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1

Rats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rats Rats Nature Bulletin No. 81 August 31, 1946 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation RATS Rats and men have been at war since the dawn of history. The "cradle of mankind" Central Asia, apparently was also the place of origin of the rat. From there, living and traveling with man, it has spread over the globe. In the United States today there are about as many rats as there are people. Cur common rat is the Norway or brown rat which arrived here from Europe before the Revolutionary War. Fiercer and more cunning, it soon exterminated the black rat and the roof rat which had migrated here with the early colonists and thrived. The black rat -- which is glossy black above, smaller and more slender -- and the roof rat, a close relative, are found now only rarely in some of the southern states, although still common in tropical America.

2

Large-scale Nanostructure Simulations from X-ray Scattering Data On Graphics Processor Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Scattering Data On Graphics Processor Clusters Abhinavaccelerators. General purpose graphics processors o?er ?nethe form factors on graphics processors. Form Factor Kernel

Sarje, Abhinav

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

OoEr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OoEr OoEr 1325.8 (MW . fR)W-001 United States Government memoranduln I~J-U Department of Energy II&& yz;; EH-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites froa the Formerly Utilized Sltes Remedial Actiorr Prograa Tb: The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. reviewed a nulaber of sites that had Doug Tonkay and Hs. Michelle LaWs, I services to the Fernald facility as fomerly provided goods and/or subcontractors. sites, recommendations were made to For 24 of.these _ eliainate them from further .-A- - consideration under Formerly Utilized Sites Remdial Actlon Program (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or reviewed the evaluation, and, In each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more formal record of the decision on these sites and to ratify and confirm the

4

DJS CLAIM ER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t t c 5 "NEUTR DJS CLAIM ER This report was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by t h e United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and

5

DiscLAimEr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mAy 2013 mAy 2013 DiscLAimEr This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal li- ability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or useful- ness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommenda- tion, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

6

DiScLAimEr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mAy 2011 ii u.S. Department of Energy Advanced carbon Dioxide capture r&D program: Technology update, may 2011 DiScLAimEr This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored...

7

Surveillance Guide - ERS ERS 14.2 Emmissions Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMISSIONS MONITORING EMISSIONS MONITORING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of radioactive materials and chemicals. The Facility Representative will verify operability of equipment and examine implementation of procedures and processes for collecting, analyzing and recording data. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with applicable requirements from DOE and implementation of appropriate codes and standards. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance implements requirements RP-0028 and ER-0023 from the RL S/RIDs. Requirement RP-0028 relates to oversight of

8

Production Evaluation of 718-ER Alloy - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fill-scale production trial was conducted to evaluate 718-ER in comparison with standard alloy 718. The processing characteristics of both alloys in.

9

Microsoft Word - westwater_er.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview and Recent Results E.R. Westwater, D. Cimini, M. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of ColoradoNational...

10

ES/ER/TM-78  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

78 78 Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment B. G. Blaylock M. L. Frank B. R. O'Neal This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; prices available from 423-576-8401 (fax 423-576-2865). Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22161. ES/ER/TM-78 Methodology for Estimating Radiation Dose Rates to Freshwater Biota Exposed to Radionuclides in the Environment B. G. Blaylock M. L. Frank B. R. O'Neal Date Issued-September 1993 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy

11

Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Er{sub x})Al{sub 2} for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant. 29 figs.

Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Takeya, Hiroyuki

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ternary Dy-Er-Al magnetic refrigerants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)Al.sub.2 for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant.

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Takeya, Hiroyuki (Ibaraki, JP)

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

Gleckler, B.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

44 LA LOUISIANE | SUmmEr 2011 hE UNIvErSIty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

professional practice in Louisiana. "In a world that has only recently awakened to the value of the wetlands44 LA LOUISIANE | SUmmEr 2011 T hE UNIvErSIty of Louisiana at Lafayette Founda- tion honored four professor of architecture at Louisiana State University in Baton rouge. together, they are partners

Raghavan, Vijay

15

ARM CLASIC ER2 CRS/EDOP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data was taken with the NASA ER-2 aircraft with the Cloud Radar System and other instruments in conjunction with the DOE ARM CLASIC field campaign. The flights were near the SGP site in north Central Oklahoma and targeted small developing convection. The CRS is a 94 GHz nadir pointing Doppler radar. Also on board the ER-2 was the Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Seven science flights were conducted but the weather conditions did not cooperate in that there was neither developing convection, or there was heavy rain.

Gerald Heymsfield

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE/ER-0214 February 1985  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the National Energy Policy Plan is to foster an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costsDOE/ER-0214 Magnetic Program Fusion Plan February 1985 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Washington, D.C. 20585 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Research February 1985

17

Index of /images/rat/rat.seq  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rat/rat.seq rat/rat.seq Parent Directory rat.seq.1.tif rat.seq.10.tif rat.seq.100.tif rat.seq.101.tif rat.seq.102.tif rat.seq.103.tif rat.seq.104.tif rat.seq.105.tif rat.seq.106.tif rat.seq.107.tif rat.seq.108.tif rat.seq.109.tif rat.seq.11.tif rat.seq.110.tif rat.seq.111.tif rat.seq.112.tif rat.seq.113.tif rat.seq.114.tif rat.seq.115.tif rat.seq.116.tif rat.seq.117.tif rat.seq.118.tif rat.seq.119.tif rat.seq.12.tif rat.seq.120.tif rat.seq.121.tif rat.seq.122.tif rat.seq.123.tif rat.seq.124.tif rat.seq.125.tif rat.seq.126.tif rat.seq.127.tif rat.seq.128.tif rat.seq.129.tif rat.seq.13.tif rat.seq.130.tif rat.seq.131.tif rat.seq.132.tif rat.seq.133.tif rat.seq.134.tif rat.seq.135.tif rat.seq.136.tif rat.seq.137.tif rat.seq.138.tif rat.seq.139.tif rat.seq.14.tif rat.seq.140.tif rat.seq.141.tif rat.seq.142.tif

18

Querying Incomplete Data over Extended ER Schemata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since Chen's Entity-Relationship (ER) model, conceptual modeling has been playing a fundamental role in relational data design. In this paper we consider an extended ER (EER) model enriched with cardinality constraints, disjointness assertions, and is-a relations among both entities and relationships. In this setting, we consider the case of incomplete data, which is likely to occur, for instance, when data from different sources are integrated. In such a context, we address the problem of providing correct answers to conjunctive queries by reasoning on the schema. Based on previous results about decidability of the problem, we provide a query answering algorithm that performs rewriting of the initial query into a recursive Datalog query encoding the information about the schema. We finally show extensions to more general settings.

Cali, Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Docket Nos. ER02-240-004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Duke Energy South Bay, LLC (DESB), a compliance refund report pursuant to a Commission order approving an Offer of Settlement (Settlement) filed in Docket No. ER02-10-000, et al. 1 The Settlement resolved all issues relating to DEO's and DESB's Year 2002 updates to their Reliability Must Run Agreements with the California Independent Operator Corporation. The Settlement also resolved one of the reserved issues left open by a previous settlement in California Independent System Operator

Duke Energy; South Bay; Duke Energy; South Bay; Mark L. Perlis; John T. Carlson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ER-12-1 completion report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DOE/ER/13897--9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/ER/13897--9 DOE/ER/13897--9 DE89 006617 THE BEHAVIOR OF MATTER UNDER NONEQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS: FUNDAMENTAL ASPECTS AND APPLICATIONS P r o g r e s s Report A p r i l 1 5 , 1 9 8 8 - A p r i l 1 4 , 1989 3 -s 8 tf » § § *" l & s t l i g S S Hya Prigogine * s l S s l g o s S Center for Studies in S t a t i s t i c a l IVfechanics g -s g. "..§' S .g g S The University of Texas S I 2 g 0..8 j g - Austin, Texas 78712 *a " I'^l s 1 s I l i - S s ^ | S l o . Thisdocumentis ^ 0 o § 5 g c ^ l l t f ^ ^ l PUBLICLY RELEASABLE I l i t l l i l Mvd,N^> a a " - "" .2 ... o * c o s ^ »15 i ; 5 1 & S 5 § "§* § 8 ^ a & s * s ^ g S S e - s - O s s g £ « * - & S C s o S g s s g- S- u 8.^ .11 i & | § 2 S & 1 g I S tt I rf 5 a .s 5 o § « J I | 3 § § i l - g ' S H o i s s . g B e « 3 January 1989 PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARIMENT OF ENERGY

22

Statistical shape fluctuations in /sup 166/Er  

SciTech Connect

Statistical shape fluctuations are calculated for /sup 166/Er at spins 0 and 40(h/2..pi..). The fluctuations produce an average shape, which is distinct from the most probable (i.e., mean field) shape. At low temperatures the average shape is similar to the most probable shape, and the shape fluctuations are small. With increasing temperature the shape fluctuations increase, as does the difference between the average shape and the most probable shape. The fluctuations smooth out the sharp shape transitions predicted by mean field theories. Although the most probable phase at spin 40(h/2..pi..) and critical temperature 1.64 MeV is oblate noncollective rotation, the fluctuations create a high probability for prolate collective, prolate noncollective, and oblate collective rotations as well.

Goodman, A.L.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ER-L-02-01.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2002 7, 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Department of Energy's Strategy for Disposal of Plutonium" (ER-L-02-01) INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE In September 2000, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into an agreement stipulating that each country will irreversibly transform 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into forms which could not be used for weapons purposes. To meet the United States' commitment, the Department of Energy planned activities at its Savannah River Site; specifically, to immobilize 8.4 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and to convert 25.6 metric tons into nuclear reactor fuel. The plan called for the design and construction of three major facilities at Savannah River: the Pit

24

DOE/ER/06035--7  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

06035--7 06035--7 DE85 014321 Technical Progress Report SUPERSONIC METAL CLUSTER BEAMS Department of Ene'rgy Contract No. DE-AS0548ER06035 For Period 3-16-w through 4-l-85 Principal Investigator: R. E. Smalley DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their emptoyecs, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or rcspond- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

25

K DOE/ER/72018~9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ .^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ K DOE/ER/72018~9 DE92 007472 Ninth Progress Report for the Division of Basic Energy Sciences Department of Energy, Contract DOE EY 76-S-03-0034, P.A. 218 (includes results of the last three years) MULTIHETEROMACROCYCLES THAT COMPLEX METAL IONS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION: REPORTING PERIOD: DATE OF THIS REPORT: Donald J. Cram, Professor of Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California at Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Avenue Los Angeles, California 90024 1 May 1980-30 April 1983 15 September 1982 Prepared for the Department of Energy, Division of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DOE EY 76 5 03 0Q3/I, P.A. 218, A^^S '7Ce/K 'i^c:,f 5?, DISTRlBUTIOfSi OF THIS DOCUMENT \B UNuiMiTED DISCLAIMER

26

Using Topex/Poseidon Data to Enhance ERS-1 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a relatively straightforward method for efficiently reducing the ERS-1 orbit error using Topex/Postidon data. The method is based on a global minimization of Topex/Poscidon-ERS-1 (TP-E) dual crossover differences. The TP-E ...

P. Y. Le Traon; P. Gaspar; F. Bouyssel; H. Makhmara

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Energy & Development, Stoichiometry, Exponential Growth Models Problem Set #2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Points: 90 [ER100/PP184], 110 [ER200/PP284] PROBLEM SET 2 SOLUTIONS Page 1 of 12 "Soft" and "Hard" Energy with social problems, not technological ones. #12;Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Energy & Development, Stoichiometry, Exponential Growth Models Problem Set #2 Due September 20

Kammen, Daniel M.

28

Hugleiingar um eli diffurjafna Ekki er ofsagt a diffurjoefnur sfiu sffl staerfraei sem mest er notu til lsingar ff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aflfrae?i ein helsta uppspretta uppgoetvana ff svi?i diffurjafna. ' I greinunum hfir ff eftir ver = v(y) y(0) = x øar sem y er tffkn fyrir ffiøekkta staer?, (sem hfir er fall). Mynd 1: vektorsvi? Mynd vflsitoelustigsins. Hverjar eru aflei?ingar øess? Diffurjafnan er x 0 = kx 2 : Hfir øarf a? rifja upp a?fer?ina um a

Magnus, Robert

29

Preliminary Assessment and Use of ERS-1 Altimeter Wave Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The satellite ERS-1, launched in July 1991, carries a radar altimeter that provides collocated measurements of significant wave height and wind speed over the oceans. During the calibration period, significant wave height and wind speed ...

S. J. Foreman; M. W. Holt; S. Kelsall

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Effects of Rain on ERS-1 Radar Altimeter Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation into a potentially important, but little-studied effect on altimeter datarain contaminationhas been carried out using ERS-1. The method involves identifying large changes in the radar backscatter coefficient and relating these ...

Trevor H. Guymer; Graham D. Quartly; Meric A. Srokosz

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Total Points: 103 [ER100/PP184], 133 [ER200/PP284 of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Total Points: 103 [ER100/PP184], 133 chillers v. Thermally enhanced oil recovery (Other answers acceptable) e) Approximately what percent

Kammen, Daniel M.

