sub 2} compounds (where R is a mixture of Er and Dy, i.e., Er{sub 1-x}Dy{sub x} and x = 0, 0.1, 0.14, 0.18, 0.25, 0.33, 0.5, and 1) have been studied. These compounds order ferromagnetically, and the middle members show both metastability in a narrow temperature window within the ferromagnetically ordered state and signatures of first order transitions in low applied fields. Results of first principles electronic structure calculations on Er{sub 0.75}Dy{sub 0.25}Al{sub 2} indicate a significant difference in the spin polarization in the 5d states of Er{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} moments. In addition, anisotropic exchange and crystalline electric field effects arise from the random distribution of rare earth ions in the lattice. These and quadrupolar effects triggered by aspherical charge distributions of Er{sup 3+} and Dy{sup 3+} ions may compete and lead to the low temperature anomalies observed in low field magnetization data.

  16. Processing and geologic analysis of conventional cores from well ER-20-6 No. 1, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prothro, L.B., Townsend, M.J.; Drellack, S.L. Jr. [and others

    1997-09-01

    In 1996, Well Cluster ER-20-6 was drilled on Pahute Mesa in Area 20, in the northwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The three wells of the cluster are located from 166 to 296 meters (m) (544 to 971 feet [ft]) southwest of the site of the underground nuclear test code-named BULLION, conducted in 1990 in Emplacement Hole U-20bd. The well cluster was planned to be the site of a forced-gradient experiment designed to investigate radionuclide transport in groundwater. To obtain additional information on the occurrence of radionuclides, nature of fractures, and lithology, a portion of Well ER-20-6 No. 1, the hole closest to the explosion cavity, was cored for later analysis. Bechtel Nevada (BN) geologists originally prepared the geologic interpretation of the Well Cluster ER-20-6 site and documented the geology of each well in the cluster. However, the cores from Well ER-20-6 No. 1 were not accessible at the time of that work. As the forced-gradient experiment and other radio nuclide migration studies associated with the well cluster progressed, it was deemed appropriate to open the cores, describe the geology, and re-package the core for long-term air-tight storage. This report documents and describes the processing, geologic analysis, and preservation of the conventional cores from Well ER20-6 No. 1.

  17. The role of Nb in intensity increase of Er ion upconversion luminescence in zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smits, K. Sarakovskis, A.; Grigorjeva, L.; Millers, D.; Grabis, J.

    2014-06-07

    It is found that Nb co-doping increases the luminescence and upconversion luminescence intensity in rare earth doped zirconia. Er and Yb-doped nanocrystalline samples with or without Nb co-doping were prepared by sol-gel method and thermally annealed to check for the impact of phase transition on luminescence properties. Phase composition and grain sizes were examined by X-ray diffraction; the morphology was checked by scanning- and high-resolution transmission electron microscopes. Both steady-state and time-resolved luminescence were studied. Comparison of samples with different oxygen vacancy concentrations and different Nb concentrations confirmed the known assumption that oxygen vacancies are the main agents for tetragonal or cubic phase stabilization. The oxygen vacancies quench the upconversion luminescence; however, they also prevent agglomeration of rare-earth ions and/or displacement of rare-earth ions to grain surfaces. It is found that co-doping with Nb ions significantly (>20 times) increases upconversion luminescence intensity. Hence, ZrO{sub 2}:Er:Yb:Nb nanocrystals may show promise for upconversion applications.

  18. Investigation of the use of an Er:YAG laser and a fluoride glass fiber for laser angioplasty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwark, Bongsin

    1989-01-01

    INVESTIGATION OF THE USE OF AN ER:YAG LASER AND A FLUORIDE ClLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thes&s BONC'SIN KA'ARK Submitted to the Office of Clraduate Sturlies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of 'tIASTER OF SGIEVCE December Iqg9 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE IJSE OF AN ER:YAG LASER. AND A FLUORIDE GLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thesis bi BONGSIN I~AVARI~ Approved as to style and content by: ry...

  19. Arginine metabolism in enterocytes of diabetic rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Natalie Anne

    2002-01-01

    Diabetic rats and patients exhibit decreased plasma arginine concentrations. Arginine is important in numerous cellular pathways, including the synthesis of nitric oxide and the release of insulin from pancreatic ? cells. At present, little...

  20. Aero III/IV Laplace Transforms Handout 1 A. G. Walton The Laplace transform 8Er of a function sE| is given by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, Andrew G

    Aero III/IV Laplace Transforms Handout 1 A. G. Walton The Laplace transform 8Er of a function s _? _r? 8Er ' E?ud|?sE|o #12;Aero III/IV Laplace Transforms Handout 2 A. G. Walton Table of elementary

  1. IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2009-01-01

    IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

  2. Concentration effect of Er{sup 3+} ions on structural and spectroscopic properties of CdNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghafouri, Sanaz Aian; Erdem, Murat; Ekmekçi, M. Kaan; Mergen, Ayhan; Özen, Gönül

    2014-12-15

    Excitation and emission spectra of a visible room-temperature Er{sup 3+} ions luminescence from powders. - Highlights: • This is the first report on spectroscopic properties of CdNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}:Er{sup 3+}. • The crystalline sizes are affected as the concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions increased. • Quenching of the luminescence was observed to be above 1.0 mol% Er{sup 3+}. - Abstract: This study is focused on the synthesis and characterization of CdNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} compounds doped with of Er{sup 3+} ions. Powders were synthesized by using the molten salt method and annealed at 900 °C for 4 h. The synthesized particles were structurally characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy. A single phase of the CdNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} was determined and the size of the particles was found to be affected by the presence and the concentration of Er{sup 3+} ions. Luminescence properties of each sample were investigated by measuring accurately the emission and excitation spectra at room temperature in the wavelength range of 200–1700 nm by exciting the Er{sup 3+} ions at 379 nm and 805 nm. Quenching of the luminescence in both visible and near infrared spectral regions was observed to be above 1.0 mol% Er{sup 3+} concentration.

  3. Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

    2013-01-22

    Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in August 2012 as part of a model evaluation program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radionuclide data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to provide data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test PIN STRIPE, conducted in borehole U-11b in 1966. Well ER-11-2 will provide information that can be used to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The main 31.1-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 399.6 meters (m). A completion casing string was not set in Well ER-11-2. However, a piezometer string was installed in the 31.1-cm open hole. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing hung on 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. The piezometer string was landed at 394.5 m, for monitoring the lower tuff confining unit. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other test-related radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 42.7 m of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium and 356.9 m of Tertiary volcanic rock. The water-level measured in the piezometer string on September 25, 2012, was 353.8 m below ground surface. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion, and future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will be limited due to the diameter of the piezometer string. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and the water level are as expected, but the section of geology encountered is higher than expected due to faulting. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field equipment was detected because the target aquifer (the Topopah Spring aquifer) at Well ER-11-2 is structurally higher than expected and thus unsaturated.

  4. Die Evolution gilt auch fr den modernen Homo sapiens hat sich ber die Evolution erhoben -das zumindest glaubt er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummaa, Virpi

    ANZEIGE Auslese Die Evolution gilt auch für den modernen Menschen Homo sapiens hat sich über die Evolution erhoben - das zumindest glaubt er gern. Doch laut einer neuen Studie schützen soziale und die Menschheit, zumindest nicht jenen Teil, der in den Genuss moderner Medizin kommt. Die Evolution

  5. FAST: Fast Acceleration of Symbolic Transition S ebastien Bardin, Alain Finkel, J er^ome Leroux, and Laure Petrucci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    FAST: Fast Acceleration of Symbolic Transition systems S#19;ebastien Bardin, Alain Finkel, J#19;er CACHAN Cedex FRANCE fbardin,finkel,leroux,petruccig@lsv.ens-cachan.fr Abstract. fast is a tool by the user. fast capabilities are compared with those of other tools. A range of case studies from

  6. MAT1140: Kort sammendrag av grafteorien Dette notatet gir en kort oversikt over den delen av grafteorien som er gjen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindstrøm, Tom

    u0 - u1 - . . . - un-1 - un der ingen hjørner forekommer mer enn ´en gang. Setning 2 Det finnes en ender i samme punkt, og der ingen av hjørnene u0, u1, . . . , un-1 er like. Grunnen til at vi krever

  7. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation for an er-doped fiber laser frequency comb at a 1 ghz repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, David

    We developed a 1 GHz Er-doped femtosecond fiber laser system providing 2nJ pulses at [equivalence relation symbol]100fs durations and demonstrated octave-spanning supercontinuum generation from 1µm - 2.4µm that is suitable ...

  8. Temporal Shaping of Entangled Photons Avi Pe'er, Barak Dayan, Asher A. Friesem, and Yaron Silberberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesem, Asher A.

    Temporal Shaping of Entangled Photons Avi Pe'er, Barak Dayan, Asher A. Friesem, and Yaron (Received 18 November 2004; published 22 February 2005) We experimentally demonstrate shaping of the two-photon wave function of entangled-photon pairs, utilizing coherent pulse-shaping techniques. By performing

  9. The 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake, Southern California: Vector Near-Field Displacements from ERS InSAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    1 The 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake, Southern California: Vector Near-Field Displacements from ERS In-slip and dip-slip in along the surface of the 1999 Hector Mine rupture (Figure 1). Many publications use In; Zebker et al., 1994; Peltzer et al., 1994; Fujiwara et al., 1997; Michel et al., 1999b; Price, 1999

  10. ER -AHR-ARNT Protein-Protein Interactions Mediate Estradiol-dependent Transrepression of Dioxin-inducible Gene Transcription*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdew, Gary

    ER -AHR-ARNT Protein-Protein Interactions Mediate Estradiol- dependent Transrepression of Dioxin binding a wide variety of environmental pollutants, including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) (5), such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin, TCDD

  11. Transformation E.R. Bachmann & P.L. McDowell MV 4202 Page 1 of3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDowell, Perry

    Transformation E.R. Bachmann & P.L. McDowell MV 4202 Page 1 of3 5. Transformations Overview window coordinates Modeling Transformations Projection Transformation Perspective Division Viewport Transformation Object Coordinates x, y, z, w Modelview Matrix Projection Matrix Eye Coordinates Clip Coordinates

  12. MGS MAG/ER observations at the magnetic pileup boundary of Mars: draping enhancement and low frequency waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    MGS MAG/ER observations at the magnetic pileup boundary of Mars: draping enhancement and low Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA Received 26 November 2002; received in revised form 19 March 2003; accepted 24 April 2003 Abstract The magnetic pileup boundary (MPB) is a sharp

  13. Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Postdoctoral fellowship in ore-deposit geology/igneous geochemistry Marie-Curie Initial Training Network ABYSS (ER1) Training network on reactive geological systems from the mantle to the abyssal sub-Cu-PGE deposits Requirements: Candidates must hold PhD in geology/geochemistry This fellowship is for a period

  14. The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitscheider, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Oeckler, Oliver [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2011-01-15

    Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

  15. Trophic Garnishes: CatRat Interactions in an Urban Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Robert D.

    they represent the majority of species. We characterized house cat (Felis catus) predation on wild Norway rats

  16. Cardiopulmonary Function in RatsWith Lung Hemorrhage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Cardiopulmonary Function in RatsWith Lung Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed Ultrasound Exposure Jeffery using superthreshold exposure conditions known to produce sig- nificant lung hemorrhage. Methods. In 1 in the left lung of each rat. In a second group of 6 rats, 5 foci of ultrasound-induced hemorrhage were

  17. The protein pheromone Er-1 of the ciliate Euplotes raikovi stimulates human T-cell activity: Involvement of interleukin-2 system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervia, Davide; Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, “Luigi Sacco” University Hospital, University of Milan, Milano ; Catalani, Elisabetta; Belardinelli, Maria Cristina; Perrotta, Cristiana; Picchietti, Simona; Alimenti, Claudio; Casini, Giovanni; Fausto, Anna Maria; Vallesi, Adriana

    2013-02-01

    Water-soluble protein signals (pheromones) of the ciliate Euplotes have been supposed to be functional precursors of growth factors and cytokines that regulate cell–cell interaction in multi-cellular eukaryotes. This work provides evidence that native preparations of the Euplotes raikovi pheromone Er-1 (a helical protein of 40 amino acids) specifically increases viability, DNA synthesis, proliferation, and the production of interferon-?, tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin (IL)-1?, IL-2, and IL-13 in human Jurkat T-cells. Also, Er-1 significantly decreases the mRNA levels of the ? and ? subunits of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), while the mRNA levels of the ? subunit appeared to be not affected. Jurkat T-cell treatments with Er-1 induced the down-regulation of the IL-2R? subunit by a reversible and time-dependent endocytosis, and increased the levels of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The cell-type specificity of these effects was supported by the finding that Er-1, although unable to directly influence the growth of human glioma U-373 cells, induced Jurkat cells to synthesize and release factors that, in turn, inhibited the U-373 cell proliferation. Overall, these findings imply that Er-1 coupling to IL-2R and ERK immuno-enhances T-cell activity, and that this effect likely translates to an inhibition of glioma cell growth. -- Highlights: ? Euplotes pheromone Er-1 increases the growth of human Jurkat T-cells. ? Er-1 increases the T-cell production of specific cytokines. ? Er-1 activates interleukin-2 receptor and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. ? The immuno-enhancing effect of Er-1 on Jurkat cells translates to an inhibition of human glioma cell growth.

  18. Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-07-01

    This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

  19. Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty fUllErton 20122012 CSUF Mihaylo University, Fullerton An Overview and Analysis of Inland Empire Exports #12;novEmbEr 2011 InstItUtE for EconomIc and EnvIronmEntal stUdIEs33 #12;Inland EmpIrE mErchandIsE Exports calIfornIa statE UnIvErsIty f

  20. THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC MODELING OF ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUELS - FINAL LDRD-ER REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, P

    2011-11-28

    This project enhanced our theoretical capabilities geared towards establishing the basic science of a high-throughput protocol for the development of advanced nuclear fuel that should couple modern computational materials modeling and simulation tools, fabrication and characterization capabilities, and targeted high throughput performance testing experiments. The successful conclusion of this ER project allowed us to upgrade state-of-the-art modeling codes, and apply these modeling tools to ab initio energetics and thermodynamic assessments of phase diagrams of various mixtures of actinide alloys, propose a tool for optimizing composition of complex alloys for specific properties, predict diffusion behavior in diffusion couples made of actinide and transition metals, include one new equation in the LLNL phase-field AMPE code, and predict microstructure evolution during alloy coring. In FY11, despite limited funding, the team also initiated an experimental activity, with collaboration from Texas A&M University by preparing samples of nuclear fuels in bulk forms and for diffusion couple studies and metallic matrices, and performing preliminary characterization.

  1. Final Technical Report for Award DE-FG02-98ER41080

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Alan

    2014-11-14

    The prime motivation of the project at McMaster University was to carry out the critical evaluation and compilation of Nuclear Structure and Decay data, and of nuclear astrophysics data with continued participation in the United States Nuclear Data Program (US-NDP). A large body of evaluated and compiled structure data were supplied for databases such as ENSDF, XUNDL, NSR, etc. residing on webpage of National Nuclear Data Center of the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, USA. Thermonuclear reaction rates of importance to stellar explosions, such as novae, x-ray bursts and supernovae, were evaluated as well. This effort was closely coupled to our ongoing experimental effort, which took advantage of radioactive ion beam and stable beam facilities worldwide to study these key reaction rates. This report contains brief descriptions of the various activities together with references to all the publications in peer-reviewed journals which were the result of work carried out with the award DE-FG02-98-ER41080, during 1998-2013.

  2. Spatially resolved penetration depth measurements and vortex manipulation in the ferromagnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wulferding, Dirk; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Lee, Minkyung; Choi, Hee Cheul; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-07-31

    We present a local probe study of the magnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C, using magnetic force microscopy at sub-Kelvin temperatures. ErNi2B2C is an ideal system to explore the effects of concomitant superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At 500 mK, far below the transition to a weakly ferromagnetic state, we directly observe a structured magnetic background on the micrometer scale. We determine spatially resolved absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth ? and study its temperature dependence as the system undergoes magnetic phase transitions from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and to weak ferromagnetic, all within the superconducting regime. We estimate the absolute pinning force of Abrikosovmore »vortices, which shows a position dependence and temperature dependence as well, and discuss the possibility of the purported spontaneous vortex formation.« less

  3. FLGESKJEMA FOR SKERE TIL PPU TEACH FIRST NORWAY Dersom du har utdanning som ikke er tatt ved UiO, m du skrive ut dette skjemaet og

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerhardy, Philipp

    FØLGESKJEMA FOR SØKERE TIL PPU TEACH FIRST NORWAY Dersom du har utdanning som ikke er tatt ved Ui søke PPU Teach First Norway i Søknadsweb. Ditt navn: Fødselsnr: Jeg har søkt om fagdidaktikk i

  4. Close-Out Report of DOE Grant DE-FG02-91ER40682 for November 1, 2009 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulini, Manfred

    2013-07-20

    This document is the close-out report of Grant DE-FG02-91ER40682 from the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) High-Energy Physics (HEP) Group to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. Final Report. DOE Computational Nanoscience Project DE-FG02-03ER46096: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, Peter [Vanderbilt University] [Vanderbilt University

    2009-11-15

    The document is the final report of the DOE Computational Nanoscience Project DE-FG02-03ER46096: Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices. It included references to 62 publications that were supported by the grant.

  6. Structural and electrical properties of the sol-gel prepared Sr{sub 1-x}Er{sub x}SnO{sub 3-{delta}} compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouni, S.; Nouri, S. [Unite de Recherche de Chimie des Materiaux et de l'Environnement UR11ES25, ISSBAT, Universite de Tunis ElManar 9, Avenue Dr. Zoheir Safi, 1006 Tunis (Tunisia); Rohlicek, J. [Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Ben Hassen, R., E-mail: rached.benhassen@fss.rnu.tn [Unite de Recherche de Chimie des Materiaux et de l'Environnement UR11ES25, ISSBAT, Universite de Tunis ElManar 9, Avenue Dr. Zoheir Safi, 1006 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2012-08-15

    Erbium-substituted strontium stannates, with Er content 0{<=}x{<=}0.09, have been prepared by sol-gel method. The solubility limit of Er was found to be about 3%. The influence of temperature and the duration of the calcination, on the confirmation of single phase of Er doped SrSnO{sub 3} were investigated by using X-ray powder diffraction. The distribution of Er{sup 3+} in the crystal structure has been studied. Rietveld refinement of the data revealed that the crystal structure of the representative compound (Sr{sub 0.97}Er{sub 0.03}SnO{sub 3-{delta}}) is orthorhombic perovskite (space group Pbnm). The cell dimensions are: a=5.7152(1) A, b=5.7092(1) A and c=8.0710(2) A. The IR spectroscopy measurements of the samples with x{<=}0.03 were done in a wavelength range 400-2000 cm{sup -1} and confirmed the observed tilting in the SnO{sub 6} octahedra. The transport properties in the system Sr{sub 1-x}Er{sub x}SnO{sub 3-{delta}}, x{<=}0.03, were investigated at high temperature. The Sr{sub 0.97}Er{sub 0.03}SnO{sub 3-{delta}} compound exhibits semiconductive behaviour and the electrical transport mechanism agrees with the non-adiabatic small polaron hopping model between nominal states Sn{sup 4+}/Sn{sup 2+} in the temperature ranges 350-525 and 525-693 K separately. - Graphical abstract: The Sr{sub 0.97}Er{sub 0.03}SnO{sub 3-{delta}} compound exhibits semiconductive behaviour and the electrical transport mechanism agrees with the non-adiabatic small polaron hopping model between nominal states Sn{sup 4+}/Sn{sup 2+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Er showed a maximum solubility of 3 mol% in SrSnO{sub 3} perovskite at 1173 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnO{sub 6} octahedra in Sr{sub 1-x}Er{sub x}SnO{sub 3-{delta}} are tilted. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expansion of the cell parameters ascribed to the apparition of Sn{sup 2+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transport mechanism in Sr{sub 0.97}Er{sub 0.03}SnO{sub 3-{delta}} agrees with the non-adiabatic small polaron hopping model.

  7. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 Retrieval of Cloud Properties and Direct Testing of Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations using ARM Observations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan, David Patrick [KNMI

    2013-07-26

    This report briefly summaries the work performed at KNMI under DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 which, in turn was conducted in support of DOE Grant DE-FG02-90ER61071 lead by E. Clothieux of Penn. State U. The specific work at KNMI revolved around the development and application of the EarthCARE simulator to ground-based multi-sensor simulations.

  8. S O long as thE dewpoint raiairis low, thErc is no fog, and tSe co&lingof t b E t h E ratE of mElting; t h E r E i s 1atEn.t k a t from condEnsation of noisturE on t h E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S O long as thE dewpoint raiairis low, thErc is no fog, and tSe co&lingof t b E t h E ratE of m, and h m t is 2ouring into thc stow dW m d night by radiation and conduction fron t l i E tvarmr fog. ing, t h E r E is so rmch moisturE t o bE condEnsEd. A i r IiEarly calm ovEr EL snov SUr=- TI`LE fog d

  9. Purification of sulfide oxidase from rat liver 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Lixia

    1994-01-01

    oxidase from rat liver has been isolated and purified by means of ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion-exchange chromatography, and size exclusion chromatography. The use of 80% saturation with ammonium sulfate at pH 7.2 provided an initial precipitation...

  10. Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

    2013-01-18

    Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in July and August 2012 as part of a model evaluation well program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radiological data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to obtain data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test MILK SHAKE, conducted in Emplacement Hole U-5k in 1968, which were considered to be uncertain due to the unknown extent of a basalt lava-flow aquifer present in this area. Well ER-5-5 is expected to provide information to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The 31.1-centimeter (cm) diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 331.3 meters (m). The completion string, set at the depth of 317.2 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval open to the basalt lava-flow aquifer and limited intervals of the overlying and underlying alluvial aquifer. A piezometer string was also installed in the annulus between the completion string and the borehole wall. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing suspended from 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing. The piezometer string was landed at 319.2 m, to monitor the basalt lava-flow aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, preliminary water quality measurements, and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 331.3 m of Quaternary–Tertiary alluvium, including an intercalated layer of saturated basalt lava rubble. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion; however, a preliminary water level was measured in the piezometer string at the depth of 283.4 m on September 25, 2012. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field instruments was detected in this hole. Future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will provide more accurate hydrologic information for this site. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and water level were as expected, though the expected basalt lava-flow aquifer is basalt rubble and not the dense, fractured lava as modeled. The lack of tritium transport is likely due to the difference in hydraulic properties of the basalt lava-flow rubble encountered in the well, compared to those of the fractured aquifer used in the flow and transport models.

  11. Long-range ferromagnetic order induced by a donor impurity band exchange in SnO{sub 2}:Er{sup 3+} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragón, F. H.; Coaquira, J. A. H.; Chitta, V. A.; Hidalgo, P.; Brito, H. F.

    2013-11-28

    In this work, the structural and magnetic properties of Er-doped SnO{sub 2} (SnO{sub 2}:Er) nanoparticles are reported. The SnO{sub 2}:Er nanoparticles have been synthesized by a polymer precursor method with Er content from 1.0% to 10.0%. X-ray diffraction results indicate the formation of only the rutile-type structure in all samples. The estimated mean crystallite size shows a decrease from ?10 to ?4?nm when the Er content is increased from 1.0% to 10.0%. The particle size values have been corroborated by transmission electron microscopy technique. The thermal dependence of the magnetization is consistent with the 3+ oxidation state of erbium ions for all samples. A strong paramagnetic-like behavior coexisting with a ferromagnetic phase has been determined for samples with Er content below 5.0%. Above this concentration, only a paramagnetic behavior has been determined. Isothermal magnetization curves are consistent with the occurrence of long-range ferromagnetic order mediated by donor electrons forming bound magnetic polarons which overlap to produce a spin-split impurity band.

  12. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

  13. Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

  14. Social Influences on Food Choices of Norway Rats and Mate Choices of Japanese Quail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef, Jr., Bennett G.

    2001-01-01

    ecology and sociology of the Norway rat . Bethesda: U.S. De-food stealing by young Norway rats. Journal of Comparativesufficient diet by Norway rats. Journal of Comparative

  15. Copyright 1998 Psychonomic Society, Inc. 76 Colonies of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timberlake, William D.

    Copyright 1998 Psychonomic Society, Inc. 76 Colonies of Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) in large and landmark orientation contributed to foraging efficiency when Norway rats were presented with different

  16. Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30

    Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

  17. Final Report for DOE grant project FG02-07ER41458 [Dense Quark Matter in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Incera, Vivian

    2012-01-24

    Final Report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER41458. This grant was originally a three-year project. However, this final report summarizes the results of the first two years, as at the end of the second year of the grant the PIs moved to a new university and the grant was closed. The work done under the first two years of the DOE grant led to several papers and presentations. It also served to train one undergraduate and three graduate students.

  18. Technical support to the ER program subsurface technologies team leader. Final report, March 15, 1993--March 15, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    This research included development of a new geologic sample management facility and associated quality assurance systems for the LANL Environmental Restoration Program. Additional work with the LANL Environmental Restoration Program included the development of Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAP) for various Operable Units for the Laboratory. The PI (Davidson) served as the sample curation/sample management specialist on the ER program Subsurface Studies Technical Team. Specialization in Field Unit Data Base systems was the focus of the work towards the end of the contract. A document is included which provides the Statement of Policy for the management of borehole samples collected during environmental restoration activities at LANL.

  19. Increased efficiency in multijunction solar cells through the incorporation of semimetallic ErAs nanoparticles into the tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zide, J.M.O.; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, A.; Strandwitz, N.C.; Zimmerman, J.D.; Steenblock-Smith, T.; Gossard, A.C.; Forman, A.; Ivanovskaya, A.; Stucky, G.D.

    2006-04-17

    We report the molecular beam epitaxy growth of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As/GaAs multijunction solar cells with epitaxial, semimetallic ErAs nanoparticles at the interface of the tunnel junction. The states provided by these nanoparticles reduce the bias required to pass current through the tunnel junction by three orders of magnitude, and therefore drastically reduce the voltage losses in the tunnel junction. We have measured open-circuit voltages which are 97% of the sum of the constituent cells, which result in nearly double the efficiency of our multijunction cell with a conventional tunnel junction.

  20. FInal Report: DE-FG02-04ER41310 "Elementary Particle Physics"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izen, Joseph M.; Ishak-Boushaki, Mustapha

    2013-10-18

    ATLAS and the LHC are delivering on the promise of discovery physics at the high energy frontier. Using 4.8 fb^-1 of 2011 ?s=7 TeV data and the first 5.8 fb?1 of 2012 ?s=8 TeV data, ATLAS published the observation of a new particle with a mass of 126 GeV with a significance of 5.9? that is compatible with a Standard Model (SM) Higgs. The LHC is outperforming intial projections for the 2012 run, and ATLAS is on track to integrate ~20 fb^(-1) of proton-proton collisions in 2012 before Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) begins in Spring 2013. University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) physicists will complete work on two ATLAS analyses this fall. The first is the search for the gauge bosons of a hypothesized dark sector. For 2011 data, UTD is responsible for the ?dark photon?search in the electron-jet channel, and we are looking forward to an expanded leadership role in the dark photon search using the full 2012 data set. Our second analysis interest is the study of X/Y/Z exotic states having cc ? content, which builds on our experience in this field from the BABAR experiment After completing a measurement of the Xc(3872) production cross section this fall, we will search for evidence of the Z(4430)+ which is reported by Belle but not confirmed by BABAR. The UTD group has played a strong role in ATLAS operations, with group members serving as Pixel Run Coordinator, ATLAS Shift Leader, and Pixel/Inner Detector Shifter. For most of the current 3-year funding cycle, a group member coordinated the development of the Pixel DAQ code, and another continues to build and maintain the data quality monitoring (DQM) application that is used by the Inner Detector control room shifter. Additionally, members of our group take Pixel on-call expert shifts for DQM and DAQ. We led an optoboard lifetime study to assess concerns of premature on-detector VCSEL failure using the Pixel working prototype detector at CERN. Physicists based at UTD participated through Pixel Offline DQM and ATLAS Distributed Computing Operations Shifts (ADCoS) During Summer 2012, UTD joined upgrade activities in preparation for LS1. We took a major role in the testing of Electro-Readout (ER) Bundle testing for new Service Quarter Panels (nSQP?s), and we developed two utilities to measure the timing jitter and bit error rate of the Pixel readout chain for use commissioning Pixel detector upgrades. During BABAR?s heyday, the UTD group pioneered the use of e^+ e^- annihilation events with hard Initial State Radiation (ISR) to study the charm threshold region, and we carried out the first BABAR double-cc ? analysis. Our most recent ISR paper, written in collaboration with A. Palano (Bari) is Exclusive Production of Ds^+ Ds^-, D_S^(*+) Ds^-, and Ds^(*+) Ds^(*-) via e+ e- Annihilation with Initial-State-Radiation was published in Physical Review D 82, 052004 (2010). Work continues on a study of ISR ?c^+ ?c^- production, and a new search to establish and study double-ss ? production is starting.

  1. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-05

    Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

  2. Ultrastructural development of the rat corpus luteum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, John Franklin

    1971-01-01

    ' -GCL ttlrcughoLL't r and in concci -ated focal points, in the cytoclasm. The c-. "ccnt=ationls took on the conf igLLration of -whorls 3, 1?' "Je e;. i1?i?n tile nate Dale, Oilee, 1/ie pa'raSOI&e were ?lost numerous 4-6 days after ovLllati on, but i.... er. The buffer u' ilizec. was s-colli- dine Cock solut! on which . ;as prepared as 2. 67 ca. ts s-coll c i!6 & 9 part, hyd rochlor ic acid, ? nd BG. "j3 part" distilled water. Sucrose was added to th. 's fixative-buffer solution at the rate of 0...

  3. Isoproterenol effects evaluated in heart slices of human and rat in comparison to rat heart in vivo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Heale, Jason; Bieraugel, Mike; Ramos, Meg [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States); Fisher, Robyn L. [Vitron Inc., Tucson, AZ (United States); Vickers, Alison E.M., E-mail: vickers_alison@allergan.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Allergan Inc., 2525 Dupont Dr, Irvine, CA 92612 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury was evaluated by gene and protein pathway changes in human heart slices, and compared to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. Isoproterenol (10 and 100 ?M) altered human and rat heart slice markers of oxidative stress (ATP and GSH) at 24 h. In this in vivo rat study (0.5 mg/kg), serum troponin concentrations increased with lesion severity, minimal to mild necrosis at 24 and 48 h. In the rat and the human heart, isoproterenol altered pathways for apoptosis/necrosis, stress/energy, inflammation, and remodeling/fibrosis. The rat and human heart slices were in an apoptotic phase, while the in vivo rat heart exhibited necrosis histologically and further progression of tissue remodeling. In human heart slices genes for several heat shock 70 kD members were altered, indicative of stress to mitigate apoptosis. The stress response included alterations in energy utilization, fatty acid processing, and the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase, a marker of increased oxidative stress in both species. Inflammation markers linked with remodeling included IL-1?, Il-1?, IL-6 and TNF? in both species. Tissue remodeling changes in both species included increases in the TIMP proteins, inhibitors of matrix degradation, the gene/protein of IL-4 linked with cardiac fibrosis, and the gene Ccl7 a chemokine that induces collagen synthesis, and Reg3b a growth factor for cardiac repair. This study demonstrates that the initial human heart slice response to isoproterenol cardiac injury results in apoptosis, stress/energy status, inflammation and tissue remodeling at concentrations similar to that in rat heart slices. - Highlights: • Human response to isoproterenol induced cardiac injury evaluated in heart slices. • Isoproterenol altered apoptosis, energy, inflammation and remodeling pathways. • Human model verified by comparison to rat heart slices and rat heart in vivo. • Human and rat respond to isoproterenol at similar concentrations in vitro.

  4. Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of Regional Lung Function in Rats Using Hyperpolarized 3 Helium Dynamic MRI Ben T. Chen,* Anja C.S. Brau, and G. Allan Johnson Dynamic regional lung function was investigated in rats using by a constant flow ventila- tor. Based on regional differences in the behavior of inspired air, the lung

  5. Serum Levels of the Fetuin-Mineral Complex Correlate with Artery Calcification in the Rat*S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    Serum Levels of the Fetuin-Mineral Complex Correlate with Artery Calcification in the Rat- mineral complex in serum and vitamin D-induced artery calcification. The first experiment shows that there is a fetuin-mineral complex in the blood of rats in which extensive calcification of the artery media has been

  6. Early Detection of Oleic Acid-Induced Lung Injury in Rats Using 111In-Labeled Anti-Rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terasaki, Mark

    Early Detection of Oleic Acid-Induced Lung Injury in Rats Using 111In-Labeled Anti of Radiology, VA Medical Center, Newington, Connecticut Previous study of the bleomycin-induced lung injury of 111In-aICAM-1 to detect inflammation in another ARDS lung injury model. Methods: 111In-labeled rat

  7. DE-FG02-08ER64658 (OASIS) - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharman, Jonathan

    2013-09-05

    Project OASIS (Operation of Advanced Structures, Interfaces and Sub-components for MEAs) was a 12 month project that ran from 1st September 2008 to 31st August 2009, and was managed by the Department of Energy Office of Science, Chicago Office, as Award No DE-FG02-08ER64658, with Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells Inc. as the sole contractor. The project was completed on schedule, with technical successes (details below) and payment of the full grant award made by DOE. The aim of the project was the development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for H2/air polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells that would give higher performance under hot/dry and dry operating conditions, ideally with no loss of performance under wet conditions. Reducing or eliminating the need for humidifying the incoming gases will allow significant system cost and size reduction for many fuel cell applications including automotive, stationary and back-up power, and portable systems. Portable systems are also of particular interest in military markets. In previous work Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells had developed very stable, corrosion-resistant catalysts suitable for resisting degradation by carbon corrosion in particular. These materials were applied within the OASIS project as they are considered necessary for systems such as automotive where multiple start-stop events are experienced. These catalysts were contrasted with more conventional materials in the design of catalyst layers and novel microporous layers (MPLs) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) combinations were also explored. Early on in the work it was shown how much more aggressive high temperature operation is than dry operation. At the same humidity, tests at 110?C caused much more dehydration than tests at 80?C and the high temperature condition was much more revealing of improvements made to MEA design. Alloy catalysts were introduced and compared with Pt catalysts with a range of particle sizes. It was apparent that the larger particle sizes of the alloy catalysts led to a reduction in performance that offset much of their kinetic advantage. The Pt-only materials clearly showed that small particles are beneficial to good performance under hot/dry conditions, because of their higher surface area, although they are known to be less stable to cyclic operation. An ex-situ water vapour sorption technique was developed that showed a very clear correlation with in-cell performance: catalyst powders that absorbed more water gave better performance in-cell. It was shown that alloy catalysts could give a 25 mV advantage over Pt-only at 1 Acm-2. GDL design was also shown to influence performance and more permeable GDLs on the anode allowed better membrane hydration and therefore conductivity. A very impermeable GDL on the cathode caused cathode flooding even under dry conditions, but a novel cathode MPL incorporating ionomer and operating at 110?C, 33/17% RH showed a 150 mV gain at 800 mAcm-2 over the conventional MPL. This project has increased the understanding of the factors that influence performance loss under dry conditions, including the development of an insightful ex-situ characterisation technique (Dynamic Vapour Sorption). All the approaches investigated can be readily implemented in state-of the-art MEAs, although optimisation would be needed to integrate the new designs with existing MEA types and to tune to the exact range of operating conditions. The work is thus expected to benefit the public by feeding through more condition-tolerant production MEAs to a range of applications and thereby accelerate the commercialisation of fuel cell technology. In summary, a number of specific catalyst, catalyst layer, MPL and GDL improvements were made during this project. Often the best designs under dry conditions translated to some performance loss under wet conditions, but compromise situations were also found where dry performance was improved with no loss of wet performance.