32

ARM - Field Campaign - AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP govCampaignsAERI-ER Intercomparison IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AERI-ER Intercomparison IOP 2004.01.12 - 2006.06.29 Lead Scientist : David Turner Data Availability Data were collected and submitted to the ARM Archive for IOPs. For data sets, see below. Summary There were three, potentially four, phases to this experiment. The length of time required for each phase was the time needed to ensure at least one severe clear period, which occur relatively frequently in January and February on the North Slope. The phases were: 1) Run the two systems side-by-side in their nominal modes to ensure that the calibration is reproducible. 2) Adjust the set-point of the hot blackbody on the second system from 60

33

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

Greg Ruskauff

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE/El%0455P DOE/ER--0455P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

455P 455P DOE/ER--0455P DE90 011269 ti DISTWIE3UTIQN Of= THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLlMiTE TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction..................................................................... 3 Materials Sciences ,,.............................. ..*............................. 7 Laser Annealing ................................................................. 7 Superior Ceramics ............................................................... 10 NickelAluminide ............................................................... 12 Synchrotron Light Sources ........................................................ 15 Far-Infrared Detectors ............................................................ 17 Glassy Metals .................................................................. 20

35

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295) April 3, 2013 The REN21 Renewables for the future of renewable energy. The report is not one scenario or viewpoint, but captures the contemporary published and prominent energy scenarios by a range of organizations. Conservative projections show 15

Kammen, Daniel M.

36

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Sidley & Austin, where he primarily worked on energy issues, before joining the University of IllinoisEnergy and Resources Group Fall 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295) October 23, 2013 In the wake, Berkeley. He is also the Co-Director of the Center for Law, Energy, and the Environment. Professor Farber

Kammen, Daniel M.

37

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295) September 12, 2012 Severin Borenstein E.T. Grether Chair in Business Administration and Public Policy Co-Director, Energy Institute at Haas Director, U.C. Energy Institute U.C. Berkeley "An Economic Framework for Analyzing Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

38

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295) February 22, 2012 What did I do during my tenure as the 'Clean Energy Czar' at the World Bank? This talk will examine the current patterns and future plans for investment in energy at the World Bank Group, which totals roughly $8 billion

Kammen, Daniel M.

39

Magnetic structure of Er5Si4 J. M. Cadogan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Materials Research, Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council, Chalk River diffraction, ac-susceptibility, and 166 Er Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The crystal space group is orthorhombic-resolution diffractometer at the NRU reactor, Chalk River Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy Canada Ltd. The neutron

Ryan, Dominic

40

The Meteorological Measurement System on the NASA ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Meteorological Measurement System (MMS) was designed and installed on one of the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft (NASA 706). The MMS provides in situ measurements of free-stream pressure (0.3 mb), temperature (0.3C), and wind vector (1 m s?...

Stan G. Scott; T. Paul Bui; K. Roland Chan; Stuart W. Bowen

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4/3/95 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4395 ERS 14.2 Emissions Monitoring, 4395 The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of...

42

Sonochemical synthesis of Er3+-doped ZnO nanospheres with enhanced upconversion photoluminescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Er3+-doped ZnO nanospheres have been synthesized via a sonochemical conversion process. The formation mechanism of these nanocrystals is connected with the sonochemical effect of ultrasound irradiation. The as-prepared Er3+ doped ...

Jun Geng, Guang-Hui Song, Jun-Jie Zhu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT OAK RIDGE, ER-B-00-03 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT OAK RIDGE, ER-B-00-03 WASTE CHARACTERIZATION AT OAK RIDGE, ER-B-00-03 Waste...

44

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3) CSCI-585 , Cyrus Shahabi · Example ER to no subclass. EER-to-Relational Mapping · Option 1: One table for superclass + two tables for subclasses (one

Shahabi, Cyrus

45

Rat Deterrent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rat Deterrent Rat Deterrent Name: mike Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: my friends have a house with a basement, they have seen rats coming from cider blocks that are open at the top ,and on inspection with a mirror seem to go all the down to the foundation, i suggested maybe putting moth balls down the blocks to help out if they are coming from the botton up, they have a new baby in the house, will this hurt anyone or cause harm? thanks Replies: Moth balls are not going to hurt anyone, but they are not going to solve the problem either. Rats are serious pests that will not be deterred by moth balls and a permanent solution, sealing up access points after removing the rats, will be needed. J. Elliott Stuff the holes with steel wool. It's not poisonous, it's cheap, and rats can't chew through it.

46

Technical Standards, DOE-ER-STD-6001-92- March 12, 1996  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE-ER-STD-6001-92: Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research; Canceled

47

Electrical and structural properties of high-k Er-silicate gate dielectric formed by interfacial reaction between Er and SiO{sub 2} films  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigate the electrical and structural properties of high-k Er-silicate film formed by the interfacial reaction between Er and SiO{sub 2} films. The increase in rapid thermal annealing temperature leads to the reduction of the interface trap density by one order of magnitude, indicating the improvement in the interface quality of Er-silicate gate dielectric. The increased capacitance value of Er-silicate gate dielectric with thermal treatment is attributed in part to the reduction of SiO{sub 2} thickness and to the increase in the relative dielectric constant of Er-silicate film caused by the chemical bonding change from Si-rich to Er-rich silicate.

Choi, Chel-Jong; Jang, Moon-Gyu; Kim, Yark-Yeon; Jun, Myung-Sim; Kim, Tae-Youb; Song, Myeong-Ho [IT Convergence Technology Research Division, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); National Nanofab Center, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

48

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-6-1  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-6-1 was constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Division at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This work was initiated as part of the Groundwater Characterization Project, now known as the Underground Test Area Project. The well cluster is located in southeastern Yucca Flat. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments for Well Cluster ER-6-1 are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and conventional core samples taken below 639 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 11 samples to resolve complex interrelationships between several of the Tertiary tuff units. Additionally, paleontological analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed the stratigraphic assignments below 539 meters within the Paleozoic sedimentary section. All three wells in the Well ER-6-1 cluster were drilled within the Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium section, the Tertiary volcanic section, and into the Paleozoic sedimentary section.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Completion report for Well Cluster ER-20-5  

SciTech Connect

The Well Cluster ER-20-5 drilling and completion project was conducted for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nye County, Nevada. Its primary tasks include collecting geological, geophysical, hydrological, and water chemistry data from new and existing wells to define groundwater quality in addition to pathways and rates of groundwater migration. A program of drilling wells near the sites of selected underground nuclear tests (near-field drilling) was implemented to obtain site-specific data about the nature and extent of migration of radionuclides that might have been produced by an underground nuclear explosion. Well Cluster ER-20-5 is the first near-field drilling project initiated at the NTS. This document presents construction data and summarizes the scientific data gathered during the drilling and well-installation phases for all three holes drilled at Well Cluster ER-20-5. Some of this information is preliminary and unprocessed, but was released so that drilling, geotechnical, well design, and completion data could be rapidly disseminated. Additional information about water levels, aquifer testing, and groundwater sampling will be reported after any of this work is performed. Any additional geologic and/or geophysical investigations conducted for this project is described in one or more analysis and interpretation reports. The lithologic and stratigraphic logs, however, are provided in final form.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Inner Mongolia Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd Bayannao er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd Place Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Sector Wind energy Product Wind project developer in China that has two projects in portfolio. References Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd is a company located in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China . References ↑ "[ Inner Mongolia Bayannao'er Fuhui Wind Power Co Ltd]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Inner_Mongolia_Bayannao_er_Fuhui_Wind_Power_Co_Ltd&oldid=346931

52

QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2 QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ ECTIO NS ENERGY INFORMA TION ADMINIST RATION May 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone, or telecommunications device for the hearing impaired. Addresses, telephone numbers, and hours are as follows: National Energy Information Center, El-231 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building, Room 1F-048 Washington, DC 20585 (202) 586-8800 Telecommunications Device for the

53

Comparative activation of estrogen receptor alpha (er alpha) by endocrine disruptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estrogen receptor ? (ER?) is a ligand activated transcription factor. Many widely used synthetic compounds and natural chemicals can activate ER?. The compounds investigated in this study include 17?-estradiol (E2), diethylstilbestrol (DES), antiestrogens ICI 182,780, 4-hydroxytamoxifen, the phytoestrogen resveratrol, and the xenoestrogens bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), octylphenol (OP), endosulfan, kepone, 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1- trichloroethane (HPTE) and 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorobiphenylol-4-ol (HO-PCB-Cl4). With the exception of the antiestrogens, all the compounds induced transactivation in MCF-7 or MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with wild-type ER? and a construct (pERE3) containing three tandem estrogen responsive elements (EREs) linked to a luciferase gene. However, these compounds differentially activated C-terminal deletion mutants of ER?. For example, neither E2 nor DES induced transactivation in MCF-7 transfected with ER?(1-537) due to partial deletion of helix 12 of ER?; however, OP, NP, resveratrol, kepone and HPTE induced this ER? mutant, demonstrating that the estrogenic activity of these synthetic compounds do not require activation function 2 (AF-2) of ER?. This study also investigated the effects of xenoestrogens on activation of reporter gene activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with a construct (pSp13) containing three tandem GC-rich Sp binding sites linked to the luciferase gene. In MCF-7 cells, antiestrogen-induced activation of ER?/Sp1 required the zinc finger motifs of ER?, whereas activation by estrogen and some xenoestrogens activation, such as endosulfan, NP and OP required the H12 of ER?. In contrast, xenoestrogens, such as HPTE, BPA, kepone and HO-PCBCl4, significantly induced transactivation of all four ER? deletion mutants tested in this study. Moreover, RNA interference assays demonstrated structuredependent differences in activation of ER?/Sp1, ER?/Sp3 and ER?/Sp4. The in vivo activities of E2, ICI 182,780, BPA and NP were further investigated in a transgenic mouse model containing pSp13 transgene. All the compounds induced luciferase activity in the mouse uterus; however activities observed in the penis and testis of male and stomach of both male and female mice were structure-dependent,. These results demonstrate that various ER ligands differentially activate ER? in breast cancer cells and transgenic mice, and their activities are dependent on ER? variants, promoter-, cell-context and selective use of different Sp proteins, suggesting these structurally diverse compounds are selective ER modulators (SERMs).

Wu, Fei

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284)Fall 2012 Topics: Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use Problem Set #1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284)Fall 2012 Topics: Energy Units & Conversions, Global Energy Use Problem Set #1 Due September 6, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Total Points: 80 For all problem sets in Energy and Society: 1) Please clearly state any assumptions (e.g., the price

Kammen, Daniel M.

56

Ris har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slr fast, at biomasse er en  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø har udgivet en rapport om moderne bioenergi. Den slår fast, at biomasse er en ligeså værdifuld skal til for at udnytte hele dens potentiale. Der er ikke noget nyt i at bruge biomasse til energi' er et spørgsmål om at udnytte ny teknologi til at gøre energi fra biomasse endnu mere rentabel og

57

Completion Report for Well ER-8-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Audit Report: ER-B-00-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Audit Report: ER-B-00-01 May 11, 2000 Central Shops at Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory's (Brookhaven) Central Shops Division (Central Shops)...

59

Kunnskap er makt! : en studie av maktforhold og sosial praksis i San Juan, Puerto Rico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sammendrag Grunnlaget for denne masteroppgaven er et 5 mneders langt feltarbeid i San Juan, Puerto Rico. Fra januar til juni 2011 bodde jeg i hovedstaden (more)

Hoff, Tuva Hiby

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Audit Report: ER-B-99-08 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Audit Report: ER-B-99-08 May 12, 1999 Health Physics Technician Subcontracts at Brookhaven National Laboratory To supplement its health physics staff, Brookhaven National...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE-ER-STD-6001-92; Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the evaluation of research results for publication in a professional journal. b. The most essential resource at DOE-ER sponsored facilities is the creativity of scientists and...

62

Grant No. DE=FG03=86ER113469  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Report, 1993 Annual Report, 1993 Grant No. DE=FG03=86ER113469 "Research in Chemical Kinetics" Principal Ihvestigator, F. S. Rowland This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its usc would not infringc privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, prccess, or ~ M c e by trade name, trademark, manufac- turer, or otherwise docs not nlecessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, m

63

EERE PROJECT M AN AG EM ENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... RTl\1ENT OF ENERGY ... RTl\1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M AN AG EM ENT CENT ER NEP .... DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:US Synthetic Corporation Page 1 of2 STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE: The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings For use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 OE-EEOOO3633 GFO-OOO3633"()()1 EE3633 Based on my review orthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.iA). I have made Ibe following determination: ex, EA, [ IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

64

ER/C-S2001, Rev. 0, PCN 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

document document . THIS DOCUMENT IS NOT CONTROLLED AND IS FOR INFORMATION/REFERENCE USE ONLY BECHTEL JACOBS COMPANY LLC f:\template\revorder.doc 1/28/98 REVISION ORDER Effective Date April 1, 1998 PROCEDURE TO BE CHANGED: Page 1 of 1 BJC-ES-01 ER/C-S2001 Risk Assessment Roles And Responsibilities (Manual Number) (Procedure Number and Title) 06/23/1992 0 (Procedure Date) (Rev. Number) Reason for Change: To comply with Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC requirements SECTION DESCRIPTION OF CHANGE Entire Document Replace "Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy systems)" with "Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC." Entire Document Replace Energy Systems Position Titles with Corresponding Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC Position Titles Entire Document Replace "Energy Systems" with "Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC."

65

Grant No. DE-FG03-86ER-13469  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report, 1994 Report, 1994 Grant No. DE-FG03-86ER-13469 "Research in Chemical Kinetics'' Principal Investigator, F. S. Rowland DISCLAIMER T h i s report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any spe- cific commercial product, process. or service by trade name, trademark, manufac- turer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

66

Thomases'er'tm-232 ext.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

32 32 Risk Assessment Program Data Management Implementation Plan This document has been approved by the East Tennessee Technology Park Technical Information Office for release to the public. Date: 11/20/97 ES/ER/TM-232 Risk Assessment Program Data Management Implementation Plan Date Issued-November 1997 Prepared by Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management under budget and reporting code EW 20 LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. managing the Environmental Management Activities at the East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant under contract DE-AC05-84OR21400 for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

67

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

CNSS Papers CI Siegfried S. Hecl^er  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNSS Papers CNSS Papers CI Siegfried S. Hecl^er m Center for National Security Studies Los Alamos National Laboratory 0!STffl?UlSUrf J? THIS iiOCy^fttMi cS l-^LI^iTEfi CENTER FOR NATIONAL SECURITY STUDIES The Center for National Security Studies is a studies and analysis or- ganization of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Drawing on the broad knowledge at Los Alamos of science and engineering relevant to national security issues, the Center's research focuses on the interaction between technology and policy and on developing insights that may improve the relationship between the development of nevv/ technology and the achieve- ment of national policy goals. The Center's staff includes both resident and visiting researchers. The principal mission of the Center is to promote and conduct long-term

69

The EDOP Radar System on the High-Altitude NASA ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft that emulates a satellite view of precipitation systems carries a variety of passive and active (lidar) remote sensing instruments. A new Doppler weather radar system at X band (9.6 GHz) called the ER-...

Gerald M. Heymsfield; Steven W. Bidwell; I. Jeff Caylor; Syed Ameen; Shaun Nicholson; Wayne Boncyk; Lee Miller; Doug Vandemark; Paul E. Racette; Louis R. Dod

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Data Sources for Figures ER2006-0227 C-1 April 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix C Data Sources for Figures #12;#12;ER2006-0227 C-1 April 2006 Feature Data Source Laboratory, ENV­Environmental Remediation & Surveillance Program, ER2005-0496; 1:2,500 Scale Data; 22 Sept:2,500 Scale Data; 10 March 2006. Canyon Rim, Location of the, Townsite South Rim in 1991; in "Line Features

71

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Completion Report for Well ER-18-2  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-18-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well, located on Buckboard Mesa in the western part of the Nevada Test Site, was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 408.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 369.7 meters approximately two months after the completion string was installed. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 15 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 420 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. The upper part of the well penetrated Tertiary-age basalt, underlain by tuffaceous moat-filling sediments interbedded with ash-flow tuff units of the Thirsty Canyon Group and the Beatty Wash Formation. The lower half of the drill hole penetrated ash-flow tuff of the mafic-rich Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-18-2 indicates that this site is located inside the structural margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lflnulegar diffurjoefnur OEetta er langur kafli. Lflnulegar diffurjoefnur eru sff flokkur diffurjafna sem menn skilja  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\Delta + ann (t)y n + hn (t) * OEa? er frekar ruglingslegt a? enska neikvae?a forskeyti? er nota? hfir ff svipa?an hfftt eins og fyrir vektorvarpanir ø.e. eftir stoekum, en stoekin eru hfir stoek fylkisins (a = AT . Nokkur daemi um øetta ver?a s?nd hfir ff eftir. Setning 6. Ef BA = AB øff er Be A = e A B. Soennun

Magnus, Robert

74

Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

75

Audit Report: ER-B-99-07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-99-07 ER-B-99-07 Audit Report: ER-B-99-07 May 4, 1999 Maintenance Activities at the Y-12 Plant Department of Energy (Department) policy requires the use of performance measures to assess the efficiency of maintenance operations. The Department recommends that performance measures be developed to evaluate progress toward meeting plant maintenance goals, and that deviations in expected results be analyzed to identify root causes and reported to management for corrective action. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Lockheed Martin) used performance measures to identify and correct inefficiencies in its maintenance program. Audit Report: ER-B-99-07 More Documents & Publications Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1999

76

Comparisons of the NASA ER-2 Meteorological Measurement System with Radar Tracking and Radiosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft longitude, latitude, and velocity, and measurements of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and horizontal wind from the meteorological measurement system (MMS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft were compared with independent ...

Steven E. Gaines; Stuart W. Bowen; R. Stephen Hipskind; T. Paul Bui; K. Roland Chan

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Bosch Solar Energy AG former ErSol Solar Energy AG | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Bosch Solar Energy AG former ErSol Solar Energy AG Jump to: navigation, search Name Bosch Solar...

78

Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-98-02 ER-B-98-02 Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 October 24, 1997 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site The Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site are over 40 years old and are approaching the end of their useful lives. The managing and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), and the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) proposed to build two new facilities to replace them. We conducted this audit to determine whether the construction of new laboratories was the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish the site's environmental monitoring and health physics missions. Audit Report: ER-B-98-02

79

Audit Report: ER-B-99-04 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Audit Report: ER-B-99-04 March 15, 1999 Credit Card Usage at the Ohio Field Office and the Fernald and Miamisburg Environmental Management Projects The Department of Energy...

80

Comparison of Four ERS-1 Scatterometer Wind Retrieval Algorithms with Buoy Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind velocity retrievals from the ERS-1 scatterometer are compared with extensive high-quality hourly buoy winds using four different algorithms in two oceanic regions during 1994. The retrieved winds exhibit significantly different wind velocity ...

Clifford Rufenach

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assimilation of ERS-1 Altimeter Wave Heights in an Operational Numerical Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observed significant wave heights (SWH) from ERS-1 have been received and evaluated at the Norwegian Meteorological Institute (DNMI) since August 1991. The observations were found to be of high quality. Since January 1992 the data were ...

Lars-Anders Breivik; Magnar Reistad

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ASCAT Soil Moisture: An Assessment of the Data Quality and Consistency with the ERS Scatterometer Heritage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a first comparison between remotely sensed surface soil moisture retrieved with the European Remote Sensing Satellite-2 (ERS-2) scatterometer (SCAT) and the corresponding product provided by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT)...

Vahid Naeimi; Zoltan Bartalis; Wolfgang Wagner

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Audit Report: ER-B-98-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Audit Report: ER-B-98-03 November 7, 1997 Audit of the Union Valley Sample Preparation Facility at Oak Ridge In 1991, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) determined...

84

Intense Convection Observed by NASA ER-2 in Hurricane Emily (2005)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 17 July, intense convection in the eyewall of Hurricane Emily (2005) was observed by the high-altitude (20 km) NASA ER-2 aircraft. Analysis of this convection is undertaken using downward-looking radar, passive microwave radiometer, electric ...

Daniel J. Cecil; Kevin R. Quinlan; Douglas M. Mach

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Magnetic Properties of RB66 (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, and Lu)  

SciTech Connect

We report magnetic susceptibility measurements of RB66 (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, and Lu) boron-rich rare earth containing borides down to 50 mK. The data suggest a spin glass low temperature state for RB66 (R = Gd, Tb, Ho, and Er) with the freezing temperatures below 1 K. The magnetic properties appear to be influenced by the anisotropy of the magnetic moments, probably via the crystalline electric field effects.

Kim, Hyunsoo; Budko, Serguei; ATanatar, Makariy; Avdashchenko, D.V.; Matovnikov, A.V.; Mitroshenkov, N.V.; Novikov, V.V.; Prozorov, Ruslan

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

Completion report for Well ER-EC-6  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Completion Report for Well ER-12-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled from November 2002 to January 2003 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology in the northwestern portion of Yucca Flat. The well was drilled to total measured depth of 2,097.9 meters. The 131.1-centimeter-diameter borehole was left open (i.e., uncased) below the base of the intermediate casing at 901.6 meters. A piezometer string was installed outside the surface casing to a depth of 176.4 meters to monitor a zone of perched water. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, sidewall core samples from 7 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated, in descending order, 137.5 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium, 48.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks, 289.6 meters of Mississippian Chainman Shale, and 1,622.5 meters of Mississippian and Upper Devonian Eleana Formation consisting of shale, argillite, sandstone, quartzite, and limestone. Forty-seven days after the well was drilled the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 65.43 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 127.14 meters.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

M. J. Townsend

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-4, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 were drilled during fiscal year (FY) 2009 and FY 2010 (NNSA/NSO, 2011a and b). The closest underground nuclear test detonations to the area of investigation are TYBO (U-20y), BELMONT (U-20as), MOLBO (U-20ag), BENHAM (U-20c), and HOYA (U-20 be) (Figure 1-1). The TYBO, MOLBO, and BENHAM detonations had working points located below the regional water table. The BELMONT and HOYA detonation working points were located just above the water table, and the cavity for these detonations are calculated to extend below the water table (Pawloski et al., 2002). The broad purpose of Wells ER-20-4 and ER-20-8 is to determine the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater, the geologic formations, groundwater geochemistry as an indicator of age and origin, and the water-bearing properties and hydraulic conditions that influence radionuclide migration. Well development and testing is performed to determine the hydraulic properties at the well and between other wells, and to obtain groundwater samples at the well that are representative of the formation at the well. The area location, wells, underground nuclear detonations, and other features are shown in Figure 1-1. Hydrostratigraphic cross sections A-A, B-B, C-C, and D-D are shown in Figures 1-2 through 1-5, respectively.

Greg Ruskauff and Sam Marutzky

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ANCCA, an estrogen-regulated AAA+ ATPase coactivator for ER alpha, is required for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification June X.at the ER target chromatin. Moreover, mutations at the ATPco-regulator complexes at chromatin is a process facilitated

Zou, June X; Revenko, Alexey S; Li, Li B; Gemo, Abigael T; Chen, Hong-Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-98-07 ER-B-98-07 Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 April 6, 1998 Personal Property at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information The Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) are responsible for safeguarding and controlling personal property in their possession and in the possession of their contractors. Categories of personal property include vehicles, heavy mobile equipment, computers and software, office furniture and equipment, laboratory equipment, security and protection equipment, and shop equipment. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Operations Office and OSTI adequately safeguarded and properly accounted for personal property in their possession and in the possession

92

Audit Report: ER-B-98-04 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-98-04 ER-B-98-04 Audit Report: ER-B-98-04 November 24, 1997 Audit Of Selected Government-Funded Grants And Contracts At Princeton University As the cognizant audit agency for Princeton University (Princeton), we audited Princeton's costs claimed under 20 Government-funded, cost-reimbursement grants and contracts (agreements). The Defense Contract Audit Agency had advised us that several Princeton employees, including two principal investigators, were also employed by a commercial business. These 2 principal investigators were responsible for 28 Government-funded agreements at Princeton between October 1, 1986, and December 31, 1996. After becoming aware that Princeton employees were also working at a commercial business, we initiated this audit of the agreements assigned to

93

Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ER-B-99-02 ER-B-99-02 Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 January 25, 1999 Small Disadvantaged Business Program at the Chicago Operations Office The Small Business Act (Act) requires that small business concerns owned and controlled by socially or economically disadvantaged individuals have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in contracts awarded by any Federal agency. Section 8(a) of the Act establishes a program that authorizes the Small Business Administration (SBA) to enter into contracts with other agencies and award subcontracts for performing those contracts to firms enrolled in the 8(a) Program directly to the agencies. Contracts are to be awarded competitively if the anticipated award price of the contract will exceed $3 million and at least two responsible 8(a) firms

94

Audit Report: ER-L-02-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-L-02-01 ER-L-02-01 Audit Report: ER-L-02-01 February 7, 2002 The Department of Energy's Strategy for Disposal of Plutonium In September 2000, the United States and the Russian Federation entered into an agreement stipulating that each country will irreversibly transform 34 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium into forms which could not be used for weapons purposes. To meet the United States' commitment, the Department of Energy planned activities at its Savannah River Site; specifically, to immobilize 8.4 metric tons of weapons-grade plutonium and to convert 25.6 metric tons into nuclear reactor fuel. The plan called for the design and construction of three major facilities at Savannah River: the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility, the Plutonium Immobilization

95

Photometric Observations of the Type Ia SN 2002er in UGC 10743  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive light and colour curves for the Type Ia supernova SN 2002er are presented as part of the European Supernova Collaboration. We have collected UBVRI photometry from ten different telescopes covering the phases from 7 days before until 619 days after maximum light. Corrections for the different instrumental systems and the non-thermal spectrum of the supernova (S-corrections) have been applied. With the densely sampled light curves we can make detailed comparisons to other well-observed objects. SN 2002er most closely resembles SN 1996X after maximum, but clearly shows a different colour evolution before peak light and a stronger shoulder in V and R bands compared to other well-observed SNe Ia. In particular, the rise time appears to be longer than what is expected from rise-time vs.decline-rate relation. We use several methods to determine the reddening towards SN 2002er based on the colour evolution at near peak and at late phases. The uvoir (bolometric) light curve shows great similarity with SN 1996X, but also indications of a higher luminosity, longer rise time and a more pronounced shoulder 25 days past maximum. The interpretation of the light curves was done with two independent light curve codes. Both find that given the luminosity of SN 2002er the 56Ni mass exceeds 0.6 Msun with prefered values near 0.7 Msun. Uncertainties in the exact distance to SN 2002er are the most serious limitation of this measurement. The light curve modelling also indicates a high level of mixing of the nickel in the explosion of SN 2002er.