  8. Magnetic and dielectric behavior of the spin-chain compound Er?BaNiO? well below its Néel temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Tathamay; Singh, Kiran; Sampathkumaran, E. V.; Mohapatra, N.

    2014-09-21

    We have recently reported that the Haldane spin-chain system, Er?BaNiO?, undergoing antiferromagnetic order below (T{sub N}=) 32 K, is characterized by the onset of ferroelectricity near 60 K due to magnetoelectric coupling induced by short-range magnetic-order within spin-chains. We have carried out additional magnetic and dielectric studies to understand the properties well below T{sub N}. We emphasize here on the following: (i) A strong frequency dependent behaviors of ac magnetic susceptibility and complex dielectric properties have been observed at much lower temperatures (<8 K), that is, “reentrant multiglass-like” phenomenon, naturally suggesting the existence of an additional transition well below T{sub N}. (ii) “Magnetoelectric phase coexistence” is observed at very low temperature (e.g., T=2 K), where the high-field magnetoelectric phase is partially arrested on returning to zero magnetic field after a cycling through metamagnetic transition.

  9. Completion Report for Well ER-12-4, Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain (includes Errata Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2006-05-01

    Well ER-12-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in May 2005, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit in the north-central portion of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located on Rainier/Aqueduct Mesa, northwest of Yucca Flat, within Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The well provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in U12t Tunnel, information on the pre-Tertiary rocks in the area, and depth to the regional water table.

  10. Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-27

    Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

  11. Relativistic energy density functionals: Low-energy collective states of {sup 240}Pu and {sup 166}Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Ring, P.; Meng, J.

    2010-06-15

    The empirical relativistic density-dependent, point-coupling energy density functional, adjusted exclusively to experimental binding energies of a large set of deformed nuclei with Aapprox =150-180 and Aapprox =230-250, is tested with spectroscopic data for {sup 166}Er and {sup 240}Pu. Starting from constrained self-consistent triaxial relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov calculations of binding energy maps as functions of the quadrupole deformation in the beta-gamma plane, excitation spectra and E2 transition probabilities are calculated as solutions of the corresponding microscopic collective Hamiltonian in five dimensions for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom and compared with available data on low-energy collective states.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of R{sub 2}MnTiO{sub 7} (R = Y and Er) pyrochlores oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martínez-Coronado, R.; Alonso, J.A.; Fernández, M.T.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: New pyrochlore-like phases of composition R{sub 2}MnTiO{sub 7} (R = Er and Y) have been synthesized by a soft-chemistry procedure involving citrates of the different metal ions followed by thermal treatments at moderate temperatures (850 °C for 12 h in air). A characterization by X-ray diffraction and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) has been carried out in order to determine the crystal structure features: these phyrochlores are cubic, space group Fd-3m, defining an intrinsically frustrated three-dimensional system. The Rietveld-refinement from NPD data at room temperature evidences an antisite cation disorder (distribution of Mn between A and B positions) that is accompanied by an increment of the oxygen-vacancy concentration due to the reduction of Mn{sup 4+} at the B position to Mn{sup 2+} at the A position. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was useful to evaluate the stability of these oxides in reducing conditions up to 500 °C. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate a ferromagnetic behavior, due to the random distribution of Mn{sup 4+} ions in the octahedral sublattice. At lower temperatures there is a polarization of the R{sup +3} magnetic moments, which also participate in the magnetic structure. Aiming to evaluate these materials as possible electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) we determined that the thermal expansion coefficients between 100 and 900 °C perfectly match with those of the usual electrolytes; however, these pyrochlore oxides display a semiconductor-like behavior with poor conductivity values, e.g. 6 × 10{sup ?3} cm{sup ?1} at 850 °C for Er, which would prevent its use as MIEC (mixed ionic-electronic conductors) oxides in SOFC devices.

  13. EnginEEring by thE numbErsBy Michael T. GiBBons ngineering bachelor's degrees remained virtually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EnginEEring by thE numbErsBy Michael T. GiBBons E ngineering bachelor's degrees remained virtually since 2005. Degrees in electrical/ computer engineering and computer science continued to fall, although and materials engineering degrees remained flat last year, the aerospace, biomedical, chemical, civil

  14. Experimental Determination of the Transition Probabilities in Er II This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for 101 lines of Er I1 were measured using an argon-erbium arc plasma. The absolute scale was established plasma, with the axial symmetry was used. The arc operated at the atmospheric pressure and the current 40-Zehnder interferometer is the third part. It permits to follow continuously the interference pattern of the arc plasma

  15. DEFG0202ER63445, PI = Professor George M. Church June 28, 2011 PROPOSAL FOR DEVELOPMENT OF ENHANCED INVIVO AND EXVIVO SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    _office@genetics.med.harvard.edu FOA Number: DEFOA0000412 DOE/OSP Office: BER Biological Systems Science DOE/OSP Manager Contact Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 208551290 DOE Grant Number: DEFG0202ER63445 SUBCONTRACTS Objectives The goal of our proposed DOE Genomic Sciences Center renewal is to develop and demonstrate new

  16. Final Report for Grant DE-FG02-91ER40690 for the period 12/1/2010 to 4/30/2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkin, Stan; Hill, Chris; Kass, Richard; Braaten, Eric; Mathur, Samir; Raby, Stuart; Shigemitsu, Junko; Gan, K. K.; Kagan, Harris; Hughes, Richard E.; Winer, Brian L.; Honscheid, Klaus

    2014-07-22

    This is the #12;final report for The Ohio State University high energy physics grant DE-FG02- 91ER40690. The activities of the various Tasks are briefy summarized over the previous grant period. The support from the Department of Energy is greatly appreciated.

  17. Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare Guse, MS; Amy Schlo2hauer, MPH; Peter Layde, MD, MSc IntroducEon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poisoning Incidence in Wisconsin: Does Age Ma2er? Thomas Leschke, BA; Clare groups for both intenEonal opioid and non-opioid poisonings Opioid range: 6 and ICD -10 codes were used to divide poisoning incidents by agent (opioid vs

  18. Juliette Gordon Low de Edward Hughes, 1887 u Galera Nacional del Retrato, Americanos del Siglo XX: 1900-1930, 3er

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    de Mike Wilkins, 1987 uMuseo Smithsonian de Arte Americano, Vestíbulo de la calle G, 1er piso -- Con escuela de aviación de los Estados Unidos la aceptó como estudiante. uObserva bien su licencia. ¿Puedes leerla? Bessie tuvo que aprender francés para poder inscribirse en la escuela de aviación. ¿Qué valores

  19. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 1 P HY S I CA L REV I E W L E T T ER S 7 JANUARY 2002 Shocks in Supersonic Sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    VOLUME 88, NUMBER 1 P HY S I CA L REV I E W L E T T ER S 7 JANUARY 2002 Shocks in Supersonic Sand such as sand grains [2]. The usual theoretical approach to understanding granular flows is dense gas kinetic

  20. CNRS Dlgation Cte d'Azur Micro Manager et Arduino pour le pilotage de stations de microscopie 1er au 3 juin 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulicaut, Jean-François

    CNRS ­ Délégation Côte d'Azur ­ Micro Manager et Arduino pour le pilotage de stations de microscopie ­ 1er au 3 juin 2015 Micro Manager et Arduino pour le pilotage de stations de microscopie Public-midi Arduino : théorie Atelier Arduino Pratique : leds, tensions, températures Commande via le serial

  1. The Lujan Center is a national user facility funded by Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy which o ers capability for basic and applied neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Energy which o ers capability for basic and applied neutron scattering relevant to national security are the domain of the low-Q scattering intrument, LQD. These well-established neutron techniques probe long Matter, Local Structure, and Nanomaterials The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center encompasses a set

  2. VOLUME 88, NUMBER 1 P HY S I CA L REV I E W L E T T ER S 7 JANUARY 2002 Oscillating Fracture Paths in Rubber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    VOLUME 88, NUMBER 1 P HY S I CA L REV I E W L E T T ER S 7 JANUARY 2002 Oscillating Fracture Paths the crack oscillates about its mean direction of motion. The field of dynamic fracture was spawned]. Despite the great advances in dynamic fracture since then [3], predicting the path of a rapidly moving

  3. Page 1 of 28 This paper can be cited as: B. Huskinson, M.P. Marshak, C. Suh, S. Er, M.R. Gerhardt, C.J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aqueous flow battery", Nature 505, 195­198 (2014). The formatted version of this manuscript can be found­inorganic aqueous flow battery Brian Huskinson1 *, Michael P. Marshak1,2 *, Changwon Suh2 , Süleyman Er2,3 , Michael,2 . In contrast, flow batteries can independently scale the power (electrode area) and energy (arbitrarily large

  4. Acceleration of wound healing in young and aged rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bryan Douglas

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of ACM on wound healing in young rats. . Page 15 2. The effect of ACM on wound healing in old, ad-lib rats . . . . . . . 17 3. The effect of ACM on wound healing in old, caloric-restricted rats . . . 4. The effect of old and young... group (AL) had been fed a laboratory diet ad libitum during their lifetime. The other group (CR) had been maintained on a calorie-restricted diet at a level of 60% of the food intake of the ad libitum-fed group. This decrease in caloric intake resulted...

  5. Phase transitions, dielectric properties, and vibrational study of stannates perovskites Sr{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}SnO{sub 3??}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ouni, S.; Nouri, S. [Unité de recherché de chimie des matériaux et de l’environnement UR11ES25, ISSBAT, Université de Tunis ElManar 9, Avenue Dr. Zoheir Safi, 1006 Tunis (Tunisia); Khemakhem, H. [Laboratoire des matériaux ferroélectriques (LFM), Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Sfax (Tunisia); Ben Hassen, R., E-mail: rached.benhassen@fss.rnu.tn [Unité de recherché de chimie des matériaux et de l’environnement UR11ES25, ISSBAT, Université de Tunis ElManar 9, Avenue Dr. Zoheir Safi, 1006 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: The diffuseness of the phase transition of the Sr{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}SnO{sub 3??} enhances with the increasing of erbium content. These compounds were found to undergo phase transitions with increasing temperature. - Highlights: • Substitution Sr/Er in the alkaline earth cage modifies the thermally induced disorder. • Two phase transitions have been observed by DSC. • The dielectric constant increases with erbium substitution. • Dielectric loss increases exponentially with temperature. • The conductivity contribution is mainly due to hopping process. - Abstract: A polycrystalline stannates perovskites Sr{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}SnO{sub 3??} (x = 0.00, 0.01 and 0.03) were synthesized by sol–gel method and their vibrational properties were investigated using Raman scattering. The substitution of Er in the Sr site, results in a slight change of the position of the Raman spectrum bands. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows two phase transitions at 532 K and 634 K for Sr{sub 0.99}Er{sub 0.01}SnO{sub 3??}. The dielectric behavior of each solid solution (x = 0.01 and x = 0.03) has been studied as a function of temperature and frequency and has confirmed the observed phase transitions. The diffuseness of the phase transitions of these materials enhances with the increasing of erbium content. The dielectric constant showed a strong increase near the phase transitions temperature which value depends with frequency. This phenomenon is usually observed in relaxor materials. The conduction and the dielectric relaxation are attributed to hopping of electrons among Sn{sup 2+} and Sn{sup 4+} ions.

  6. Up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 by ER stress facilitates cell death of brain capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kito, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Daiju; Department of Biological Chemistry, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto; Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya ; Ohya, Susumu; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We found that application of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with tunicamycin to brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) induced cell death. {yields} The ER stress facilitated the expression of inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and induced sustained membrane hyperpolarization. {yields} The membrane hyperpolarization induced sustained Ca{sup 2+} entry through voltage-independent nonspecific cation channels and consequently facilitated cell death. {yields} The K{sub ir}2.1 up-regulation by ER stress is, at least in part, responsible for cell death of BCECs under pathological conditions. -- Abstract: Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form blood brain barrier (BBB) to maintain brain homeostasis. Cell turnover of BCECs by the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is critical for maintaining the integrity of BBB. Here we found that stimuli with tunicamycin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, up-regulated inward rectifier K{sup +} channel (K{sub ir}2.1) and facilitated cell death in t-BBEC117, a cell line derived from bovine BCECs. The activation of K{sub ir} channels contributed to the establishment of deeply negative resting membrane potential in t-BBEC117. The deep resting membrane potential increased the resting intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration due to Ca{sup 2+} influx through non-selective cation channels and thereby partly but significantly regulated cell death in t-BBEC117. The present results suggest that the up-regulation of K{sub ir}2.1 is, at least in part, responsible for cell death/cell turnover of BCECs induced by a variety of cellular stresses, particularly ER stress, under pathological conditions.

  7. Experimental approaches to establish rat embryonic stem cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Stephen Earl

    2011-06-27

    The rat has been an established experimental animal model within many areas of biological investigation for over one hundred years due to its size, breeding characteristics, and knowledge of its physiology and behaviour. ...

  8. RAT FR MIGRATION e.V. Integration und Illegalitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kallenrode, May-Britt

    RAT FÜR MIGRATION e.V. (RfM) Integration und Illegalität in Deutschland herausgegeben von Klaus J >Festung EuropaMigration. Von Klaus J. Bade Resolution des Rates für Migration zum Problem der aufenthaltsrechtlichen Illegalität

  9. Mechanical properties of normotensive and hypertensive female rat carotid arteries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Katherine Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    female rat carotid arteries to applied loads considering active and passive responses in the longitudinal and circumferential directions, and (3) to compare the female response in both groups to data available for males. The first objective provides...

  10. Lymphocyte depletion in peripheral blood of gamma irradiated rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldin, Eric Michael

    1972-01-01

    LYMPHOCYTE DEPLETION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF GAMMA IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis by ERIC MICHAEL GOLDIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1972 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) LYMPHOCYTE DEPLETION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF GAMMA IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis by ERIC MICHAEL GOLDIN Approved as to sty1e and con ent by: ( hairman of Co it ee) (H of Depar ment...

  11. Thermoregulatory Behavior in Infant Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) and Syrian Golden Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermoregulatory Behavior in Infant Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) and Syrian Golden Hamsters). In contrast to hamsters, infant Norway rats are capable of producing heat using brown adipose tissue (BAT

  12. Structural and functional alterations associated with transformation in rat ovarian cell model systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Echols, Jana Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    In vitro cell model systems derived from rat granuloma cells were developed for the study of multistep ovarian carcinogenesis. Spontaneously immortalized rat granuloma cells (SIGC) were transfected with either the pSV3neo plasmid which contains...

  13. Inflammasome Sensor NLRP1 Controls Rat Macrophage Susceptibility to Toxoplasma gondii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirelli, Kimberly

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular parasite that infects a wide range of warm-blooded species. Rats vary in their susceptibility to this parasite. The Toxo1 locus conferring Toxoplasma resistance in rats was previously ...

  14. Toxicity assessments of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in isolated mitochondria, rat hepatocytes, and zebrafish show good concordance across chemical classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadanaciva, Sashi [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Aleo, Michael D. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Strock, Christopher J. [Cyprotex US, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Stedman, Donald B. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wang, Huijun [Computational Sciences, Pfizer Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Will, Yvonne, E-mail: yvonne.will@pfizer.com [Compound Safety Prediction, Worldwide Medicinal Chemistry, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    To reduce costly late-stage compound attrition, there has been an increased focus on assessing compounds in in vitro assays that predict attributes of human safety liabilities, before preclinical in vivo studies are done. Relevant questions when choosing a panel of assays for predicting toxicity are (a) whether there is general concordance in the data among the assays, and (b) whether, in a retrospective analysis, the rank order of toxicity of compounds in the assays correlates with the known safety profile of the drugs in humans. The aim of our study was to answer these questions using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a test set since NSAIDs are generally associated with gastrointestinal injury, hepatotoxicity, and/or cardiovascular risk, with mitochondrial impairment and endoplasmic reticulum stress being possible contributing factors. Eleven NSAIDs, flufenamic acid, tolfenamic acid, mefenamic acid, diclofenac, meloxicam, sudoxicam, piroxicam, diflunisal, acetylsalicylic acid, nimesulide, and sulindac (and its two metabolites, sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone), were tested for their effects on (a) the respiration of rat liver mitochondria, (b) a panel of mechanistic endpoints in rat hepatocytes, and (c) the viability and organ morphology of zebrafish. We show good concordance for distinguishing among/between NSAID chemical classes in the observations among the three approaches. Furthermore, the assays were complementary and able to correctly identify “toxic” and “non-toxic” drugs in accordance with their human safety profile, with emphasis on hepatic and gastrointestinal safety. We recommend implementing our multi-assay approach in the drug discovery process to reduce compound attrition. - Highlights: • NSAIDS cause liver and GI toxicity. • Mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to NSAID liver toxicity. • ER stress is a mechanism that contributes to liver toxicity. • Zebrafish and cell based assays are complimentary.

  15. Emission intensity in the visible and IR spectral ranges from Si-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with erbium (Er) and europium (Eu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezdrogina, M. M., E-mail: margaret.m@mail.ioffe.ru; Kostina, L. S.; Beliakova, E. I.; Kuzmin, R. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    The photo- and electroluminescence spectra of silicon-based structures formed by direct bonding with simultaneous doping with rare-earth metals are studied. It is shown that emission in the visible and IR spectral ranges can be obtained from n-Si:Er/p-Si and n-Si:Eu/p-Si structures fabricated by the method suggested in the study. The results obtained make this method promising for the fabrication of optoelectronic devices.

  16. Boric Acid Causes ER Stress and Activates the eIF2alpha/ATF4 and ATF6 Branches of the Unfolded Protein Response in Prostate Cancer Cells and Using Toxicology in the Public Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobylewski, Sarah Ellen

    2012-01-01

    in utero exposure. It possibly causes adrenal and testicularrisk (United States). Cancer Causes Control2007;18(1):71-7.Los Angeles Boric Acid Causes ER Stress and Activates the

  17. High-resolution imaging of vessels in the isolated rat brain M. F. Valverde Salzmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-resolution imaging of vessels in the isolated rat brain M. F. Valverde Salzmann1 , N for the distribution of vessels in the rat brain. Angiography is able to use the blood flow in the brain of the living of this study was to obtain a full picture of vessels even down to relatively small size in the isolated rat

  18. Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope predators; island ecosystem conservation; stable isotope analysis; Norway rats; diet. Correspondence Heather of introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus has raised concerns for the fate of the large least auklet Aethia

  19. Stimulus Control of Maternal Responsiveness to Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Pup Ultrasonic Vocalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stimulus Control of Maternal Responsiveness to Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Pup Ultrasonic be considered a specialization of Norway rats and other small rodents. When removed from the nest and placed in a cool environment, infant Norway rats emit USVs. These vocalizations range from 30 to 50 k

  20. ELECTRICAL STIMULATION REDUCES AGE RELATED ATROPHY AND WEAKNESS IN EDL MUSCLES OF RATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Robert G.

    the atrophy and weakness. We electrically stimulated EDL muscles of adult and old rats during a 2 month period of denervation. The control muscles of old rats had declines in muscle mass and maximum force compared with adult control muscles. Denervated muscles of either adult or old rats had even larger declines. Stimulated

  1. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Gallium arsenide in mice and rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Greenspan, B.J.; Dill, J.A.; Stoney, K.H.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1990-12-01

    Gallium arsenide is a crystalline compound used extensively in the semiconductor industry. Workers preparing solar cells and gallium arsenide ingots and wafers are potentially at risk from the inhalation of gallium arsenide dust. The potential for gallium arsenide to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague- Dawley rats and CD-1 (Swiss) mice exposed to 0, 10, 37, or 75 mg/m{sup 3} gallium arsenide, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and {approx}30 positively mated rats or {approx}24 positively mated mice. Mice were exposed on 4--17 days of gestation (dg), and rats on 4--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Gallium and arsenic concentrations were determined in the maternal blood and uterine contents of the rats (3/group) at 7, 14, and 20 dg. 37 refs., 11 figs., 30 tabs.

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  3. NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite: A highly efficient visible-light-driven photocatalyst utilizing upconversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenzhong, E-mail: wzwang@mail.sic.ac.cn; Sun, Songmei; Zhang, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Design and synthesis of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} based on upconversion. • NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite was prepared for the first time. • Core–shell structure benefits the properties. • Upconversion contributed to the enhanced photocatalytic activity. • Helps to understand the functionality of new type photocatalysts. - Abstract: NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} core/shell nanocomposite was designed and prepared for the first time based on upconversion. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The results revealed that the as-synthesized NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} consisted of spheres with a core diameter of about 26 nm and a shell diameter of around 6 nm. The core was upconversion illuminant NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb and the shell was Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} around the core, which was confirmed by EDS. The NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} exhibited higher photocatalytic activity for the photodecomposition of Rhodamine B (RhB) under the irradiation of Xe lamp and green light emitting diode (g-LED). The mechanism of the high photocatalytic activity was discussed by photoluminescence spectra (PL), which is mainly attributed to upconversion of NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb in the NaYF{sub 4}:Er,Yb/Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanocomposite and the core–shell structure.

  4. Sexually dimorphic gene regulation in brain as a target for endocrine disrupters: Developmental exposure of rats to 4-methylbenzylidene camphor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maerkel, Kirsten [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and GREEN Tox, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Durrer, Stefan [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and GREEN Tox, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Henseler, Manuel [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and GREEN Tox, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Schlumpf, Margret [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and GREEN Tox, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Lichtensteiger, Walter [Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and GREEN Tox, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Walter.Lichtensteiger@access.unizh.ch

    2007-01-15

    The developing neuroendocrine brain represents a potential target for endocrine active chemicals. The UV filter 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) exhibits estrogenic activity, but also interferes with the thyroid axis. We investigated effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 4-MBC in the same rat offspring at brain and reproductive organ levels. 4-MBC (7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) was administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during gestation and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. mRNA of estrogen target genes involved in control of sexual behavior and gonadal functions was measured by real-time RT-PCR in ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) and medial preoptic area (MPO) of adult offspring. 4-MBC exposure affected mRNA levels of ER alpha, progesterone receptor (PR), preproenkephalin (PPE) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in a sex- and region-specific manner. In order to assess possible changes in sensitivity of target genes to estrogens, offspring were gonadectomized on day 70, injected with estradiol (E2, 10 or 50 {mu}g/kg s.c.) or vehicle on day 84, and sacrificed 6 h later. The acute induction of PR mRNA, and repression (at 6 h) of PPE mRNA by E2 was enhanced by 4-MBC in male and female VMH and female MPO, whereas male MPO exhibited reduced responsiveness of both genes. Steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 mRNA levels were increased in female VMH and MPO. The data indicate profound sex- and region-specific alterations in the regulation of estrogen target genes at brain level. Effect patterns in baseline and E2-induced gene expression differ from those in uterus and prostate.

  5. Viability of adult rat skin following 13 Mev proton irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraway, Bobby Lamar

    1966-01-01

    alteration resulting from total skin proton irradiation seemed to be dose related. Therefore, since the amount of tissue alteration seems to be dose-dependent, a hypothesis was developed that growth and viability of skin cells removed' by biopsy... rats each were subjected to total-skin proton irradiation of varying doses. The dose varied from 1300 rad in Group I to 200 rad in Group 1V. Two rats from each group served as controls and received no irradiation. Five days and 30 days...

  6. Pumping-route-dependent concentration quenching and temperature effect of green up- and down-conversion luminescence in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jingjing; Sun, Jiashi [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Liu, Jutao [College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Jinsu [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Tian, Yue [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); College of Life Science, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian, Liaoning 116600 (China); Fu, Shaobo; Cheng, Lihong; Zhong, Haiyang [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China); Xia, Haiping [Key laboratory of Photo-electronic Materials, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315211 (China); Chen, Baojiu, E-mail: chenmbj@sohu.com [Department of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian, Liaoning 116026 (China)

    2013-06-01

    Graphical abstract: A comparative study on the concentration quenching behaviors of green down- and up-conversion emissions was carried out for the first time, and the different concentration quenching mechanisms were analyzed. Secondly, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration. Highlights: ? Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er/Yb phosphors were prepared via a co-precipitation reaction. ? Morphology and structure of the phosphors were characterized by XRD and SEM. ? Concentration quenching mechanisms for down and up emissions were studied. ? Thermal effect induced by laser irradiation was studied via temperature sensing tech. - Abstract: Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3} phosphors with various Er{sup 3+} concentrations and fixed Yb{sup 3+} concentration were synthesized via a co-precipitation method, and their crystal structure and morphology were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration quenching behaviors of green up- and down-conversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} were analyzed, and it was confirmed that the difference between quenching concentration for up- and down-conversion emissions resulted from the different population routes. The temperature sensing properties of the Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors were studied, and it was found that the Er{sup 3+} doping concentration slightly affected the sensitivity, and Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} phosphors could be used in a broad temperature region for detecting temperature. Finally, the thermal effect induced by 980 nm LD irradiation was investigated, it was observed that the equilibrium temperature of Gd{sub 2}(WO{sub 4}){sub 3}:Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} sample was decided by both the excitation power and Er{sup 3+} doping concentration.

  7. DJS CLAIM ER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost Ground8 GasDEVELOPMENTS E P I IT h it c 5

  8. DOE/ER-0442

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l l e2Q)1382 THE HUMAN12

  9. OoEr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700 GJO-2003-411-TAC GJO-PIN~$ .,2,Oak

  10. Well ER-6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2006-09-01

    The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of limestone and dolomite, and is pervasively fractured. Groundwater flow in this aquifer is primarily in the fractures, and the hydraulic properties are primarily related to fracture frequency and fracture characteristics (e.g., mineral coatings, aperture, connectivity). The objective of the multiple-well aquifer test (MWAT) was to determine flow and hydraulic characteristics for the LCA in Yucca Flat. The data were used to derive representative flow model and parameter values for the LCA. The items of specific interest are: Hydraulic conductivity; Storage parameters; Dual-porosity behavior; and Fracture flow characteristics. The objective of the tracer transport experiment was to evaluate the transport properties and processes of the LCA and to derive representative transport parameter values for the LCA. The properties of specific interest are: Effective porosity; Matrix diffusion; Longitudinal dispersivity; Adsorption characteristics; and Colloid transport characteristics. These properties substantially control the rate of transport of contaminants in the groundwater system and concentration distributions. To best support modeling at the scale of the corrective action unit (CAU), these properties must be investigated at the field scale. The processes represented by these parameters are affected by in-situ factors that are either difficult to investigate at the laboratory scale or operate at a much larger scale than can be reproduced in the laboratory. Measurements at the field scale provide a better understanding of the effective average parameter values. The scale of this tracer test is still small compared to the scale of a CAU, but is of sufficient scale to be generally representative of the processes that affect in-situ transport. The scale of the tracer test undertaken is limited by the rate of transport in the formation and the resultant time frame required for completing such a test. The measurements at the field scale will provide information for relating laboratory measurements for transport processes to the larger scale. This report describes the analysis of the tracer test data and development of a conceptual model of transport in the LCA in Yucca Flat.

  11. Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tank, David

    Action potentials reliably invade axonal arbors of rat neocortical neurons Charles L. Cox* , Winfried Denk§ , David W. Tank§ , and Karel Svoboda*¶ *Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Cold Spring Harbor, Murray Hill, NJ 07974 Communicated by James D. Watson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor

  12. Effects of Methanol on the Retinal Function of Juvenile Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casanova, Christian

    Effects of Methanol on the Retinal Function of Juvenile Rats C. Plaziac1 , P. Lachapelle2 , C Received 18 April 2002; accepted 22 July 2002 Abstract We have investigated the effect of methanol exposure recorded prior to and up to 72 h after the administration of methanol. Data were compared to a control

  13. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices A. Zebda1,2 , S. Cosnier1 the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal further developments. Following recent developments in nano- and biotechnology, state-of-the-art biofuel

  14. channels enable burst output in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Ray

    to generate an appropriate spike output depends on a balance between membrane depolarizationsKv3 K+ channels enable burst output in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells B. E. McKay and R. W. Turner and the repolarizing actions of K+ currents. The high-voltage-activated Kv3 class of K+ channels repolarizes Na+ spikes

  15. Inconclusive Experiment with Rats By Bill Menke, December 1, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    of genetically-modified corn. The Times article says: The editor of the journal, Food and Chemical Toxicology the paper's main result, that rats fed genetically-modified, herbicide-resistant corn have a higher incident was a bit disingenuous of him. I do find delicious the irony that Séralini's paper is critiquing genetically-modified

  16. Facial Wiping in the Rat Fetus: Variation of Chemosensory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Scott R.

    how variation in stimulus parameters of lemon odor infusion (concentration, volume, and infusion time) affected the wiping response of E20 rat fetuses. Infusions of higher concentration or greater volume of stimulation. Intraoral infusion of chemosensory fluids with strong olfactory components, such as lemon extract

  17. JET PROPULSION LAB 0 RAT 0 R Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    JET PROPULSION LAB 0 RAT 0 R Y ANN U A L REP 0 R T #12;#12;------ - - ~ CON TEN T S DIRECTOR Administration for the penod January 1 through December 31, 1986. JET PROPULSION LABORATORY Califorrua Institute, Voyager 2 gave us our first close view of the distant giant Uranus, its complex rings, inclined magnetic

  18. Exercise training modulates apoptotic signaling in the aging rat heart 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Hyo Bum

    2005-11-01

    in the rate of apoptosis has been reported with aging in the rat left ventricle. In contrast, exercise training not only improves cardiac function, but also reduces the risk of heart disease. However, the ability of exercise training to modulate apoptotic...

  19. Neurotransmitter Modulation in Rat Hippocampus Via Extracranial Focal Electrical Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besio, Walter G.

    in developing countries. Besio et al. have been analyzing the effects of noninvasive transcranial focalNeurotransmitter Modulation in Rat Hippocampus Via Extracranial Focal Electrical Stimulation Besio electrical stimulation (TFS) for the control of seizures. The TFS has been very successful in controlling

  20. Phytoestrogens in menopausal supplements induce ER-dependent cell proliferation and overcome breast cancer treatment in an in vitro breast cancer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duursen, Majorie B.M. van; Smeets, Evelien E.J.W.; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Nijmeijer, Sandra M.; Berg, Martin van den

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer treatment by the aromatase inhibitor Letrozole (LET) or Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen (TAM) can result in the onset of menopausal symptoms. Women often try to relieve these symptoms by taking menopausal supplements containing high levels of phytoestrogens. However, little is known about the potential interaction between these supplements and breast cancer treatment, especially aromatase inhibitors. In this study, interaction of phytoestrogens with the estrogen receptor alpha and TAM action was determined in an ER-reporter gene assay (BG1Luc4E2 cells) and human breast epithelial tumor cells (MCF-7). Potential interactions with aromatase activity and LET were determined in human adrenocorticocarcinoma H295R cells. We also used the previously described H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model to study interactions with steroidogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. In this model, genistein (GEN), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and four commercially available menopausal supplements all induced ER-dependent tumor cell proliferation, which could not be prevented by physiologically relevant LET and 4OH-TAM concentrations. Differences in relative effect potencies between the H295R/MCF-7 co-culture model and ER-activation in BG1Luc4E2 cells, were due to the effects of the phytoestrogens on steroidogenesis. All tested supplements and GEN induced aromatase activity, while 8PN was a strong aromatase inhibitor. Steroidogenic profiles upon GEN and 8PN exposure indicated a strong inhibitory effect on steroidogenesis in H295R cells and H295R/MCF-7 co-cultures. Based on our in vitro data we suggest that menopausal supplement intake during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided, at least until more certainty regarding the safety of supplemental use in breast cancer patients can be provided. - Highlights: • Supplements containing phytoestrogens are commonly used by women with breast cancer. • Phytoestrogens alter steroidogenesis in a co-culture breast cancer model. • Letrozole or tamoxifen treatment is used to inhibit ER-dependent breast tumor growth. • Phytoestrogens induce in vitro tumor cell growth, even in combination with LET or TAM. • Use of phytoestrogens during breast cancer treatment should better be avoided.

  1. Modification of sympathetic neuronal function in the rat tail artery by dietary lipid treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panek, R.L.; Dixon, W.R.; Rutledge, C.O.

    1985-06-01

    The effect of dietary lipid treatment on sympathetic neuronal function was examined in isolated perfused tail arteries of adult rats. The hypothesis that dietary manipulations alter the lipid environment of receptor proteins which may result in the perturbation of specific membrane-associated processes that regulate peripheral adrenergic neurotransmission in the vasculature was the basis for this investigation. In the present study, rats were fed semisynthetic diets enriched in either 16% coconut oil (saturated fat) or 16% sunflower oil (unsaturated fat). The field stimulation-evoked release of endogenous norepinephrine and total /sup 3/H was decreased significantly in rats receiving the coconut oil diet when compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Norepinephrine content in artery segments from coconut oil-treated rats was significantly higher compared to either sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Tail arteries from rats receiving the coconut oil diet displayed significantly lower perfusion pressure responses to nerve stimulation at all frequencies tested when compared to the sunflower oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats. Vasoconstrictor responses of perfused tail arteries exposed to exogenous norepinephrine resulted in an EC50 for norepinephrine that was not changed by the dietary treatment, but adult rats receiving the sunflower oil diet displayed a significantly greater maximum response to exogenous norepinephrine (10(-5) M) compared to arteries from either coconut oil- or standard lab chow-fed rats.