G. Pignata; F. Patat; S. Benetti; S. Blinnikov; W. Hillebrandt; R. Kotak; B. Leibundgut; P. A. Mazzali; P. Meikle; Y. Qiu; P. Ruiz-Lapuente; S. Smartt; E. Sorokina; M. Stritzinger; M. Stehle; M. Turatto; T. Marsh; F. Martin-Luis; N. McBride; J. Mendez; L. Morales-Rueda; D. Narbutis; R. Street

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Measurement of thermal neutron cross section and resonance integral for the {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er reaction by using a {sup 55}Mn monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal neutron cross section and the resonance integral of the reaction {sup 170}Er(n,{gamma}){sup 171}Er were measured by the Cd-ratio method using a {sup 55}Mn monitor as single comparator. Analytical grade MnO{sub 2} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder samples with and without a cylindrical 1 mm Cd shield box were irradiated in an isotropic neutron field obtained from three {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources. The induced activities in the samples were measured with a 120.8% relative efficiency p-type HPGe detector. The correction factors for gamma-ray attenuation (F{sub g}), thermal neutron self-shielding (G{sub th}), and resonance neutron self-shielding (G{sub epi}) effects, and the epithermal neutron spectrum shape factor ({alpha}) were taken into account. The thermal neutron cross section for the (n,{gamma}) reaction in {sup 170}Er has been determined to be 8.00 {+-} 0.56 b, relative to that of the {sup 55}Mn monitor. However, some previously reported experimental results compared to the present result show a large discrepancy ranging from 8.3 to 86%. The present result is, in general, in good agreement with the recently measured values by 9%. According to the definition of Cd cut-off energy at 0.55 eV, the resonance integral obtained is 44.5 {+-} 4.0 b, which is determined relative to the reference integral value of the {sup 55}Mn monitor by using cadmium ratios. The existing experimental data for the resonance integral are distributed between 18 and 43 b. The present resonance integral value agrees only with the measurement of 43 {+-} 5 b by Gillette [Thermal Cross Section and Resonance Integral Studies, ORNL-4155, 15 (1967)] within uncertainty limits.

Yuecel, Haluk [Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEK), Besevler Campus, 06100 Tandogan-Ankara (Turkey); Budak, M. Gueray; Karadag, Mustafa [Gazi University, Gazi Education Faculty, 06500 Teknikokullar-Ankara (Turkey)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

LB-ER-10-06 SC NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LB-ER-10-06 LB-ER-10-06 SC NEPA Tracking Number U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF SCIENCE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (NEPA) ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION NOTIFICATION FORM Solicitation/Award No. (if applicable): _N"'/c:..A':-:-.,,--:-:--:_-:----;:-=:-;:-;-=:--:--:---:::-:-::---:-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Organization Name: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, California Title of Proposed UC use of DOE infrastructure and UC's Subsequent Construction and Operation of the Project/Research: Solar Energy Research Center (SERC) Building Total DOE FundinglTotal Project Funding: ~$O::..:..../ $"'54::..:..:...4.:.:.M"-_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ I. Project Description (use additional pages as necessary): A. Proposed ProjecUAction (delineate Federally funded/Non-Federally funded portions)

98

N-acetylation and phosphorylation of Sec complex subunits in the ER membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of N-acetylation, however, remains unclear for the acetylation leads to missorting of secretory proteins to the cytosol. These observations led to the conclusion that N- acetylation interferes with ER targeting [5]. Although protein flux across the ER... to the N-terminus (S2, S3, T5, T12) and a second one closer to the transmembrane do- main of Sbh1p (S35, S38) (Table 1). Mutation of S35, but not of S38, to alanine led to complete destabilization of Sbh1p in our hands, and the mutant was one of the few...

Soromani, Christina; Zeng, Naiyan; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Heinzle, Elmar; Klein, Marie-Christine; Tretter, Thomas; Seaman, Matthew N J; Rmisch, Karin

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

Magnetic and superconducting phase diagrams in ErNi2B2C  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the superconducting upper critical field Hc2(T) and the magneticphasediagram of the superconductor ErNi2B2C made with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The magnetic field was applied in the basal plane of the tetragonal crystal structure. We have found large gapless regions in the superconductingphasediagram of ErNi2B2C, extending between different magnetic transitions. A close correlation between magnetic transitions and Hc2(T) is found, showing that superconductivity is strongly linked to magnetism.

Galvis, J.A.; Crespo, M.; Guillamon, I.; Suderow, Hermann; Vieira, S.; Garcia Hernandez, M.; Budko, Serguei; Canfield, Paul

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Structural basis of FFAT Motif-mediated ER targeting Stephen E. Kaiser, Jason H. Brickner1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/FFAT motif/ORP proteins/VAP-33 proteins 2 #12;Introduction The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi it is conserved in a large family of Oxysterol Binding Protein Related Proteins (ORPs) (Figure 1A and Supplemental Figure 1A) (Loewen et al., 2003). ORPs are regulators of lipid metabolism that are targeted by their FFAT

Walter, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A 94-GHz Cloud Radar System on a NASA High-Altitude ER-2 Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 94-GHz (W band) Cloud Radar System (CRS) has been developed and flown on a NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) aircraft. The CRS is a fully coherent, polarimetric Doppler radar that is capable of detecting clouds and precipitation from the ...

Lihua Li; Gerald M. Heymsfield; Paul E. Racette; Lin Tian; Ed Zenker

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

PARTICLE FILTERING AND CRAM ER-RAO LOWER BOUND FOR UNDERWATER NAVIGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARTICLE FILTERING AND CRAM ´ER-RAO LOWER BOUND FOR UNDERWATER NAVIGATION Rickard Karlsson, Fredrik-mail: {rickard,fredrik}@isy.liu.se Tobias Karlsson Saab Bofors Underwater Systems Box 910 SE-591 29 Motala relying on a dig- ital underwater terrain map and sonar measurements. The method is applicable for both

Gustafsson, Fredrik

103

Validation of Atlantic Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures Measured by the ERS-1 Along Track Scanning Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period from October 1991 to May 1992 the royal research ship Bransfield made its annual voyage from the United Kingdom to Antarctica and back. Whenever the measurement swath of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) on the ERS-1 ...

J. P. Thomas; J. Turner

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1] PEtER BoRwEin ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LITTLEWOOD-TYPE PROBLEMS ON [0,1]. PEtER BoRwEin, TAm bAs eRD bElyi , AnD u bExA ? bos. ?R????? ' ??????d?f gh ???d kl mopRC ?s C?h?f?t.

105

7016 EXPAnDing tHE fROntiERS Solar Decathlon team, circa 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7016 ­ EXPAnDing tHE fROntiERS #12;Solar Decathlon team, circa 2005 #12;CONCRETE CANOE;Above: ASCE (Class of Spring 1978) - Reunion, circa October 2007 Photo credit: Ralph Wheeler and Bob, then with the written part of the requirement, this added burden represented at least one additional credit hour

Aydilek, Ahmet

106

March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model -1 1 ER to Relational Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 1 ER to Relational Mapping #12;March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 2+ #12;March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 3 - Introduction In the previous lectures we looked at conceptual into a relational schema. #12;March 23, 2008 DB:EER Model - 1 4 - Mapping Entity Types Mapping of Regular Entity

Adam, Salah

107

TAW-Er:a U.S. DEPARMEENT OF ENERGY EER E PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TAW-Er:a TAW-Er:a U.S. DEPARMEENT OF ENERGY EER E PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERI\ ITNATION RECIPIENT:Bowling Green State University STATE: OH PRO.IECT TITLE : Coasta; Ohio Wind Project Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FG36-06G086096 GF0-09-171 G086096 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

108

US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEI'ER1IllNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEI'ER1IllNATION DEI'ER1IllNATION Page I of3 RECIPIENT:Verdant Power, Inc. STATE: NY PROJECT TITLE : Advancement of the Kinetic Hydropower System (KHPS) to DOE TRL 7/8 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOO5929 GF0-0005929-OO1 EE5929 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APP .. :NDlX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination 83.6 S mall-scale research and development, laboratory o peratio ns, and pilot projects 83.16 Researc h activities in aquatic env ironments Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits),

109

Microsoft Word - DOE-ER-0670T_6.09_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-0670T ER-0670T UC-402 Science Plan for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) February 1996 United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Research Office of Health and Environmental Research Environmental Sciences Division Washington, DC 20585 ARM Science Plan iii Executive Summary The purpose of this Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Plan is to articulate the scientific issues driving the ARM Program, and to relate them to DOE's programmatic objectives for ARM, based on the experience and scientific progress gained over the past five years. ARM programmatic objectives are to: 1. Relate observed radiative fluxes and radiances in the atmosphere, spectrally resolved and as a function of position and time, to the temperature and composition of the atmosphere, specifically including

110

Audit Report: ER-B-99-06 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Audit Report: ER-B-99-06 April 14, 1999 Bechtel Jacobs Payroll Creation The Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) awarded a contract to the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (Bechtel Jacobs) in December 1997. The terms of the contract require Bechtel Jacobs to create new jobs in the Oak Ridge area with a cumulative payroll of $427 million through Fiscal Year (FY) 2003. In FY 1998, the contract required Bechtel Jacobs to create $11 million in new payroll. The objective of the audit was to determine if Bechtel Jacobs met its commitment to create at least $11 million in new payroll in the Oak Ridge, Tennessee area through September 30, 1998. Audit Report: ER-B-99-06 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0498 Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1999

111

Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 June 19, 2000 Waste Characterization at Oak Ridge Waste characterization is a series of steps performed to determine the weight, volume, and physical characteristics of radioactive waste. The Department of Energy (Department) uses data obtained from waste characterization to evaluate treatment and disposal options for the waste. The characterization process begins when the generator of the waste prepares a general description of the waste produced. The extent of work performed for the final characterization is dependent on the amount and quality of information provided by the generator and the proposed treatment or disposal option for the waste. Audit Report: ER-B-00-03 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0434 Audit Report: IG-0426

112

Audit Report: ER-B-98-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8-01 8-01 Audit Report: ER-B-98-01 October 23, 1997 Audit of the Deactivation, Decontamination, and Disposal of Surplus Facilities at the Savannah River Site Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse) is responsible for managing the Department of Energy's (Department) surplus facilities at the Savannah River Site (Site). In Fiscal Year (FY) 1996, the Site had 162 surplus facilities and anticipated that 118 more would become surplus within the next 5 years. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) and Westinghouse had economically and promptly deactivated, decontaminated, and disposed of surplus facilities at the Site. Audit Report: ER-B-98-01 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0684

113

Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: ER-B-98-02 October 24, 1997 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site The Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Site are over 40 years old and are approaching the end of their useful lives. The managing and operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse), and the Savannah River Operations Office (Operations Office) proposed to build two new facilities to replace them. We conducted this audit to determine whether the construction of new laboratories was the most cost-effective alternative to accomplish the site's environmental monitoring and health physics missions. Audit Report: ER-B-98-02

114

Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 February 14, 1997 Audit of the Department of Energy's Grant for Economic Development at the Mound Plant The downsizing of the Department of Energy's (Department) facilities as a result of the end of the Cold War had a negative impact on communities that were heavily dependent on the Department's operations for economic stability. To lessen the impact, the Department provided financial assistance to local communities through Federal grants and cooperative agreements. The objective of this audit was to determine whether funding provided for economic development at the Mound Plant was used for the Department's intended purposes. Audit Report: ER-B-97-02 More Documents & Publications Audit of Shutdown and Transition of the Mound Plant, IG-0408

115

Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 December 10, 1997 Audit Of The Department Of Energy's Contracts With Envirocare Of Utah, Inc The Department of Energy (Department) is responsible for protecting human health and the environment by providing an effective and efficient system that treats, stores, and disposes of Departmental waste. The Department disposes of some of its waste at Envirocare of Utah, Inc., (Envirocare) a commercial treatment and disposal facility in Clive, Utah. The audit objective was to determine whether the Department and its contractors were using the most favorable rates available for the disposal of waste at Envirocare. Audit Report: ER-B-98-05 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0426 Audit Report: IG-0612 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-09-17

116

The Theory of High Energy Collision Processes - Final Report DOE/ER/40158-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1984, DOE awarded Harvard University a new Grant DE-FG02-84ER40158 to continue their support of Tai Tsun Wu as Principal Investigator of research on the theory of high energy collision processes. This Grant was renewed and remained active continuously from June 1, 1984 through November 30, 2007. Topics of interest during the 23-year duration of this Grant include: the theory and phenomenology of collision and production processes at ever higher energies; helicity methods of QED and QCD; neutrino oscillations and masses; Yang-Mills gauge theory; Beamstrahlung; Fermi pseudopotentials; magnetic monopoles and dyons; cosmology; classical confinement; mass relations; Bose-Einstein condensation; and large-momentum-transfer scattering processes. This Final Report describes the research carried out on Grant DE-FG02-84ER40158 for the period June 1, 1984 through November 30, 2007. Two books resulted from this project and a total of 125 publications.

Wu, Tai, T.