  2. Neth, H., Khemlani, S. S., Oppermann, B., & Gray, W. D. (2006). Juggling multiple tasks: A rational analysis of multitasking inn a synthetic task environment, Proceedings of the 50th annual meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. San Francisc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    2006-01-01

    of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. San Francisco, CA: HFES. JUGGLING MULTIPLE TASKS: A RATIONAL

  3. Preparation and thermophysical properties of (Sm{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides for thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoge, Chen; Shusen, Yang; Hongsong, Zhang; Gang, Li; Zhenjun, Li.; Bo, Ren; Xudan, Dang; Haoming, Zhang; An, Tang

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • These ceramic materials with fluorite structure were synthesized. • Defect points lead to their lower thermal conductivities. • The lower ionic radius of Er{sup 3+} ion leads to the reduction of thermal expansion coefficient of (Sm{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} oxides. - Abstract: (Sm{sub 1?x}Er{sub x}){sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} ceramics were synthesized by sol–gel method and sintered at 1600 °C for 10 h in air. The influence of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}-substitution on the phase structure and thermophysical properties of Sm{sub 2}Ce{sub 2}O{sub 7} was investigated. The phase structures of these ceramics were identified by X-ray diffraction showing that all synthesized ceramics have fluorite-type structure. The measurements for thermophysical properties of these ceramics show that their thermal conductivities and thermal expansion coefficients remarkably decreased through Er-substitution. However, the thermal expansion coefficients were higher than that of YSZ and their thermal conductivities were much lower than that of 8YSZ. The excellent thermophysical property implies that these solid solutions are potential materials for the ceramics layer in thermal barrier coatings.

  4. Effects on food intake following stimulation of alpha1- and alpha2-adrenoceptors within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of dietary-obese and dietary-resistant rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Lance Richard

    1994-01-01

    Rats fed diets high in fat and sucrose exhibit varying degrees of obesity. Studies have sought to define differences between dietary-obese (DIO) rats and dietary-resistant (DR) rats which may contribute to the cause or ...

  5. Temperature dependence of Er{sup 3+} ionoluminescence and photoluminescence in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Bi nanopowder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boruc, Zuzanna, E-mail: z.boruc@stud.elka.pw.edu.pl; Fetli?ski, Bartosz; Kaczkan, Marcin; Malinowski, Micha? [Institute of Microelectronics and Optoelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland); Gawlik, Grzegorz [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wolczynska 133, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-06-15

    Ionoluminescence (IL) and photoluminescence (PL) of trivalent erbium ions (Er{sup 3+}) in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowder host activated with Bi{sup 3+} ions has been studied in order to establish the link between changes in luminescent spectra and temperature of the sample material. IL measurements have been performed with H{sub 2}{sup +} 100 keV ion beam bombarding the target material for a few seconds, while PL spectra have been collected for temperatures ranging from 20?°C to 700?°C. The PL data was used as a reference in determining the temperature corresponding to IL spectra. The collected data enabled the definition of empirical formula based on the Boltzmann distribution, which allows the temperature to be determined with a maximum sensitivity of 9.7 × 10{sup ?3}?°C{sup ?1}. The analysis of the Er{sup 3+} energy level structure in terms of tendency of the system to stay in thermal equilibrium, explained different behaviors of the line intensities. This work led to the conclusion that temperature changes during ion excitation can be easily defined with separately collected PL spectra. The final result, which is empirical formula describing dependence of fluorescence intensity ratio on temperature, raises the idea of an application of method in temperature control, during processes like ion implantation and some nuclear applications.

  6. Swimming in Flavored Water Leads to Avoidance of that Flavor in Laboratory Rats (Rattus Norvegicus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2015-01-01

    study. The rat-in-flavored-water procedure, thus, departsreviewed Swimming in Flavored Water Leads to Avoidance ofthat swam in the flavored water. A statistically reliable

  7. Sex difference in the principal cytochrome P-450 for tributyltin metabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohhira, Shuji [Department of Hygiene, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu-machi, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)]. E-mail: s-ohhira@dokkyomed.ac.jp; Enomoto, Mitsunori [Department of Hygiene, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu-machi, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Matsui, Hisao [Department of Hygiene, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu-machi, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan)

    2006-01-15

    Tributyltin is metabolized by cytochrome P-450 (CYP) system enzymes, and its metabolic fate may contribute to the toxicity of the chemical. In the present study, it is examined whether sex differences in the metabolism of tributyltin exist in rats. In addition, the in vivo and in vitro metabolism of tributyltin was investigated using rat hepatic CYP systems to confirm the principal CYP involved. A significant sex difference in metabolism occurred both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that one of the CYPs responsible for tributyltin metabolism in rats is male specific or predominant at least. Eight cDNA-expressed rat CYPs, including typical phenobarbital (PB)-inducible forms and members of the CYP2C subfamily, were tested to determine their capability for tributyltin metabolism. Among the enzymes studied, a statistically significant dealkylation of tributyltin was mediated by CYP2C6 and 2C11. Furthermore, the sex difference in metabolism disappeared in vitro after anti-rat CYP2C11 antibody pretreatment because CYP2C11 is a major male-specific form in rats. These results indicate that CYP2C6 is the principal CYP for tributyltin metabolism in female rats, whereas CYP2C11 as well as 2C6 is involved in tributyltin metabolism in male rats, and it is suggested that CYP2C11 is responsible for the significant sex difference in the metabolism of tributyltin observed in rats.

  8. Brain reward deficits accompany withdrawal (hangover) from acute ethanol in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulteis, Gery; Liu, Jian

    2006-01-01

    stimulation reward: effects of ethanol. Alcohol Clin Exp Resstimulus produced by ethanol withdrawal. J Pharmacol Expthe "anxiogenic" response to ethanol withdrawal in the rat.

  9. PyRAT (python radiography analysis tool): overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Jerawan C; Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT was developed as a quantitative tool for robustly characterizing objects from radiographs to solve problems such as the hybrid nonlinear inverse problem. The optimization software library that was used is the nonsmooth optimization by MADS algorithm (NOMAD). Some of PyRAT's features are: (1) hybrid nonlinear inverse problem with calculated x-ray spectrum and detector response; (2) optimization based inversion approach with goal of identifying unknown object configurations - MVO problem; (3) using functionalities of Python libraries for radiographic image processing and analysis; (4) using the Tikhonov regularization method of linear inverse problem to recover partial information of object configurations; (5) using a priori knowledge of problem solutions to define feasible region and discrete neighbor for the MVO problem - initial data analysis + material library {yields} a priori knowledge; and (6) using the NOMAD (C++ version) software in the object.

  10. Non-essential amino acid metabolism in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crooks, James Darrell

    1971-01-01

    -bound amino acids were studied' The amino acids studied were asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, alanine, arginine, and praline. Growth rates of rats increased with increased levels of glutamate in the diet. Effects of level... of dietary glutamic acid on endogenous pool size;, of the free amino acids were studied. No consistent patterns were observed. The pool sizes of all but four of the free amino acids increased after the ingestion of a meal. Glucose levels decreased...

  11. PyRAT - python radiography analysis tool (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temple, Brian A; Buescher, Kevin L; Armstrong, Jerawan C

    2011-01-14

    PyRAT is a radiography analysis tool used to reconstruction images of unknown 1-0 objects. The tool is written in Python and developed for use on LINUX and Windows platforms. The tool is capable of performing nonlinear inversions of the images with minimal manual interaction in the optimization process. The tool utilizes the NOMAD mixed variable optimization tool to perform the optimization.

  12. Proposal to Sequence an Organism of Unique Interest for Research on Aging: Heterocephalus glaber, the Naked Mole-Rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Magalhães, João Pedro

    , the Naked Mole-Rat João Pedro de Magalhães1 , John M. Sedivy2 , Caleb E. Finch3 , Steven N. Austad4, we propose the genome sequencing of a unique long-lived organism, the naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus

  13. Contributions of Endothermy to Huddling Behavior in Infant Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) and Syrian Golden Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contributions of Endothermy to Huddling Behavior in Infant Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus little thermoregulatory benefit from the presence of multiple littermates. In contrast, infant Norway hamsters and Norway rats both produce altricial young that differ substan- tially in their thermoregulation

  14. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the magnetic field spreads from the hot spot over the surface that contains the toroidal gap, it will propagate through the gap and set up a steady state in the capsule. The main compression is then initiated. First, it closes the gap and crow-bars the field, then it compresses the fuel to ignition. In addition to this application, we discuss the use of this mechanism to induce Mega-gauss fields in laboratory apparatus for measurements of the effects of large magnetic fields on material samples. A preliminary target design for this purpose is presented. It is made of high-density material with no hydrogen surface contamination to minimize fast ion losses and to minimize x-ray preheat of the sample (the material, whose magnetic properties are to be measured). In it, the gap is designed to allow the magnetic field to move into the interior of the target while minimizing the flow of hot electrons into the interior. By adjusting the size of the gap as well as its configuration, the hot electron effects can be minimized. Since the strength of the magnetic field depends on the radial distance to the sample from the center of the conductor carrying the return current, the sample is located at a point of minimum conductor radius. This location also minimizes the effects on the measurement of any hot electrons that flow into the interior. Useful experiments can be accomplished with the “seed” field alone in this geometry. Compressing the capsule after the insertion of the seed field may allow experiments with even larger magnetic fields. We have used computer-simulation techniques to address a number of issues. Our conclusions include: • This magnetic-field generating mechanism is a viable method for generating magnetic fields in ICF targets and for laboratory experiments. • Useful experiments on material samples can be done with the seed field of 1 to10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) and higher magnetic fields can be obtained by subsequently compressing the capsule. • The results reported here can be studied experimentally with a modest CO2 laser that emits 4.5 J of ene

  15. 8/26/10 10:33 AMAPS -52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics -Eve...er Numerical Simulations of Coronal Heating: Reduced MHD via GPGPUs Page 1 of 2http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DPP10/Event/131043

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    8/26/10 10:33 AMAPS -52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics - Eve...er Numerical/131043 Bulletin of the American Physical Society 52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics - Eve...er Numerical Simulations of Coronal Heating: Reduced MHD via GPGPUs Page 2 of 2http://meetings.aps

  16. A new reasonable scenario to search for ER-alpha energy-time-position correlated sequences in a real time mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsyganov, Y S

    2015-01-01

    A new real-time PC based algorithm and a compact C++ code to operate in a real-time mode with a 48x128 strip double side position sensitive large area silicon radiation detector Micron Semiconductors (UK) are developed and tested. Namely with this new approach it has become possible to provide the quick extraction of EVR-alpha correlated sequences in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Specific attention is paid to the application of new CAMAC 4 M modules for charge particle position measurement during long- term experiments aimed to the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. Some attention is paid to the different (combined) algorithm scenario to search for ER-alpha and alpha-alpha chains.

  17. High-resolution study of 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} excitations in {sup 168}Er with the (p,t) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucurescu, D. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Graw, G.; Hertenberger, R. [Sektion Physik, Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wirth, H.-F.; Faestermann, T.; Kruecken, R.; Mahgoub, M. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lo Iudice, N. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Monte S Angelo, Via Cintia I-80126 Naples (Italy); Sushkov, A.V.; Shirikova, N.Yu. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Sun, Y. [Department of Physics and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physics, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221009 (China); Jolie, J.; Brentano, P. von; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Moeller, O.; Muecher, D.; Scholl, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Casten, R.F.; Meyer, D.A. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Excited states in the deformed nucleus {sup 168}Er have been studied with high-energy resolution, in the (p,t) reaction, with the Munich Q3D spectrograph. A number of 25 excited 0{sup +} states (four tentative) and 63 2{sup +} states have been assigned up to 4.0 MeV excitation energy. This unusually rich characterization of the 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states in a deformed nucleus, close to a complete level scheme, offers a unique opportunity to check, in detail, models of nuclear structure that incorporate many excitation modes. A comparison of the experimental data is made with two such models: the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM), and the projected shell model (PSM). The PSM wave functions appear to contain fewer correlations than those of the QPM and than required by the data.

  18. A new reasonable scenario to search for ER-alpha energy-time-position correlated sequences in a real time mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. S. Tsyganov

    2015-06-05

    A new real-time PC based algorithm and a compact C++ code to operate in a real-time mode with a 48x128 strip double side position sensitive large area silicon radiation detector Micron Semiconductors (UK) are developed and tested. Namely with this new approach it has become possible to provide the quick extraction of EVR-alpha correlated sequences in heavy ion induced complete fusion nuclear reactions. Specific attention is paid to the application of new CAMAC 4 M modules for charge particle position measurement during long- term experiments aimed to the synthesis of new superheavy nuclei. Some attention is paid to the different (combined) algorithm scenario to search for ER-alpha and alpha-alpha chains.

  19. Maternal Responsiveness to Infant Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Ultrasonic Vocalizations During the Maternal Behavior Cycle and After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maternal Responsiveness to Infant Norway Rat (Rattus norvegicus) Ultrasonic Vocalizations During environment, Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) pups emit ultrasonic vocalizations that can elicit maternal search is particularly important in altricial species such as the Norway rat in which infants rely on the mother

  20. Synaptic Plasticity and NO-cGMP-PKG Signaling Regulate Pre-and Postsynaptic Alterations at Rat Lateral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafe, Glenn

    in the lateral amygdala (LA) within 24 hrs following training. Further, we show that rats given intra-LA infusion immunoreactivity in the LA, while those rats infused with the PKG activator 8-Br-cGMP exhibit a significant increase in these proteins in the LA. In contrast, rats given intra-LA infusion of the NO scavenger c

  1. Prefrontal involvement in the regulation of emotion: convergence of rat and human studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Gregory J.

    experiments designed to bridge human and rodent models of emotion regulation. Addresses 1 Department of prefrontal involvement of emotion regula- tion using rat and human models, and suggest future experimentsPrefrontal involvement in the regulation of emotion: convergence of rat and human studies Gregory J

  2. Preferential Cell Migration to Rat Organ Lysates for Studies of Chemotactic Factors in Cancer Metastases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    migration of cells from the primary to the secondary in the process of metastasis of cancer althoughPreferential Cell Migration to Rat Organ Lysates for Studies of Chemotactic Factors in Cancer the molecular mechanisms are not clear. This study investigated cell migration in response to rat organ lysates

  3. Experimental and theoretical studies of oxygen gradients in rat pial microvessels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popel, Aleksander S.

    no substantial impact on the transmural PO2 gradient. Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism (2008) 28, 1597Experimental and theoretical studies of oxygen gradients in rat pial microvessels Maithili Sharan1 near cortical arterioles and transmural PO2 gradients in the pial arterioles of the rat. Under control

  4. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alencar, Adriano Mesquita

    Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects of in vivo elastase P. Ingenito, and Be´la Suki. Lung and alveolar wall elastic and hysteretic behavior in rats: effects behavior of the alveolar walls and the macroscopic mechanical properties of the whole lung in an in vivo

  5. A 3-D mathematical model to identify organ-specific risks in rats during thermal stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    outcomes associated with heat stress is critical for effective management and mitigation of injury, which in a rat exposed to heat stress in an attempt to understand the correlation between heat load core temperature measurements in control and heat-stressed rats and other published experimental data

  6. Plasticity in the Rat Posterior Auditory Field Following Nucleus Basalis Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    Plasticity in the Rat Posterior Auditory Field Following Nucleus Basalis Stimulation Amanda C. Plasticity in the rat posterior auditory field following nucleus basalis stimulation. J Neurophysiol 98: 253 have been shown to cause frequency-specific plasticity in both primary and secondary cortical areas

  7. Comparative demography of black rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta) in Ontario and Maryland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    #12;Comparative demography of black rat snakes (Elaphe obsoleta) in Ontario and Maryland Gabriel. Demographic data collected from 1981 to 1998 in Ontario (ON; 583 males and 588 females) and from 1942 to 1976 season (ON % 135 days, MD % 190 days), rat snakes of both sexes from Ontario had lower and more variable

  8. Ontogeny of NMDA receptor-mediated morphine tolerance in the postnatal rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Gordon A.

    . On the other hand, in agreement with the adult data, NOS inhibitors suppress withdrawal in the 7-day-old rat of morphine tolerance in adult rats. But NMDA receptors undergo dramatic change during the first few weeks antagonists MK-801 and dextromethorphan on the development of morphine tolerance in 7-, 14-, and 21-day-old

  9. THRESHOLD ESTIMATES OF ULTRASOUND-INDUCED LUNG HEMORRHAGE IN ADULT RATS: ROLE OF PULSE DURATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    THRESHOLD ESTIMATES OF ULTRASOUND-INDUCED LUNG HEMORRHAGE IN ADULT RATS: ROLE OF PULSE DURATION W-induced lung hemorrhage has been estimated as a function of pulse duration (PD) in adult rats. A total of 220, there were five in situ (at the lung surface) peak rarefactional pressures. For PDs of 1.3, 4.4, 8.2, and 11

  10. Lesion Resolution Following Exposure of Rat Lung to Pulsed Ultrasound James F. Zachary,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Lesion Resolution Following Exposure of Rat Lung to Pulsed Ultrasound James F. Zachary,1 Leon A ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage in mice, rats, rabbits, monkeys, and pigs. This study characterized the temporal reparative (healing) responses in lung fol- lowing the induction of lesions by pulsed ultrasound

  11. Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Impedance measurements of ex vivo rat lung at different volumes of inflation Michael L. Oelze that the occurrence of ultrasonically induced lung hemorrhage in rats was directly correlated to the level of lung inflation. In that study, it was hypothesized that the lung could be modeled as two components consisting

  12. ARTICLE IN PRESS Oxalate, calcium and ash intake and excretion balances in fat sand rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vatnick, Itzick

    ARTICLE IN PRESS Oxalate, calcium and ash intake and excretion balances in fat sand rats (Psammomys and other inorganic matter (ash) intake and excretion in fat sand rats feeding on two different diets/3 of the ash content. In animals feeding on both diets, 65­80% of the oxalate ingested did not appear in urine

  13. Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla Govind Nair* and ADC of the rat eyes were measured at 50 3 50 3 800 lm at 7 Tesla. Profiles of T1, T2, T2* and ADC

  14. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Ana

    Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition. Keystone rodent interactions: prairie dogs and kangaroo rats structure the biotic composition of a desertified grass- land. Á Ecography 29: 755Á765. Understanding the interactive effects of multiple keystone

  15. Behavioral Assays to Study Sensorimotor Deficit and Recovery in Rats Following Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman-Cruz, Glorian M.

    2010-07-14

    being ovariectomized via a gradual release pellet and the other did not receive an estrogen treatment. All the rats then went through a stroke surgery 3 weeks after the ovariectomy surgery. Before the stroke surgery, all rats also went through training...

  16. The harmful effects of late-onset alcohol consumption on cortical bone in aged rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowlin, Julie Lee

    2001-01-01

    This study looked at the effects of late-onset alcohol consumption for 8 weeks on the aged rat model (15 months old). Thirty 15 month old female Fisher 344 rats were divided into three diet groups: Alcohol (n=9), pair-fed (n=9), and pellet (n=6...

  17. Car~070 Jo..c......,J o~ L-+er."8:nb-J 1xCo"",~"".-fiv{ La.""" r 7 (~") ( )'P...;""'j 2 0 0 1')

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, James

    Car~070 Jo..c......,J o~ L-+er."8:nb-J 1xCo"",~"".-fiv{ La.""" r 7 (~") ( )'P...;""'j 2 0 0 1 not have their belief on the factual question of effectiveness contaminated by their ethical views

  18. 891070-9932/142014IEEE sEptEmbEr 2014 IEEE rObOtICs & AUtOmAtION mAGAZINE By Yaroslav Tenzer, Leif P. Jentoft, and Robert D. Howe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the recently available miniature barometric sensor chips, which include a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS891070-9932/14©2014IEEE sEptEmbEr 2014 · IEEE rObOtICs & AUtOmAtION mAGAZINE · The Feel of MEMS Barometers The Feel of MEMS Barometers By Yaroslav Tenzer, Leif P. Jentoft, and Robert D. Howe Inexpensive

  19. Rare-earth-rich tellurides: Gd{sub 4}NiTe{sub 2} and Er{sub 5}M{sub 2}Te{sub 2} (M=Co, Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magliocchi, Carmela; Meng, Fanqin; Hughbanks, Timothy . E-mail: trh@mail.chem.tamu.edu

    2004-11-01

    Three new rare earth metal-rich compounds, Gd{sub 4}NiTe{sub 2}, and Er{sub 5}M{sub 2}Te{sub 2} (M=Ni, Co), were synthesized in direct reactions using R, R{sub 3}M, and R{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (R=Gd, Er; M=Co, Ni) and single-crystal structures were determined. Gd{sub 4}NiTe{sub 2} is orthorhombic and crystallizes in space group Pnma with four formula units per cell. Lattice parameters at 110(2)K are a=15.548(9), b=4.113(2), c=11.7521(15)A. Er{sub 5}Ni{sub 2}Te{sub 2} and Er{sub 5}Co{sub 2}Te{sub 2} are isostructural and crystallize in the orthorhombic space group Cmcm with two formula units per cell. Lattice parameters at 110(2)K are a=3.934(1), b=14.811(4), c=14.709(4)A, and a=3.898(1), b=14.920(3), c=14.889(3)A, respectively. Metal-metal bonding correlations were analyzed using the empirical Pauling bond order concept.

  20. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 19 P HY S I CA L REV I EW L E T T ER S 11 MAY 1998 van der Waals Energies in Density Functional Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meir, Yigal

    yields the correct ground­state densities and energies of elec­ tronic systems under the action tool for calculating ground­state energies and density distributions of atoms, molecules, and solidsVOLUME 80, NUMBER 19 P HY S I CA L REV I EW L E T T ER S 11 MAY 1998 van der Waals Energies

  1. Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex following subchronic acrolein toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa; Abnous, Khalil; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Acrolein, a member of reactive ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes, is a major environmental pollutant. Acrolein is also produced endogenously as a toxic by-product of lipid peroxidation. Because of high reactivity, acrolein may mediate oxidative damages to cells and tissues. It has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of pathological states including pulmonary, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we employed proteomics approach to investigate the effects of subchronic oral exposures to 3 mg/kg of acrolein on protein expression profile in the brain of rats. Moreover effects of acrolein on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were investigated. Our results revealed that treatment with acrolein changed levels of several proteins in diverse physiological process including energy metabolism, cell communication and transport, response to stimulus and metabolic process. Interestingly, several differentially over-expressed proteins, including ?-synuclein, enolase and calcineurin, are known to be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in the levels of some proteins were confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, acrolein increases the level of MDA, as a lipid peroxidation biomarker and decreased GSH concentrations, as a non-enzyme antioxidant in the brain of acrolein treated rats. These findings suggested that acrolein induces the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and so that may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. - Highlights: • Acrolein intoxication increased lipid peroxidation and deplete GSH in rat brain. • Effect of acrolein on protein levels of cerebral cortex was analyzed by 2DE-PAGE. • Levels of a number of proteins with different biological functions were increased.

  2. The effects of alcohol and irradiation on the albino rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klobukowski, Christopher John

    1963-01-01

    '&eight During the Test I'eriod. lh Combined. Daily Caloric Intake - Ca- lories per 100 Grams of 3ody Ueight. 17 Survival '?ata and Peak Death Days 3xpt. II. Surv1 vBI Data and Peek !3ea'l h Days Sxpte Ilia 3 j& Average Dody "? eights ( Pram... ~ ) ?" i rat Day I'ostirradiation. Average Pluid Intake (in millili gers) per 100 Grams of Dody Ueight, T~so Dave Pre-, Three ?Days Postirradiafion, "?S Average Percent ?ge of Total Caloric lntal:e per 100 Grams of 3od. , ? '?eight Supplied. 'by...

  3. Effect of co-exposure and cadmium in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tandon, S.K.; Tewari, P.C.

    1987-10-01

    Metabolism and toxicity of heavy metals may be influenced by certain factors such as protein malnutrition, essential element deficiency or alcoholism. Ethanol has been found to enhance the absorption of lead in body and alcoholics have been reported to be more susceptible to lead intoxication. As alcoholism may be common among industry workers and a significant section of population, who may be exposed to cadmium, it was considered of interest to investigate the influence of ethanol-cadmium co-exposure on cadmium sensitive hepatic, renal and serum enzymes, tissue accumulation of cadmium, essential trace element status and cadmium induced hepatic metallothione in synthesis in rats.

  4. SU-E-T-492: Implementing a Method for Brain Irradiation in Rats Utilizing a Commercially Available Radiosurgery Irradiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cates, J; Drzymala, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to implement a method for accurate rat brain irradiation using the Gamma Knife Perfexion unit. The system needed to be repeatable, efficient, and dosimetrically and spatially accurate. Methods: A platform (“rat holder”) was made such that it is attachable to the Leskell Gamma Knife G Frame. The rat holder utilizes two ear bars contacting bony anatomy and a front tooth bar to secure the rat. The rat holder fits inside of the Leskell localizer box, which utilizes fiducial markers to register with the GammaPlan planning system. This method allows for accurate, repeatable setup.A cylindrical phantom was made so that film can be placed axially in the phantom. We then acquired CT image sets of the rat holder and localizer box with both a rat and the phantom. Three treatment plans were created: a plan on the rat CT dataset, a phantom plan with the same prescription dose as the rat plan, and a phantom plan with the same delivery time as the rat plan. Results: Film analysis from the phantom showed that our setup is spatially accurate and repeatable. It is also dosimetrically accurate, with an difference between predicted and measured dose of 2.9%. Film analysis with prescription dose equal between rat and phantom plans showed a difference of 3.8%, showing that our phantom is a good representation of the rat for dosimetry purposes, allowing for +/- 3mm diameter variation. Film analysis with treatment time equal showed an error of 2.6%, which means we can deliver a prescription dose within 3% accuracy. Conclusion: Our method for irradiation of rat brain has been shown to be repeatable, efficient, and accurate, both dosimetrically and spatially. We can treat a large number of rats efficiently while delivering prescription doses within 3% at millimeter level accuracy.

  5. Q-switched and mode-locked Er{sup 3+}-doped fibre laser using a single-multi-single fibre filter and piezoelectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji Wang; Yunjun Zhang; Aotuo Dong; Xiaoxin Xu; Youlun Ju; Baoquan Yao [National Key Laboratory of Tunable Laser Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China, 150001 (China)

    2014-04-28

    The active Q-switched and passive mode-locked Er{sup 3+}-doped all-fibre laser is presented. The fibre laser centre wavelength is located at 1563 nm and determined by the homemade singlemulti- single (SMS) in-line fibre filter. The laser spectrum width is nearly 0.1 nm. The active Q-switched mechanism relies on the polarisation state control using a piezoelectric to press a segment of passive fibre on the circular cavity. The nonlinear polarisation rotation technology is used to realise the passive self-started modelocked operation. In the passive mode-locked regimes, the output average power is 2.1 mW, repetition frequency is 11.96 MHz, and single pulse energy is 0.18 nJ. With the 100-Hz Q-switched regimes running, the output average power is 1.5 mW. The total Q-switched pulse width is 15 ?s, and every Q-switched pulse is made up by several tens of mode-locked peak pulses. The calculated output pulse energy of the Q-switched fibre laser is about 15 ?J, and the energy of every mode-locked pulse is about 64–68 nJ during a Q-switched pulse taking into account the power fraction propagating between pulses. (lasers)

  6. Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses DE-FG02-05 ER 63947 Final Technical Report 15 May 2005 â?? 14 May 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon Bouffler; Christophe Badie; Natalie Brown; Rosemary Finnon

    2010-07-28

    This report provides a full summary of the results obtained under grant DE-FG02-05ER63947, Radiation Leukaemogenesis at low doses. The studies employed an experimental model of radiation leukaemogenesis with the main aim of identifying key events that convert normal cells into leukaemic cells follwoing exposure to radiation. Important aspect of the work was to understand dose-response relationships and time course relationships for leakaemogenis events. The studies performed provided evidence for direct radiation-induced losses of the Sfpi1/PU.1 gene being critical for induction of the disease. No threshold below 0.1 Gy in the induction of the gene losses was observed. The critical cell type in which the myeloid lekaemias arise has been identified and point mutations in the Sfpi1/PU.1 gene are common in leukaemias. The consequences of the genetic losses and mutation have been examined and these provide evidence of a disruption of differentiation in leukaemic cells. Additional pathways to leukaemogenesis have been identified also. Overall the study provides quantitiative data suitable for testing approaches to modelling of leukaemia rosk at low doses.

  7. Black phosphorus as saturable absorber for the Q-switched Er:ZBLAN fiber laser at 2.8 {\\mu}m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Zhipeng; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Chujun; Yuan, Peng; Wen, Shuangchun; Qian, Liejia

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus, a newly emerged two-dimensional material, has attracted wide attention as novel photonic material. Here, multi-layer black phosphorus is successfully fabricated by liquid phase exfoliation method. By employing black phosphorus as saturable absorber, we demonstrate a passively Q-switched Er-doped ZBLAN fiber laser at the wavelength of 2.8 {\\mu}m. The modulation depth and saturation fluence of the black phosphorus saturable absorber are measured to be 15% and 9 {\\mu}J/cm2, respectively. The Q-switched fiber laser delivers a maximum average power of 485 mW with corresponding pulse energy of 7.7 {\\mu}J and pulse width of 1.18 {\\mu}s at repetition rate of 63 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time to demonstrate that black phosphorus can realize Q-switching of 2.8-{\\mu}m fiber laser. Our research results show that black phosphorus is a promising saturable absorber for mid-infrared pulsed lasers.

  8. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-d-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 min of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  9. Developing a Biosensor for Estrogens in Water Samples: Study ofthe Real-time Response of Live Cells of the Estrogen-sensitive YeastStrain RMY/ER-ERE using Fluorescence Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wozei, E.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Holman, H-Y.N.

    2005-07-13

    Using a fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) substrate we show that in live cells of an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE with human estrogen receptor (ER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes {beta}-galactosidase, the uptake of 17 {beta}-estradiol (E2) and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximal enzyme-catalyzed product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. This finding which agrees with the well-known rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions could have implications for shortening the duration of environmental sample screening and monitoring regimes using yeast-based estrogen assays, and the development of biosensors for environmental estrogens to complement quantification methods.

  10. Fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence from glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}:NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals under excitation of two near infrared femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Xiaoying; Cheng, Wenjing; Zhou, Kan; Ma, Jing; Feng, Donghai; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Jia, Tianqing; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2014-08-14

    In this paper, we report fine tunable red-green upconversion luminescence of glass ceramic containing 5%Er{sup 3+}: NaYF{sub 4} nanocrystals excited simultaneously by two near infrared femtosecond lasers. When the glass ceramic was irradiated by 800?nm femtosecond laser, weak red emission centered at 670?nm was detected. Bright red light was observed when the fs laser wavelength was tuned to 1490?nm. However, when excited by the two fs lasers simultaneously, the sample emitted bright green light centered at 550?nm, while the red light kept the same intensity. The dependences of the red and the green light intensities on the two pump lasers are much different, which enables us to manipulate the color emission by adjusting the two pump laser intensities, respectively. We present a theoretical model of Er{sup 3+} ions interacting with two fs laser fields, and explain well the experimental results.

  11. Secondary structure of rat and human amylin across force fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi -cheng; de Pablo, Juan J.; Paci, Emanuele

    2015-07-29

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, ?-helices, and ?-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin wasmore »determined as a function of ?-helix and ?-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards ?-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly ?-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable dynamic pathways that facilitate the formation of aggregates and, eventually, amyloid fibrils.« less

  12. The effect of moderate alcohol intake on bone mineral density of ovariectomized rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipley, Debra Lynn

    1997-01-01

    groups had access to rat chow and distilled water ad libitim. Ovariectomized animals had increased weight and decreased femur density and bone volume per total volume. They also had decreased total trubecular area, trabecular area and number as well...

  13. Cardiac dysfunction in the ZDF rat: Possible mechanisms and benefits of exercise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanHoose, Lisa

    2011-12-31

    heart disease include left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic and systolic dysfunction, and diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy, which are regularly observed at varying severities in persons with type 2 diabetes. The Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rat has...

  14. Function and acuity of the rat vibrissa system during texture discrimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morita, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    cortex underlying texture discrimination. PLoS Biol 5, e305.of vibrissal tactile discrimination in the rat. J NeurosciMice can learn roughness discrimination with vibrissae in a

  15. Confocal Image-Based Computational Modeling of Nitric Oxide Transport in a Rat Mesenteric Lymphatic Vessel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, John 1988-

    2012-11-15

    physiologic geometries obtained from confocal images of a rat mesenteric lymphatic vessel to determine the characteristics of NO transport in the lymphatic flow regime. Both steady and unsteady analyses were performed. Steady models were simulated...

  16. Effect of housing conditions on sex differences in spatial cognition in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Anjanette Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Male mammals typically outperform females in tests of spatial ability. However, in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicus), from which the majority of data in support of this difference come, sex differences are not consistently ...

  17. Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Quantification of Neuroepithelial Bodies and Their Innervation in Fawn-Hooded and Wistar Rat Lungs neuroendocrine system (DNES) of the lungs, the neuroendocrine cells of which have been shown to express

  18. Endogenous opioids and attenuated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to immune challenge in pregnant rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, J. A.; Ochedalski, T; Meddle, S. L.; Ma, S.; Brunton, P. J.; Douglas, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    In late pregnant rats, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is hyporesponsive to psychogenic stressors. Here, we investigated attenuated HPA responses to an immune challenge and a role for endogenous opioids. ACTH ...

  19. Beneficial effects of dietary L-arginine supplementation to diabetic rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohli, Ripla

    2004-09-30

    Diabetic rats exhibit decrease in plasma arginine, NO synthesis and tetrahydrobiopterin in endothelial cells (EC). Treatment with L-arginine may be beneficial for enhancing NO synthesis in diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. However...

  20. Electrical, molecular and behavioral effects of interictal spiking in the rat Daniel T. Barkmeier b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    interictal spiking in rats. Methods: A single injection of tetanus toxin into somatosensory cortex generated activation and plasticity gene induction as is seen in the human interictal state. Increasing spike frequency

  1. Impact of Ghrelin Receptor Antagonism on Nicotine and Cocaine Drug Reactivity in Rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifford, Patrick Shane

    2013-05-01

    Ghrelin is a 28 amino acid peptide that interacts with ghrelin receptors (GHS-Rs) to modulate brain reinforcement circuits. Systemic ghrelin infusions augment cocaine (COC) stimulated locomotion and conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats...