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Notices Docket Numbers: ER11-3935-000. Applicants: CL Power Sales Eight,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Federal Register 2 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 131 / Friday, July 8, 2011 / Notices Docket Numbers: ER11-3935-000. Applicants: CL Power Sales Eight, LLC. Description: CL Power Sales Eight, LLC submits tariff filing per 35.37: CL Power Sales Eight, LLC Triennial MBR Update for the NE Region to be effective 6/30/2011. Filed Date: 06/29/2011. Accession Number: 20110629-5160. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, August 29, 2011. Docket Numbers: ER11-3936-000. Applicants: CP Power Sales Twenty, LLC. Description: CP Power Sales Twenty, LLC submits tariff filing per 35.37: CP Power Sales Twenty, LLC Triennial MBR Update for the NE Region to be effective 6/30/2011. Filed Date: 06/29/2011. Accession Number: 20110629-5161. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on Monday, August 29, 2011.

118

Sampling and Analysis Plan for Catch Tank 241ER311 Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAF') identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) objectives for the characterization of catch tank 241-ER-311 vapor space. Data to be collected under this revision (Revision 2) of the TSAP will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of the portable exhauster recently installed for the tank. Vapor samples taken previous to the issuance of this revision shall be analyzed in accordance with Revision 1.

NGUYEN, D.M.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Photometric Observations of the Type Ia SN 2002er in UGC 10743  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extensive light and colour curves for the Type Ia supernova SN 2002er are presented as part of the European Supernova Collaboration. We have collected UBVRI photometry from ten different telescopes covering the phases from 7 days before until 619 days after maximum light. Corrections for the different instrumental systems and the non-thermal spectrum of the supernova (S-corrections) have been applied. With the densely sampled light curves we can make detailed comparisons to other well-observed objects. SN 2002er most closely resembles SN 1996X after maximum, but clearly shows a different colour evolution before peak light and a stronger shoulder in V and R bands compared to other well-observed SNe Ia. In particular, the rise time appears to be longer than what is expected from rise-time vs.decline-rate relation. We use several methods to determine the reddening towards SN 2002er based on the colour evolution at near peak and at late phases. The uvoir (bolometric) light curve shows great similarity with SN 199...

Pignata, G; Benetti, S; Blinnikov, S; Hillebrandt, W; Kotak, R; Leibundgut, B; Mazzali, P A; Meikle, P; Qiu, Y; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Smartt, S; Sorokina, E; Stritzinger, M; Stehle, M; Turatto, M; Marsh, T; Martin-Luis, F; McBride, N; Mndez, J; Morales-Rueda, L; Narbutis, D; Street, R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ORP-3 Rescues ER Membrane Expansions Caused by the VAPB-P56S Mutation in Familial ALS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A mutation in ER membrane protein VAPB is responsible for causing a familial form of ALS (ALS8). The VAPB-P56S mutation causes protein aggregation and a (more)

Darbyson, Angie L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sequential Assimilation of ERS-1 SAR Data into a Coupled Land SurfaceHydrological Model Using an Extended Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first attempt to sequentially assimilate European Space Agency (ESA) Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) estimations of surface soil moisture in the production scheme of a lumped rainfallrunoff model has been ...

C. Francois; A. Quesney; C. Ottl

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ER-2 Doppler Radar Investigations of the Eyewall of Hurricane Bonnie during the Convection and Moisture Experiment-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A persistent, mesoscale region of intense eyewall convection contained within Hurricane Bonnie on 23 August 1998 is examined from multiple observations synthesized from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft. The ...

Gerald M. Heymsfield; Jeffrey B. Halverson; Joanne Simpson; Lin Tian; T. Paul Bui

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Dynamics of the green and red upconversion emissions in Yb3+-Er3+-Codoped Y2O3 nanorods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient green and red upconversion emission in Y2O3:Yb3+, Er3+ nanorods under 978nm radiation excitation is achieved. Experimental effective lifetimes, luminescent emissions, and nanorod sizes depend strongly ...

O. Meza; L. A. Diaz-Torres; P. Salas; C. Angeles-Chavez; A. Martnez; J. Morales; J. Oliva

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal lens study of thermo-optical properties and concentration quenching of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate based glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have used the thermal lens technique combined with conventional spectroscopy to characterize the thermo-optical properties of Er3+-doped lead pyrophosphate-based glasses. More precisely, we have investigated and quantified experimentally the fluorescence quantum efficiencies of the Er3+ levels, and we describe the role of concentration quenching effects. The fluorescence quantum efficiency of the 4I13/2 level is very high when compared to other phosphate glasses, while that of the green-coupled levels is very small. Other important photonic materials parameters, such as the thermal diffusivity and temperature coefficient of the optical path length change, were obtained and compared with those of other glass systems. The cumulative results obtained here for the Er-doped lead pyrophosphate glass show that this material is a good candidate for photonic applications with a characteristic Er3+ infrared emission around 1550 nm.

Santos, C. C. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotnica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Fsica, Brazil; Guedes, Ilde [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara, Brazil; Vermelho, M. V. D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Jacinto, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Brazil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of 4-phenylbutyric acid on the process and development of diabetic nephropathy induced in rats by streptozotocin: Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-oxidative activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), although the precise regulatory mechanism is still unclear. Recent reports have shown that chemical molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) can suppress oxidative stress by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We therefore hypothesized that 4-PBA could provide renoprotection through the suppression of oxidative stress in DN rats. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: a normal control (NC) group, a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN model group, and a DN plus 4-PBA (1 g/kg) treatment group. At the end of 4, 8, and 12 weeks, hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity and the expression of phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1{alpha} (p-IRE1{alpha}), p47phox, nitrotyrosine (NT) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the kidneys of all rats were determined; malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum and urine were also detected; renal nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in all of the rats was examined at the end of 12 weeks. Compared with the NC group, the DN rats showed a significant increase in hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-{kappa}B activity, the expression of p-IRE1{alpha}, p47phox, NT and Nrf2 in renal tissue; markedly, MDA levels were higher and SOD activity was lower in serum and urine of DN rats than in NC rats for the indicated time. These alterations were inhibited by the administration of 4-PBA. These findings first demonstrated that treatment with 4-PBA significantly inhibits the process and development of diabetic nephropathy in rats through the regulation of ER stress-oxidative activation.

Luo Zhifeng [Institute of Nephrology of Chongqing and Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Feng Bing, E-mail: fxb12@yahoo.com.c [Institute of Nephrology of Chongqing and Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Mu Jiao; Qi Wei; Zeng Wei; Guo Yanhong; Pang Qi; Ye Zilin; Liu Li; Yuan Fahuan [Institute of Nephrology of Chongqing and Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

FOEU-iERLY UTILIZED SITES REKEDIAL ACTION PROG%AM ELIMINATION REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

y ((-' q ' y ((-' q ' c - ,' .* FOEU-iERLY UTILIZED SITES REKEDIAL ACTION PROG%AM ELIMINATION REPORT FORMERERATOOLAND ENGINEERING COMPANY 4555 UEST ADDISON STREET CHICAGO, ILLINOIS NOVEMBER 14, 1989 Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Facility and Site Decommissioning . . CONTENTS Page INTRODU~ION......................... 1 BAcI(GROuND.......................... 1 Site Function. ...................... 1 Site Description ..................... 2 Radiological History and Status .............. 2 ELIMINATION ANALYSIS ..................... 2 REFERENCES .......................... 4 -- -.. I. m -- ELIMINATION REPORT FORMER ERA TOOL AND ENGINEERING COMPANY 4555 WEST ADDISON STREET CHICAGO, ILLINOIS INTRODUCTION

127

Electrically active Er doping in InAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and GaAs  

SciTech Connect

The electron concentration in dilute alloys of Er in GaAs, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As, and InAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy is studied as a function of Er concentration and In content. Using first-principles calculations based on hybrid density functional theory, we attribute an observed increase in conduction electron concentration to Er incorporation on interstitial sites. Er also incorporates on substitutional sites where it is isovalent and electrically inactive. The formation energy of interstitial Er in InAs is significantly smaller than in GaAs, allowing for more electrically active Er in InAs. The results provide insight into characteristics of rare-earth elements as dopants in semiconductors.

Burke, Peter G.; Ismer, Lars; Lu Hong; Frantz, Elan; Janotti, Anderson; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Bowers, John E.; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

128

The {beta}-Decay Properties of Scissors Mode 1{sup +} States in {sup 164}Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The beta decay properties of collective I{sup {pi}}K = 1{sup +}1 states in doubly even deformed {sup 164}Er nuclei are investigated in the framework of the rotational invariant random-phase approximation. It is shown that an essential decrease of the rate of the allowed {beta}-decay to the excited 1{sup +}-states as compared with that to the ground state may be due to the orbital nature of the states. The model Hamiltonian includes restoring rotational invariance of the deformed single particle Hamiltonian forces and the spin-spin interactions. The analytical expressions for the Gamov-Teller (G-T) and Fermi (F) decay matrix elements are derived. The single-particle energies were obtained from the Warsaw deformed Woods-Saxon potential with deformation parameter {delta}{sub 2} = 0.24. The numerical results for {beta}{sup +} transition from {sup 164}Tm to {sup 164}Er indicate the importance of using rotational invariant Hamiltonian to explain experimental data.

Yildirim, Z.; Kuliev, A.; Ozkan, S. [Sakarya University, Department of Physics, 54100, Sakarya (Turkey); Guliyev, E. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'ER1vllNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'ER1vllNATION 'ER1vllNATION RECIPI ENT:Township of Branchburg PROJECT TITLE: Branchburg Solar Page I of2 STATE: NJ Funding Opportunity Announ~~menl Number P rocur~menlln5lrumenf Number- NEPA Control Number- CID Numbn COP 78.10 EEOOO3094 GF()'oo()3094-OO1 0 Bas~d on my review of the Information ~oncerning Ihe proposed action, as NEPA Complian~e Om~er (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA),1 have mad~ th~ following deter-mination : CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 5. 1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

130

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERJ\IINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEN CEN T ER NEPA DETERJ\IINATION REC)PIENT:Flint Geothermal LLC Page 1 of2 STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: Recovery Act: Direct Confirmation of Commercial Geothermal Resources in Colorado using Remote Sensing and On·Site Exploration , Testing and Analysis Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number OE-FOA-OOOO109 DE-EEOOO2828 GFO-10-2S1 2828 BasC'd on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, 3S NEPA Compliance Omen (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and

131

u.s. DEPART1IENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EERE PROJECT MANAG EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETER1.IINATION RECIPIENT:TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PROJECT TITLE: ARRA SEP CITY OF ADDISON TURBINE PROJECT Page 1 of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity AnDouncement Number Proc:urcmentlnstrumcnt Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE·EEOOOO116 EEOOOO116 EE116 Based on my review oftbe informatioll concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Order 4Sl.IA), I ban made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including. but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). dala analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

132

EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETEIU.IlNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

p-, ** p-, ** ~ , u.s DEPARTMENT OFENFRGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETEIU.IlNATION RECIPIENT:Simpson College; a SEP ARRA sub-recipient of the Iowa Economic Development Authority PROJECf TITLE: Simpson College Boiler Plant De-Centralization Page 1 of3 STATE: lA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOO162 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-0000162-020 EE162 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed aelion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 (a) Actions to conserve energy or water, demonstrate potential energy or water conservation, and promote energy

133

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEME T CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANAGEME T CEN ANAGEME T CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Hiawatha CUSD #426 PROJECf TITLE: Hiawatha GUSD #426 Part II Page 1 of2 STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOAOOOOO52 EEOOOO119 GFO-10-349 EE11 9 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners

134

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AII.ol AII.ol ) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPI ENT :Mass Department of Energy Resources PROJECf TITL E : SunShot Massachusetts Page 1 of2 ST ATE: MA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE· FOA 0000549 DE-EEOOO5692 GFO-OOO5692-OO1 0 Based on my review of the information concerning tbe proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order45I.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Oescript ion: A 11 Technical advice and assistance to organlzatlons Technical advice and planning assistance to intemational, national, state, and local organizations. A9 Info rmati on gathering, analys is, and dissemination

135

Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Audit Report: ER-B-98-07 April 6, 1998 Personal Property at the Oak Ridge Operations Office and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information The Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) and the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) are responsible for safeguarding and controlling personal property in their possession and in the possession of their contractors. Categories of personal property include vehicles, heavy mobile equipment, computers and software, office furniture and equipment, laboratory equipment, security and protection equipment, and shop equipment. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Operations Office and OSTI adequately safeguarded and properly accounted for personal property in their possession and in the possession

136

US. DEPARTMENT OFENERGl: EE RE PROJECT MAN AG EME:-IT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFENERGl: OFENERGl: EE RE PROJECT MAN AG EME:-IT CENT ER NEP."' DETERMINATION REClPIENT:Oregon Department of Energy PROJECT TITLE: Estacada High School Page 1 of2 STI\T[: OR Funding Opportunity Announcement Numbe r Procuremtnllnslrumenl Number NEPA Control Number elo Number DE FDA 0000052 DE·EEOOOQ140 GFO-O000140-009 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEI'A Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.11\), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX ANV NUMBER: Description: 65.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially hannful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

137

DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETElThIINAIION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irmo Irmo u.s. DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETElThIINAIION PROJECT TITl.E: Irma Charing Cross Sidewalk Project ARRA-EECBG Page 1 of2 fJ Wl G) STATE: SC Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PrOCUT£ment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number EEOOO0950/000 DE-EEOOOO950 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDlX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conselVe energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation , and promote energy.efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

138

T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTJ\ffiN DEPARTJ\ffiN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:BISON GEAR & ENG PROJECT TITLE; HYPOID GEAR MOTOR PLATFORM Page 1 of2 .; STATE: IL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO1 19 EE119 Based on my review of the infonnation concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (aulhoriud under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following detennination: ex. EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially hannful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

139

T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMEN DEPARTMEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Heidtman Steel Products PROJECT TITLE: VVind Energy Industry Equipment Additions I STATE: IL funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pr()(urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elD Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO119 EE119 Based on my review ofthe information concerning the proposed aetion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordcr451.1A),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 1.31 Relocation of machinery and equipment, such as analytical laboratory apparatus, electronic hardware, maintenance equipment, and health and safety equipment, including minor construction necessary for removal and installation,

140

U.S. DEPARTlYIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEMENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M ANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl\'.ITNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT: The University of Utah STATE: UT PROJECT TITLE : A New Method for Low-cost Production of Titanium Alloys for Reducing Energy Consumption of Mechanical Systems Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000560 DE-EE0005761 GF0-0005761-001 G05761 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45J.lA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM EN T CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EN EN T CEN T ER NEPADETERMINATION RECIPIENT :Hudson Valley Community College; sub Suffolk Community College PROJECf TITLE: Northeast Photovoltaic Regional Training Provider Page 1 of2 STATE: NY Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number elO Number DE-EEOOO2087 DE-EEOOO2087 GF0-0002087-OO3 EE2087 Baud on my review orlhe information concerning tbe propos~ action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determinatio n: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 1 nform ation gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, Inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (indudlng, but not limited 10, computer modeling). document preparation (including, but not limited to, conceptual design.