  2. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  3. Bifunction in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped BaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses prepared by aerodynamic levitation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Minghui; Yu, Jianding; Pan, Xiuhong; Cheng, Yuxing; Liu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel BaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses have been prepared by aerodynamic levitation. • The obtained glasses show high thermal stability with T{sub g} = 763.3 °C. • Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped glasses show strong upconversion based on a two-photon process. • Red emission is stronger than green emissions for EBT by high Yb{sup 3+} concentration. • Magnetic ions are paramagnetic and the distribution is homogeneous in the glasses. - Abstract: Novel Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped BaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} spherical glasses have been fabricated by aerodynamic levitation method. The thermal stability, upconversion luminescence, and magnetic properties of the present glass have been studied. The glasses show high thermal stability with 763.3 °C of the onset temperature of the glass transition. Red and green emissions centered at 671 nm, 548 nm and 535 nm are obtained at 980 nm excitation. The upconversion is based on a two-photon process by energy transfer, excited-state absorption, and energy back transfer. Yb{sup 3+} ions are more than Er{sup 3+} ions in the glass, resulting in efficient energy back transfer from Er{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+}. So the red emission is stronger than the green emissions. Magnetization curves indicate that magnetic rare earth ions are paramagnetic and the distribution is homogeneous and random in the glass matrix. Aerodynamic levitation method is an efficient way to prepare glasses with homogeneous rare earth ions.

  4. NOAA Technical Rep_o_rt_N_M_F_S_l_2_4 o_c_to_b_er_I_99_5 Effects of the Cessation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Rep_o_rt_N_M_F_S_l_2_4 o_c_to_b_er_I_99_5 Effects of the Cessation of Sewage Sludge Technical Report NMFS 124 A Technical Report of the Fishery Bulletin Effects of the Cessation of Sewage Sludge Dumping at the 12-Mile Site Proceedings ofthe 12-Mile Dumpsite Symposium Ocean Place Hilton Hotel

  5. Tissue magnesium and calcium concentration in relation to magnesium and calcium intake in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinkham, Carrie Stanton

    1987-01-01

    TISSUE MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM CONCENTRATION IN RELATION TO MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM INTAKE IN RATS A Thesis by CARRIE STANTON PINKRAM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirerrents... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1987 Major Subject: Nutrition TISSUE MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM CONCENTRATION IN RELATION TO MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM INTAKE IN RATS A Thesis by CARRIE STANTON PINKHAM Approved as to style and content by: Karen S...

  6. The Lower Keys marsh rabbit and silver rice rat: steps toward recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Neil Desmond

    2006-10-30

    -1 LOWER KEYS MARSH RABBIT AND THE SILVER RICE RAT: STEPS TOWARDS RECOVERY A Thesis by NEIL DESMOND PERRY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2006 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences LOWER KEYS MARSH RABBIT AND THE SILVER RICE RAT: STEPS TOWARDS RECOVERY A Thesis by NEIL DESMOND PERRY Submitted to the Office...

  7. Copper induced osteopenia and its relationship to the development of postmenopausal osteoporosis in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Cindy Deann

    1992-01-01

    COPPER INDUCED OSTEOPENIA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS IN THE RAT A Thesis CINDY DEANN YEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Nutrition COPPER INDUCED OSTEOPENIA AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF POSTMENOPAUSAL OSTEOPOROSIS IN THE RAT A Thesis CINDY DEANN YEE Approved as to style and content...

  8. Antimuscarinic effects of chloroquine in rat pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habara, Y.; Williams, J.A.; Hootman, S.R.

    1986-06-13

    Chloroquine inhibited carbachol-induced amylase release in a dose-dependent fashion in rat pancreatic acini; cholecystokinin- and bombesin-induced secretory responses were almost unchanged by the antimalarial drug. The inhibition of carbachol-induced amylase release by chloroquine was competitive in nature with a K/sub i/ of 11.7 ..mu..M. Chloroquine also inhibited (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding to acinar muscarinic receptors. The IC/sub 50/ for chloroquine inhibition of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding was lower than that for carbachol or the other antimalarial drugs, quinine and quinidine. These results demonstrate that chloroquine is a muscarinic receptor antagonist in the exocrine pancreas.

  9. Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-07-04

    We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

  10. Zinc content of selected tissues and taste perception in rats fed zinc deficient and zinc adequate rations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boeckner, L.S.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-05

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of feeding zinc sufficient and zinc deficient rations on taste sensitivity and zinc contents of selected organs in rats. The 36 Sprague-Dawley male weanling rats were divided into 2 groups and fed zinc deficient or zinc adequate rations. The animals were subjected to 4 trial periods in which a choice of deionized distilled water or a solution of quinine sulfate at 1.28 x 10/sup -6/ was given. A randomized schedule for rat sacrifice was used. No differences were found between zinc deficient and zinc adequate rats in taste preference aversion scores for quinine sulfate in the first three trial periods; however, in the last trial period rats in the zinc sufficient group drank somewhat less water containing quinine sulfate as a percentage of total water consumption than did rats fed the zinc deficient ration. Significantly higher zinc contents of kidney, brain and parotid salivary glands were seen in zinc adequate rats compared to zinc deficient rats at the end of the study. However, liver and tongue zinc levels were lower for both groups at the close of the study than were those of rats sacrificed at the beginning of the study.

  11. ATTRACTIVENESS OF CARBON DISULFIDE TO WILD NORWAY RATS J. RUSSELL MASON, U.S. Deparunent of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Denver Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    that carbon disulfide (CSz) and carbonyl sulfide were present on the breath of rats in rela- tively high

  12. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Miller, Gregory Hale

    2012-10-14

    Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr. Phillip Colella, the head of ANAG, and some of his colleagues. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL working with computational models of climate change. Finally, it should be noted that the work conducted by Professor Puckett and his students Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri and described in this final report for DOE grant # DE-FC02-03ER25579 is closely related to work performed by Professor Puckett and his students under the auspices of Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER25473 An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations: A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC). Dr. Colella was the lead PI for this SciDAC grant, which was comprised of several research groups from DOE national laboratories and five university PI's from five different universities. In theory Professor Puckett tried to use funds from the SciDAC grant to support work directly involved in implementing algorithms developed by members of his research group at UCD as software that might be of use to Puckett's SciDAC CoPIs. (For example, see the work reported in Section 2.2.2 of this final report.) However, since there is considerable lead time spent developing such algorithms before they are ready to become `software' and research plans and goals change as the research progresses, Professor Puckett supported each member of his research group partially with funds from the SciDAC APDEC ISIC DE-FC02-01ER25473 and partially with funds from this DOE MICS grant DE-FC02-03ER25579. This has necessarily resulted in a significant overlap of project areas that were funded by both grants. In particular, both Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri were supported partially with funds from grant # DE-FG02-03ER25579, for which this is the final report, and in part with funds from Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant # DE-FC02-01ER25473. For example, Sarah Williams received support from DE-FC02- 01ER25473 and DE-FC02-03ER25579, both while at UCD taking cla

  13. Beauchef041er semestre 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapaport, Iván

    lanza iniciativa Campus Sustentable / 57 Se crea Centro de Investigación en Inteligencia de Negocios

  14. miller-er-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII: The ManhattanCO2mfsacademicCorrection

  15. In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Michael F.; Edwards, Brenda C.

    2010-07-15

    Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

  16. Effect of Age and Exercise on the Viscoelastic Properties of Rat Tail Tendon accepted version, Annals of Biomedical Engineering 41, (6), 1120-1128 (2013).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakes, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    old rats were used to provide an adult control, while a group of 3 month old rats provided a young but not direct loading from the exercise regimen. Twenty-four month old rats underwent one of three treadmill, no #12;investigations lend conclusive evidence of a link between old age and changes in viscoelasticity

  17. Dietary apigenin and naringenin protect against colon carcinogenesis by lowering high multiplicity aberrant crypt foci and enhancing apoptosis in azoxymethane-treated rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardi, Tety

    2006-08-16

    investigated the potentially protective effects of four citrus flavonoids and one limonoid mixture against the promotion stage of chemically-induced colon cancer in rats. Male SD rats (n =60; 10 rats/group) were assigned to receive diets containing 0...

  18. The role of hepatic mitochondria in the regulation of glucose metabolism in BHE rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, M.J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The interacting effects of dietary fat source and thyroxine treatment on the hepatic mitochondrial function and glucose metabolism were studied. In the first study, three different sources of dietary fatty acids and thyroxine treatment were used to investigate the hepatic mitochondrial thermotropic behavior in two strains of rat. The NIDDM BHE and Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Feeding coconut oil increased serum T{sub 4} levels and T{sub 4} treatment increased serum T{sub 3} levels in the BHE rats. In the mitochondria from BHE rats fed coconut oil and treated with T{sub 4}, the transition temperature disappeared due to a decoupling of succinate supported respiration. This was not observed in the Sprague-Dawley rats. In the second study, two different sources of dietary fat and T{sub 4} treatment were used to investigate hepatic mitochondrial function. Coconut oil feeding increased Ca{sup ++}Mg{sup ++}ATPase and Mg{sup ++}ATPase. T{sub 4} treatment had potentiated this effect. T{sub 4} increased the malate-aspartate shuttle and {alpha}-glycerophosphate shuttle activities. In the third study, the glucose turnover rate from D-({sup 14}C-U)/(6-{sup 3}H)-glucose and gluconeogeneis from L-({sup 14}C-U)-alanine was examined. Dietary fat or T{sub 4} did not affect the glucose mass. T{sub 4} increased the irreversible fractional glucose turnover rate.

  19. Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayland, B.B.

    2009-08-31

    Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

  20. Methods for testing the strength of cancellous bone and tested method effects on cortical bone in the ovariectomized rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruhmann, Sean Phillip

    1998-01-01

    In this study, two mechanical testing procedures were developed to test the strength of cancellous bone from the proximal tibia of the rat, the "punch method" and the "whole slice method". These were used to quantify the effect of ovariectomy on rat...

  1. Characterization of the Bone Loss and Recovery Response at the Distal Femur Metaphysis of the Adult Male Hindlimb Unloaded Rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Joshua Morgan

    2012-02-14

    Metaphysis of the Rat ....................................................................... 10 2.4 Mechanical Testing Methods for Rat Distal Femur Metaphysis ............................ 13 2.5 Reduced Platen Compression Mechanical Testing... ........................................................... 27 3.5 RPC Mechanical Testing and Analysis .................................................................... 30 3.6 Data Analysis .......................................................................................................... 32 4...

  2. Real-Time Imaging of Perivascular Transport of Nanoparticles During Convection-Enhanced Delivery in the Rat Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Chris B.

    , and nanoparticles infused into neural tissue localize in the perivascular spaces of blood vessels within the brain-time distribution of nanoparticles infused in the cortex of live, anesthetized rats via CED. Fluorescent nanoparticles of 24 and 100 nm nominal diameters were infused into rat cortex through microfluidic probes. We

  3. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoguang [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan) [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Department of Medical Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Qian, Hua [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan) [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Miyamoto, Fusako [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Naito, Takeshi [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kawaji, Kumi [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kazumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan) [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); JST Innovation Plaza Kyoto, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8245 (Japan); Hattori, Toshio [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)] [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Matsuoka, Masao [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  4. Magnesium and pyridoxine intake and mineral content of selected tissues and physical development in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, Susan Elaine

    1986-01-01

    lower f eed intake s than did rats from other dietary treatments. During lactation, dai ly feed consumpt ion was lower in an ima1 s depr ived of magnesium. Approximately 24 hr postpartum, in dams who consumed a magnesium-deficient diet, the heart... and kidney contained significantly more calcium, 150'% and 300% respectively. During lactation, mild magnesium restriction resulted in increased weight loss by dams and decreased weight gain by pupa. In the of f spring of rats dep1 et ed o f magnesium...

  5. Luminescence properties of light-emitting diodes based on GaAs with the up-conversion Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Er,Yb luminophor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruzintsev, A. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Microelectronics Technology (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gran@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Barthou, C.; Benalloul, P. [Institute des NanoSciences (France)

    2008-03-15

    Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S luminophors doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions are produced by means of solid-phase synthesis and deposited onto standard AL123A infrared light-emitting diodes. When excited with 940 nm radiation from a light-emitting diode, the structures exhibit intense visible up-conversion luminescence. A maximal brightness of 2340 cd/m{sup 2} of green and red up-conversion luminescence at corresponding wavelengths around 550 and 600 nm is observed for the Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S compound doped with 2 at % Er{sup 3+} ions and 6 at % Yb{sup 3+} ions. The ratio of the intensity of green (or red) up-conversion luminescence to the intensity of infrared Stokes luminescence increases with increasing applied voltage. The efficiency of visible emission of the light-emitting diode structures is {eta} = 1.2 lm/W at an applied voltage of 1.5 V.

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Liquid-Solid and Liquid-Vapor Interfaces of Metals and Alloys, Grant DE-FG02-06ER46321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, Stuart

    2012-09-27

    The research supported by ER46321 was designed to understand in microscopic detail the structures of the interfaces between liquid metals and alloys and solid media. The system chosen for study, because of detailed knowledge of the structure of the corresponding liquid alloy-vapor interface, was the interface between a Si crystal and a dilute alloy of Pb in Ga. Experimental study of the Si:PbGa interface was anticipated to be very difficult; it requires preparation of an interface between a liquid metal and a solid surface that is flat to better than a nanometer on the scale length of the x-ray coherence, alignment of the x-ray beam and the surface in the sub-micro radian regime, and the use of high energy x-rays to penetrate the window and reach the interface without disastrous loss of intensity. The experimental design was subject to compromises forced by the limit to the highest x-ray energy available at the ChemMatCARS beam-line, namely 30 keV, which reduced the scattered signal relative to what can be obtained with higher x-ray energy. Although considerable progress was achieved during the support period and its no-cost extension, the difficulties encountered prevented completion of the studies and the data collected are incomplete. These data hint at the existence of unexpected structural features of the interface, in particular that Pb dimers play an important role in the interfacial structure. These data provide a different picture of the interface from the pentagonal structure inferred to be present in the interface between pure Pb and Si 001 (Nature 408, 839 (2000)), but much like the Ga dimers in the interface between liquid Ga and the 100 face of diamond (Nature 390, 379 (1997), J. Chem. Phys. 123, 104703 (2005)). However, during the latter part of the support period significant progress was made in the theoretical description of the liquid metal-crystal interface. In particular, stimulated by the results of an experimental study of the interface between liquid Hg and the reconstructed (0001) face of sapphire, we developed an extension of the self-consistent quantum Monte Carlo scheme previously used to study the structure of the liquid metal-vapor interface. The calculated density distribution is in very good agreement with that inferred from the experimental data. We conclude, contrary to the original interpretation offered by Tamam et al (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2010, I, 1041-1045), thast to account for the difference in structure between the liquid Hg-vapor and liquid Hg-reconstructed (0001) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces it is not necessary to assume there is charge transfer from the Hg to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Rather, the available experimental data are adequately reproduced when the van der Waals interaction of the Al and O atoms with Hg atoms and the exclusion of the electron density from the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via repulsion of the electrons from the closed shells of the ions in the solid are accounted for. We believe this interpretation will be applicable to a wide range of liquid metal-crystal interfaces.

  7. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  8. Effects of Dietary Lead and Cholesterol Supplementation on Hemolysis in the Sprague-Dawley Rat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Effects of Dietary Lead and Cholesterol Supplementation on Hemolysis in the Sprague-Dawley Rat1 has been observed in a number of organisms exposed to lead. Previous investigators have proposed into the serum. Lead-exposed fish have displayed depressed serum cholesterol and elevated serum protein

  9. Sex and species differences in spatial memory in food-storing kangaroo rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Lucia

    did not differentially affect recovery in the two species of kangaroo rats, unlike previous studies recovery. Female performance was significantly impaired by the absence of local landmarks, while male persistence. Using a touch-screen to simulate a feeder array, coal tits, Periparus ater, show greater mem- ory

  10. LEARNING IND MOTIVATION (1974) 5, 231-247 Instrumental and Contingent Saccharin Licking in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timberlake, William D.

    1974-01-01

    LEARNING IND MOTIVATION (1974) 5, 231-247 Instrumental and Contingent Saccharin Licking in Rats!/ Instrumental licking of .4% saccharin solution was increased by the contingent opportunity to lick a less in instrumental responding. The results support the hypothesis that instrumental responding will increase

  11. Effects of simulated microgravity on vasoconstrictor and mechanical properties of the rat abdominal aorta 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopoulos, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    aminoguanidine (0.3mM). Active and passive stress-stretch relations were investigated by an extension response. Maximal tension developed in response to NE and AVP was less in aortic rings from HU rats, and the iNOS inhibitor did not normalize this difference...

  12. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of isoprene in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Isoprene, a reactive, branched diene, is used in large quantities in the manufacture of polyisoprene and as a copolymer in the synthesis of butyl rubber. The potential for isoprene to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in rodents, by exposing four groups each of Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 280, 1400, or 7000 ppM isoprene vapors, 6 h/day, 7 day/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.30 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 31 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

  13. 0 50 100 150 FIGURE 3. The arctangent distribution t to the rat cancer data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    , New York, NY. GEHAN, E. A. (1965). \\A Generalized Wilcoxon Test for Comparing Arbitrarily Singly- Censored Samples." Biometrika 52, pp. 203{223. KECECIOGLU, D. (1991). Reliability Engineering Handbook of the distribution's heavy right tail. Cox and Snell (1981, page 169) present data on life span of rats who have been

  14. Cytokine-induced Neutrophil Chemoattractant Mediates Neutrophil Influx in Immune Complex Glomerulonephritis in Rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trask, Barbara Crippes

    Glomerulonephritis in Rat Xiaobo Wu, Arthur J. Wittwer,* Linda S. Carr,* Barbara A. Crippes, * Joseph E. De B. Lefkowith, M.D., Box 8045, Divi- sion of Rheumatology, Washington University School of Medicine that these mediators may have pleotrophic effects (1-4). Very little is known, in fact, about the participation

  15. The effects of ethanol on strychnine sensitive glycine receptors in the rat basolateral amygdala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botting, Shaleen Kaye

    2000-01-01

    to measure the anxiolytic and anxiogenic effects of chronic ethanol ingestion and withdrawal. In these tests we found that both the ethanol and control rats displayed a slightly greater interest in exploring the dark side of the box, while the ethanol...

  16. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  17. Passive spatial and temporal integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in cerebellar Purkinje cells of young rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passive spatial and temporal integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in cerebellar Purkinje cells linearly independent of the spatial and temporal separation of inputs. Summation of inputs in a passive. Keywords: Dendritic integration; Parallel fiber; Excitation; Timing; Synchrony; Rat Based on a passive

  18. Altered neurochemical levels in the rat brain following chronic nicotine Sara Falasca a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chronic nicotine Prefrontal cortex Dorsal striatum Hypothalamus A B S T R A C T Converging evidence shows as glutamate and gamma aminobutyric acid in the rat prefrontal cortex, dorsal striatum and hypothalamus. We of carnitine in the hypothalamus (26.59%, p

  19. Involvement of growth factors and their receptors in radon-induced rat lung tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, F.C.; Dagle, G.E.; Cross, F.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-12-31

    In this paper we examine the role of growth factors (GF) and their receptors (GFR) in radon-induced rat lung tumors. Inhalation exposure of radon and its daughters induced lung tumors in rats, but the molecule/cellular mechanisms are not known. Recent evidence suggests that GF/GFR play a critical role in the growth and development of lung cancer in humans and animals. We have developed immunocytochemical methods for identifying sites of production and action of GF/GFR at the cellular level; for example, the avidin-biotin horseradish peroxidase technique. In radon-induced rat epidermoid carcinomas, epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGF-receptors (EGF-R), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-{alpha}), and bombesin were found to be abnormally expressed. These abnormal expressions, mainly associated with epidermoid carcinomas of the lung, were not found in any other lung tumor types. Our data suggest that EGF, EGF-R, TGF-{alpha}, and bombesin are involved in radon oncogenesis in rat lungs, especially in epidermoid carcinomas, possibly through the autocrine/paracrine pathway.

  20. Dim Light at Night Increases Immune Function in Nile Grass Rats, a Diurnal Rodent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Randy J.

    Dim Light at Night Increases Immune Function in Nile Grass Rats, a Diurnal Rodent Laura K. Fonken lighting during the 20th century, human and nonhuman animals became exposed to high levels of light significant implications for certain ecological niches because of the important influence light exerts

  1. Running Title: Intraspinal stimulation caudal to spinal cord transections in rats.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prochazka, Arthur

    coordination and weight-bearing sufficient for locomotion. These results support the main assumption, including the restoration of hindlimb weight-bearing and coordinated locomotion (Cheng et al. 1996; Coumans spinalized rats do not recover weight-bearing locomotion spontaneously (Basso et al. 1996), though they may

  2. Effect of pulse polarity and energy on ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage in adult rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Effect of pulse polarity and energy on ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage in adult rats Leon A the role of inertial cavitation in ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage by examining the effect of pulse polarity at a common in situ at the lung surface peak rarefactional pressure pr(in situ) and at a common

  3. A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

  4. The Encapsulation of Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells Within Porous Scaffold 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iacob, Alexandra

    2009-09-30

    Growing rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC) in vitro has posed numerous difficulties in the past. Smooth muscle cells are known to need a three-dimensional (3-D) structure, neighboring cells, space to allow for elongation and media to encourage...

  5. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of tetrahydrofuran in mice and rats: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-08-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF), a four-carbon cyclic ether, is widely used as an industrial solvent. Although it has been used in large quantities for many years, few long-term toxicology studies, and no reproductive or developmental studies, have been conducted on THF. This study addresses the potential for THF to cause developmental toxicity in rodents by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 600, 1800, or 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors, 6 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.33 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6--17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as O dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 27 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs.

  6. Increased severity of acute Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection in rats with alloxan-induced diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Maiduguri, Nigeria b Department of Biochemistry, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, P.M.B. 1069, Maiduguri, Nigeria (Received 6 January 1998; accepted 20 July 1998) Abstract-Twenty rats were [191. Recently, low dietary energy nutrition in animals was reported to increase the severity

  7. Effects of chronic cadmium exposure on the conditioned reinforcing properties of morphine and fentanyl in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Dennis K

    1997-01-01

    as determined on a pre-test. In Experiment 1. control and cadmium-exposed rats received 0, 0.6, 1.25, 2.5. or 5 mg/kg morphine sulfate (ip) for 4 days, and vehicle only for 4 days. Control animals showed a preference for the drug-paired side at 1.25, 2.5. and 5...

  8. Zoology 109 (2006) 5465 Differential segmental growth of the vertebral column of the rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Philip J.

    2006-01-01

    ZOOLOGY Zoology 109 (2006) 54­65 Differential segmental growth of the vertebral column of the rat (Rattus norvegicus) Philip J. BergmannÃ, Amanda D. Melin, Anthony P. Russell Vertebrate Morphology the development of these organisms. We investigate the segmental and regional growth of the entire vertebral

  9. 5-Hydroxy-L-tryptophan suppresses food intake in food-deprived and stressed rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtman, Richard

    Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA c Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA Received 22 January 2003 deprivation and a standardized stress (tail pinch), and on plasma 5-HTP levels in humans. In rats, 5-HTP (3

  10. Measurement of Cerebral Glucose Metabolic Rates in the Anesthetized Rat by Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Carolyn Beebe

    - thetized rats with the ATLAS (Advanced Technology Laboratory Animal Scanner) small animal PET scanner and biochemical processes, and it does so with minimal invasiveness. The spatial resolution of typical PETF-FDG, the ATLAS Small Animal PET Scanner, and Arterial Blood Sampling Kazuaki Shimoji, MD1; Laura

  11. Plasma kinetics, tissue distribution, and cerebrocortical sources of reverse triiodothyronine in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obregon, M.J.; Larsen, P.R.; Silva, J.E.

    1985-06-01

    Studies in vitro have shown that rT3 is a potent and competitive inhibitor of T4 5'-deiodination (5'D). Recent studies in vivo have shown that cerebrocortical (Cx) T4 5'D-type II (5'D-II) activity (propylthiouracil (PTU) insensitive pathway), is reduced by T4 and rT3, the latter being more potent than T3 in Cx 5'D-II suppression. Some other reports had described rT3 production in rat brain as a very active pathway of thyroid hormone metabolism. To examine the possibility that rT3 plays a physiological role in regulating Cx 5'D-II, we have explored rT3 plasma kinetics, plasma to tissue exchange, and uptake by tissues in the rat, as well as the metabolic routes of degradation and the sources of rT3 in cerebral cortex (Cx). Plasma and tissue levels were assessed with tracer (/sup 125/I)rT3. Two main compartments were defined by plasma disappearance curves in euthyroid rats (K/sub 1/ = -6.2 h-1 and K/sub 2/ = -0.75 h-1). In Cx of euthyroid rats, (/sup 125/I)rT3 peaked 10 min after iv injection, tissue to plasma ratio being 0.016 +/- 0.004 (SE). In thyroidectomized rats, plasma and tissue (/sup 125/I)rT3 concentrations were higher than in euthyroid rats, except for the Cx that did not change. PTU caused further increases in all the tissues studied, except for the Cx and the pituitaries of thyroidectomized rats. From the effect of blocking 5'D-I with PTU or reducing its activity by making the animals hypothyroid, we concluded that 5'D-I accounts for most of the rT3 clearance from plasma. In contrast, in Cx and pituitary the levels of rT3 seem largely affected by 5'D-II activity. Since the latter results suggest that plasma rT3 does not play a major role in determining rT3 levels in these tissues, we explored the sources of rT3 in Cx using (/sup 125/I)T4. The (/sup 125/I)rT3 (T4) to (/sup 125/I)T4 ratio remained constant at 0.03 from 1 up to 5 h after injection of (/sup 125/I)T4.

  12. The role of constrictor prostanoids in the development of aortic coarctation-induced hypertension in male and female rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltzer, Wendy Irene

    2005-02-17

    function and arterial blood pressure (MAP) during development of aortic coarctation-induced hypertension (HT). M and F rats, (15-18 wks.) in four groups: normotensive (NT), hypertensive (HT), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX estrogen-replaced (OE), underwent...

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced reduction of glomerular filtration rate in rats with fulminant hepatic failure.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    filtration rate using FITC-inulin. Am J Physiol 1999;276:rate by single-bolus inulin: a comparison of estimationanalogues on glomerular inulin space of isolated rats renal

  14. Investigating the modulation of neonatal rat facial motoneurone excitability by monoamine neurotransmitters: Postsynaptic mechanisms and presynaptic modulation of glutamate release. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Emma M

    2007-01-01

    The activity patterns of 5-HT-releasing neurons can be positively correlated with behavioural state and motor function and the central 5-HT system modulates motor activity at the cellular level. The rat facial motor ...

  15. Characterization and Mapping of the Gene Conferring Resistance to Rift Valley Fever Virus Hepatic Disease in WF.LEW Rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callicott, Ralph J.

    2010-01-14

    Rift Valley Fever Virus is a plebovirus that causes epidemics and epizootics in sub-Saharan African countries but has expanded to Egypt and the Arabian Peninsula. The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is susceptible to ...

  16. Rats in Virtual Space: The development and implementation of a multimodal virtual reality system for small animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aharoni, Daniel Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    recent years. A light weight Styrofoam sphere is placed in aa 24 inch diameter hollow Styrofoam sphere, Figure 2.2: Flowtreadmill for rats. The Styrofoam sphere is constructed from

  17. Prospective grading of neoplastic change in rat esophagus epithelium using angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wax, Adam

    Angle-resolved low-coherence interferometry (a/LCI) is used to obtain quantitative, depth-resolved nuclear morphology measurements. We compare the average diameter and texture of cell nuclei in rat esophagus epithelial ...

  18. A Novel Method for the Evaluation of Mechanical Properties of Cancellous Bone in the Rat Distal Femur 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Matthew W.

    2010-01-14

    The mechanical properties of the cancellous bone in the laboratory rat animal model are of great interest to the research community for the evaluation of treatments for osteoporosis. Cancellous bone responds rapidly and ...

  19. Periadolescent oral manganese exposure affects conditioned place preference by cocaine and conditioned place aversion by lithium chloride in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Samuel Ming Hin

    2013-02-22

    Manganese neurotoxicity compromises basal ganglia functions that could affect the limbic system and drug sensitivity. Male rats were orally exposed to manganese chloride (0, 100, 200 mg/kg/day Mn) for 15 days starting at postnatal day (PND) 28...

  20. Redescription of the enigmatic long-tailed rat Sigmodontomys aphrastus (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) with comments on taxonomy and natural history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCain, Christy M.; Timm, Robert M.; Weksler, Marcelo

    2007-08-01

    Sigmodontomys aphrastus, the long-tailed rat, is an exceedingly rare rodent species from montane regions of Central and South America of which very little is known ecologically or systematically. It has been variously ...

  1. Single whole-body exposure to sarin vapor in rats: Long-term neuronal and behavioral deficits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grauer, Ettie [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness-Ziona (Israel)], E-mail: ettieg@iibr.gov.il; Chapman, Shira; Rabinovitz, Ishai; Raveh, Lily; Weissman, Ben-Avi; Kadar, Tamar; Allon, Nahum [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness-Ziona (Israel)

    2008-03-01

    Freely moving rats were exposed to sarin vapor (34.2 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g/l) for 10 min. Mortality at 24 h was 35% and toxic sings in the surviving rats ranged from sever (prolonged convulsions) through moderate to almost no overt signs. Some of the surviving rats developed delayed, intermittent convulsions. All rats were evaluated for long-term functional deficits in comparison to air-exposed control rats. Histological analysis revealed typical cell loss at 1 week post inhalation exposure. Neuronal inflammation was demonstrated by a 20-fold increase in prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) levels 24 h following exposure that markedly decreased 6 days later. An additional, delayed increase in PGE{sub 2} was detected at 1 month and continued to increase for up to 6 months post exposure. Glial activation following neural damage was demonstrated by an elevated level of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) seen in the brain 4 and 6 months after exposure. At the same time muscarinic receptors were unaffected. Six weeks, four and six months post exposure behavioral evaluations were performed. In the open field, sarin-exposed rats showed a significant increase in overall activity with no habituation over days. In a working memory paradigm in the water maze, these same rats showed impaired working and reference memory processes with no recovery. Our data suggest long lasting impairment of brain functions in surviving rats following a single sarin exposure. Animals that seem to fully recover from the exposure, and even animals that initially show no toxicity signs, developed some adverse neural changes with time.

  2. Effects of stress on serum triglycerides, nonsterified fatty acids, and total cholesterol levels in male rats after ethanol administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershock, D.; Vogel, W.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Serum triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and total cholesterol were determined during one hour immobilization stress in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after ethanol administration (2g/kg, i.p.). Stress and ethanol effects were evaluated in two experiments: (1) rats maintained on Purina Rodent Chow for six weeks and fasted for 24 hours; and (2) rats maintained on the same diet supplemented with 1% cholesterol and 10% peanut oil for six weeks and nonfasted prior to experimentation. Blood was obtained from indwelling jugular catheters. In each experiment, differences were seen in triglyceride and NEFA levels but not in total cholesterol. In the regular diet-fed rats (1), serum triglyceride levels were not affected by either stress or ethanol. However, NEFA levels did show differences in the response to ethanol and stress. A 63% decrease from baseline after 5{prime} of stress was partially abolished by ethanol; instead, a 24% increase was observed. Also, a stress-induced increase in NEFA which occurred after 15{prime} was not observed in the ethanol treated rats; rather, a decrease in NEFA was noted. Total cholesterol did not change in response to stress or ethanol. In the high cholesterol diet-fed rats (2), ethanol did not suppress a stress-induced increase in triglyceride levels. NEFA levels in ethanol-treated rats were higher during the first 15{prime} of stress as compared to stress alone. A decrease in NEFA was however seen in the ethanol-treated rats after 30{prime} of stress and these levels remained lower than the stress alone group. A diet-induced increase in total cholesterol levels was observed; however, no changes were seen due to either or ethanol. Thus, ethanol administration prior to acute immobilization stress did affect serum triglyceride and NEFA levels but did not change total cholesterol.

  3. CYP3A Mediated Ketamine Metabolism is Severely Impaired in Liver S9 Fractions from Aging Sprague Dawley Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Santamaria; Marie-Chantal Giroux; Pascal Vachon; Francis Beaudry

    2015-09-25

    Ketamine is widely used in veterinary medicine and in medicine. Ketamine is metabolized to its active metabolite norketamine principally by liver CYP3A. Drug metabolism alterations during aging have severe consequences particularly in anesthesiology and very few studies on older animals were conducted for ketamine. The objective of the present study is to assess the influence of aging on CYP3A metabolism of ketamine. Liver S9 fractions from 3, 6, 12 and 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were prepared and Michaelis-Menten parameters were determined for primary metabolic pathways. The derived maximum enzyme velocity (i.e. Vmax) suggests a rapid saturation of the CYP3A enzyme active sites in liver S9 fractions of 18-month old rats. Observed Vmax for Liver S9 fractions from 3, 6 and 12 month old male Sprague Dawley rats were 2.39 (+-0.23), 2.61 (+-0.18), and 2.07 (+-0.07) respectively compared to 0.68 (+-0.02) for Liver S9 fractions from 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats. Interestingly, we observed a 6 to 7 fold change in the derived Km when comparing Liver S9 fractions from 18 month old male Sprague Dawley rats with Liver S9 fractions from younger rats. Our results suggest that rat CYP3A enzyme undergoes conformational changes with age particularly in our geriatric group (e.g. 18 month rats) leading significant decrease in the rate of formation of norketamine. Moreover, our results strongly suggest a severe impairment of CYP3A ketamine mediated metabolism.

  4. Sex- and dose-dependency in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of (+)-methamphetamine and its metabolite (+)-amphetamine in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milesi-Halle, Alessandra [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham 611, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Hendrickson, Howard P. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham 611, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Laurenzana, Elizabeth M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham 611, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Gentry, W. Brooks [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham 611, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Owens, S. Michael [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham 611, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)]. E-mail: mowens@uams.edu

    2005-12-15

    These studies investigated how (+)-methamphetamine (METH) dose and rat sex affect the pharmacological response to METH in Sprague-Dawley rats. The first set of experiments determined the pharmacokinetics of METH and its pharmacologically active metabolite (+)-amphetamine (AMP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats after 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg METH doses. The results showed significant sex-dependent changes in METH pharmacokinetics, and females formed significantly lower amounts of AMP. While the area under the serum concentration-time curve in males increased proportionately with the METH dose, the females showed a disproportional increase. The sex differences in systemic clearance, renal clearance, volume of distribution, and percentage of unchanged METH eliminated in the urine suggested dose-dependent pharmacokinetics in female rats. The second set of studies sought to determine the behavioral implications of these pharmacokinetic differences by quantifying locomotor activity in male and female rats after saline, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg METH. The results showed sex- and dose-dependent differences in METH-induced locomotion, including profound differences in the temporal profile of effects at higher dose. These findings show that the pharmacokinetic and metabolic profile of METH (slower METH clearance and lower AMP metabolite formation) plays a significant role in the differential pharmacological response to METH in male and female rats.

  5. Final report for Texas A&M University Group Contribution to DE-FG02-09ER25949/DE-SC0002505: Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data (and ASCR-funded collaboration between Sandia National Labs, Texas A&M University and University of Utah)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas, Joseph Maurice

    2013-02-27

    We summarize the contributions of the Texas A\\&M University Group to the project (DE-FG02-09ER25949/DE-SC0002505: Topology for Statistical Modeling of Petascale Data - an ASCR-funded collaboration between Sandia National Labs, Texas A\\&M U, and U Utah) during 6/9/2011 -- 2/27/2013.

  6. Brown, E.H., Housen, B.A., and Schermer, E.R., 2007, Tectonic evolution of the San Juan Islands thrust system, Washington, in Stelling, P., and Tucker, D.S., eds., Floods, Faults, and Fire: Geological Field Trips in Washington State and Southwest British

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Housen, Bernie

    convergent margin tectonism. The area is underlain by the San Juan Islands­northwest Cascades thrust system, dispersal and final emplacement of terranes of the San Juan Islands­northwest Cascades thrust system evolution of the San Juan Islands thrust system, Washington E.H. Brown B.A. Housen E.R. Schermer Department

  7. Co-localization and regulation of basic fibroblast growth factor and arginine vasopressin in neuroendocrine cells of the rat and human brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    EGS: Designed human hypothalamus/ neurohypophysis studies,1b receptor mRNA in the hypothalamus and choroid plexus.ribonucleic acid in rat hypothalamus. Horm Metab Res 1995,

  8. Association of brominated proteins and changes in protein expression in the rat kidney with subcarcinogenic to carcinogenic doses of bromate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolisetty, Narendrababu [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Bull, Richard J. [MoBull Consulting, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Costyn, Leah J. [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Delker, Don A. [School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Guo, Zhongxian [Water Quality Office, Public Utilities Board, 608576 (Singapore); Cotruvo, Joseph A. [Joseph Cotruvo and Associates, LLC, Washington, DC 20016 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Cummings, Brian S., E-mail: bsc@rx.uga.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The water disinfection byproduct bromate (BrO{sub 3}{sup ?}) produces cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in rat kidneys. Our previous studies demonstrated that BrO{sub 3}{sup ?} caused sex-dependent differences in renal gene and protein expression in rats and the elimination of brominated organic carbon in their urine. The present study examined changes in renal cell apoptosis and protein expression in male and female F344 rats treated with BrO{sub 3}{sup ?} and associated these changes with accumulation of 3-bromotyrosine (3-BT)-modified proteins. Rats were treated with 0, 11.5, 46 and 308 mg/L BrO{sub 3}{sup ?} in drinking water for 28 days and renal sections were prepared and examined for apoptosis (TUNEL-staining), 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-oxoG), 3-BT, osteopontin, Kim-1, clusterin, and p-21 expression. TUNEL-staining in renal proximal tubules increased in a dose-related manner beginning at 11.5 mg BrO{sub 3}{sup ?}/L in female rats and 46 mg/L in males. Increased 8-oxoG staining was observed at doses as low as 46 mg/L. Osteopontin expression also increased in a dose-related manner after treatment with 46 mg/L, in males only. In contrast, Kim-1 expression increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes, although to a greater extent in females at the highest dose. Clusterin and p21 expression also increased in a dose-related manner in both sexes. The expression of 3-BT-modified proteins only increased in male rats, following a pattern previously reported for accumulation of ?-2{sub u}-globulin. Increases in apoptosis in renal proximal tubules of male and female rats at the lowest doses suggest a common mode of action for renal carcinogenesis for the two sexes that is independent of ?-2{sub u}-globulin nephropathy. - Highlights: • Bromate induced nephrotoxicity in both male and female rats by similar mechanisms. • Apoptosis was seen in both male and female rats at the lowest doses tested. • Bromate-induced apoptosis correlated to 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine formation. • Bromate increased the level of 3-bromotyrosine-modified proteins in male rats only. • These data identify possible novel mechanisms for bromate-induced nephrotoxicity.

  9. Productive Energy of Certain Feeds as Measured by Production of Fat and Flesh by Growing Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1943-01-01

    STATION A B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas BUIJTJETIN NO. ($32 OCTOBER 1943 PRODUCTIVE ENERGY OF CERTAIN FEEDS AS MEASURED BY PRODUCTION OF FAT AND FLESH BY GROWING RATS G. S. FRAPS Division of Chemistry AGRICULTZTRAL AND MECHANICAL... COLLEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] 'revious work with chickens shoxved that the energy values of feeds re very nearly in proportion to the digestible nutrients. Experiments *e made with a different kind...

  10. The gestation-dependent variation in aflatoxin B? activation by rat liver microsomes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Florence Elizabeth

    1989-01-01

    of Committee) John E. Martin (Member) J es E. Womack (Member) Gerald R. Bratton (Head of Department) ~ E~ 4o/oL John R. Gold (Chair of Genetics Faculty) May 1989 ABSTRACT The Gestation-Dependent Variation in Aflatoxin Bt Activation by Rat Liver... . . . . . . avg. . . . . . . . BSA . . . . . . . BP , . . . . . BCA . . . . . . . . cm . . . . . . . . Ci oC . . . . . . . DNA . . . . . . . . . DMSO . . . . . . . E R . . . . . G6P . . . . . . . G6PDH . . . . . . . . HBSS . . . . . . . . . hist...

  11. EXCITABILITY OF ENGINEERED MUSCLE CONSTRUCTS, DENERVATED AND STIMULATED-DENERVATED MUSCLES OF RATS, AND CONTROL SKELETAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, Robert G.

    , AND CONTROL SKELETAL MUSCLES IN NEONATAL, YOUNG, ADULT AND OLD MICE AND RATS. Robert G. Dennis, Douglas E. Dow for stimulated-denervated muscles or control muscles in young, adult, or old rodents. The R50 and C50 were: (1 of age), 0.45±0.03 & 0.86±0.03; young (1 to 5 months of age) and adult (8 to 14 months of age), 0

  12. Differential rates of loss of chromosome aberrations in rat thyroids after X rays or Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, D.; Gellard, P.A.; Hendry, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Rat thryoid glands were exposed in vivo to 5.5-Gy X rays or 2.75-Gy neutrons (14.7 MeV) and cell proliferation was stimulated by goitrogen treatment at various intervals up to 48 weeks postirradiation. The amount of chromosome damage in stimulated follicular cells declined much more slowly after neutron than X irradiation, suggesting differential repair. This observation may be relevant to the question of residual cellular damage and oncogenesis after X rays and neutrons.

  13. Oncogenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is being utilized as an empirical model for testing dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the skin DNA, including, strand breaks and thymine dimers, are being measured and compared to tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molcular lesions are being compared to split dose repair. Modifiers and radiosensitizers are being utilized to test specific aspects of a chromosome breakage theory of radiation oncogenesis.

  14. Tumorigenic action of beta, proton, alpha and electron radiation on the rat skin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Rat skin is utilized as a model system for studying dose and time related aspects of the oncogenic action of ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Molecular lesions in the DNA of the epidermis, including strand breaks and thymine dimers, are measured and compared to the temporal and dose related aspects of tumor induction. The induction and repair kinetics of molecular lesions are compared to split dose recovery as modified by sensitizers and type of radition of oncogenic damage.

  15. The effect of stress on the pulsatile pattern of luteinizing hormone in the ovariectomized rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farr, Kathryn Louise

    1982-01-01

    . Two consecutive 25 vl blood samples were col- lected through an indwelling juqular cannula every 5 minutes for a period of 4 hours for each treatment group. Control rats were undis- turbed during the sampling period, while the stress groups... underwent their respective stress during the final 2 hours of the 4 hour samp- ling period. Concentrations of whole blood LH were quantitated by a validated radioimmunoassay. Mean whole blood LH concentration, peak frequency and mean pulse height...

  16. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in Hydra attenuata and in rat whole embryo culture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Marion Carol

    1991-01-01

    TOXICITY OF CHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA . . 34 Materials and Methods Results Discussion 36 37 43 IV EXPERIMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN THE RAT, 46 Materials and Methods Results Discussion... and little is known about their potential for causing developmental defects. Because the PCDEs are closely related to the chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and the PCBs, it is of interest to review studies conducted to determine the developmental toxicity...

  17. Comparative effects of sodium channel blockers in short term rat whole embryo culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Mats F, E-mail: Mats.Nilsson@farmbio.uu.se [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala University (Sweden); Sköld, Anna-Carin; Ericson, Ann-Christin; Annas, Anita; Villar, Rodrigo Palma [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Cebers, Gvido [AstraZeneca R and D, iMed, 141 Portland Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hellmold, Heike; Gustafson, Anne-Lee [AstraZeneca R and D Södertälje (Sweden); Webster, William S [Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2013-10-15

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect on the rat embryonic heart of two experimental drugs (AZA and AZB) which are known to block the sodium channel Nav1.5, the hERG potassium channel and the L-type calcium channel. The sodium channel blockers bupivacaine, lidocaine, and the L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine were used as reference substances. The experimental model was the gestational day (GD) 13 rat embryo cultured in vitro. In this model the embryonic heart activity can be directly observed, recorded and analyzed using computer assisted image analysis as it responds to the addition of test drugs. The effect on the heart was studied for a range of concentrations and for a duration up to 3 h. The results showed that AZA and AZB caused a concentration-dependent bradycardia of the embryonic heart and at high concentrations heart block. These effects were reversible on washout. In terms of potency to cause bradycardia the compounds were ranked AZB > bupivacaine > AZA > lidocaine > nifedipine. Comparison with results from previous studies with more specific ion channel blockers suggests that the primary effect of AZA and AZB was sodium channel blockage. The study shows that the short-term rat whole embryo culture (WEC) is a suitable system to detect substances hazardous to the embryonic heart. - Highlights: • Study of the effect of sodium channel blocking drugs on embryonic heart function • We used a modified method rat whole embryo culture with image analysis. • The drugs tested caused a concentration dependent bradycardia and heart block. • The effect of drugs acting on multiple ion channels is difficult to predict. • This method may be used to detect cardiotoxicity in prenatal development.

  18. Regulation of Endothelial Phenotype in Rat Soleus Muscle Feed Arteries: Influence of Aging and Exercise Training 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Daniel Wayne

    2012-02-14

    diabetes, insulin-stimulated vasodilation is impaired as a result of an imbalance in NO and ET-1 production. We tested the hypothesis that chronic voluntary wheel running (RUN) prevents impair- ments in insulin-stimulated vasodilation associated... with obesity and type 2 diabetes independent of the effects of RUN on adiposity by random- izing Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of hyperphagia-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes, to 1) RUN, 2) caloric restriction (CR; diet adjusted...

  19. A study of the effect of restricted diets in the male albino rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Travis Barton

    1961-01-01

    26 Sections of the Testes Stained with Hematwylin and Eosin 30 CHAPTER l INT RODUCT ION During the past 30 years there has been rr, uch invssti~tion of the various effects of low caloric intake upon laboratory anirrals, This has come about... in decreased growth rats due to decreased food %take, it becomes necessary to differentiate between the various effects and thereby account for those due to caloric decrease. The problem is very coxrplex and cannot becozr. s completely solved until...

  20. Cortical Plasticity and Behavioral Recovery Following Focal Lesion to Primary Motor Cortex in Adult Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishibe, Mariko

    2012-05-31

    ………………………………..…………42 Fig 10 Anatomical substrate for cortical motor map competition: convergence of corticospinal projections of M1………………………………………………………………………….……..43 Fig 11 Single-pellet reach and retrieval task………………………………………….………….44 CHAPTER TWO Fig 1... in inhibiting the inaccurate placing response (Barth et al., 1990). The M1/S1 rough mirror-image connectivity particularly plays a crucial role in the movements presumably necessary for single-pellet reach and retrieval task. Rats first locate a singly...

  1. IDENTIFYING MECHANISMS OF INSULIN PRODUCTION AND SECRETION IN SMALL AND LARGE RAT ISLETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Han-Hung

    2011-12-31

    . The PP cell produces pancreatic polypeptide, a regulator of pancreatic secreting activities including exocrine and endocrine. The epsilon cell produces ghrelin, which is thought to be important in growth hormone release, metabolic regulation and energy...M glucose) and during high simulation (20mM) glucose perifusion experiments (Lehmann et al., 2007). In addition, transplanting small rat islets into type 1 diabetic animal model surprisingly led to better blood glucose control 60 days after...

  2. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Deborah K.; Pellicore, Linda S.

    2012-06-15

    Background: Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Method: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Results and conclusion: Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine.

  3. Use of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) to determine the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, M.F.; Chadwick, R.W.; Cooke, N.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Hill, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The compound lindane (gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane) has been used to study the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing Fischer 344 rat. The distribution and metabolic fate of lindane at 2, 9, 16, and 23 d of age was investigated following subcutaneous administration of lindane at 20 mg/kg containing 0.5 microCi (U-/sup 14/C)lindane in peanut oil. Groups of 10 pups (5 male and 5 female) were sacrificed at 4-h intervals during the 24-h period following dosing. Adrenals, blood, brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidneys were analyzed for radioactivity. Urine samples were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites of lindane. There was a significant age-dependent increase in the metabolism of lindane in the rat. High levels of radioactivity in the lung and increased reductive dechlorination suggest that the lung may play a greater role in metabolism of lindane by young rats. Oxidative phase I reactions increased significantly, while anaerobic reductive dechlorination of lindane to 4-chlorophenylmercapturic acid decreased significantly with age. Phase II sulfate and glutathione conjugations decreased significantly and glucuronide conjugation increased significantly with age. Metabolism and excretion of lindane appear to parallel development of the hepatic enzymes involved in phase I and phase II reactions.

  4. Use of. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (lindane) to determine the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, M.F.; Chadwick, R.W.; Cooke, N.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Hill, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The compound lindane (..gamma..-hexachlorocyclohexane) has been used to study the ontogeny of metabolism in the developing Fischer 344 rat. The distribution and metabolic rate of lindane at 2, 9, 16, and 23 d of age was investigated following subcutaneous administration of lindane at 20 mg/kg containing 0.5 ..mu..Ci (U-/sup 14/C)lindane in peanut oil. Groups of 10 pups (5 male and 5 female) were sacrificed at 4-h intervals during the 24-h period following dosing. Adrenals, blood, brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidneys were analyzed for radioactivity. Urine samples were analyzed for radioactivity and metabolites of lindane. There was a significant age-dependent increase in the metabolism of lindane in the rat. High levels of radioactivity in the lung and increased reductive dechlorination suggest that the lung may play a greater role in metabolism of lindane by young rats. Oxidative phase I reactions increased significantly, while anaerobic, reductive dechlorination of lindane to 4-chlorophenylmercapturic acid decreased significantly and glucuronide conjugation increased significantly with age. Metabolism and excretion of lindane appear to parallel development of the hepatic enzymes involved in phase I and phase II reactions.

  5. Life-threatening interaction between the root extract of Pueraria lobata and methotrexate in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, H.-M.; Fang, S.-H.; Wen, K.-C.; Hsiu, S.-L.; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Hou, Y.-C.; Chi, Y.-C.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn . E-mail: pdlee@mail.cmu.edu.tw

    2005-12-15

    Isoflavone supplements are nowadays widely used as alternative for hormone replacement therapy. However, the safety remains unanswered. This study attempted to investigate the effect of Pueraria lobata root decoction (PLRD), an isoflavone-rich herb, on the pharmacokinetics of methotrexate (MTX), a bicarboxylate antimetabolite with narrow therapeutic window. Rats were orally and intravenously given methotrexate alone and coadministered with PLRD. Blood samples were withdrawn via cardiopuncture at specific time points after drug administration. Serum methotrexate concentrations were assayed by specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using noncompartment model of WINNONLIN for both oral and intravenous data of MTX. Our results showed that coadministration of 4.0 g/kg and 2.0 g/kg of PLRD significantly increased the AUC{sub 0-t} by 207.8% and 127.9%, prolonged the mean residence time (MRT) by 237.8 and 155.2%, respectively, finally resulted in surprisingly high mortalities of 57.1% and 14.3% in rats. When MTX was given intravenously, the coadministration of PLRD at 4.0 g/kg significantly increased the half-life by 53.9% and decreased the clearance by 47.9%. In conclusion, the coadministration of PLRD significantly decreased the elimination and resulted in markedly increased exposure of MTX in rats.

  6. Application of metabonomics on an experimental model of fibrosis and cirrhosis induced by thioacetamide in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantinou, Maria A.; Theocharis, Stamatios E.; Mikros, Emmanuel . E-mail: mikros@pharm.uoa.gr

    2007-01-01

    Metabonomics has already been used to discriminate different pathological states in biological fields. The metabolic profiles of chronic experimental fibrosis and cirrhosis induction in rats were investigated using {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy of liver extracts and serum combined with pattern recognition techniques. Rats were continuously administered with thioacetamide (TAA) in the drinking water (300 mg TAA/L), and sacrificed on 1st, 2nd, and 3rd month of treatment. {sup 1}H NMR spectra of aqueous and lipid liver extracts, together with serum were subjected to Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Liver portions were also subjected to histopathological examination and biochemical determination of malondialdehyde (MDA). Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis were progressively induced in TAA-treated rats, verified by the histopathological examination and the alterations of MDA levels. TAA administration revealed a number of changes in the {sup 1}H NMR spectra compared to control samples. The performance of PCA in liver extracts and serum, discriminated the control samples from the fibrotic and cirrhotic ones. Metabolic alterations revealed in NMR spectra during experimental liver fibrosis and cirrhosis induction, characterize the stage of fibrosis and could be illustrated by subsequent PCA of the spectra. Additionally, the PCA plots of the serum samples presented marked clustering during fibrosis progression and could be extended in clinical diagnosis for the management of cirrhotic patients.

  7. 12/14/14, 1:51 PMI Trained Rats to Trade, and Win, on Wall Street | VICE | United States Page 1 of 5http://www.vice.com/read/rattraders-0000519-v21n12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by machines--or, as was the case here, by rats. Like the work of many in this field, my research indicates became fat very fast); when they were wrong they received a minor electric shock. Soon some rats were

  8. Direct examination of cadmium bonding in rat tissues dosed with mine wastes and cadmium-containing solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diacomanolis, V.; Ng, J. C. [University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Coopers Plains, QLD, 4008 (Australia); Sadler, R. [School of Public Health, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Harris, H. H. [School of Chemistry and Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Nomura, M. [Photon Factory, Institute of Material Structure Science, Tsukuba (Japan); Noller, B. N. [University of Queensland, Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation, St Lucia 4072 QLD (Australia)

    2010-06-23

    Direct examination by XANES and EXAFS of metal bonding in tissue can be demonstrated by examining cadmium uptake and bonding in animal tissue maintained at cryogenic temperatures. XANES at the K-edge of cadmium were collected at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR), NW10A beam line at KEK-Tsukuba-Japan. Rats fed with 1g mine waste containing 8-400 mg/kg cadmium per 200g body weight (b.w.) or dosed by oral gavage with either cadmium chloride solution alone (at 6 mg/kg b.w.) or in combination with other salts (As, Cu or Zn), 5 days/week for 6 weeks, had 0.1-7.5 and 8-86 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney, respectively. Rats given intraperitoneally (ip) or intravenously (iv) 1-4 times with 1 mg/kg b.w. cadmium solution had 30-120 mg/kg cadmium in the liver or kidney. Tissues from rats were kept and transferred at cryogenic temperature and XANES were recorded at 20 K. The spectra for rat liver samples suggested conjugation of cadmium with glutathione or association with the sulfide bond (Cd-S) of proteins and peptides. EXAFS of rat liver fed by Cd and Zn solutions showed that Cd was clearly bound to S ligands with an inter-atomic distance of 2.54 A ring for Cd-S that was similar to cadmium sulfide with an inter-atomic distance of 2.52 A ring for Cd-S. Liver or kidney of rats fed with mine wastes did not give an edge in the XANES spectra indicating little uptake of cadmium by the animals. Longer and higher dosing regimen may be required in order to observe the same Cd-S bond in the rat tissue from mine wastes, including confirmation by EXAFS.

  9. TRIGEMINAL UPTAKE AND CLEARANCE OF INHALED MANGANESECHLORIDE IN RATS AND MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J; Bench, G; Myers, O; Tinner, B; Staines, W; Barr, E; Divine, K K; Barrington, W; Karlsson, J

    2003-12-09

    Inhaled manganese (Mn) can enter the olfactory bulbs via the olfactory epithelium, and can then be further transported trans-synaptically to deeper brain structures. In addition to olfactory neurons, the nasal cavity is innervated by the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve that projects to the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Direct uptake and transport of inhaled metal particles in the trigeminal system has not been investigated previously. We studied the uptake, deposition, and clearance of soluble Mn in the trigeminal system following nose-only inhalation of environmentally relevant concentrations. Rats and mice were exposed for 10 days (6 hours/day, 5 days/week) to air or MnCl2 aerosols containing 2.3 {+-} 1.3mg Mn/m{sup 3} with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 3.1 {+-} 1.4 {micro}m for rats and 2.0 {+-} 0.09 mg Mn/m{sup 3} MnCl{sup 2} with MMAD of 1.98 {+-} 0.12 {micro}m for mice. Mn concentrations in the trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus were measured 2 hours (0 day), 7, 14, or 30 days post-exposure using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Manganese-exposed rats and mice showed statistically elevated levels of Mn in trigeminal ganglia 0, 7 and 14 days after the 10 day exposure period when compared to control animals. The Mn concentration gradually decreased over time with a clearance rate (t{sub 1/2}) of 7-8 days. Rats and mice were similar in both average accumulated Mn levels in trigeminal ganglia and in rates of clearance. We also found a small but significant elevation of Mn in the spinal trigeminal nucleus of mice 7 days post-exposure and in rats 0 and 7 days post-exposure. Our data demonstrate that the trigeminal nerve can serve as a pathway for entry of inhaled Mn to the brain in rodents following nose-only exposure and raise the question of whether entry of toxicants via this pathway may contribute to development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Radiation-Induced Liver Fibrosis Is Mitigated by Gene Therapy Inhibiting Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Signaling in the Rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du Shisuo; Qiang Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zeng Zhaochong, E-mail: zeng.zhaochong@zs-hospital.sh.c [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou Jian [Liver Cancer Institute, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Tan Yunshan [Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhang Zhengyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zeng Haiying [Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Liu Zhongshan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: We determined whether anti-transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) intervention could halt the progression of established radiation-induced liver fibrosis (RILF). Methods and Materials: A replication-defective adenoviral vector expressing the extracellular portion of human T{beta}RII and the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G fusion protein (AdT{beta}RIIFc) was produced. The entire rat liver was exposed to 30 Gy irradiation to generate a RILF model (RILFM). Then, RILFM animals were treated with AdT{beta}RIIFc (1 x 10{sup 11} plaque-forming units [PFU] of T{beta}RII), control virus (1 x 10{sup 11} PFU of AdGFP), or saline. Delayed radiation liver injury was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Chronic oxidative stress damage, hepatic stellate cell activation, and hepatocyte regeneration were also analyzed. Results: In rats infected with AdT{beta}RIIFc, fibrosis was significantly improved compared with rats treated with AdGFP or saline, as assessed by histology, hydroxyproline content, and serum level of hyaluronic acid. Compared with AdGFP rats, AdT{beta}RIIFc-treated rats exhibited decreased oxidative stress damage and hepatic stellate cell activation and preserved liver function. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in the progression of liver fibrosis and suggest that anti-TGF-{beta} intervention is feasible and ameliorates established liver fibrosis. In addition, chronic oxidative stress may be involved in the progression of RILF.

  11. A new way to study teaching in animals: despite demonstrable benefits, rat dams do not teach their young what to eat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    A new way to study teaching in animals: despite demonstrable benefits, rat dams do not teach taught are large. Here, we determined, first, whether Rattus novegicus dams would modify their food by mothers would be effective, if it occurred. We examined food choices of rat dams trained to eat one of two

  12. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-yl-ureido)-cyclohexyloxy]-benzoic acid is neuroprotective in rat model of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    , and at 180 min after reperfusion. Neuroprotective effects of t-AUCB were evaluated in primary rat neuronal-AUCB may exert its neuroprotective effects by affecting multiple components of neurovascular unit including]-benzoic acid is neuroprotective in rat model of ischemic stroke Jafar Sadik B. Shaik,1 Muzamil Ahmad,3 Wenjin

  13. A STUDY OF FISCHER 344 RATS EXPOSED TO SILICA DUST FOR SIX MONTHS AT CONCENTRATIONS OF 0, 2, 10 OR 20 MG / M3.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUTZMAN,R.S.

    1984-02-01

    The major objective of this study was to relate the results of a series of functional tests to the compositional and structural alterations in the rat lung induced by subchronic exposure to silica dust. Fischer-344 rats were exposed for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 6 months to either 0, 2, 10, or 20 mg SiO{sub 2}/m{sup 3}. The general appearance of the exposed rats was not different from that of the controls. Interestingly, female rats exposed to silica dust, at all tested concentrations, gained more weight than the controls. The lung weight and the lung-to-body weight ratio was greater in the male rats exposed to the highest concentration of silica dust.

  14. Modeling of optical amplifier waveguide based on silicon nanostructures and rare earth ions doped silica matrix gain media by a finite-difference time-domain method: comparison of achievable gain with Er3+ or Nd3+ ions dopants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Julien; Dufour, Christian; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study of the gain achievement is performed in a waveguide optical amplifier whose active layer is constituted by a silica matrix containing silicon nanograins acting as sensitizer of either neodymium ions (Nd 3+) or erbium ions (Er 3+). Due to the large difference between population levels characteristic times (ms) and finite-difference time step (10 --17 s), the conventional auxiliary differential equation and finite-difference time-domain (ADE-FDTD) method is not appropriate to treat such systems. Consequently, a new two loops algorithm based on ADE-FDTD method is presented in order to model this waveguide optical amplifier. We investigate the steady states regime of both rare earth ions and silicon nanograins levels populations as well as the electromagnetic field for different pumping powers ranging from 1 to 10 4 mW.mm-2. Furthermore, the three dimensional distribution of achievable gain per unit length has been estimated in this pumping range. The Nd 3+ doped waveguide shows a higher gross...

  15. Final Report for U.S. DOE GRANT No. DEFG02-96ER41015 November 1, 2010 - April 30, 2013 entitled HIGH ENERGY ACCELERATOR AND COLLIDING BEAM USER GROUP at the UNIVERSITY of MARYLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, Nicholas; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Eno, Sarah C; Skuja, Andris; Baden, Andrew; Roberts, Douglas

    2013-07-26

    We have #12;finished the third year of a three year grant cycle with the U.S. Department of Energy for which we were given a #12;five month extension (U.S. D.O.E. Grant No. DEFG02-96ER41015). This document is the fi#12;nal report for this grant and covers the period from November 1, 2010 to April 30, 2013. The Maryland program is administered as a single task with Professor Nicholas Hadley as Principal Investigator. The Maryland experimental HEP group is focused on two major research areas. We are members of the CMS experiment at the LHC at CERN working on the physics of the Energy Frontier. We are also analyzing the data from the Babar experiment at SLAC while doing design work and R&D towards a Super B experiment as part of the Intensity Frontier. We have recently joined the LHCb experiment at CERN. We concluded our activities on the D#31; experiment at Fermilab in 2009.

  16. RatBot: anti-enumeration peer-to-peer botnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eidenbenz, Stephan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Songqing [GEORGE MASON UNIV.

    2010-01-01

    Botnets have emerged as one of the most severe cyber threats in recent years. To obtain high resilience against a single point of failure, the new generation of botnets have adopted the peer-to-peer (P2P) structure. One critical question regarding these P2P botnets is: how big are they indeed? To address this question, researchers have proposed both actively crawling and passively monitoring methods to enumerate existing P2P botnets. In this work, we go further to explore the potential strategies that botnets may have to obfuscate their true sizes. Towards this end, this paper introduces RatBot, a P2P botnet that applies some statistical techniques to defeat existing P2P botnet enumeration methods. The key ideas of RatBot are two-fold: (1) there exist a fraction of bots that are indistinguishable from their fake identities, which are spoofing IP addresses they use to hide themselves; (2) we use a heavy-tailed distribution to generate the number of fake identities for each of these bots so that the sum of observed fake identities converges only slowly and thus has high variation. We use large-scale high-fidelity simulation to quantify the estimation errors under diverse settings, and the results show that a naive enumeration technique can overestimate the sizes of P2P botnets by one order of magnitude. We believe that our work reveals new challenges of accurately estimating the sizes of P2P botnets, and hope that it will raise the awareness of security practitioners with these challenges. We further suggest a few countermeasures that can potentially defeat RatBot's anti-enumeration scheme.

  17. Effect of intranasal manganese administration on neurotransmission and spatial learning in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blecharz-Klin, Kamilla; Piechal, Agnieszka; Joniec-Maciejak, Ilona; Pyrzanowska, Justyna; Widy-Tyszkiewicz, Ewa

    2012-11-15

    The effect of intranasal manganese chloride (MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O) exposure on spatial learning, memory and motor activity was estimated in Morris water maze task in adult rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats received for 2 weeks MnCl{sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O at two doses the following: 0.2 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.2) or 0.8 mg/kg b.w. (Mn0.8) per day. Control (Con) and manganese-exposed groups were observed for behavioral performance and learning in water maze. ANOVA for repeated measurements did not show any significant differences in acquisition in the water maze between the groups. However, the results of the probe trial on day 5, exhibited spatial memory deficits following manganese treatment. After completion of the behavioral experiment, the regional brain concentrations of neurotransmitters and their metabolites were determined via HPLC in selected brain regions, i.e. prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. ANOVA demonstrated significant differences in the content of monoamines and metabolites between the treatment groups compared to the controls. Negative correlations between platform crossings on the previous platform position in Southeast (SE) quadrant during the probe trial and neurotransmitter turnover suggest that impairment of spatial memory and cognitive performance after manganese (Mn) treatment is associated with modulation of the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in the brain. These findings show that intranasally applied Mn can impair spatial memory with significant changes in the tissue level and metabolism of monoamines in several brain regions. -- Highlights: ? Intranasal exposure to manganese in rats impairs spatial memory in the water maze. ? Regional changes in levels of neurotransmitters in the brain have been identified. ? Cognitive disorder correlates with modulation of 5-HT, NA and DA neurotransmission.

  18. Subacute effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on hepatic gene expression profiles in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canton, Rocio F. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: rfcanton@gmail.com; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H.; Ven, Leo T.M. van der [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Laboratory for Heath Protection Research, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heneweer, Marjoke [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2008-09-01

    Hexabromoyclododecane (HBCD), used as flame retardant (FR) mainly in textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacture, has been identified as a contaminant at levels comparable to other brominated FRs (BFRs). HBCD levels in biota are increasing slowly and seem to reflect the local market demand. The toxicological database of HBCD is too limited to perform at present a solid risk assessment, combining data from exposure and effect studies. In order to fill in some gaps, a 28-day HBCD repeated dose study (OECD407) was done in Wistar rats. In the present work liver tissues from these animals were used for gene expression profile analysis. Results show clear gender specificity with females having a higher number of regulated genes and therefore being more sensitive to HBCD than males. Several specific pathways were found to be affected by HBCD exposure, like PPAR-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism, triacylglycerol metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, and phase I and II pathways. These results were corroborated with quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid metabolism were especially down-regulated in females. Genes involved in phase I and II metabolism were up-regulated predominantly in males, which could explain the observed lower HBCD hepatic disposition in male rats in this 28-day study. These sex-specific differences in gene expression profiles could also underlie sex-specific differences in toxicity (e.g. decreased thyroid hormone or increased serum cholesterol levels). To our knowledge, this is the fist study that describes the changes in rat hepatic gene profiles caused by this commonly used flame retardant.

  19. Response of rat brain protein synthesis to ethanol and sodium barbital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, S.; Greenberg, S.A.; Do, K.; Grey, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) depressants such as ethanol and barbiturates under acute or chronic conditions can induce changes in rat brain protein synthesis. While these data demonstrate the individual effects of drugs on protein synthesis, the response of brain protein synthesis to alcohol-drug interactions is not known. The goal of the present study was to determine the individual and combined effects of ethanol and sodium barbital on brain protein synthesis and gain an understanding of the mechanisms by which these alterations in protein synthesis are produced. Specifically, the in vivo and in vitro effects of sodium barbital (one class of barbiturates which is not metabolized by the hepatic tissue) were examined on brain protein synthesis in rats made physically dependent upon ethanol. Using cell free brain polysomal systems isolated from Control, Ethanol and 24 h Ethanol Withdrawn rats, data show that sodium barbital, when intubated intragastrically, inhibited the time dependent incorporation of /sup 14/C) leucine into protein by all three groups of ribosomes. Under these conditions, the Ethanol Withdrawn group displayed the largest inhibition of the /sup 14/C) leucine incorporation into protein when compared to the Control and Ethanol groups. In addition, sodium barbital when added at various concentrations in vitro to the incubation medium inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C) leucine into protein by Control and Ethanol polysomes. The inhibitory effects were also obtained following preincubation of ribosomes in the presence of barbital but not cycloheximide. Data suggest that brain protein synthesis, specifically brain polysomes, through interaction with ethanol or barbital are involved in the functional development of tolerance. These interactions may occur through proteins or polypeptide chains or alterations in messenger RNA components associated with the ribosomal units.

  20. The effects of a marginal intake of magnesium with soy protein concentrate on growth, gestation, and lactation in the rat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Cynthia Anne

    1986-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19B6 Major Subject: Nutrrtion THE EFFECTS OF A MARGINAL INTAKE OF MAGNESIUM WITH SOY PROTEIN CONCENTRATE ON GROWTH, GESTATION, AND LACTATION IN THE RAT A Thesis by CYNTHIA ANNE MCLAUGHLIN Approved...

  1. The effect of a prolonged magnesium restriction on the humoral immune response in maternal rats and their offspring 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohill, Diane T

    1987-01-01

    TIIE EFFECT 0F A PR0L0NGED MAGNESIUM RESTRI CTI0N ON THE HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN HATERHAL RATS AHD THEIR OFFSPRING A Thesis by DIANE T. COHILL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in Partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SC IENCE May 1987 Major Subject: Nutrition THE EFFECT OF A PROLONGED MAGNESIUM RESTRICTION ON THE HUMORAL IMMUNE RESPONSE IN MATERNAL RATS AND THEIR OFFSPRING A Thesis by DIANE T. COHILL Approved as to sty le...

  2. Effect of dietary cysteine, methionine, and sterculic acid on fatty acid distribution in rat adipose tissue 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brotze, Mary Frances

    1968-01-01

    . Statistical Anal sis The data were treated according to the analysis of variance for data with a single criterion of classifica- tion(24). Each of the ratios for the triglyceride frac- tion were analyzed as: Source oi Variation De rees of Freedom Total... ACIDS IN ADIPOSE TISSUE OF THE RAT B. Free Fatty Acid Fraction Group No. Sterculia f~oa ao 1 Methionine level in diet Cysteine level in diet 16/16:1 18/18:1 18/18:2 18:1/18:2 III IV VI VII VIII 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 0. 2 low low high...