142

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl\llNATION RECIPIENT:Texas Engineering Experiment Station Page 1 of2 STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE; Development of a Geological and Geomedlanical Framework for the Analysis of MEQ in EGS Experiments Funding Opportunity Announ('~mtnt Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA.()()O()075 DE-EEOOO2757 GFO-10-278 2757 Based on my review ollhe information concerning the proposw. action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A). I have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

143

Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Audit Report: ER-B-99-02 January 25, 1999 Small Disadvantaged Business Program at the Chicago Operations Office The Small Business Act (Act) requires that small business concerns owned and controlled by socially or economically disadvantaged individuals have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in contracts awarded by any Federal agency. Section 8(a) of the Act establishes a program that authorizes the Small Business Administration (SBA) to enter into contracts with other agencies and award subcontracts for performing those contracts to firms enrolled in the 8(a) Program directly to the agencies. Contracts are to be awarded competitively if the anticipated award price of the contract will exceed $3 million and at least two responsible 8(a) firms

144

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GRANT DE-FG05-94ER14464  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT REPORT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GRANT DE-FG05-94ER14464 INFRARED ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMICAL KINETICS OF FREE RADICALS Principal Investigators: Robert F. Curl and Graham P. Glass Department of Chemistry and Rice Quantum Institute Rice University, Houston, TX 77251 (713)348-4816 (713)348-3285 rfcurl@rice.edu gglass@rice.edu November 2004 PROGRAM SCOPE This research was directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of the chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. Work on the reaction of OH with acetaldehyde has been completed and published and work on the reaction of O( 1 D) with CH 4 has been completed and submitted for publication. In the course of our investigation of branching

145

U.S. DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY DEPARTIIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERl'dINATION RECIPIENT:Sacramento Municipal Utility District PROJECf TITLE: CRED - SMUD: New Hope Dairy STATE: CA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOO122 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOO3070 NEPA Control Number CID Number o Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (suCh as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

146

Audit Report: ER-B-99-05 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Audit Report: ER-B-99-05 April 8, 1999 Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Withdrawal of Fees As the operator of the Department's Savannah River Site, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (Westinghouse) receives three types of fees: (1) award fees commensurate with the overall performance rating, (2) Performance Based Incentive (PBI) fees for achieving measurable goals or defined tasks as specified in annual operating plans, and (3) Cost Reduction Incentive Program (CRIP) fees for making improvements in site operations that reduce total contract costs. The Department's Contracting Officer notifies Westinghouse when fees are earned, and Westinghouse withdraws the authorized amounts from the Department's letter-of-credit account. The audit objective was to determine whether Westinghouse withdrew

147

.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EE EE RE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION t'age I or L RECIPIENT:Govornor's Energy Office STATE: CO PROJECT TITLE: COLORADO SEP ARRA - Commercial Buildings - Denver Housing Authority Funding Opportunity Announc:ement Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000082 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOOOO82-011 cm Number o Ba~d on my review of the information c:onc:erning the proposed ac:tion, as NEPA Complianc:e Officer (authorized under OOE Order 4St.IA), t haYe made the (allowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85. 1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

148

u.s. DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CENT ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DFTFRlIllNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:City of Cleveland· Division of Engineering & Construction STATE: OH PROJECT TITLE: Cleveland City ARRA·EECBG Act 9 (Lake-to--Lake Bikeway) Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number cm Number OE·EEOOOO705 0 Based on my review oflhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), [have made the following determination: CX, EA, E[S APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and planning assistance to internaUonal, national, stale, and local organizations, A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

149

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl'dINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl'dINATION RECIPIENT:Ohio Department of Development PROJECT TITLE: SEP ARRA - Targeting Industrial Efficiency - Reliable Castings Corporation Page 1 of2 STATE: OH Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procuremenllnstrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EEOOOO165 EEOOOO165 GFO-O000165-021 GOO Based on my review arlhe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

150

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CEN T ER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEN CEN T ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:King County PROJECT YWCA Family Village at Issaquah STATE: WA TITLE: Funding Opportunity Announcement Num~r Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 DE-EEOOOO854 EEO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 82.1 Modifications of an existing structure to enhance workplace habitability (including, but not limited to: improvements to lighting, radiation shielding, or heatinglventilatingl air conditioning and its instrumentation; and noise reduction ). 82.5 Safety and environmental improvements of a facility, including replacement and upgrade of facility components, that do

151

Final Report 94ER75989 [U.S. DOE-FCCSET-Summer Teaching Enhancement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for the interagency agreement between the Department of Energy and NASA, 94ER75989, titled U.S. DOE-FCCSET-Summer Teaching Enhancement Program. Our goal to enhance the classroom Instruction in the earth and environmental science programs in the secondary schools of the state of Maryland. The participation of 72 teachers of secondary school students were collaborative partners with the 24 local Maryland School System, the Maryland State Department of Education, the University of Maryland, and the Goddard Space Flight Center. The program enabled these teachers the opportunity to attend a four-week program to enhance the teaching of the earth and environmental sciences in the secondary schools of Maryland. Participants learned how earth systems are studied both from the ground station earth monitoring project and continued it during the school year with their students. Each teacher served as an ambassador for earth science teaching enhancement in their respective school and school system.

NONE

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fermi Surface Evolution Across Multiple Charge Density Wave Transitions in ErTe3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fermi surface (FS) of ErTe{sub 3} is investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Low temperature measurements reveal two incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) gaps created by perpendicular FS nesting vectors. A large {Delta}{sub 1} = 175 meV gap arising from a CDW with c* - q{sub CDW1} {approx} 0.70(0)c* is in good agreement with the expected value. A second, smaller {Delta}{sub 2} = 50 meV gap is due to a second CDW with a* - q{sub CDW2} {approx} 0.68(5)a*. The temperature dependence of the FS, the two gaps and possible interaction between the CDWs are examined.

Moore, R.G.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Brouet, V.; /Orsay, LPS; He, R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Lu, D.H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Ru, N.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Shen, Z.-X.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARThIEN DEPARThIEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGEM ENT CENT ER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPI ENT:TEXAS COMPTROLLER OF PUBLIC ACCOUNTS PROJECT TITLE: ARRA SEP CITY OF SEADRI FT Page I of2 STATE: TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procunment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number eln Number DE-EEOOOO116 EEOOOO11 6 0 Based on my review o(lhe infonnalion concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized uodu DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits). data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

154

Audit Report: ER-B-99-01 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Audit Report: ER-B-99-01 December 21, 1998 Decontamination and Decommissioning at the East Tennessee Technology Park The East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) contains about 400 buildings with approximately 14.4 million square feet of space. Almost 90 percent of the space is comprised of buildings that are currently undergoing or are planned for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Departmental policy requires that D&D projects be prioritized based on employee and public health and safety, protection of the environment, compliance with environmental laws and regulations, cost-effectiveness, and future site plans. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Oak Ridge Operations Office (Operations Office) reduced health, safety, and

155

Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in August 2012 as part of a model evaluation program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radionuclide data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to provide data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test PIN STRIPE, conducted in borehole U-11b in 1966. Well ER-11-2 will provide information that can be used to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The main 31.1-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 399.6 meters (m). A completion casing string was not set in Well ER-11-2. However, a piezometer string was installed in the 31.1-cm open hole. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing hung on 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. The piezometer string was landed at 394.5 m, for monitoring the lower tuff confining unit. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other test-related radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 42.7 m of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium and 356.9 m of Tertiary volcanic rock. The water-level measured in the piezometer string on September 25, 2012, was 353.8 m below ground surface. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion, and future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will be limited due to the diameter of the piezometer string. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and the water level are as expected, but the section of geology encountered is higher than expected due to faulting. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field equipment was detected because the target aquifer (the Topopah Spring aquifer) at Well ER-11-2 is structurally higher than expected and thus unsaturated.

NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Radiometric Validation of ERS-1 Along-Track Scanning Radiometer Average Sea Surface Temperature in the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ERS-1 along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) provides a half-degree latitude by half-degree longitude average sea surface temperature (ASST) measurement representative of the thermal skin layer of the ocean that is intended for use in global ...

Craig J. Donlon; Ian S. Robinson

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Consistency of Geosat, SSM/I, and ERS-1 Global Surface Wind SpeedsComparison with In Situ Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare wind speed retrieved from the Geosat altimeter, from two Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) microwave radiometers. The SSM/I F08 and SSM/I F10, and from the European Space Agency ERS-1 scatterometer. As ground truth, ship ...

J. Boutin; J. Etcheto

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation for an er-doped fiber laser frequency comb at a 1 ghz repetition rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We developed a 1 GHz Er-doped femtosecond fiber laser system providing 2nJ pulses at [equivalence relation symbol]100fs durations and demonstrated octave-spanning supercontinuum generation from 1m - 2.4m that is suitable ...

Chao, David

159

The crystal structure of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3}: New single-crystal data for an old problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Single crystals of the orthoborate {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were synthesized from Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 2 GPa and 800 {sup o}C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The crystal structure was determined on the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data, collected at room temperature. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic pseudowollastonite-type structure, space group C2/c, with the lattice parameters a=1128.4(2) pm, b=652.6(2) pm, c=954.0(2) pm, and {beta}=112.8(1){sup o} (R{sub 1}=0.0124 and wR{sub 2}=0.0404 for all data). -- graphical abstract: The first satisfying single-crystal structure determination of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} sheds light on the extensively discussed structure of {pi}-orthoborates. The application of light pressure during the solid state synthesis yielded in high-quality crystals, due to pressure-induced crystallization. Research highlights: {yields} High-quality single crystals of {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} were prepared via high-pressure-induced crystallization. {yields} At least five different space groups for the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are reported. {yields} {pi}-ErBO{sub 3} is isotypic to the pseudowollastonite-type CaSiO{sub 3}. {yields} Remaining ambiguities regarding the structure of the rare-earth {pi}-orthoborates are resolved.

Pitscheider, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kaindl, Reinhard [Institut fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Oeckler, Oliver [Department Chemie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Butenandtstrasse 5-13, D-81377 Muenchen (Germany); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: Hubert.Huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Metabolism of Americium in the Rat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. J. Barber, J. G Hamilton, Metabolism of Plutonium inRats, Plutonium Project Record of the National Nuclearin the Rat (CH 3606) Plutonium Project Record of the

Scott, K.G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

THERMODYNAMIC AND KINETIC MODELING OF ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUELS - FINAL LDRD-ER REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This project enhanced our theoretical capabilities geared towards establishing the basic science of a high-throughput protocol for the development of advanced nuclear fuel that should couple modern computational materials modeling and simulation tools, fabrication and characterization capabilities, and targeted high throughput performance testing experiments. The successful conclusion of this ER project allowed us to upgrade state-of-the-art modeling codes, and apply these modeling tools to ab initio energetics and thermodynamic assessments of phase diagrams of various mixtures of actinide alloys, propose a tool for optimizing composition of complex alloys for specific properties, predict diffusion behavior in diffusion couples made of actinide and transition metals, include one new equation in the LLNL phase-field AMPE code, and predict microstructure evolution during alloy coring. In FY11, despite limited funding, the team also initiated an experimental activity, with collaboration from Texas A&M University by preparing samples of nuclear fuels in bulk forms and for diffusion couple studies and metallic matrices, and performing preliminary characterization.

Turchi, P

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NFPA DE'fER],llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DE'fER],llNATION DE'fER],llNATION RECIPIENT:Oklahoma Department of Commerce PROJECf TITLE : OKLAHOMA SEP ANNUAL - PY12 Page I on STATE: OK Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Inst.-ument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-FOA-OOOO643 NT43203 GFQ-0043203-Q01 Based on my review oflhe Information cODccming the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and assistance to organizations A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Rational for detennination: Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. Information gathering (induding. but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

164

To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov Re: Public Comments on Form EIA-861, ''Annual Electric Power Industry Report''  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov To: Rebecca Peterson, ERS2014@eia.gov Re: Public Comments on Form EIA-861, ''Annual Electric Power Industry Report'' From: Volunteer members of the Large Public Power Council Energy Efficiency Working Group (LPPC EEWG) Benchmarking Subcommittee, led by:  Subcommittee Chair Norman Muraya (Austin Energy) norman.muraya@austinenergy.com,  Member Tom Gross (Orlando Utilities Commission) tgross@ouc.com, and  Facilitated by Annika Brink (Alliance to Save Energy/Clean and Efficient Energy Program for Public Power) abrink@ase.org. Over the course of the past year, the LPPC EEWG's Benchmarking Subcommittee has leveraged data from Form EIA-861, Schedule 6 to benchmark the energy efficiency activities and performance of LPPC

165

Completion Report for the Well ER-6-2 Site Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat - Climax Mine  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-6-2 and its satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1, were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Well ER-6-2 was drilled in two stages in 1993 and 1994; the satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled nearby in 1993 but was abandoned. The wells were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit Number 97, in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. The wells are located in Yucca Flat, within Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. The wells provided information regarding the radiological and hydrogeological environment in a potentially down-gradient position from tests conducted in northern and central Yucca Flat. Construction of Well ER-6-2 began with a 1.2-meter-diameter surface conductor hole, which was drilled and cased off to a depth of 30.8 meters below the surface. A 50.8-centimeter diameter surface hole was then rotary drilled to the depth of 578.5 meters and cased off to the depth of 530.4 meters. The hole diameter was then reduced to 27.0 centimeters, and the borehole was advanced to a temporary depth of 611.4 meters. The borehole was conventionally cored to a total depth of 1,045 meters with a diameter of 14.0 centimeters. Borehole sloughing required cementing and re-drilling of several zones. The open-hole completion accesses the lower carbonate aquifer, the CP thrust fault, and the upper clastic confining unit. A fluid level depth of 543.2 meters was most recently measured in the open borehole in September 2007. No radionuclides were encountered during drilling. The satellite hole Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled approximately 15.2 meters north of Well ER-6-2 on the same drill pad. This was planned to be used as an observation well during future hydrologic testing at Well ER-6-2; however, the satellite hole was abandoned at the depth of 399 meters due to stuck drill pipe, and was subsequently cemented to the surface. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments in this report are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, cores taken between the depths of 619.3 and 1,042.4 meters, and geophysical log data. Stratigraphic assignments within the Paleozoic section are based on paleontological analyses. The well was collared in alluvium and at 30.8 meters penetrated Paleozoic carbonate rocks. These consisted of dolostone with minor shale and limestone of the Bonanza King Formation, and limestone with minor quartzite, sandstone, and dolostone assigned to the Guilmette Formation. The borehole reached total depth in a shale unit assigned to the Chainman Shale. The units below the Bonanza King Formation are overturned due to faulting and folding and, therefore, are stratigraphically upside-down.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Analysis of ER-12-3 FY 2005 Hydrologic Testing, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-3 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Well ER-12-3 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-3 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 4,908 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 7,390.8 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was YUBA (U-12b.10), conducted in the U-12b Tunnel approximately 1,529 ft northeast of the well site. The YUBA test working point elevation was located at approximately 6,642 ft amsl. The YUBA test had an announced yield of 3.1 kilotons (kt) (SNJV, 2006b). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer-thrust plate (LCA3) located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Development and hydraulic testing of ER-12-3 took place between June 3 and July 22, 2005. The development objectives included removing residual drilling fluids and improving the hydraulic connection of the well within the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA). The hydraulic testing objectives focused on obtaining further hydrogeologic, geochemical, and radiochemical data for the site. Details on the data collected during the testing program are presented in the report ''Rainier Mesa Well ER-12-3 Data Report for Well Development and Hydraulic Testing'' (SNJV, 2006b). Participants in ER-12-3 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-3 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted.

Bill Fryer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'ER.1.nNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'ER.1.nNATION 'ER.1.nNATION RECIPIENT:Pacific intemational Center for High Technology Research PROJECT TITL.E: Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture Page1of4 STATE: HI Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FG36-08G088146 GFO-G088146-005 G088146 Based on my review orthe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Ordn451.IA), I hne made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 8 3.6 Siting, construction (or modification). operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and oonveotionallaboratory operations (for example, preparation of chemical standards and sample analysis);

168

Audit of Work Force Restructuring at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, ER-B-96-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Inspector General AUDIT OF WORK FORCE RESTRUCTURING AT THE FERNALD ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT Report Number: ER-B-96-01 Eastern Regional Audit Office Date of Issue: April 23, 1996 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 AUDIT OF WORK FORCE RESTRUCTURING AT THE FERNALD ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PROJECT TABLE OF CONTENTS Page SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PART I - APPROACH AND OVERVIEW 3 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Scope and Methodology . . . . . . . . 3

169

Luminescence, energy transfer, and upconversion mechanisms of Y2O3nanomaterials doped with Eu3+, Tb3+, Tm3+, Er3+, and Yb3+Ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Luminescence, energy transfer, and upconversion mechanisms of nanophosphors (Y2O3:Eu3+, Tb3+, Y2O3:Tm3+, Y2O3:Er3+, Yb3+) both in ...

TranKim Anh; Paul Benalloul; Charles Barthou; Lam ThiKieu Giang; Nguyen Vu; LeQuoc Minh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of the ERS Scatterometer-Derived Soil Water Index to Monitor Water Availability and Precipitation Distribution at Three Different Scales in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the capability of the European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) scatterometer-derived soil water index (SWI) data to disclose water availability and precipitation distribution in China is investigated. Monthly averaged SWI data for ...

Deming Zhao; Claudia Kuenzer; Congbin Fu; Wolfgang Wagner

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 Retrieval of Cloud Properties and Direct Testing of Cloud and Radiation Parameterizations using ARM Observations.  

SciTech Connect

This report briefly summaries the work performed at KNMI under DOE Grant DE-FG02-06ER64160 which, in turn was conducted in support of DOE Grant DE-FG02-90ER61071 lead by E. Clothieux of Penn. State U. The specific work at KNMI revolved around the development and application of the EarthCARE simulator to ground-based multi-sensor simulations.

Donovan, David Patrick [KNMI

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in July and August 2012 as part of a model evaluation well program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radiological data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to obtain data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test MILK SHAKE, conducted in Emplacement Hole U-5k in 1968, which were considered to be uncertain due to the unknown extent of a basalt lava-flow aquifer present in this area. Well ER-5-5 is expected to provide information to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The 31.1-centimeter (cm) diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 331.3 meters (m). The completion string, set at the depth of 317.2 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval open to the basalt lava-flow aquifer and limited intervals of the overlying and underlying alluvial aquifer. A piezometer string was also installed in the annulus between the completion string and the borehole wall. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing suspended from 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing. The piezometer string was landed at 319.2 m, to monitor the basalt lava-flow aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, preliminary water quality measurements, and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 331.3 m of QuaternaryTertiary alluvium, including an intercalated layer of saturated basalt lava rubble. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion; however, a preliminary water level was measured in the piezometer string at the depth of 283.4 m on September 25, 2012. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field instruments was detected in this hole. Future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will provide more accurate hydrologic information for this site. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and water level were as expected, though the expected basalt lava-flow aquifer is basalt rubble and not the dense, fractured lava as modeled. The lack of tritium transport is likely due to the difference in hydraulic properties of the basalt lava-flow rubble encountered in the well, compared to those of the fractured aquifer used in the flow and transport models.

NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

173

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Baseline Safety Analysis File (BSAF) is a facility safety reference document for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) environmental restoration activities. The BSAF contains information and guidance for safety analysis documentation required by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) activities, including: Characterization of potentially contaminated sites. Remedial investigations to identify and remedial actions to clean up existing and potential releases from inactive waste sites Decontamination and dismantlement of surplus facilities. The information is INEL-specific and is in the format required by DOE-EM-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports. An author of safety analysis documentation need only write information concerning that activity and refer to BSAF for further information or copy applicable chapters and sections. The information and guidance provided are suitable for: {sm_bullet} Nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480-23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) with hazards that meet the Category 3 threshold (DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports) {sm_bullet} Radiological facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94, Hazard Baseline Documentation) Nonnuclear facilities (DOE-EM-STD-5502-94) that are classified as {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} hazard facilities (DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System). Additionally, the BSAF could be used as an information source for Health and Safety Plans and for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) for nuclear facilities with hazards equal to or greater than the Category 2 thresholds, or for nonnuclear facilities with {open_quotes}moderate{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} hazard classifications.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Completion Report for Well ER-16-1 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-16-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit, Number 99. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of the Shoshone Mountain area, especially in the older Tertiary and pre-Tertiary strata. The main 46.99-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 702.9 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 663.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 1,220.7 meters. A completion string set at the depth of 1,162.4 meters consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless-steel casing, with one continuous slotted interval open to the lower carbonate aquifer. The fluid level in the borehole soon dropped, so the borehole was deepened in July 2006. To deepen the borehole, the slotted section was cemented and a 12.1-centimeter hole was drilled through the bottom of the completion string to the new total depth of 1,391.7 meters, which is 171.0 meters deeper than the original borehole. A string of 6.03-centimeter carbon-steel tubing with one continuous slotted interval at 1,361.8 to 1,381.4 meters, and open to the lower carbonate aquifer, was installed in the well with no gravel packing or cement, to serve as a monitoring string. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 37 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 646.8 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 744.9 meters of Paleozoic dolomite, quartzite, shale, and limestone. Three weeks after the monitoring string was installed, the water level was tagged at the drill hole depth of 1,271.9 meters, which equates to an estimated elevation of 761.7 meters, accounting for the borehole angle.

NSTec Geology Services

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Via E-mail to ERS2014@eia.gov Ms. Rebecca Peterson U. S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of the Northwest Balancing Authorities of the Northwest Balancing Authorities Page 1 of 6 May 6, 2013 Via E-mail to ERS2014@eia.gov Ms. Rebecca Peterson U. S. Energy Information Administration U. S. Department of Energy Re: Comments on Proposed Form EIA-930 "Balancing Authority Operations Report" Avista Corporation ("Avista"), Portland General Electric Company ("PGE"), NorthWestern Energy, Puget Sound Energy ("PSE"), Seattle City Light, Chelan PUD, and Tacoma Power (collectively, "Northwest Balancing Authorities" or "Northwest BAs") appreciate the opportunity to make comments on the

177

Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

MonChER: Monte-Carlo generator for CHarge Exchange Reactions. Version 1.1. Physics and Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MonChER is a Monte Carlo event generator for simulation of single and double charge exchange reactions in proton-proton collisions at energies from 0.9 to 14 TeV. Such reactions, $pp\\to n+X$ and $pp\\to n+X+n$, are characterized by leading neutron production. They are dominated by $\\pi^+$ exchange and could provide us with more information about total and elastic $\\pi^+ p$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^+$ cross sections and parton distributions in pions in the still unexplored kinematical region.

R. A. Ryutin; A. E. Sobol; V. A. Petrov

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Prenatal PCBs disrupt early neuroendocrine development of the rat hypothalamus  

SciTech Connect

Neonatal exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can interfere with hormone-sensitive developmental processes, including brain sexual differentiation. We hypothesized that disruption of these processes by gestational PCB exposure would be detectable as early as the day after birth (postnatal day (P) 1) through alterations in hypothalamic gene and protein expression. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected twice, once each on gestational days 16 and 18, with one of the following: DMSO vehicle; the industrial PCB mixture Aroclor 1221 (A1221); a reconstituted mixture of the three most prevalent congeners found in humans, PCB138, PCB153, and PCB180; or estradiol benzoate (EB). On P1, litter composition, anogenital distance (AGD), and body weight were assessed. Pups were euthanized for immunohistochemistry of estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) or TUNEL labeling of apoptotic cells or quantitative PCR of 48 selected genes in the preoptic area (POA). We found that treatment with EB or A1221 had a sex-specific effect on developmental apoptosis in the neonatal anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), a sexually dimorphic hypothalamic region involved in the regulation of reproductive neuroendocrine function. In this region, exposed females had increased numbers of apoptotic nuclei, whereas there was no effect of treatment in males. For ER{alpha}, EB treatment increased immunoreactive cell numbers and density in the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) of both males and females, while A1221 and the PCB mixture had no effect. PCR analysis of gene expression in the POA identified nine genes that were significantly altered by prenatal EDC exposure, in a manner that varied by sex and treatment. These genes included brain-derived neurotrophic factor, GABA{sub B} receptors-1 and -2, IGF-1, kisspeptin receptor, NMDA receptor subunits NR2b and NR2c, prodynorphin, and TGF{alpha}. Collectively, these results suggest that the disrupted sexual differentiation of the POA by prenatal EDC exposures is already evident as early as the day after birth, effects that may change the trajectory of postnatal development and compromise adult reproductive function.