  3. Magnesium deficiency and type of protein during gestation and lactation in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, Kathryn Ellen Hughes

    1988-01-01

    those fed the CD diet, but only for one day (day 8). No physical changes were noted during week 1 of lactation. One dam from group CD exhibited bright pink ears and a slightly pink tail during week 2 of lactation, but these signs were not apparent... with deficient males produced smaller litters. Restricted diets during gestation and lactation in rats have also been shown to cause reduced serum and bone magnesium levels in dams and reduced viability and body weights of offspring (2). Ma nesium and Protein...

  4. Digestibility of Human Foods and Animal Feeds as Measured by Experiments with Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1945-01-01

    AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS GIBB GILCHRIST, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] As part of the comprehensive investigation of the energy values of animal feeds and human foods, digestion experiments were made with white rats. Results of 508 tests... This publication is part of a comprehensive investigation of the energy values of animal feeds and human foods. Previous work has shown that the 1 differences in energy values of food and feeds as measured by experiments with chickens are due to a large extent...

  5. Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Preston

    1967-01-01

    . The rats were exposed separately for a period of two minutes. The dose rate measurements were determined prior to this study by using lithium fluoride dosimeter s, and were brought up to date by calculation. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, one ml... carbonate 10 drops Magnesium sulfate 25 mgm Manganese sulfate 7. 5 mgm Iron phosphate 500 gm Sodium fluoride 1 mgm Potassium iodide 25 mcgm Potassium phosphate 1 mgm Potassium chloride 10 mgm 10 mgm Copper Sulfate 40 rngm Aluminum potassium s ul...

  6. Effects of acute chlorpyrifos exposure on in vivo acetylcholine accumulation in rat striatum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karanth, Subramanya [Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, 264 McElroy Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, 264 McElroy Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Mirajkar, Nikita [Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, 264 McElroy Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Pope, Carey [Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University, 264 McElroy Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)]. E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu

    2006-10-01

    This study examined the acute effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) on cholinesterase inhibition and acetylcholine levels in the striatum of freely moving rats using in vivo microdialysis. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg) or CPF (84, 156 or 279 mg/kg, sc) and functional signs of toxicity, body weight and motor activity recorded. Microdialysis was conducted at 1, 4 and 7 days after CPF exposure for measurement of acetylcholine levels in striatum. Rats were then sacrificed and the contralateral striatum and diaphragm were collected for biochemical measurements. Few overt signs of cholinergic toxicity were noted in any rats. Body weight gain was significantly affected in the high-dose (279 mg/kg) group only, while motor activity (nocturnal rearing) was significantly reduced in all CPF-treated groups at one day (84 mg/kg) or from 1-4 days (156 and 279 mg/kg) after dosing. Cholinesterase activities in both diaphragm and striatum were markedly inhibited (50-92%) in a time-dependent manner, but there were relatively minimal dose-related changes. In contrast, time- and dose-dependent changes in striatal acetylcholine levels were noted, with significantly higher levels noted in the high-dose group compared to other groups. Maximal increases in striatal acetylcholine levels were observed at 4-7 days after dosing (84 mg/kg, 7-9-fold; 156 mg/kg, 10-13-fold; 279 mg/kg, 35-57-fold). Substantially higher acetylcholine levels were noted when an exogenous cholinesterase inhibitor was included in the perfusion buffer, but CPF treatment-related differences were substantially lower in magnitude under those conditions. The results suggest that marked differences in acetylcholine accumulation can occur with dosages of CPF eliciting relatively similar degrees of cholinesterase inhibition. Furthermore, the minimal expression of classic signs of cholinergic toxicity in the presence of extensive brain acetylcholine accumulation suggests that some compensatory process(es) downstream from synaptic neurotransmitter accumulation limits the expression of toxicity following acute CPF exposure.

  7. Chronic cellular responses of rat skin to 13 Mev proton irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkle, Donald King

    1966-01-01

    irradiated in a total of six rad groups as follows: Number in Grou dD 10 6 9 6 7 8 ZOO 400 700 1300 2000 2500 All sections of skin and tumor tissues were submitted to the Anatomic Pathology Section, USAF School of Aerospace Medicine...CHRONIC CELLULAR RESPONSES OF RAT SKIN TO 13 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION A Thesis by DONALD KING HINKLE, D. V. M. Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AErM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  8. A rat retinal damage model predicts for potential clinical visual disturbances induced by Hsp90 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Dan, E-mail: DZhou@syntapharma.com [Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp., 45 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Liu, Yuan; Ye, Josephine; Ying, Weiwen; Ogawa, Luisa Shin; Inoue, Takayo; Tatsuta, Noriaki; Wada, Yumiko; Koya, Keizo [Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp., 45 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States); Huang, Qin [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, MA 02132 (United States); Bates, Richard C.; Sonderfan, Andrew J. [Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp., 45 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In human trials certain heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitors, including 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922, have caused visual disorders indicative of retinal dysfunction; others such as 17-AAG and ganetespib have not. To understand these safety profile differences we evaluated histopathological changes and exposure profiles of four Hsp90 inhibitors, with or without clinical reports of adverse ocular effects, using a rat retinal model. Retinal morphology, Hsp70 expression (a surrogate marker of Hsp90 inhibition), apoptotic induction and pharmacokinetic drug exposure analysis were examined in rats treated with the ansamycins 17-DMAG and 17-AAG, or with the second-generation compounds NVP-AUY922 and ganetespib. Both 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 induced strong yet restricted retinal Hsp70 up-regulation and promoted marked photoreceptor cell death 24 h after the final dose. In contrast, neither 17-AAG nor ganetespib elicited photoreceptor injury. When the relationship between drug distribution and photoreceptor degeneration was examined, 17-DMAG and NVP-AUY922 showed substantial retinal accumulation, with high retina/plasma (R/P) ratios and slow elimination rates, such that 51% of 17-DMAG and 65% of NVP-AUY922 present at 30 min post-injection were retained in the retina 6 h post-dose. For 17-AAG and ganetespib, retinal elimination was rapid (90% and 70% of drugs eliminated from the retina at 6 h, respectively) which correlated with lower R/P ratios. These findings indicate that prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 activity in the eye results in photoreceptor cell death. Moreover, the results suggest that the retina/plasma exposure ratio and retinal elimination rate profiles of Hsp90 inhibitors, irrespective of their chemical class, may predict for ocular toxicity potential. - Highlights: • In human trials some Hsp90 inhibitors cause visual disorders, others do not. • Prolonged inhibition of Hsp90 in the rat eye results in photoreceptor cell death. • Retina/plasma ratio and retinal elimination rate are linked to toxicity potential. • Rat retinotoxic responses to individual Hsp90 inhibitors reflect clinical profiles. • Rodent modeling may be used to assess ocular risks of targeted Hsp90 compounds.

  9. 2/6/08 3:54 PMPursuing Synthetic Life, Dazzled by Reality -New York Times Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/05/science/05angi.html?_r=1&sq=Nat...er%20microbes%20science&st=nyt&oref=slogin&scp=2&pagewanted=print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    ://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/05/science/05angi.html?_r=1&sq=Nat...er%20microbes%20science&st=nyt&oref=slogin&scp=2 scientists announced on Jan. 24 that they had reconstituted the complete set of genes for a microbe using with what cells already have done of their own accord, usually in the format of bacteria. Microbes have been

  10. High affinity peptide histidine isoleucine-preferring receptors in rat liver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, S.; Chou, J.; Kubota, E.

    1987-11-23

    Peptide Histidine Isoleucine (PHI) is generally considered a low affinity agonist for Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) receptors. In this study, the authors investigated the presence of characteristics of (/sup 125/I)-PHI binding sites on rat liver membranes. Detergents at nonsolubilizing concentrations were included in the assay buffer to reduce adsorptive loss of PHI to acceptable levels and permit measurement of PHI-binding to receptors. Under these conditions, binding of PHI to liver membranes was time- and temperature-dependent, reversible and saturable. Unlabeled PHI was 9.7-fold more potent than VIP, and 357-fold more potent than secretin in displacing (/sup 125/I)-PHI binding. Scatchard analysis suggested the presence of two classes of PHI receptors, with Kd 27 pM and 512 pM. The data from (/sup 125/I)-PHI and (/sup 125/I)-VIP binding studies suggested that one class of receptors was PHI-preferring, and the other, equally reactive with PHI and VIP. The concentration of immunoreactive PHI, measured by radioimmunoassay, in blood from the hepatic portal vein of anesthetized rats was 2-fold higher than that from the hepatic vein, suggesting uptake of circulating PHI by the liver. 25 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  11. Treatment with 8-OH-DPAT attenuates the weight loss associated with activity-based anorexia in female rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Elaine

    studies suggest a possible role for 5-HT in the etiology of anorexia nervosa. Recently, we have examined that promote activity-based anorexia (ABA). In this animal model of anorexia nervosa, rats are food restricted symptoms of anorexia nervosa including hypophagia, hyperactivity, progressive weight loss, and disruptions

  12. COMPARATIVE COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF AIRFLOWS AND VAPOR DOSIMETY IN THE RESPIRATORY TRACTS OF RAT, MONKEY, AND HUMAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Richard A.; Kabilan, Senthil; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Timchalk, Charles; Glenny, Robb W.; Pipavath, Sudhaker; Cox, Timothy C.; Wallis, Chris; Larson, Richard; Fanucchi, M.; Postlewait, Ed; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2012-07-01

    Coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models is useful for predicting site-specific dosimetry of airborne materials in the respiratory tract and elucidating the importance of species differences in anatomy, physiology, and breathing patterns. Historically, these models were limited to discrete regions of the respiratory system. CFD/PBPK models have now been developed for the rat, monkey, and human that encompass airways from the nose or mouth to the lung. A PBPK model previously developed to describe acrolein uptake in nasal tissues was adapted to the extended airway models as an example application. Model parameters for each anatomic region were obtained from the literature, measured directly, or estimated from published data. Airflow and site-specific acrolein uptake patterns were determined under steadystate inhalation conditions to provide direct comparisons with prior data and nasalonly simulations. Results confirmed that regional uptake was dependent upon airflow rates and acrolein concentrations with nasal extraction efficiencies predicted to be greatest in the rat, followed by the monkey, then the human. For human oral-breathing simulations, acrolein uptake rates in oropharyngeal and laryngeal tissues were comparable to nasal tissues following nasal breathing under the same exposure conditions. For both breathing modes, higher uptake rates were predicted for lower tracheo-bronchial tissues of humans than either the rat or monkey. These extended airway models provide a unique foundation for comparing dosimetry across a significantly more extensive range of conducting airways in the rat, monkey, and human than prior CFD models.

  13. Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlins, Scott A.; Bollinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2005-08-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca2+o). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca2+]o, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca2+o. Further, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G-protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca2+o-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca2+o. This is consistent with the known expression of TGFa by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR mediated response to increased Ca2+o in Rat-1 fibroblasts, and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

  14. The Effects of Nerve Growth Factor on Spatial Recent Memory in Aged Rats Persist after Discontinuation of Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frick, Karyn M.

    21205 Nerve growth factor (NGF) infusion significantly reduces spatial recent memory deficits in aged examined. Four- and 22-month-old rats were tested preoper- atively, infused intraventricularly with recombinant human NGF or vehicle, and tested both during the 4 week infusion period and during the 4 weeks

  15. Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning in Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Beacon Training in a Water Maze Can Facilitate and Compete With Subsequent Room Cue Learning experiments in which rats completed a water-maze blocking procedure, experimental groups were trained to use location. A Room Test (landmarks and background cues only) showed that Stage 1 training with a fixed

  16. Evidence That Androgen Acts Through NMDA Receptors to Affect Motoneurons in the Rat Spinal Nucleus of the Bulbocavernosus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breedlove, Marc

    . Twenty-five days later, bulbocavernosus muscles were injected with the retrograde tracer cholera toxin of the bulbocavernosus; neural plasticity; NMDA receptor; androgen; motoneurons; MK-801 The rat spinal nucleus and Breedlove, 1995). The NMDA receptor has been implicated in many instances of neural plasticity, including

  17. In vivo chlorine-35, sodium-23 and proton magnetic resonance imaging of the rat brain , M. Augath2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In vivo chlorine-35, sodium-23 and proton magnetic resonance imaging of the rat brain S. Kirsch1 of the cytoplasm and the volume of cells [1]. In order to investigate the feasibility of combined in vivo 35 Cl, 23 Na and 1 H MRI we developed a rf coil setup to measure 35 Cl, 23 Na and 1 H signals in one scanning

  18. Bromocriptine increased operant responding for high fat food but decreased chow intake in both obesity-prone and resistant rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Cho, J. Kim, R.; Michaelides, M.; Primeaux, S.; Bray, G.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine (DA) and DAD{sub 2} receptors (D2R) have been implicated in obesity and are thought to be involved in the rewarding properties of food. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are susceptible to diet induced obesity (DIO) while S5B/P (S5B) rats are resistant when given a high-fat diet. Here we hypothesized that the two strains would differ in high-fat food self-administration (FSA) and that the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differently affect their behavior. Ad-libitum fed OM and S5B/P rats were tested in a FSA operant chamber and were trained to lever press for high-fat food pellets under a fixed-ratio (FR1) and a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. After sixteen days of PR sessions, rats were treated with three different doses of BC (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg). No significant differences were found between the two strains in the number of active lever presses. BC treatment (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) increased the number of active lever presses (10 mg/kg having the strongest effect) whereas it decreased rat chow intake in the home cage with equivalent effects in both strains. These effects were not observed on the day of BC administration but on the day following its administration. Our results suggest that these two strains have similar motivation for procuring high fat food using this paradigm. BC increased operant responding for high-fat pellets but decreased chow intake in both strains, suggesting that D2R stimulation may have enhanced the motivational drive to procure the fatty food while correspondingly decreasing the intake of regular food. These findings suggest that susceptibility to dietary obesity (prior to the onset of obesity) may not affect operant motivation for a palatable high fat food and that differential susceptibility to obesity may be related to differential sensitivity to D2R stimulation.

  19. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, J.S.; Gross, E.A.; Joyner, D.R.; Godo, M.N.; Morgan, K.T. (Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  20. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China) [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)] [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China) [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ? Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ? This action did not involve the participation of GABA{sub A} receptors. ? A decrease in the Ca{sup 2+} influx through Ca{sub v}2.2 and Ca{sub v}2.1 channels was involved. ? A role for the MAPK/ERK/synapsin I pathway in the action of hispidulin was suggested. ? This study provided further understanding of the mode of hispidulin action in the brain.

  1. Characterization of the Femoral Neck Region’s Reponse to the Rat Hindlimb Unloading Model through Tomographic Scanning, Mechanical Testing and Estimated Strengths 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kupke, Joshua Scott

    2011-02-22

    quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), mechanical testing in two different loading conditions, and estimated strength indices. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (6-mo) were grouped into baseline (BL), ambulatory cage control (CC) and hindlimb unloaded (HU); HU...

  2. Lung tissue engineering : in vitro synthesis of lung tissue from neonatal and fetal rat lung cells cultured in a three-dimensional collagen matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Patty P., 1981-

    2004-01-01

    The focus of this study was to investigate the histology of tissue formed when fetal (16-20 days gestation) and neonatal (2 days old) rat lung cells were grown in a collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffold. This project employed ...

  3. Leptin acts centrally to induce the prepubertal secretion of luteinizing hormone in the female rat: a potential early role in the pubertal process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dearth, Robert Keith

    1999-01-01

    Recent data generated from adult male and female rats indicates that lepton is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion via a hypothalamic action. Consequently, we hypothesized that this peptide may similarly play a role...

  4. BurrowView Seeing the world through the eyes of rats Jo Agila Bitsch Link, Gregor Fabritius, Muhammad Hamad Alizai, Klaus Wehrle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , extreme terrestrial environments, such as the natural habitat of rats, present specific challenges: (1) The node size is greatly limited due to increasingly narrow pathways in burrows and to allow for natural

  5. Role of Pulse Repetition Frequency and Exposure Duration on the Superthreshold Behavior of Ultrasound-induced Lung Hemorrhage in Adult Mice and Rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    of Ultrasound-induced Lung Hemorrhage in Adult Mice and Rats William D. O'Brien Jr.,1 Leon A. Frizzell,1 David J behavior for ultrasound-in- duced lung hemorrhage was investigated in 150 mice and 150 rats at 2.8 MHz-induced lung hemorrhage and on the size of the lesions at superthreshold levels has been exam- ined to a very

  6. In Situ Casting and Imaging of the Rat Airway Tree for Accurate 3D Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacob, Rick E.; Colby, Sean M.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.

    2013-08-01

    The use of anatomically accurate, animal-specific airway geometries is important for understanding and modeling the physiology of the respiratory system. One approach for acquiring detailed airway architecture is to create a bronchial cast of the conducting airways. However, typical casting procedures either do not faithfully preserve the in vivo branching angles, or produce rigid casts that when removed for imaging are fragile and thus easily damaged. We address these problems by creating an in situ bronchial cast of the conducting airways in rats that can be subsequently imaged in situ using 3D micro-CT imaging. We also demonstrate that deformations in airway branch angles resulting from the casting procedure are small, and that these angle deformations can be reversed through an interactive adjustment of the segmented cast geometry. Animal work was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  7. Laser speckle-imaging of blood microcirculation in the brain cortex of laboratory rats in stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilensky, M A; Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, Oxana V; Timoshina, P A; Kuznetsova, Jana V; Semyachkin-Glushkovskii, I A; Agafonov, Dmitry N; Tuchin, Valerii V

    2012-06-30

    The results of experimental approbation of the method of laser full-field speckle-imaging for monitoring the changes in blood microcirculation state of the brain cortex of laboratory rats under the conditions of developing stroke and administration of vasodilating and vasoconstrictive agents are presented. The studies aimed at the choice of the optimal conditions of speckle-image formation and recording were performed and the software implementing an adaptive algorithm for processing the data of measurements was created. The transfer of laser radiation to the probed region of the biotissue was implemented by means of a silica-polymer optical fibre. The problems and prospects of speckle-imaging of cerebral microcirculation of blood in laboratory and clinical conditions are discussed.

  8. Distribution of phospholipase C isozymes in various rat tissues and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, P.G.; Ryu, S.H.; Choi, W.C.; Lee, K.Y.; Rhee, S.G.

    1987-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies prepared against PLC-I or PLC-II enzyme did not cross-react with the other. Using a pair of antibodies which recognizes 2 different antigenic sites on the same molecule, radioimmunoassays were developed for the quantitation of PLC-I and PLC-II in homogenates of various tissues and cultured cells, prepared by homogenization in a 2 M KCl buffer. The contents of PLC enzymes were measured in 19 rat tissues, in human platelets and in 17 cultured cells. Results indicate that the concentration of PLC-I and PLC-II is very high in brain, PLC-I is localized mainly in brain and partly in seminal vesicles, PLC-II is found in most tissues and cells. PLC-I is highly localized even in brain: 5 different neuroblastoma did not contain PLC-I while 2 glioma and 1 astrocytoma contained significant amounts.

  9. DOE/ER/06035--7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l l e2Q)1382 THE

  10. DOE/ER/13897--9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l l e2Q)1382

  11. DOE/ER/13897-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l l e2Q)1382lviA,'{ ' - n

  12. Final Report for DOE Award ER25756

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesselman, Carl

    2014-11-17

    The SciDAC-funded Center for Enabling Distributed Petascale Science (CEDPS) was established to address technical challenges that arise due to the frequent geographic distribution of data producers (in particular, supercomputers and scientific instruments) and data consumers (people and computers) within the DOE laboratory system. Its goal is to produce technical innovations that meet DOE end-user needs for (a) rapid and dependable placement of large quantities of data within a distributed high-performance environment, and (b) the convenient construction of scalable science services that provide for the reliable and high-performance processing of computation and data analysis requests from many remote clients. The Center is also addressing (c) the important problem of troubleshooting these and other related ultra-high-performance distributed activities from the perspective of both performance and functionality

  13. ES/ER/TM-125 Estimating Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 4. LIFE HISTORY PARAMETERS FOR SELECTED ENDPOINT SPECIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 4.1 SHORT

  14. Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/64323

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valocchi, Albert J. University of Illinois, Dept of Civil & Environ Engr

    2013-06-05

    The DOE SciDAC program funded a team that developed PFLOTRAN, the next-generation (�peta-scale�) massively parallel, multiphase, multicomponent reactive flow and transport code. These codes are required to improve understanding and risk management of subsurface contaminant migration and geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The important fate and transport processes occurring in the subsurface span a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and involve nonlinear interactions among many different chemical constituents. Due to the complexity of this problem, modeling subsurface processes normally requires simplifying assumptions. However, tools of advanced scientific computing that have been used in other areas such as energy and materials research can also help address challenging problems in the environmental and geoscience fields. The overall project was led by Los Alamos National Laboratory and included Argonne, Oak Ridge and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories, in addition to the University of Illinois. This report summarizes the results of the research done at the University of Illinois, which focused on improvements to the underlying physical and computational modeling of certain transport and mixing processes.

  15. Our Enigmatic Sun E.R. Priest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priest, Eric

    flares occur? What is the effect of solar variations on the Earth's climate? How is the solar wind are accelerated in solar flares. Nevertheless, great progress on each of these questions has been made over Abstract. Many major puzzles in Solar Physics have not yet been answered and are of wide importance

  16. Ecuaciones Diferenciales Ordinarias 1er semestre 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    disuelta en agua. Se bombea agua pura en el tanque a raz´on de 5 litros por segundo, y la mezcla que s´olo queden 10 kg de sal en el agua? (10) Consideremos una cascada de dos tanques con vol que fluye hacia dentro del tanque 1 es agua pura. (a) Encontrar la cantidad x(t) de sal en el tanque 1

  17. for Pulsed Power & erElectronics|Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    generation, explosive generators, and electric space propulsion engines. Pulsed Power research at Texas Tech for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Texas Tech- netic generators have also been investigated. The area of pulsed power research involves storing

  18. GAS FLOW THROUGH POROUS BARRiERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    reached. The equilibrium constant for S03 = S02 + PSO isK PO PSO log K = 8,8557 - 54~5.5 ~ 1,21572 log T.one has a known inlet or PSO - 2KPso in + 4KPso PSO ln -

  19. Final Scientific Report for ER41087

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiller, John R.

    2013-08-23

    The primary focus of the work was the development of methods for the nonperturbative solution of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) in a form that yields wave functions for the eigenstates, from which hadronic properties can be computed. The principal approach was to use a light-front Hamiltonian formulation. In light-front coordinates, t+z/c plays the role of time, with t the ordinary time, z a space direction, and c the speed of light. This leads to a relativistic formulation that retains useful characteristics of nonrelativistic treatments. A bound state of many constituents can be represented by wave functions that define probabilities for each possible arrangement of internal momenta. These functions satisfy integral equations that can be approximated numerically to yield a matrix representation. The matrix problem can be solved by iterative methods. The approximate wave functions can then be used to compute properties of the bound state. Methods have been developed for model theories and gauge theories, including quantum electrodynamics and theories that are supersymmetric. The work has required the development of new numerical algorithms and computer codes for singular integral equations and eigenvalue problems. A key aspect of the work is the construction of practical procedures for nonperturbative regularization and renormalization. Two methods of regularization have been studied. One is the addition of heavy Pauli--Villars (PV) particles to the Lagrangian, with their metrics and couplings tuned to provide the necessary cancellations in the regularization. The other method of regularization is the addition of supersymmetric partners, to extend a theory to a supersymmetric form. The supersymmetric theories were solved by the supersymmetric discrete light-cone quantization (SDLCQ) method. The most significant accomplishments of the project were the SDLCQ calculation of direct evidence for a Maldacena duality conjecture, construction of a practical light-front quantization for QED in an arbitrary covariant gauge, and invention of the light-front coupled-cluster method, designed to eliminate the need for Fock-space truncations.

  20. Microsoft Word - westwater_er.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection ofOctober10 Years2,2004 North Slope of Alaska

  1. NASA is operating two Lockheed ER-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGEMissionStressMoveMuncrief Ames019NAPL CalculatorNASAis

  2. K DOE/ER/72018~9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducingJobs2015 Bonneville1June 26JunjianJustin

  3. CPEB1 modulates lipopolysaccharide-mediated iNOS induction in rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ki Chan; Hyun Joo, So; Shin, Chan Young

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 is increased by LPS stimulation in rat primary astrocytes. {yields} JNK regulates expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 in reactive astrocytes. {yields} Down-regulation of CPEB1 using siRNA inhibits oxidative stress and iNOS induction by LPS stimulation. {yields} CPEB1 may play an important role in regulating inflammatory responses in reactive astrocytes induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Upon CNS damage, astrocytes undergo a series of biological changes including increased proliferation, production of inflammatory mediators and morphological changes, in a response collectively called reactive gliosis. This process is an essential part of the brains response to injury, yet much is unknown about the molecular mechanism(s) that induce these changes. In this study, we investigated the role of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) in the regulation of inflammatory responses in a model of reactive gliosis, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. CPEB1 is an mRNA-binding protein recently shown to be expressed in astrocytes that may play a role in astrocytes migration. After LPS stimulation, the expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 was increased in rat primary astrocytes in a JNK-dependent process. siRNA-induced knockdown of CPEB1 expression inhibited the LPS-induced up-regulation of iNOS as well as NO and ROS production, a hallmark of immunological activation of astrocytes. The results from the study suggest that CPEB1 is actively involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in astrocytes, which might provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism after brain injury.

  4. Evaluation of the pharmacokinetics and cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin in rat receiving nilotinib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Zhi-yong; Wan, Li-li; Yang, Quan-jun; Han, Yong-long; Li, Yan; Yu, Qi; Guo, Cheng; Li, Xiao

    2013-10-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent chemotherapy drug with a narrow therapeutic window. Nilotinib, a small-molecule Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was reported to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transmembrane transporters. The present study aimed to investigate nilotinib's affection on the steady-state pharmacokinetics, disposition and cardiotoxicity of DOX. A total of 24 male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomized into four groups (6 in each) and received the following regimens: saline, intravenous DOX (5 mg/kg) alone, and DOX co-administrated with either 20 or 40 mg/kg nilotinib. Blood was withdrawn at 12 time points till 72 h after DOX injection and the concentrations of DOX and its metabolite doxorubicinol (DOXol) in serum and cardiac tissue were assayed by LC–MS–MS method. To determine the cardiotoxicity, the following parameters were investigated: creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, malondialdehyde, and superoxide dismutase. Histopathological examination of heart section was carried out to evaluate the extent of cardiotoxicity after treatments. The results showed that pretreatment of 40 mg/kg nilotinib increased the AUC{sub 0–t} and C{sub max} of DOX and DOXol. However, their accumulation in cardiac tissue was significantly decreased when compared with the group that received DOX alone. In addition, biochemical and histopathological results showed that 40 mg/kg nilotinib reduced the cardiotoxicity induced by DOX administration. In conclusion, co-administration of nilotinib increased serum exposure, but significantly decreased the accumulation of DOX in cardiac tissue. Consistent with in vitro profile, oral dose of 40 mg/kg nilotinib significantly decreased the cardiotoxicity of DOX in rat by enhancing P-gp activity in the heart.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse spherical SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles with core-shell structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Zhang, C.M. [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lin, J., E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2009-10-15

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles have been coated with rare earth oxide layers by a Pechini sol-gel process, leading to the formation of core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectra as well as lifetimes were used to characterize the resulting SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) samples. The obtained core-shell phosphors have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution (average size ca. 380 nm), smooth surface and non-agglomeration. The thickness of shells could be easily controlled by changing the number of deposition cycles (40 nm for two deposition cycles). Under the excitation of ultraviolet, the Ln{sup 3+} ion mainly shows its characteristic emissions in the core-shell particles from Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) shells. - Graphical abstract: The advantages of core-shell phosphors are the easy availability of homogeneous spherical morphology in different size, and its corresponding luminescence color can change from red, yellow to green.

  6. Long-term survival and maturation of spinally grafted human fetal and embryonic stem cellderived neural precursors in implantable tacrolimus pellet- immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-G93A model rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01

    after Tacrolimus releasable pellet implantation. Rats werein implantable tacrolimus pellet-immunosuppressed ALS SOD1-releasing Tacrolimus pellets……………………………. 12 3.2 Tolerability

  7. Transgenic rats overexpressing the human MrgX3 gene show cataracts and an abnormal skin phenotype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaisho, Yoshihiko . E-mail: Kaisho_Yoshihiko@takeda.co.jp; Watanabe, Takuya; Nakata, Mitsugu; Yano, Takashi; Yasuhara, Yoshitaka; Shimakawa, Kozo; Mori, Ikuo; Sakura, Yasufumi; Terao, Yasuko; Matsui, Hideki; Taketomi, Shigehisa

    2005-05-13

    The human MrgX3 gene, belonging to the mrgs/SNSRs (mass related genes/sensory neuron specific receptors) family, was overexpressed in transgenic rats using the actin promoter. Two animal lines showed cataracts with liquification/degeneration and swelling of the lens fiber cells. The transient epidermal desquamation was observed in line with higher gene expression. Histopathology of the transgenic rats showed acanthosis and focal parakeratosis. In the epidermis, there was an increase in cellular keratin 14, keratin 10, and loricrin, as well as PGP 9.5 in innervating nerve fibers. These phenotypes accompanied an increase in the number of proliferating cells. These results suggest that overexpression of the human MrgX3 gene causes a disturbance of the normal cell-differentiation process.

  8. The effects of exercise and dietary fat on calcium, magnesium, iron, and zinc on selected tissues in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Thuy Huong

    1989-01-01

    of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Nutrition THE EFFECTS OF EXERCISE AND DIETARY FAT ON CALCIUM, MAGNESIUM, IRON, AND ZINC ON SELECTED TISSUES IN RATS A Thesis by THUY HUONG NGUYEN Approved as to style... and content by: Karen S. ubena (Chair of Committee) L. yne Greene (Member) Barbara C. O' Brien (Member) Gary C. Smith (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT The Effects of Exercise and Dietary Fat on Calcium, Magnesium, Iron, and Zinc...

  9. Abstract The aim of this study was to characterize functionally the single-channel properties of rat hypotha-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    records) at 10 µM was 0.030±0.017 and 0.030±0.028 at 1 mM. Keywords Purinoceptor · Hypothalamus/receptors throughout the adult rat CNS includ- ing the hypothalamus in which P2X4 and P2X6 subunits are expressed that closely resemble native currents in dorsal root ganglion cells [21]. For the hypothalamus

  10. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Sunakawa, Hajime [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Functional Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Aniya, Yoko [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan)], E-mail: yaniya@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp

    2008-10-01

    Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore.

  11. Atrazine-induced reproductive tract alterations after transplacental and/or lactational exposure in male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, Jennifer L.; Enoch, Rolondo R.; Wolf, Douglas C.; Fenton, Suzanne E. . E-mail: fenton.suzanne@epa.gov

    2007-02-01

    Studies showed that early postnatal exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) delayed preputial separation (PPS) and increased incidence of prostate inflammation in adult Wistar rats. A cross-fostering paradigm was used in this study to determine if gestational exposure to ATR would also result in altered puberty and reproductive tissue effects in the male rat. Timed-pregnant Long-Evans (LE) rats were dosed by gavage on gestational days (GD) 15-19 with 100 mg ATR/kg body weight (BW) or 1% methylcellulose (controls, C). On postnatal day (PND)1, half litters were cross-fostered, creating 4 treatment groups; C-C, ATR-C, C-ATR, and ATR-ATR (transplacental-milk as source, respectively). On PND4, male offspring in the ATR-ATR group weighed significantly less than the C-C males. ATR-ATR male pups had significantly delayed preputial separation (PPS). BWs at PPS for C-ATR and ATR-ATR males were reduced by 6% and 9%, respectively, from that of C-C. On PND120, lateral prostate weights of males in the ATR-ATR group were significantly increased over C-C. Histological examination of lateral and ventral prostates identified an increased distribution of inflammation in the lateral prostates of C-ATR males. By PND220, lateral prostate weights were significantly increased for ATR-C and ATR-ATR, but there were no significant changes in inflammation in either the lateral or ventral prostate. These results suggest that in LE rats, gestational ATR exposure delays PPS when male offspring suckle an ATR dam, but leads to increased lateral prostate weight via transplacental exposure alone. Inflammation present at PND120 does not increase in severity with time.

  12. Changes in testicular fluid production and plasma hormones in the adult rat after testicular 60Co irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to irradiation by a medical y-ray machine (Cobalt 60 source ; skin source distance : 70 cm). The gonads were subjected to a total dose of 0.8 Gy in one dose over a period of nearly 1 min. When the rats were irradiated irradiation P. LAPORTE Marie-Claude VIGUIER-MARTINEZ D. ZONGO O. LE FLOCH F. LIPINSKI (1) Station de Physio

  13. In vivo treatment with diphenyl ditelluride induces neurodegeneration in striatum of young rats: Implications of MAPK and Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heimfarth, Luana; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Andrade, Cláudia; Pettenuzzo, Letícia; Guma, Fátima T. Costa Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto Saraiva [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)] [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Batista Teixeira da Rocha, João [Departamento de Química, Centro de Ciências Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS Brazil (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)] [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    In the present report 15 day-old Wistar rats were injected with 0.3 ?mol of diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe){sub 2}/kg body weight and parameters of neurodegeneration were analyzed in slices from striatum 6 days afterwards. We found hyperphosphorylation of intermediate filament (IF) proteins from astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein—GFAP and vimentin) and from neuron (low-, medium- and high molecular weight neurofilament subunits: NF-L, NF-M and NF-H, respectively) and increased MAPK (Erk, JNK and p38MAPK) as well as PKA activities. The treatment induced reactive astrogliosis in the striatum, evidenced by increased GFAP and vimentin immunocontent as well as their mRNA overexpression. Also, (PhTe){sub 2} significantly increased the propidium iodide (PI) positive cells in NeuN positive population without altering PI incorporation into GFAP positive cells, indicating that in vivo exposure to (PhTe){sub 2} provoked neuronal damage. Immunohistochemistry showed a dramatic increase of GFAP staining characteristic of reactive astrogliosis. Moreover, increased caspase 3 in (PhTe){sub 2} treated striatal slices suggested apoptotic cell death. (PhTe){sub 2} exposure decreased Akt immunoreactivity, however phospho-GSK-3-? (Ser9) was unaltered, suggesting that this kinase is not directly implicated in the neurotoxicity of this compound. Therefore, the present results shed light into the mechanisms of (PhTe){sub 2}-induced neurodegeneration in rat striatum, evidencing a critical role for the MAPK and Akt signaling pathways and disruption of cytoskeletal homeostasis, which could be related with apoptotic neuronal death and astrogliosis. -- Highlights: ? Diphenyl ditelluride causes apoptotic neuronal death in the striatum of young rats. ? Diphenyl ditelluride causes reactive astrogliosis in the striatum of rats. ? Diphenyl ditelluride disrupts the homeostasis of the cytoskeleton of the striatum. ? The actions of diphenyl ditelluride are mediated by MAPK and Akt signaling pathways.

  14. Inter-strain heterogeneity in rat hepatic transcriptomic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Cindy Q.; Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Pang, Renee; P'ng, Christine; Chong, Lauren C.; Harding, Nicholas J. [Informatics and Biocomputing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada)] [Informatics and Biocomputing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland) [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio (Finland); Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, University of Helsinki (Finland); Okey, Allan B. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Boutros, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Boutros@oicr.on.ca [Informatics and Biocomputing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    The biochemical and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) have been the subject of intense study for decades. It is now clear that essentially all TCDD-induced toxicities are mediated by DNA–protein interactions involving the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR). Nevertheless, it remains unknown which AHR target genes cause TCDD toxicities. Several groups, including our own, have developed rodent model systems to probe these questions. mRNA expression profiling of these model systems has revealed significant inter-species heterogeneity in rodent hepatic responses to TCDD. It has remained unclear if this variability also exists within a species, amongst rodent strains. To resolve this question, we profiled the hepatic transcriptomic response to TCDD of diverse rat strains (L-E, H/W, F344 and Wistar rats) and two lines derived from L-E × H/W crosses, at consistent age, sex, and dosing (100 ?g/kg TCDD for 19 h). Using this uniquely consistent dataset, we show that the majority of TCDD-induced alterations in mRNA abundance are strain/line-specific: only 11 genes were affected by TCDD across all strains, including well-known dioxin-responsive genes such as Cyp1a1 and Nqo1. Our analysis identified two novel universally dioxin-responsive genes as well as 4 genes induced by TCDD in dioxin-sensitive rats only. These 6 genes are strong candidates to explain TCDD-related toxicities, so we validated them using 152 animals in time-course (0 to 384 h) and dose–response (0 to 3000 ?g/kg) experiments. This study reveals that different rat strains exhibit dramatic transcriptional heterogeneity in their hepatic responses to TCDD and that inter-strain comparisons can help identify candidate toxicity-related genes.

  15. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  16. Repeated exposure of the developing rat brain to magnetic resonance imaging did not affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Changlian [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Gao, Jianfeng [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Department of Physiology, Henan Traditional Medical University (China); Li, Qian; Huang, Zhiheng; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongfu [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatrics, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Zhengzhou University (China); Kuhn, Hans-Georg [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Blomgren, Klas, E-mail: klas.blomgren@neuro.gu.se [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden) [Center for Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, University of Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The effect of MRI on the developing brain is a matter of debate. {yields} Repeated exposure to MRI did not affect neurogenesis. {yields} Memory function was not affected by repeated MRI during development. {yields} Neither late gestation nor young postnatal brains were affected by MRI. {yields} Repeated MRI did not cause cell death in the neurogenic region of the hippocampus. -- Abstract: The effect of magnetic fields on the brain is a matter of debate. The objective of this study was to investigate whether repeated exposure to strong magnetic fields, such as during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), could elicit changes in the developing rat brain. Embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day 14 (P14) rats were exposed to MRI using a 7.05 T MR system. The animals were anesthetized and exposed for 35 min per day for 4 successive days. Control animals were anesthetized but no MRI was performed. Body temperature was maintained at 37 {sup o}C. BrdU was injected after each session (50 mg/kg). One month later, cell proliferation, neurogenesis and astrogenesis in the dentate gyrus were evaluated, revealing no effects of MRI, neither in the E15, nor in the P14 group. DNA damage in the dentate gyrus in the P14 group was evaluated on P18, 1 day after the last session, using TUNEL staining. There was no difference in the number of TUNEL-positive cells after MRI compared with controls, neither in mature neurons, nor in newborn progenitors (BrdU/TUNEL double-labeled cells). Novel object recognition was performed to assess memory function 1 month after MRI. There was no difference in the recognition index observed after MRI compared with the control rats, neither for the E15, nor for the P14 group. In conclusion, repeated exposure to MRI did not appear to affect neurogenesis, cell death or memory function in rats, neither in late gestation (E15-E18) nor in young postnatal (P14-P17) rats.

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report, USDOE Award DE-FG-02ER54684, Recipient: CompX, Project Title: Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.W. Harvey, CompX, Del Mar, CA 92014

    2009-11-12

    This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole radial plasma cross-section. The actual EBW experiment will cost several million dollars, and remains in the proposal stage. The HHFW current drive system has been experimentally implemented on NSTX, and successfully drives substantial current. The understanding of the experiment is to be accomplished in terms of general concepts of rf current drive, and also detailed modeling of the experiment which can discern the various competing processes which necessarily occur simultaneously in the experiment. An early discovery of the CompX codes, GENRAY and CQL3D, was that there could be significant interference between the neutral beam injection fast ions in the machine (injected for plasma heating) and the HHFW energy. Under many NSTX experimental conditions, power which could go to the fast ions would then be unavailable for current drive by the desired HHFW interaction with electrons. This result has been born out by experiments; the modeling helps in understanding difficulties with HHFW current drive, and has enabled adjustment of the experiment to avoid interaction with neutral beam injected fast ions thereby achieving stronger HHFW current drive. The detailed physics modeling of the various competing processes is almost always required in fusion energy plasma physics, to ensure a reasonably accurate and certain interpretation of the experiment, enabling the confident design of future, more advanced experiments and ultimately a commercial fusion reactor. More recent work entails detailed investigation of the interaction of the HHFW radiation for fast ions, accounting for the particularly large radius orbits in NSTX, and correlations between multiple HHFW-ion interactions. The spherical aspect of the NSTX experiment emphasized particular physics such as the large orbits which are present to some degree in all tokamaks, but gives clearer clues on the resulting physics phenomena since competing physics effects are reduced.

  18. In vivo determination of triglyceride (TG) secretion in rats fed different dietary saturated fats using (2- sup 3 H)-glycerol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, H.C.; Yang, H.; Lasekan, J.; Clayton, M.; Ney, D.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (154{plus minus}1 g) were fed diets containing 2% corn oil (CO) + 14% butterfat (BF), beef tallow (BT), olive oil (OO) or coconut oil (CN) vs a 16% CO control diet for 5 weeks. Changes in plasma TG specific activity (dpm/mg TG) were determined in individual unanesthetized rats after injection of 100 {mu}Ci (2-{sup 3}H)-glycerol via a carotid cannula. Fractional rate constants were obtained using a 2-compartment model and nonlinear regression analysis. Results demonstrated no difference in the fractional rate constants among dietary groups; but, differences in the rates of hepatic TG secretion were noted. Rats fed BT showed a higher rate of hepatic TG secretion than rats fed CO. Rats fed BF, OO or CN showed somewhat higher rates of hepatic TG secretion than CO. VLDL TG, phospholipid, and apolipoprotein B and E levels were higher with saturated fats vs CO. The data suggest that the higher plasma TG levels noted in response to feeding saturated fats vs corn oil can be explained, in part, by an increased flux of hepatic TG secretion.

  19. Ethanol-induced cell damage in cultured rat antral mucosa assessed by chromium-51 release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sewell, R.B.; Ling, T.S.; Yeomans, N.D.

    1986-08-01

    We have developed an in vitro method for studying ethanol-induced injury to gastric mucosa using organ culture of rat antrum. Cell damage was assessed by measurement of the release of (/sup 51/Cr)sodium chromate from preloaded cells, a method adapted from a standard immunologic technique. This system provided rapid and highly reproducible quantitation of tissue injury as assessed by /sup 51/Cr release into the culture medium. The threshold concentration for ethanol-induced damage was between 10 and 15% v/v, similar to in vivo thresholds observed by others. /sup 51/Cr release could also be induced by very short exposure to ethanol (5-15 min), and then continued despite ethanol removal. Interestingly, after continuous ethanol exposure, a plateau of maximum /sup 51/Cr release was reached 60 min after exposure to ethanol over the concentration range 20-50%, suggesting tissue adaptation to ethanol damage. This organ culture system, which allows precise control of experimental conditions, may be useful for studying mechanisms of gastric mucosal injury and protection.

  20. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  1. Influence of copper and iron on subacute cadmium intoxication in protein-malnourished rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.C.; Kachru, D.N.; Tandon, S.K.

    1986-10-01

    Male albino rats maintained on low-protein (9%) diets were dosed intraperitoneally with 0.75 mg Cd/kg, as cadmium chloride, for 20 days. Groups of these animals were provided with diets supplemented with 40 ppm Cu, 400 ppm Fe or a combination of both during the exposure period. Hepatic and renal distribution of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Fe along with activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases and ribonuclease and glutathione content were studied. Uptake of Cd both in liver and in kidney was significant and was accompanied by increased Zn and depletion of Fe concentration. The Cu level remained unaltered. Dietary supplementation of Cu or Fe interacted effectively and influenced the metal distribution. Acid and alkaline phosphatases in both liver and kidney were inhibited by Cd exposure. However, Cu and/or Fe supplements could to a varying degree offset the Cd-induced inhibition. Cadmium exposure did not, however, elicit any effect on hepatic and renal ribonuclease activity of low-protein-fed animals. The glutathione concentration registered profound increase on Cd exposure, possibly to act as a defense mechanism.

  2. Adipose tissue stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 index is increased and linoleic acid is decreased in obesity-prone rats fed a high-fat diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Alsiö, Johan; Västermark, Åke; Risérus, Ulf; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2013-01-08

    were 8 weeks old and weighed 352 ± 12 g (mean ± SD). The rats were housed one per cage, in standard macrolon cages (type IV), which had a wood chip bedding and a wooden house as enrichment. All rats had free access to water. Ambient temperature (21-22°C... storage and oxidation [20,21]. Certain FAs and their ratios can also be utilized as important risk markers for various diseases and desaturase indices have been closely linked to several obesity-related conditions [22-26]. Especially, SCD-16 and D6D have...

  3. ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    ft3 natural gas g. 4.490x1012 kWhe/yr x 1 0.14 x 1 2· 5.7 x 1 365 = 1.5x1010 m2 solar panels h.6106 1 x 1 106 = 2.3x107 M J/kg Natural gas = 3.9107 3 x 3 0.80 x 1 106 = 49 MJ/kg Oil = 6.1109 x-yr x 1 gal/30 mi = 4x10^8 gal gas saved/yr 2. 1x10^6 vehicles x 13000 mi/vehicle-yr x 1 kWh/5 mi = 2.6x

  4. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Wh for each city. [4 points] e. Next, compare your results above to the average residential electricity rates in each of these cities. i. In which cities is electricity from PV equal to or cheaper than retail rates to compare the costs of generating electricity using solar energy in different parts of the United States. a

  5. Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    above to the average residential electricity rates in each of these cities. In which cities is electricity from PV equal to or cheaper than retail rates? [2 points] GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY: Concerning Rate (¢/kWh) 16.5 19.2 10.30 12.3 PV electricity is more expensive than residential rates in Detroit

  6. ER100/PPC184/ER200/PPC284, Fall 2014 Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    points) e. How many kilograms of wood? (3 points) f. How many cubic feet of natural gas? (Note on the highway and 40% in the city, calculate average daily gas consumption in gallons per person, and yearly gas/1756211/Energy-and-Society-Fall-2014 2. ENERGY USE IN CHINA: In 2012, China's electric power sector generated 4

  7. Er-Mssbauer investigation of ErNiAl4 D.H. Ryan1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    to the highest CF levels, further INS measurements (with Einc 40 meV) will be undertaken at CNBC Chalk River

  8. EmpowEr your practicE mastEr of NursiNg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrajt, Graciela

    be completed in collaboration with your current workplace, encouraging application of the core concepts you are balancing jobs and families, core classes meet only once per week, on Fridays. Students can choose to earn ·Translational research ·Leadership ·Diversity and social justice ·Ethics, policy and civic engagement ·Health

  9. Effect of dietary magnesium and calcium on blood lipids and minerals in tissues in rats fed a high fat diet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conboy-Downs, Jean

    1991-01-01

    EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM ON BLOOD LIPIDS AND MINERALS ZN TISSUES IN BATS FED A HIGH FAT DIET A Thesis by JEAN CONBOY-DONNS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Nutrition EFFECT OF DIETARY MAGNESIUM AND CALCIUM ON BLOOD LIPZDS AND MZNERALS ZN TISSUES IN RATS FED A BIGS FAT DIET A Thesis by JEAN CONBOY-DOWNS Approved as to style...

  10. Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 6–7 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (89–90%) and CPF (78–83%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (88–91%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (35–50%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: • Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. • Functional signs were only noted with parathion. • Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. • 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. • The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

  11. Hippocampal proteomic and metabonomic abnormalities in neurotransmission, oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways in a chronic phencyclidine rat model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Want, Elizabeth J.; Guest, Paul C.; Rahmoune, Hassan; Holmes, Elaine; Bahn, Sabine

    2015-06-04

    Sprague–Dawley rats (Charles River, Margate, UK) were housed in groups of four under standard laboratory conditions with food (Harlan UK, Bicester, UK) and water available ad libitum. All experiments were conducted during the light cycle and were in full... homogenisation and cooling on dry ice. The mixtures were then centrifuged at 10,000g for 10min at 4oC. Supernatants (aqueous extracts) were collected and transferred to clean Eppendorf tubes. Aqueous extracts were dried in a vacuum concentrator (Savant...

  12. Effects of dietary fat and fiber on the oxidative status of the small intestine and colon of rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Lisa Merle

    2006-08-16

    stream_source_info etd-tamu-2005A-NUTR-Sanders.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 222131 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name etd-tamu-2005A-NUTR-Sanders.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1... and Fiber on the Oxidative Status of the Small Intestine and Colon of Rats. (May 2005) Lisa Merle Sanders, B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Joanne R. Lupton Colon cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers...

  13. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Modified Dominant Lethal Study of Sulfur Mustard in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-05-01

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard (HD) [bis{2-chloroethyl)-sulfide) ' a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Little, however, is known about the mutagenic activity of HD in mammalian species and data regarding the dominant lethal effects of HD are ambiguous. The purpose of this study was to determine the dominant lethal effect in male and female rats orally exposed to HD. The study was conducted in two phases; a female dominant lethal phase and a male dominant lethal phase. Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex were administered 0.08, 0.20, or 0.50 mg/kg HD in sesame oil 5 days/week for 10 weeks. For the female phase, treated or untreated males were mated with treated females and their fetuses were evaluated at approximately 14 days after copulation. For the male dominant lethal phase, treated males cohabited with untreated femal (during 5 days of each week for 10 weeks) and females were sacrificed for fetal evaluation 14 days after the midweek of cohabitation during each of the 10 weeks. The appearance and behavior of the rats were unremarkable throughout the experiment and there were no treatment-related deaths. Growth rates were reduced in both female and male rats treated with 0.50 mg/kg HD. Indicators of reproductive performance did not demonstrate significant female dominant lethal effects, although significant male dominant lethal effects were observed at 2 and 3 week post-exposure. These effects included increases of early fetal resorptions and preimplantation losses and decreases of total live embryo implants. These effects were most consistently observed at a dose of 0.50 mg/kg, but frequently occurred at the lower doses. Although no treatment-related effects on male reproductive organ weights or sperm motility were found, a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm was detected in males exposed to 0. 50 mg/kg HD. The timing of these effects is consistent with an effect during the postmeiotic stages of spermatogenesis, possibly involving the generally sensitive spermatids.

  14. Interdisciplinary neurotoxicity inhalation studies: Carbon disulfide and carbonyl sulfide research in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sills, Robert C. [Laboratory of Experimental Pathology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 Alexander Drive, South Campus, MD B3-08, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov; Harry, G. Jean [Laboratory of Neurobiology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 Alexander Drive, South Campus, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Valentine, William M. [Department of Pathology and Center in Molecular Toxicology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Morgan, Daniel L. [Laboratory of Molecular Toxicology, NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2005-09-01

    Inhalation studies were conducted on the hazardous air pollutants, carbon disulfide, which targets the central nervous system (spinal cord) and peripheral nervous system (distal portions of long myelinated axons), and carbonyl sulfide, which targets the central nervous system (brain). The objectives were to investigate the neurotoxicity of these compounds by a comprehensive evaluation of function, structure, and mechanisms of disease. Through interdisciplinary research, the major finding in the carbon disulfide inhalation studies was that carbon disulfide produced intra- and intermolecular protein cross-linking in vivo. The observation of dose-dependent covalent cross-linking in neurofilament proteins prior to the onset of lesions is consistent with this process contributing to the development of the neurofilamentous axonal swellings characteristic of carbon disulfide neurotoxicity. Of significance is that valine-lysine thiourea cross-linking on rat globin and lysine-lysine thiourea cross-linking on erythrocyte spectrin reflect cross-linking events occurring within the axon and could potentially serve as biomarkers of carbon disulfide exposure and effect. In the carbonyl sulfide studies, using magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), we determined that carbonyl sulfide targets the auditory pathway in the brain. MRM allowed the examination of 200 brain slices and made it possible to identify the most vulnerable sites of neurotoxicity, which would have been missed in our traditional neuropathology evaluations. Electrophysiological studies were focused on the auditory system and demonstrated decreases in auditory brain stem evoked responses. Similarly, mechanistic studies focused on evaluating cytochrome oxidase activity in the posterior colliculus and parietal cortex. A decrease in cytochrome oxidase activity was considered to be a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of carbonyl sulfide neurotoxicity.

  15. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF ? mediators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orona, N.S.; Tasat, D.R.

    2012-06-15

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 ?M). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3} 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO{sub 3}. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ?}). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNF? and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O{sub 2}{sup ?} may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O{sub 2}{sup ?} may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNF? route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium?related diseases. -- Highlights: ? Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ? At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ? At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNF?. ? Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

  16. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Patel, Kinal J., E-mail: kinalv5@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Shen, Jianliang, E-mail: jianliangs@gmail.com [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Reimer, David, E-mail: reimerd@las.rutgers.edu [Laboratory Animal Services, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Gow, Andrew J., E-mail: gow@rci.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  17. Initiation, promotion, initiation experiments with radon and cigarette smoke: Lung tumors in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moolgavkar, S.H.

    1990-02-01

    Much recent attention has focused on the recessive oncogenesis model according to which inactivation of both alleles of a tumor suppressor gene (anti-oncogene) leads to cancer. Over the past decade Dr. Moolgavkar has been involved in the development and testing of a two-mutation model for carcinogenesis, which may be viewed as a mathematical generalization of the recessive oncogenesis model. In a series of papers this model has been shown to be consistent with a large body of epidemiologic and experimental data. Thus, the current project funded under the auspices of DOE, is part of a much larger program. The goals of this larger program are: the mathematical development of the two-mutation model for application to various epidemiologic and experimental data sets; investigation of the statistical properties of the model and development of software for fitting the model to various data sets, including cohort and case-control data in epidemiology. Directly relevant to the radon program, we have completed an analysis of radon-induced lung tumors in rats within the context of the two-mutation model. We found that the model described the data well. The results indicate that fractionation of exposure increased the lifetime probability of tumor. Examination of the parameters of the model suggests that the effect of fractionation can be explained by the relative effects of radon daughters on the mutation rates and on the kinetics of growth of initiated cells. The first mutation rate is very strongly dependent upon the rate of exposure to radon daughters, the second mutation rate much less so, suggesting that the nature of the two mutational events is different.

  18. Covalent modification of hepatic microsomal lipids of rats by carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaphalia, B.S.; Ansari, G.A. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1989-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to isolate and identify various lipids bound to 14C label during hepatic microsomal metabolism of 14CCl4 in vitro under anaerobic conditions and in vivo in rats. The two major radioactive fractions identified by thin-layer chromatography each for neutral lipids and phospholipids from in vitro and in vivo experiments corresponded to fatty acids and triglycerides and to phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), respectively. Approximately 89% of the radioactivity associated with phospholipids was found in PC and PE fractions. Hydrolysis of PC and PE with phospholipase A2 released about 50% of the total radioactivity as lipid moieties corresponding to fatty acids. The radioactive neutral lipids and the lipid moieties hydrolyzed from PC and PE were methylated with boron trifluoride in methanol. These methylated lipids were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the elution profiles of 14C label found for the lipids obtained from in vitro experiments were similar to those from in vivo. The major radioactive fractions eluted immediately after methyl oleate were identified as trichloromethyloctadecenoic and trichloromethyleicosatrienoic acid methyl esters by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. The mass spectral analysis of these fractions also indicated the formation of dichlorocarbene adduct of oleic acid. However, similar mass spectrometric detection of trichloromethylated lipids was not evident in neutral lipids and phospholipids isolated from in vivo studies. The 14C-labeled lipids eluted as a nonpolar fraction exhibited a high molecular weight containing more than three chlorines. Dimerization and cross-linking of trichloromethylated lipids based on HPLC and mass spectral analysis are also discussed in this paper.

  19. Intervention of D-glucose ameliorates the toxicity of streptozotocin in accessory sex organs of rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikram, A.; Tripathi, D.N.; Ramarao, P. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, Punjab-160062 (India); Jena, G.B. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Sector-67, S.A.S. Nagar, Punjab-160062 (India)], E-mail: gbjena@gmail.com

    2008-01-01

    Streptozotocin (STZ) is a naturally occurring compound isolated from Streptomyces achromogens. It is used extensively for inducing diabetes in experimental animals. Diabetes mellitus is known to have proven adverse effects on male sexual organs and their reproductive functions. The atrophy of prostate gland and other organs of the genitourinary tract were observed in experimental diabetic animals. STZ exhibits a structural resemblance to D-glucose due to the presence of sugar moiety in its structure. Pancreatic {beta}-cells mainly contain GLUT1 and GLUT2 glucose transporters. Possibly due to structural resemblance, STZ and D-glucose, share a common recognition site for entry into the {beta}-cells. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effect of D-glucose on STZ-induced toxicity in accessory sex organs of male rats. Animals were kept on overnight fasting. One group received vehicle and served as negative control, while all other groups were given STZ (45 mg/kg). Animals that received only STZ served as positive control. The effect of D-glucose was studied on STZ treated animals with different dosage of D-glucose (250, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg). Restoration of body weight, plasma glucose and plasma insulin was evident only at 1000 and 2000 mg/kg of D-glucose. The protective effect of D-glucose is evident only when it is administered simultaneously with STZ. In the present investigation, we report that simultaneous administration of D-glucose along with STZ ameliorates STZ-induced toxicity. This is evident from the restoration of accessory sex organ's weight, cellular morphology as well as insulin level.

  20. Maternal exposure to cadmium during gestation perturbs the vascular system of the adult rat offspring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronco, Ana Maria, E-mail: amronco@inta.cl [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Montenegro, Marcela; Castillo, Paula; Urrutia, Manuel [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Saez, Daniel [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Hirsch, Sandra [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Zepeda, Ramiro [Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, Miguel N. [Laboratory of Nutrition and Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology (INTA), University of Chile, Casilla 138-11, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-03-01

    Several cardiovascular diseases (CVD) observed in adulthood have been associated with environmental influences during fetal growth. Here, we show that maternal exposure to cadmium, a ubiquitously distributed heavy metal and main component of cigarette smoke is able to induce cardiovascular morpho-functional changes in the offspring at adult age. Heart morphology and vascular reactivity were evaluated in the adult offspring of rats exposed to 30 ppm of cadmium during pregnancy. Echocardiographic examination shows altered heart morphology characterized by a concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Also, we observed a reduced endothelium-dependent reactivity in isolated aortic rings of adult offspring, while endothelium-independent reactivity remained unaltered. These effects were associated with an increase of hem-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the aortas of adult offspring. The expression of HO-1 was higher in females than males, a finding likely related to the sex-dependent expression of the vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), which was lower in the adult female. All these long-term consequences were observed along with normal birth weights and absence of detectable levels of cadmium in fetal and adult tissues of the offspring. In placental tissues however, cadmium levels were detected and correlated with increased NF-{kappa}B expression - a transcription factor sensitive to inflammation and oxidative stress - suggesting a placentary mechanism that affect genes related to the development of the cardiovascular system. Our results provide, for the first time, direct experimental evidence supporting that exposure to cadmium during pregnancy reprograms cardiovascular development of the offspring which in turn may conduce to a long term increased risk of CVD.

  1. Toxicokinetics of ?-thujone following intravenous and gavage administration of ?-thujone or ?- and ?-thujone mixture in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waidyanatha, Suramya, E-mail: waidyanathas@niehs.nih.gov [Division of National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Johnson, Jerry D.; Hong, S. Peter [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Robinson, Veronica Godfrey [Division of National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Gibbs, Seth; Graves, Steven W. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Hooth, Michelle J.; Smith, Cynthia S. [Division of National Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Plants containing thujone have widespread use and hence have significant human exposure. ?-Thujone caused seizures in rodents following gavage administration. We investigated the toxicokinetics of ?-thujone in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice following intravenous and gavage administration of ?-thujone or a mixture of ?- and ?-thujone (which will be referred to as ?,?-thujone). Absorption of ?-thujone following gavage administration was rapid without any dose-, species-, sex- or test article-related effect. Absolute bioavailability of ?-thujone following administration of ?-thujone or ?,?-thujone was generally higher in rats than in mice. In rats, females had higher bioavailability than males following administration of either test article although a sex difference was not observed in mice. C{sub max} and AUC{sub ?} increased greater than proportional to the dose in female rats following administration of ?-thujone and in male and female mice following administration of ?,?-thujone suggesting possible saturation of elimination kinetics with increasing dose. Dose-adjusted AUC{sub ?} for male and female rats was 5- to 15-fold and 3- to 24-fold higher than mice counterparts following administration of ?-thujone and ?,?-thujone, respectively (p-value < 0.0001 for all comparisons). Following both intravenous and gavage administration, ?-thujone was distributed to the brains of rats and mice with females, in general, having higher brain:plasma ratios than males. These data are in support of the observed toxicity of ?-thujone and ?,?-thujone where females were more sensitive than males of both species to ?-thujone-induced neurotoxicity. In general there was no difference in toxicokinetics between test articles when normalized to ?-thujone concentration. - Highlights: • Absorption of ?-thujone following gavage administration was rapid in rats and mice. • Rats undergo higher exposure to ?-thujone than mice. • ?-Thujone brain:plasma ratios were greater than 1 in both rats and mice. • Brain:plasma ratio in females was higher than in males. • These data are in support of the observed neurotoxicity of ?-thujone.

  2. Cell Detection in Knife-Edge Scanning Microscopy Images of Nissl-stained Mouse and Rat Brain Samples Using Random Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal Das, Shashwat

    2014-11-26

    of images, use heuristics that are time consuming to develop, or do not generalize well to three dimensional data. In this thesis, I propose two methods based on random forests for detecting neuron bodies in the rat and mouse brain KESM data. The proposed...

  3. Effect of HZE radiation and diets rich in fiber and n-3 poly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) on colon cancer in rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glagolenko, Anna Anatolievna

    2006-08-16

    weeks earlier and at the end of the study had morbidity/mortality rate 14.2% higher (P=0.0005) than non-irradiated rats. There was no significant effect of HZE radiation on colon cancer incidence. The effects of dietary fibers and oils on health state...

  4. Role of MMP2, MMP3 and MMP9 in the development of breast cancer brain and lung metastasis in a syngeneic rat model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendes, Odete Rodrigues

    2005-11-01

    In order to study the expression of MMP2, MMP 3 and MMP9 in breast cancer brain and lung metastasis, we used a syngeneic rat model of distant metastasis of ENU1564, a carcinogen-induced mammary adenocarcinoma cell line. ...

  5. Localized In Vivo 1H NMR Detection of Neurotransmitter Labeling in Rat Brain During Infusion of [1-13C] D-Glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localized In Vivo 1H NMR Detection of Neurotransmitter Labeling in Rat Brain During Infusion of [1 infusions of 13C-labeled glucose. Magn Reson Med 41:1077­1083, 1999. 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words] glucose infusion In vivo 13C NMR spectroscopy with localization is emerg- ing as an important tool

  6. Differential Effects of HIF-1 Inhibition by YC-1 on the Overall Outcome and Blood-Brain Barrier Damage in a Rat Model of Ischemic Stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Jingqi; Zhou, Bo; Taheri, Saeid; Shi, Honglian

    2011-11-16

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a master regulator of cellular adaptation to hypoxia and has been suggested as a potent therapeutic target in cerebral ischemia. Here we show in an ischemic stroke model of rats that inhibiting HIF-1 and its...

  7. The effect of treatment with BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, on sensory fibers of the rat following peripheral nerve injury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    The effect of treatment with BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, on sensory fibers the effect BRX-220, a co-inducer of heat shock proteins, in injury-induced peripheral neuropathy. Following sciatic nerve injury in adult rats and treatment with BRX-220, the following features of the sensory

  8. Strain-guided mineralization in the bone–PDL–cementum complex of a rat periodontium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grandfield, Kathryn; Herber, Ralf -Peter; Chen, Ling; Djomehri, Sabra; Tam, Caleb; Lee, Ji -Hyun; Brown, Evan; Woolwine III, Wood R.; Curtis, Don; Ryder, Mark; et al

    2015-04-18

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanical strain by mapping physicochemical properties at periodontal ligament (PDL)–bone and PDL–cementum attachment sites and within the tissues per se. Design: Accentuated mechanical strain was induced by applying a unidirectional force of 0.06 N for 14 days on molars in a rat model. The associated changes in functional space between the tooth and bone, mineral forming and resorbing events at the PDL–bone and PDL–cementum attachment sites were identified by using micro-X-ray computed tomography (micro-XCT), atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic histomorphometry, Raman microspectroscopy, and AFM-based nanoindentation technique. Results frommore »these analytical techniques were correlated with histochemical strains specific to low and high molecular weight GAGs, including biglycan, and osteoclast distribution through tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Results: Unique chemical and mechanical qualities including heterogeneous bony fingers with hygroscopic Sharpey's fibers contributing to a higher organic (amide III — 1240 cm?¹) to inorganic (phosphate — 960 cm?¹) ratio, with lower average elastic modulus of 8 GPa versus 12 GPa in unadapted regions were identified. Furthermore, an increased presence of elemental Zn in cement lines and mineralizing fronts of PDL–bone was observed. Adapted regions containing bony fingers exhibited woven bone-like architecture and these regions rich in biglycan (BGN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) also contained high-molecular weight polysaccharides predominantly at the site of polarized bone growth. Conclusions: From a fundamental science perspective the shift in local properties due to strain amplification at the soft–hard tissue attachment sites is governed by semiautonomous cellular events at the PDL–bone and PDL–cementum sites. Over time, these strain-mediated events can alter the physicochemical properties of tissues per se, and consequently the overall biomechanics of the bone–PDL–tooth complex. From a clinical perspective, the shifts in magnitude and duration of forces on the periodontal ligament can prompt a shift in physiologic mineral apposition in cementum and alveolar bone albeit of an adapted quality owing to the rapid mechanical translation of the tooth.« less

  9. Long-term effects on reproductive parameters in female rats after translactational exposure to PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sager, D.B.; Girard, D.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Green Bay, WI (United States))

    1994-07-01

    In an integrated series of experiments, we assessed effects of translactational exposure to Aroclor 1254 at three different ages: As young adults (2-4.5 months), as mature adults (5-8 months), and as older adults (8.5-13 months). Developing female rats were exposed postnatally to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) via oral treatment of the dams on Days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 of lactation at the following doses: 8 [mu]g/g (PCBI), 32 [mu]g/g (PCBII), and 64 [mu]g/g (PCBIII) in peanut oil. Puberty, both vaginal opening and first estrus, was delayed in PCBII and PCBIII offspring. PCB exposure at all doses had a pronounced and consistent effect on uterine response. In mature PCBII and PCBIII adults, uterine wet weights were reduced at all stages of the estrous cycle and in light-induced persistent vaginal estrus (PVE). PCBI offspring exhibited a decreased uterine weight in proestrus and in light-induced PVE. Analysis of estrous cycles for 40 days at all ages indicated increases in diestrus. Fertility in young adults and mature adults was affected, with PCBIII young adults exhibiting less success with preimplantation stages, and PCBII and PCBIII mature adults showing an effect at pre- and/or postimplantation stages. As determined by patterns in estrous cycling and rate of development of PVE in 64 days of constant light, exposure to PCBs did not hasten reproductive aging at any of the ages examined. Instead, PCBIII young adults and PCBII and PCBIII older adults exhibited a delay in onset of light-induced PVE. This study demonstrates that translactational exposure to a PCB mixture that has little notable effect on the dams, not only delays puberty in the female offspring, but also several months later results in decreased uterine response, impairment of fertility, and irregular cycle patterns. Reproductive aging, however, is not hastened, and even may be delayed. Many of these effects could be explained, in part, by interference with estrogen. 67 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Urine acidification has no effect on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling or epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression in rat urinary bladder urothelium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achanzar, William E. Moyer, Carolyn F.; Marthaler, Laura T.; Gullo, Russell; Chen, Shen-Jue; French, Michele H.; Watson, Linda M.; Rhodes, James W.; Kozlosky, John C.; White, Melvin R.; Foster, William R.; Burgun, James J.; Car, Bruce D.; Cosma, Gregory N.; Dominick, Mark A.

    2007-09-15

    We previously reported prevention of urolithiasis and associated rat urinary bladder tumors by urine acidification (via diet acidification) in male rats treated with the dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR){alpha}/{gamma} agonist muraglitazar. Because urine acidification could potentially alter PPAR signaling and/or cellular proliferation in urothelium, we evaluated urothelial cell PPAR{alpha}, PPAR{delta}, PPAR{gamma}, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression, PPAR signaling, and urothelial cell proliferation in rats fed either a normal or an acidified diet for 5, 18, or 33 days. A subset of rats in the 18-day study also received 63 mg/kg of the PPAR{gamma} agonist pioglitazone daily for the final 3 days to directly assess the effects of diet acidification on responsiveness to PPAR{gamma} agonism. Urothelial cell PPAR{alpha} and {gamma} expression and signaling were evaluated in the 18- and 33-day studies by immunohistochemical assessment of PPAR protein (33-day study only) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurement of PPAR-regulated gene expression. In the 5-day study, EGFR expression and phosphorylation status were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining and egfr and akt2 mRNA levels were assessed by qRT-PCR. Diet acidification did not alter PPAR{alpha}, {delta}, or {gamma} mRNA or protein expression, PPAR{alpha}- or {gamma}-regulated gene expression, total or phosphorylated EGFR protein, egfr or akt2 gene expression, or proliferation in urothelium. Moreover, diet acidification had no effect on pioglitazone-induced changes in urothelial PPAR{gamma}-regulated gene expression. These results support the contention that urine acidification does not prevent PPAR{gamma} agonist-induced bladder tumors by altering PPAR{alpha}, {gamma}, or EGFR expression or PPAR signaling in rat bladder urothelium.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of a Novel Ferrocyanide Functionalized Nanopourous Silica Decorporation Agent for Cesium in Rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timchalk, Charles; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Wiacek, Robert J.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2010-09-01

    Novel decorporation agents are being developed to protect against radiological terrorist attacks. These sorbents, known as the self-assembled monolayer on mesoporous supports (SAMMS™), are hybrid materials where differing organic moieties are grafted onto mesoporous silica (SiO2). In vitro experiments focused on the evaluation, and optimization of SAMMS for capturing radiocesium (137Cs); based on these studies, a ferrocyanide copper (FC-Cu-EDA)-SAMMS was advanced for in vivo evaluation. In vivo experiments were conducted comparing the performance of the SAMMS vs. insoluble Prussian blue. Groups of jugular cannulated rats (4/treatment) were evaluated. Group I was administered 137Cs (~40 ?geq/kg) by intravenous (iv) injection and oral gavage; Group II was administered pre-bound 137Cs-SAMMS and sequential 137Cs + SAMMS (~61 ngeq/kg) by oral gavage; and Group III evaluated orally administered 137Cs (~0.06 ?geq/kg) followed by 0.1 g of either SAMMS or Prussian blue. Following dosing the rats were maintained in metabolism cages for 72 hour and blood, urine and fecal samples were collected for 137Cs analysis (gamma counting). Rats were then humanely euthanized, and selected tissues analyzed. Orally administered 137Cs was rapidly and well absorbed (~100% relative to iv dose), and the pharmacokinetics (blood, urine, feces & tissues) were very comparable to the iv dose group. For both exposures the urine and feces accounted for 20 and 3% of the dose, respectively. The prebound 137Cs-SAMMS was retained primarily within the feces (72% of the dose), with ~1.4% detected in the urine, suggesting that the 137Cs remained tightly bound to SAMMS. SAMMS & Prussian blue both effectively captured available 137Cs in the gut with feces accounting for 80-88% of the administered dose, while less than 2% was detected in the urine. This study suggests that the functionalized SAMMS out performs Prussian blue in vitro at low pH, but demonstrates comparable in vivo sequestration efficacy at low exposure concentrations. The comparable response may be the result of the low 137Cs dose and high sorbent dosage that was utilized. Future studies are planned to optimize SAMMS in vivo performance over a broader range of doses and conditions.

  12. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2?-, 3?-cyclic-nucleotide-3?-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase. • The retina exhibits diminished neurotrophin levels and cellular differentiation. • The toxic effect is apoptotic.

  13. Anticonvulsant treatment of sarin-induced seizures with nasal midazolam: An electrographic, behavioral, and histological study in freely moving rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilat, E. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel)]. E-mail: gilat@iibr.gov.il; Kadar, T. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Levy, A. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Rabinovitz, I. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Cohen, G. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Kapon, Y. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Sahar, R. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel); Brandeis, R. [Department of Pharmacology, Israel Institute for Biological Research, Ness Ziona, 74100 (Israel)

    2005-11-15

    Centrally mediated seizures and convulsions are common consequences of exposure to organophosphates (OPs). These seizures rapidly progress to status epilepticus (SE) and contribute to profound brain injury. Effective management of these seizures is critical for minimization of brain damage. Nasal application of midazolam (1.5 mg/kg) after 5 min of sarin-induced electrographic seizure activity (EGSA) ameliorated EGSA and convulsive behavior (238 {+-} 90 s). Identical treatment after 30 min was not sufficient to ameliorate ECoG paradoxical activity and convulsive behavior. Nasal midazolam (1.5 mg/kg), together with scopolamine (1 mg/kg, im) after 5 min of EGSA, exerted a powerful and rapid anticonvulsant effect (53 {+-} 10 s). Delaying the same treatment to 30 min of EGSA leads to attenuation of paroxysmal ECoG activity in all cases but total cessation of paroxysmal activity was not observed in most animals tested. Cognitive tests utilizing the Morris Water Maze demonstrated that nasal midazolam alone or together with scopolamine (im), administered after 5 min of convulsions, abolished the effect of sarin on learning. Both these treatments, when given after 30 min of convulsions, only decreased the sarin-induced learning impairments. Whereas rats which were not subject to the anticonvulsant agents did not show any memory for the platform location, both treatments (at 5 min as well as at 30 min) completely abolished the memory deficits. Both treatments equally blocked the impairment of reversal learning when given at 5 min. However, when administered after 30 min, midazolam alone reversed the impairments in reversal learning, while midazolam with scopolamine did not. Rats exposed to sarin and treated with the therapeutic regimen with the exclusion of midazolam exhibited severe brain lesions that encountered the hippocampus, pyriform cortex, and thalamus. Nasal midazolam at 5 min prevented brain damage, while delaying the midazolam treatment to 30 min of EGSA resulted in brain damage. The addition of scopolamine to midazolam did not alter the above observation. In summary, nasal midazolam treatment briefly after initiation of OP-induced seizure leads to cessation of EGSA and prevented brain lesions and behavioral deficiencies in the rat model.

  14. Evaluation of the developmental toxicity of cyclopiazonic acid using H?y?d?r?a? a?t?t?e?n?u?a?t?a? and postimplantation rat whole embryo bioassays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dryden, Catherine Jeane.?

    1991-01-01

    EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID USING HYDRA ATTENUATA AND POSTIMPLANTATION RAT WHOLE EMBRYO BIOASSAYS A Thesis by CATHERINE JEANE' DRYDEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology EVALUATION OF THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF CYCLOPIAZONIC ACID USING HYDRA A?TENUATA AND POSTIMPLANTATION RAT WHOLE EMBRYO...

  15. On-off intermittency of thalamo-cortical oscillations in the electroencephalogram of rats with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgenia Sitnikova; Alexander E. Hramov; Alexey A. Ovchinnikov; Alexey A. Koronovskii

    2013-02-17

    Spike-wave discharges (SWD) are electroencephalographic hallmarks of absence epilepsy. SWD are known to originate from thalamo-cortical neuronal network that normally produce sleep spindle oscillations. Although both sleep spindles and SWD are considered as thalamo-cortical oscillations, functional relationship between them is still uncertain. The present study describes temporal dynamics of SWD and sleep spindles as determined in long-term EEG recordings in WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. It was found that non-linear dynamics of SWD fits well to the law of 'on-off intermittency'. Typical sleep spindles that occur during slow-wave sleep (SWS) also demonstrated 'on-off intermittency' behavior, in contrast to high-voltage spindles during intermediate sleep stage, whose dynamics was uncertain. This implies that both SWS sleep spindles and SWD are controlled by a system-level mechanism that is responsible for regulating circadian activity and/or sleep-wake transitions.

  16. Differential regulation of apoptosis in slow and fast twitch muscles of aged female F344BN rats

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rice, Kevin M.; Manne, Nandini D. P. K.; Gadde, Murali K.; Paturi, Satyanarayana; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Blough, Eric

    2015-03-28

    Age-related muscle atrophy is characterized by decreases in muscle mass and is thought be mediated, at least in part, by increases in myocyte apoptosis. Recent data has demonstrated that the degree of muscle loss with aging may differ between males and females while other work has suggested that apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation may be regulated differently in fast- and slow-twitch muscles. Herein, we investigate how aging affects the regulation of muscle apoptosis in the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of young (6-month), aged (26-month), and very aged (30-month) female Fischer 344/NNiaHSD × Brown Norway/BiNiamore »(F344BN) rats. Tissue sections were stained with hydroethidium for ROS and protein extract was subjected to immunoblotting for assessing apoptotic markers. Our data suggest that decreases in muscle mass were associated with increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL positive) and increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) as determined by hydroethidium staining in both the EDL and soleus. Similar to our previous work using aged male animals, we observed that the time course and magnitude of changes in Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, caspase-9, and cleavage of ?-fodrin protein were regulated differently between muscles. As a result, These data suggest that aging in the female F344BN rat is associated with decreases in muscle mass, elevations in ROS level, increased muscle cell DNA fragmentation, and alterations in cell membrane integrity and that apoptotic mechanisms may differ between fiber types.« less

  17. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Song, Guanbin, E-mail: song@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Sung, Kuo-Li Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China) [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0412 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  18. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause the adaptive change of glucocorticoid-IGF1 axis.

  19. The Relative Contributions of COX-1 and COX-2 to Vascular Biosynthesis of Prostacyclin and Thromboxane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborn, Pamela

    2014-01-17

    X+estrogen-replaced (OvX+ER-F) rats were studied. Rats were sacrificed 14 days post-op, and 3mm aortic rings were incubated in Krebs-Henseleit-bicarbonate buffer (KHB), containing either vehicle (basal), vasopressin (VP, 10^(-6) M), VP+SC-560 (SC, selective COX-1...

  20. Telmisartan prevents hepatic fibrosis and enzyme-altered lesions in liver cirrhosis rat induced by a choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined diet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin Haiyan [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1 Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yanbian University Hospital, Yanji, Jilin (China); Yamamoto, Naoki; Uchida, Koichi; Terai, Shuji [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1 Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Sakaida, Isao [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Minami-Kogushi 1-1-1 Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: sakaida@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-28

    Rennin-angiotensin system is involved in liver fibrogenesis through activating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Telmisartan (Tel) is an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, could function as a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} activator. Here we studied the effect of Tel on liver fibrosis, pre-neoplastic lesions in vivo and primary HSCs in vitro. In vivo study, we used the choline-deficient L-amino acid-defined (CDAA)-diet induced rat NASH model. The rats were fed the CDAA diet for 8 weeks to induce liver fibrosis and pre-neoplastic lesions, and then co-administrated with Tel for another 10 weeks. Tel prevented liver fibrogenesis and pre-neoplastic lesions by down-regulating TGF{beta}1 and TIMP-1, 2 and increasing MMP-13 expression. Tel inhibited HSCs activation and proliferation. These results suggested that Tel could be a promising drug for NASH related liver fibrosis.

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry . E-mail: thierry.giardina@univ.u-3mrs.fr

    2005-05-06

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure.

  2. Differential cardiotoxicity in response to chronic doxorubicin treatment in male spontaneous hypertension-heart failure (SHHF), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Leslie C.; Radin, M. Judith; Heller, Lois; Rogers, Lynette K.; Tobias, Anthony; Matise, Ilze; Wang, Qi; Apple, Fred S.; McCune, Sylvia A.

    2013-11-15

    Life threatening complications from chemotherapy occur frequently in cancer survivors, however little is known about genetic risk factors. We treated male normotensive rats (WKY) and strains with hypertension (SHR) and hypertension with cardiomyopathy (SHHF) with 8 weekly doses of doxorubicin (DOX) followed by 12 weeks of observation to test the hypothesis that genetic cardiovascular disease would worsen delayed cardiotoxicity. Compared with WKY, SHR demonstrated weight loss, decreased systolic blood pressure, increased kidney weights, greater cardiac and renal histopathologic lesions and greater mortality. SHHF showed growth restriction, increased kidney weights and renal histopathology but no effect on systolic blood pressure or mortality. SHHF had less severe cardiac lesions than SHR. We evaluated cardiac soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) content and arachidonic acid metabolites after acute DOX exposure as potential mediators of genetic risk. Before DOX, SHHF and SHR had significantly greater cardiac sEH and decreased epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) (4 of 4 isomers in SHHF and 2 of 4 isomers in SHR) than WKY. After DOX, sEH was unchanged in all strains, but SHHF and SHR rats increased EETs to a level similar to WKY. Leukotriene D4 increased after treatment in SHR. Genetic predisposition to heart failure superimposed on genetic hypertension failed to generate greater toxicity compared with hypertension alone. The relative resistance of DOX-treated SHHF males to the cardiotoxic effects of DOX in the delayed phase despite progression of genetic disease was unexpected and a key finding. Strain differences in arachidonic acid metabolism may contribute to variation in response to DOX toxicity. - Highlights: • Late doxorubicin toxicity evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and cardiomyopathic rats. • Hypertension enhances the delayed toxicity of doxorubicin. • Genetic predisposition to cardiomyopathy did not further enhance toxicity. • Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids increased in response to doxorubicin in SHR and SHHF. • Altered leukotriene metabolism may contribute greater toxicity in SHR vs. SHHF rats.

  3. Perinatal lead exposure sensitizes rats to the rewarding effects of cocaine, but not cocaine/3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine(MDMA) combinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardon, Aaron Lynn

    2013-02-22

    . , & Bratton, G. R. (1993). Chronic exposure to lead attenuates cocaine- induced behavioral activation. Pharmacolo Biochemist and Behavior 44, 221-225. Guilaite, T. R. (1 997). Pb inhibits NMDA function at high and low affinity sites: Developmental d gt Ih I...'" Edition. Prentice Hall, NJ; 1997. Miller, D. K. , Nation, J. R. , Jost, T. E. , Schell, J. B. , & Bratton, G. R. (2000). Differential effects of adult and perinatal lead exposure on morphine-induced locomotor activity in rats. Pharmacolo Biochemist...

  4. Changes in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in cisplatin-induced acute renal failure after treatment of JBP485 in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tao, E-mail: liutaomedical@qq.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China)] [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Meng, Qiang, E-mail: mengq531@yahoo.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Wang, Changyuan, E-mail: wangcyuan@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Liu, Qi, E-mail: llaqii@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Guo, Xinjin, E-mail: guo.xinjin@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China)] [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Sun, Huijun, E-mail: sunhuijun@hotmail.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); Peng, Jinyong, E-mail: jinyongpeng2005@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China) [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, 9 West Section, Lvshun South Road, Lvshunkou District, Dalian 116044 (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Liaoning, Dalian Medical University (China); and others

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cyclo-trans-4-L-hydroxyprolyl-L-serine (JBP485) on acute renal failure (ARF) induced by cisplatin is related to change in expression of renal Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 in rats. JBP485 reduced creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and indoxyl sulfate (IS) in plasma and malondialdehyde (MDA) in kidney, and recovered the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in cisplatin-treated rats. The plasma concentration of PAH (para-aminohippurate) determined by LC–MS/MS was increased markedly after intravenous administration of cisplatin, whereas cumulative urinary excretion of PAH and the uptake of PAH in kidney slices were significantly decreased. qRT-PCR and Western-blot showed a decrease in mRNA and protein of Oat1 and Oat3, an increase in mRNA and protein of Mrp2 in cisplatin-treated rats, and an increase in IS (a uremic toxin) after co-treatment with JBP485. It indicated that JBP485 promoted urinary excretion of toxins by upregulating renal Mrp2. This therefore gives in part the explanation about the mechanism by which JBP485 improves ARF induced by cisplatin in rats. -- Highlights: ? Cisplatin induces acute renal failure (ARF). ? The expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 were changed during ARF. ? The regulated expression of Oat1, Oat3 and Mrp2 is an adaptive protected response. ? JBP485 could facilitate the adaptive protective action.

  5. JBP485 improves gentamicin-induced acute renal failure by regulating the expression and function of Oat1 and Oat3 in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xinjin [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Meng, Qiang; Liu, Qi; Wang, Changyuan; Sun, Huijun; Peng, Jinyong; Ma, Xiaochi [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Dalian Medical University, Liaoning (China); Kaku, Taiichi [Japan Bioproducts Industry Co. Ltd., Tomigaya, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Liu, Kexin, E-mail: kexinliu@dlmedu.edu.cn [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Dalian Medical University, Dalian (China); Provincial Key Laboratory for Pharmacokinetics and Transport, Dalian Medical University, Liaoning (China)

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the effects of JBP485 (an anti-inflammatory dipeptide and a substrate of OAT) on regulation of the expression and function of renal Oat1 and Oat3, which can accelerate the excretion of accumulated uremic toxins (e.g. indoxyl sulfate) in the kidney to improve gentamicin-induced ARF in rats. JBP485 caused a significant decrease in the accumulation of endogenous substances (creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and indoxyl sulfate) in vivo, an increase in the excretion of exogenous compounds (lisinopril and inulin) into urine, and up-regulation of the expressions of renal Oat1 and Oat3 in the kidney tissues and slices via substrate induction. To determine the effect of JBP485 on the accelerated excretion of uremic toxins mediated by Oat1 and Oat3, the mRNA and protein expression levels of renal basolateral Oats were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, western blot, immunohistochemical analysis and an immunofluorescence method. Gentamicin down-regulated the expression of Oats mRNA and protein in rat kidney, and these effects were reversed after administration of JBP485. In addition, JBP485 caused a significant decrease in MPO and MDA levels in the kidney, and improved the pathological condition of rat kidney. These results indicated that JBP485 improved acute renal failure by increasing the expression and function of Oat1 and Oat3, and by decreasing overoxidation of the kidney in gentamicin-induced ARF rats. - Highlights: • JBP485 could up-regulate function and expression of Oat1 and Oat3 in kidney. • Effects of JBP485 on ARF are mediated by stimulating excretion of uremic toxins. • JBP485 protected against gentamicin-induced ARF by decreasing MPO and MDA.

  6. Sprague-Dawley rats display metabolism-mediated sex differences in the acute toxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonsart, Julien [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Menet, Marie-Claude [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Plateau Spectrometrie de Masse (IFR 71), Service de Chimie Analytique, Paris F-75006 (France); Decleves, Xavier [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Galons, Herve [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U648, Paris F-75006 (France); Crete, Dominique; Debray, Marcel; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Noble, Florence [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France)]|[INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France)], E-mail: florence.noble@univ-paris5.fr

    2008-07-01

    The use of the amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has been associated with unexplained deaths. Male humans and rodents are more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females, including a potentially lethal hyperthermia. MDMA is highly metabolized to five main metabolites, by the enzymes CYP1A2 and CYP2D. The major metabolite in rats, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), also causes hyperthermia. We postulated that the reported sex difference in rats is due to a sexual dimorphism(s). We therefore determined (1) the LD50 of MDMA and MDA, (2) their hyperthermic effects, (3) the activities of liver CYP1A2 and CYP2D, (4) the liver microsomal metabolism of MDMA and MDA, (5) and the plasma concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites 3 h after giving male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats MDMA (5 mg.kg{sup -1} sc). The LD50 of MDMA was 2.4-times lower in males than in females. MDMA induced greater hyperthermia (0.9 deg. C) in males. The plasma MDA concentration was 1.3-fold higher in males, as were CYP1A2 activity (twice) and N-demethylation to MDA (3.3-fold), but the plasma MDMA concentration (1.4-fold) and CYP2D activity (1.3-fold) were higher in females. These results suggest that male SD rats are more sensitive to MDMA acute toxicity than are females, probably because their CYP1A2 is more active, leading to higher N-demethylation and plasma MDA concentration. This metabolic pathway could be responsible for the lethality of MDMA, as the LD50 of MDA is the same in both sexes. These data strongly suggest that the toxicity of amphetamine-related drugs largely depends on metabolic differences.

  7. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanko, Jason; Enoch, Rolondo; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine; Wolf, Douglas; Malarkey, David; Fenton, Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73 mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100 mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15 19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73 mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  8. SU-E-I-34: Intermittent Low- and High-Dose Ethanol Exposure Alters Neurochemical Responses in Adult Rat Brain: An Ex Vivo 1H NMR Spectroscopy at 11.7 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Do-Wan; Kim, Sang-Young; Song, Kyu-Ho; Choe, Bo-Young

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The first goal of this study was to determine the influence of the dose-dependent effects of intermittent ethanol intoxication on cerebral neurochemical responses among sham controls and low- and high-dose-ethanol-exposed rats with ex vivo high-resolution spectra. The second goal of this study was to determine the correlations between the metabolite-metabolite levels (pairs-of-metabolite levels) from all of the individual data from the frontal cortex of the intermittent ethanol-intoxicated rats. Methods: Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups. Twenty rats in the LDE (n = 10) and the HDE (n = 10) groups received ethanol doses of 1.5 g/kg and 2.5 g/kg, respectively, through oral gavage every 8-h for 4 days. At the end of the 4-day intermittent ethanol exposure, one-dimensional ex vivo 500-MHz proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were acquired from 30 samples of the frontal cortex region (from the 3 groups). Results: Normalized total-N-acetylaspartate (tNAA: NAA + NAAG [N-acetylaspartyl-glutamate]), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in the frontal cortex of the HDE-exposed rats than that of the LDE-exposed rats. Moreover, compared to the CNTL group, the LDE rats exhibited significantly higher normalized GABA levels. The 6 pairs of normalized metabolite levels were positively (+) or negatively (?) correlated in the rat frontal cortex as follows: tNAA and GABA (+), tNAA and Aspartate (Asp) (?), myo-Inositol (mIns) and Asp (?), mIns and Alanine (+), mIns and Taurine (+), and mIns and tNAA (?). Conclusion: Our results suggested that repeated intermittent ethanol intoxication might result in neuronal degeneration and dysfunction, changes in the rate of GABA synthesis, and oxidative stress in the rat frontal cortex. Our ex vivo 1H high-resolution-magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy results suggested some novel metabolic markers for the dose-dependent influence of repeated intermittent ethanol intoxication in the frontal cortex.

  9. Phase-Contrast MRI and CFD Modeling of Apparent 3He Gas Flow in Rat Pulmonary Airways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-08-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized 3He is potentially useful for developing and testing patient-specific models of pulmonary airflow. One challenge, however, is that PC-MRI provides apparent values of local 3He velocity that not only depend on actual airflow but also on gas diffusion. This not only blurs laminar flow patterns in narrow airways but also introduces anomalous airflow structure that reflects gas-wall interactions. Here, both effects are predicted in a live rat using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and for the first time, simulated patterns of apparent 3He gas velocity are compared with in-vivo PC-MRI. Results show (1) that correlations (R2) between measured and simulated airflow patterns increase from 0.23 to 0.79 simply by accounting for apparent 3He transport, and that (2) remaining differences are mainly due to uncertain airway segmentation and partial volume effects stemming from relatively coarse MRI resolution. Higher-fidelity testing of pulmonary airflow predictions should therefore be possible with future imaging improvements.

  10. Sonic hedgehog stimulates the proliferation of rat gastric mucosal cells through ERK activation by elevating intracellular calcium concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Ohnishi, Hirohide [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)]. E-mail: hohnishi@jichi.ac.jp; Takano, Koji [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Noguti, Takasi [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Mashima, Hirosato [Department of Gastroenterology, University of Tokyo School of Medicine, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Hoshino, Hiroko [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Kita, Hiroto [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Sato, Kiichi [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan); Matsui, Hirofumi [Division of Gastroenterology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8576 (Japan); Sugano, Kentaro [Department of Gastroenterology, Jichi Medical School, Tochigi 329-0498 (Japan)

    2006-06-02

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a member of hedgehog peptides family, is expressed in gastric gland epithelium. To elucidate Shh function to gastric mucosal cells, we examined the effect of Shh on the proliferation of a rat normal gastric mucosal cell line, RGM-1. RGM-1 cells express essential components of Shh receptor system, patched-1, and smoothened. Shh enhanced DNA synthesis in RGM-1 cells and elevated intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). In addition, Shh as well as calcium ionophore A32187 rapidly activated ERK. However, Shh failed to activate ERK under calcium-free culture condition. Pretreatment of cells with PD98059 attenuated the DNA synthesis promoted by Shh. Moreover, when cells were pretreated with cyclopamine, Shh could not elevate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, activate ERK or promote DNA synthesis. On the other hand, although Shh induced Gli-1 nuclear accumulation in RGM-1 cells, Shh activated ERK even in cells pretreated with actinomycin D. These results indicate that Shh promotes the proliferation of RGM-1 cells through an intracellular calcium- and ERK-dependent but transcription-independent pathway via Patched/Smoothened receptor system.

  11. Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in hydra attenuata and in rat whole-embryo culture. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, M.C.

    1991-05-01

    Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are a class of biaryl compounds that have little commercial application, but appear to be widespread in the environment. They have been found in wood preservative waste dumpsites and in fly ash from municipal waste incinerators. They have been detected in bird eggs and tissues, fish, and other edible marine organisms in the United States, Canada, and Europe. There are limited reports in the extant literature on the toxicity of PCDEs. This study was designed to evaluate the toxicity of selected PCDEs in cultures of Hydra attenuata and post-implantation rat whole embryos. The toxicity of several closely related polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was evaluated in both cultures and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was evaluated in whole embryo culture. Embryonic growth and development parameters (yolk sac diameter, crown-rump length, somite count, and DNA and protein content) and gross morphology were determined. Findings indicated that these chemicals were neither embryotoxic nor teratogenic. Thus, the PCDEs, which elicit other diverse toxic and biochemical responses in rodents, are relatively inactive in these bioassays for developmental toxicity.

  12. Metabolomic changes in follicular fluid induced by soy isoflavones administered to rats from weaning until sexual maturity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchang; Liu, Jin; Sun, Yan; Li, Yuchen; Li, Hong; Xiao, Shihua; Shen, Xiaohua

    2013-06-15

    Female Wistar rats at 21 days of age were treated with one of three concentrations of soy isoflavones (SIF) (50, 100 or 200 mg/kg body weight, orally, once per day) from weaning until sexual maturity (3 months) in order to evaluate the influence of SIF on ovarian follicle development. After treatment, the serum sex hormone levels and enumeration of ovarian follicles of the ovary were measured. The metabolic profile of follicular fluid was determined using HPLC-MS. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to identify differences in metabolites and reveal useful toxic biomarkers. The results indicated that modest doses of SIF affect ovarian follicle development, as demonstrated by decreased serum estradiol levels and increases in both ovarian follicle atresia and corpora lutea number in the ovary. SIF treatment-related metabolic alterations in follicular fluid were also found in the PCA and PLS-DA models. The 24 most significantly altered metabolites were identified, including primary sex hormones, amino acids, fatty acids and metabolites involved in energy metabolism. These findings may indicate that soy isoflavones affect ovarian follicle development by inducing metabolomic variations in the follicular fluid. - Highlights: ? Modest doses of soy isoflavones (SIF) do affect ovarian follicle development. ? SIF treatment-related metabolic alterations in follicular fluid were found. ? The 24 most significantly altered metabolites were identified.

  13. o-p?-DDT-mediated uterotrophy and gene expression in immature C57BL/6 mice and Sprague–Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwekel, Joshua C.; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Williams, Kurt J.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.

    2013-12-15

    1,1,1-Trichloro-2,2-bis(2-chlorophenyl-4-chlorophenyl)ethane (o,p?-DDT) is an organochlorine pesticide and endocrine disruptor known to activate the estrogen receptor. Comprehensive ligand- and species-comparative dose- and time-dependent studies were conducted to systematically assess the uterine physiological, morphological and gene expression responses elicited by o,p?-DDT and ethynyl estradiol (EE) in immature ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice and Sprague–Dawley rats. Custom cDNA microarrays were used to identify conserved and divergent differential gene expression responses. A total of 1256 genes were differentially expressed by both ligands in both species, 559 of which exhibited similar temporal expression profiles suggesting that o,p?-DDT elicits estrogenic effects at high doses when compared to EE. However, 51 genes exhibited species-specific uterine expression elicited by o,p?-DDT. For example, carbonic anhydrase 2 exhibited species- and ligand-divergent expression as confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The identification of comparable temporal phenotypic responses linked to gene expression demonstrates that systematic comparative gene expression assessments are valuable for elucidating conserved and divergent estrogen signaling mechanisms in rodent uterotrophy. - Highlights: • o,p?-DDT and enthynyl estradiol (EE) both elicit uterotrophy in mice and rats. • o,p?-DDT and EE have different kinetics in uterine wet weight induction. • o,p?-DDT elicited stromal hypertrophy in rats but myometrial hypertrophy in mice. • 1256 genes were differentially expressed by both ligands in both species. • Only 51 genes had species-specific uterine expression.

  14. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

  15. Sprague-Dawley rats display sex-linked differences in the pharmacokinetics of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its metabolite 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonsart, Julien, E-mail: julien.fonsart@lrb.aphp.f [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France); INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Laboratoire de Toxicologie Biologique, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris F-75010 (France); Menet, Marie-Claude [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Plateau Spectrometrie de Masse (IFR 71), Service de Chimie Analytique, Paris F-75006 (France); Debray, Marcel; Hirt, Deborah; Noble, Florence; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Decleves, Xavier [Universite Paris Descartes, Faculte de Pharmacie, Paris F-75006 (France); CNRS, UMR 7157, Paris F-75006 (France); INSERM, U705, Paris F-75006 (France)

    2009-12-15

    The use of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) has increased in recent years; it can lead to life-threatening hyperthermia and serotonin syndrome. Human and rodent males appear to be more sensitive to acute toxicity than are females. MDMA is metabolized to five main metabolites by the enzymes CYP1A2, CYP2D and COMT. Little is presently known about sex-dependent differences in the pharmacokinetics of MDMA and its metabolites. We therefore analyzed MDMA disposition in male and female rats by measuring the plasma and urine concentrations of MDMA and its metabolites using a validated LC-MS method. MDA AUC{sub last} and C{sub max} were 1.6- to 1.7-fold higher in males than in females given MDMA (5 mg/kg sc), while HMMA C{sub max} and AUC{sub last} were 3.2- and 3.5-fold higher, respectively. MDMA renal clearance was 1.26-fold higher in males, and that of MDA was 2.2-fold higher. MDMA AUC{sub last} and t{sub 1/2} were 50% higher in females given MDMA (1 mg/kg iv). MDA C{sub max} and AUC{sub last} were 75-82% higher in males, with a 2.8-fold higher metabolic index. Finally, the AUC{sub last} of MDA was 0.73-fold lower in males given 1 mg/kg iv MDA. The volumes of distribution of MDMA and MDA at steady-state were similar in the two sexes. These data strongly suggest that differences in the N-demethylation of MDMA to MDA are major influences on the MDMA and MDA pharmacokinetics in male and female rats. Hence, males are exposed to significantly more toxic MDA, which could explain previously reported sexual dysmorphism in the acute effects and toxicity of MDMA in rats.

  16. The use of labeled leucine in establishing the time of allanto-chorionic fusion in the female albino rat with reference to implantation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, James Edward

    1966-01-01

    THE USE OF LABELED LEUCINE IN ESTABLISHING THE TIME OF ALLANTO-CHORIONIC FUSION IN THE FEMALE ALBINO RA T WIT H RE FERE NC E T 0 IM PLANTA T I ON A Thesis By JAMES EDWARD RUTLEDGE Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASSAM... University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1966 Major Subject: Physiology of Reproduction THE USE OF LABELED LEUCINE IN ESTABLISHING THE TIME OF ALLANTO- CHORIONIC FUSION IN THE FEMALE ALBINO RAT...

  17. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions in a Rat Prostate Carcinoma In Vivo: Comparison of 1, 2, and 6 Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karger, Christian P., E-mail: c.karger@dkfz.de [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Peschke, Peter [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)] [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Scholz, Michael [Department of Biophysics, Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany)] [Department of Biophysics, Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research (GSI), Darmstadt (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany) [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the effective ?/? ratio for local tumor control of a radioresistant rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1) after 6 fractions of carbon ions and photons. Methods and Materials: A total of 82 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with 6 fractions of either photons or carbon ions, by use of increasing dose levels and a 2-cm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were used to determine RBE values. Including data for 1 and 2 fractions from a previous study, we estimated ?/? ratios. Results: For 6 fractions, the values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were 116.6 ± 3.0 Gy for photons and 43.7 ± 2.3 Gy for carbon ions and the resulting RBE was 2.67 ± 0.15. The ?/? ratio was 84.7 ± 13.8 Gy for photons and 66.0 ± 21.0 Gy for carbon ions. Using these data together with the linear-quadratic model, we estimated the maximum RBE to be 2.88 ± 0.27. Conclusions: The study confirmed the increased effectiveness of carbon ions relative to photons over the whole dose range for a highly radioresistant tumor. The maximum RBE below 3 is in line with other published in vivo data. The RBE values may be used to benchmark RBE models. Hypoxia seems to have a major impact on the radiation response, although this still has to be confirmed by dedicated experiments.

  18. The potential reproductive, neurobehavioral and systemic effects of soluble sodium tungstate exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInturf, S.M. [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Bekkedal, M.Y.V. [Two Steps Forward, LLC, Sun Prairie, WI (United States); Wilfong, E. [U.S. Naval Academy, 572M Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD (United States); Arfsten, D. [Navy Drug Screening Laboratory P.O. Box 113, Naval Air Station Jacksonville, FL (United States); Chapman, G. [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States); Gunasekar, P.G., E-mail: palur.gunasekar@wpafb.af.mil [Naval Medical Research Unit at Dayton (NAMRU), Wright Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    The debate on tungsten (W) is fostered by its continuous usage in military munitions. Reports demonstrate W solubilizes in soil and can migrate into drinking water supplies and, therefore, is a potential health risk to humans. This study evaluated the reproductive, systemic and neurobehavioral effects of sodium tungstate (NaW) in rats following 70 days of daily pre-and postnatal exposure via oral gavage to 5, 62.5 and 125 mg/kg/day of NaW through mating, gestation and weaning (PND 0-20). Daily administration of NaW produced no overt evidence of toxicity and had no apparent effect on mating success or offspring physical development. Distress vocalizations were elevated in F{sub 1} offspring from the high dose group, whereas righting reflex showed unexpected sex differences where males demonstrated faster righting than females; however, the effects were not dose-dependent. Locomotor activity was affected in both low and high-dose groups of F{sub 1} females. Low-dose group showed increased distance traveled, more time in ambulatory movements and less time in stereotypic behavior than controls or high dose animals. The high-dose group had more time in stereotypical movements than controls, and less time resting than controls and the lowest exposure group. Maternal retrieval was not affected by NaW exposure. Tungsten analysis showed a systemic distribution of NaW in both parents and offspring, with preferential uptake within the immune organs, including the femur, spleen and thymus. Histopathological evidence suggested no severe chronic injury or loss of function in these organs. However, the heart showed histological lesions, histiocytic inflammation from minimal to mild with cardiomyocyte degeneration and necrosis in several P{sub 0} animals of 125 mg NaW dose group. The result of this study suggests that pre and postnatal exposure to NaW may produce subtle neurobehavioral effects in offspring related to motor activity and emotionality.

  19. DOE/ER-0382 THE HUMAN GENOME INITIATIVE OF THE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l l e2Q)1382 THE HUMAN

  20. DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n e v i l l e2Q)1382 THE HUMAN1