Dickerson, Sarah M.; Cunningham, Stephanie L. [Center for Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Gore, Andrea C., E-mail: andrea.gore@mail.utexas.edu [Center for Molecular and Cellular Toxicology, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute for Neuroscience, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

FInal Report: DE-FG02-04ER41310 "Elementary Particle Physics"  

SciTech Connect

ATLAS and the LHC are delivering on the promise of discovery physics at the high energy frontier. Using 4.8 fb^-1 of 2011 ?s=7 TeV data and the first 5.8 fb?1 of 2012 ?s=8 TeV data, ATLAS published the observation of a new particle with a mass of 126 GeV with a significance of 5.9? that is compatible with a Standard Model (SM) Higgs. The LHC is outperforming intial projections for the 2012 run, and ATLAS is on track to integrate ~20 fb^(-1) of proton-proton collisions in 2012 before Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) begins in Spring 2013. University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) physicists will complete work on two ATLAS analyses this fall. The first is the search for the gauge bosons of a hypothesized dark sector. For 2011 data, UTD is responsible for the ?dark photon?search in the electron-jet channel, and we are looking forward to an expanded leadership role in the dark photon search using the full 2012 data set. Our second analysis interest is the study of X/Y/Z exotic states having cc ? content, which builds on our experience in this field from the BABAR experiment After completing a measurement of the Xc(3872) production cross section this fall, we will search for evidence of the Z(4430)+ which is reported by Belle but not confirmed by BABAR. The UTD group has played a strong role in ATLAS operations, with group members serving as Pixel Run Coordinator, ATLAS Shift Leader, and Pixel/Inner Detector Shifter. For most of the current 3-year funding cycle, a group member coordinated the development of the Pixel DAQ code, and another continues to build and maintain the data quality monitoring (DQM) application that is used by the Inner Detector control room shifter. Additionally, members of our group take Pixel on-call expert shifts for DQM and DAQ. We led an optoboard lifetime study to assess concerns of premature on-detector VCSEL failure using the Pixel working prototype detector at CERN. Physicists based at UTD participated through Pixel Offline DQM and ATLAS Distributed Computing Operations Shifts (ADCoS) During Summer 2012, UTD joined upgrade activities in preparation for LS1. We took a major role in the testing of Electro-Readout (ER) Bundle testing for new Service Quarter Panels (nSQP?s), and we developed two utilities to measure the timing jitter and bit error rate of the Pixel readout chain for use commissioning Pixel detector upgrades. During BABAR?s heyday, the UTD group pioneered the use of e^+ e^- annihilation events with hard Initial State Radiation (ISR) to study the charm threshold region, and we carried out the first BABAR double-cc ? analysis. Our most recent ISR paper, written in collaboration with A. Palano (Bari) is Exclusive Production of Ds^+ Ds^-, D_S^(*+) Ds^-, and Ds^(*+) Ds^(*-) via e+ e- Annihilation with Initial-State-Radiation was published in Physical Review D 82, 052004 (2010). Work continues on a study of ISR ?c^+ ?c^- production, and a new search to establish and study double-ss ? production is starting.

Izen, Joseph M. [University of Texas at Dallas] [University of Texas at Dallas; Ishak-Boushaki, Mustapha [University of Texas at Dallas] [University of Texas at Dallas

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

None

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

182

In-situ time-of-flight neutron diffraction of ErD2 (beta phase) formation during D2 loading.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to better understand the structural changes occurring during hydrogen loading of erbium target materials, we have performed D{sub 2} loading of erbium metal (powder) with simultaneous neutron diffraction analysis. This experiment tracked the conversion of Er metal to the {alpha} erbium deuteride (solid-solution) phase and then on to the {beta} (fluorite) phase. Complete conversion to ErD{sub 2.0} was accomplished at 10 Torr D{sub 2} pressure with deuterium fully occupying the tetrahedral sites in the fluorite lattice. Increased D{sub 2} pressure (up to 500 Torr at 450 C) revealed {approx}10 % deuterium occupation of the octahedral sites. Subsequent vacuum pumping of the sample at 450 C removed octahedral site occupancy while maintaining tetrahedral deuterium occupancy, thereby yielding stoichiometric ErD{sub 2.0} {beta} phase.

Browning, James Frederick (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Llobet, Anna (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Snow, Clark Sheldon; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Wixom, Ryan R.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gene therapy in alcoholic rats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 70 Sept. 9, 2001 Gene Therapy Reduces Drinking in "Alcoholic" Rats UPTON, NY - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that increasing the level of a brain protein important for transmitting pleasure signals can turn rats that prefer alcohol into light drinkers, and those with no preference into near teetotalers. The findings, published in the first September 2001 issue of the Journal of Neurochemistry (Vol. 78, No. 5), may have implications for the prevention and treatment of alcoholism in humans. "This is a preliminary study, but when you see a rat that chooses to drink 80 to 90 percent of its daily fluid as alcohol, and then three days later it's down to 20 percent, that's a dramatic drop in alcohol intake - a very clear change in behavior," said Panayotis Thanos, the lead researcher. "This gives us great hope that we can refine this treatment for future clinical use."

184

DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NllPA DEl'ER}.fiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY DEPARThIl!NT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NllPA DEl'ER}.fiNATION RECIPIENT:Cortiand County Business Development Corporation PROJE(.T TITLE : Energy Independent Agri-Business Outreach Page I of2 STATE: NY Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-EOOO3110 Procurement Instrument Number EEOOO3110 NEPA Control Number em Number GFO-10-573 0 Based on my review orlbe information concerning the proposed action, as N[PA Compliance Officer (autborized under DOE Order 4SI.IA),1 have made tbe follol'iing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, bul nollimiled 10, literature surveys. inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

185

U.S. DFPAR.Tl\IFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA:'\1AGE\1ENTCEN rER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tl\IFNT OF ENERGY Tl\IFNT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA:'\1AGE\1ENTCEN rER NEPA DETFRl\.ITNATION Page 1 of2 RECIPIENT:Southwest Research Institute STATE: TX PROJECT TITLE : Optimizing the CSP Tower Air Brayton Cycle System to meet the SunShot Objectives Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000595 DE-EE0005805 GF0-0005805-001 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made tbe foUowing determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and

186

T OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT MANAGEM EN T CEN T ER NEPA DETERI\lINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IEN IEN T OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT MANAGEM EN T CEN T ER NEPA DETERI\lINATION RECi PI ENT:Miami-Dade County PROJECT TITLE : County of Miami-Dade, FL Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Granl STATE: FL Page 1 of2 ~ 0 "· I ~ ' """, .. Funding Opportunity Announcement NUffiMr Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbu eIn Number DE-EEOOOO790.007.013.014 DE-EEOOOO790(S) EEO Based on my review of the information concrrning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoril:ed under DOE Order 45I.1A), I have made the followin~ detcnnination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: IA;scription: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

187

U.S. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA D:ETERl\ITNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTUEN DEPARTUEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA D:ETERl\ITNATION Page 1 of2 REC)PIENT:COUNTY OF MONTEREY , DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS STAn:: co PROJECT TITLE: RECOVERY ACT: COUNTY OF MONTEREY , CA ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT Funding Opportunity Announcement Numbu Pro<:urtrntnt Instrument Numbcr NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 DE·EEOOOO897,OO1 0 Ba~d on my review or the information (oncuning the proposed adion, as NEPA Compliance Offictr (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following dctcnnination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do nol increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

188

DEPART:tvIENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJ ECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERlIlINAIION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tvIENT OF ENERG tvIENT OF ENERG Y EERE PROJ ECT MANAGEMENT CEN T ER NEPA DETERlIlINAIION RECIPIENT;County of Montgomery Page 1 of2 STATE: PA ~ R liO i ~ PROJELi TITLE: Montgomery County (PA): Financial Incentive Program and Energy Efficiency Retrofits -- ARRA-EECBG (S) Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000013 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000938 NEPA Control Number em Number o Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1 A), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including

189

u.s. DEPARU1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rMc-n rMc-n ;:. u.s. DEPARU1ENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENT ER NEPA DETERl\IINATION Page 1 of2 R£CIPIENT:Altus AFB STATE: OK PROJECT TITLE: Altus Air Force 8ase- Second Met Tower; NREL Tracking No. 10-005a Funding Opportunity Announc~mtnt Number Procurement Instrumcnt Number NEPA Conl.rol Numbcr 10-005a CID Number G010337 Based on my review oftht information (onenning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriud under DOE Order 45 I. IA). I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 83.1 Onsile and offsite site characterization and environmental monitoring, including siting, construction (or modification). operation , and dismantlement or closing (abandonment) of characterization and monitoring devices and smng

190

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Completion Report for Well ER-12-4, Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain (includes Errata Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in May 2005, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit in the north-central portion of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located on Rainier/Aqueduct Mesa, northwest of Yucca Flat, within Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The well provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in U12t Tunnel, information on the pre-Tertiary rocks in the area, and depth to the regional water table.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

NSTec Environmental Management

2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

Audit of Economic Development Grants and a Cooperative Agreement with East Tennessee Not-For-Profit Organizations, ER-B-97-01  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUDIT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GRANTS AND A COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH EAST TENNESSEE NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Report Number: ER-B-97-01 Eastern Regional Audit Office Date of Issue: October 22, 1996 AUDIT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT GRANTS AND A COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT WITH EAST TENNESSEE NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

196

Analysis of the linkages between rainfall and land surface conditions in the West African monsoon through CMAP, ERS-WSC, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the linkages between rainfall and land surface conditions in the West African monsoon monsoon. Citation: Philippon, N., E. Mougin, L. Jarlan, and P.-L. Frison (2005), Analysis of the linkages between rainfall and land surface conditions in the West African monsoon through CMAP, ERS-WSC, and NOAA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

Information Content in the ERS-1 Three-Day Repeat Orbit Scatterometer Winds over the North Pacific from January through March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines ERS-1 3-day repeat orbit scatterometer wind data from January through March 1992. The study region encompasses the North Pacific from 30 to 50N and 160E to 130W longitude. The data are separated by orbit trajectory and ...

Paul T. Beaudoin; David M. Legler; James J. O'Brien

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy and Society (ER 100/200, PP 184/284) Fall 2013 Topics: Biomass, Transportation, Climate Change Problem Set #7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Society (ER 100/200, PP 184/284) Fall 2013 Topics: Biomass, Transportation, Climate/184], 125 [200/284] 1. Electric Vehicles and Biomass When you think of modern bioenergy, you probably think of ethanol used for transportation fuel. But as we learned in lecture, biomass can also be used in power

Kammen, Daniel M.

199

The incommensurate magnetic structure of Er3Cu4Ge4 J M Cadogan1, D H Ryan2 and L M D Cranswick3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Centre, NRCC, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0, Canada E-mail: cadoganB, ordered along the crystal c-axis, with a propagation vector [0 1 2 0]. This is the free-ion Er3+ moment

Ryan, Dominic

200

A Summertime Antarctic Mesocyclone Event over the Southern Pacific during FROST SOP-3: A Mesoscale Analysis Using AVHRR, SSM/I, ERS, and Numerical Model Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of three summertime mesoscale cyclones (MCs) over the northern Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas from 10 to 12 January 1995 (during FROST SOP-3) is studied by means of AVHRR data, ERS and SSM/I retrievals, and mesoscale numerical ...

Michael Lieder; Gnther Heinemann

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

A PrototypeFi er-Opti DiOpti Level-Sensor forLi Propane-Butane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper descr= es a fiber7---L=. levelsensor designed tomeasur the level of liquidprid.7---L7L.M= in ar8D= tivelyshor rrD (60 cm) in the top par ofstorfl7 tanks at oil ril.8---j= with the pur ose of monitorMj the level of thispr duct in the filledor slightly under88.M or over7---'fl tanks durs. var79= measurMj oper9Dfl'.Mj discrfl' multi-element device employing novel r7'7'.Mj=9---'. tr'7'.Mj=9 was selected because it yields both alar' measurMjj tr7---fl and high rh.8=8flD.M Sever. innovationso#er a competitive advantage toindustrMj useru 1) Special micr77L'7.Mj rr77L'7.Mj8 tr77L'7. 2) Efficient and economicalsensor multiplexing scheme; 3) Fast leveltr - king oper---LL.Mj algorMjfl'flL. verflj---9 rflj---9.Mjfl of the sensor

Vladimir Spw Victor; A Prototypefi; Vladimir A. Spww +a; Victor De Leon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Desert RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This helps the D-RATS team determine the system requirements necessary for exploring distant locations while exploration methods, equipment and tools developed in laboratory settings in a real world environment developing the technical skills required of the next generation of explorers. Desert RATS is one of a suite

204

N NE EX XT T G GE EN NE ER RA AT TI IO ON N S SA AF FE EG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NE NE EX XT T G GE EN NE ER RA AT TI IO ON N S SA AF FE EG GU UA AR RD DS S I IN NI IT TI IA AT TI IV VE E ( (N NG GS SI I) ) O OP PP PO OR RT TU UN NI IT TI IE ES S F FO OR R S ST TU UD DE EN NT TS S A AN ND D Y YO OU UN NG G P PR RO OF FE ES SS SI IO ON NA AL LS S I IN NT TE ER RE ES ST TE ED D I IN N S SA AF FE EG GU UA AR RD DS S/ /N NO ON NP PR RO OL LI IF FE ER RA AT TI IO ON N The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) was launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in FY 2008 to develop the policies, concepts, technologies, expertise, and infrastructure necessary to strengthen and sustain the international safeguards system as it evolves to meet new challenges over the next 25 years. NGSI's Human Capital Development subprogram 1 aims to revitalize and expand the international safeguards human capital base in the United States by attracting, educating, training, and retaining

205

DOE/ER-0442  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Executive Summary: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Foreword In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted

206

DiscLAimEr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of ENErgy ADvANcED cArbON DiOxiDE cApTurE r&D prOgrAm: TEchNOLOgy upDATE, mAy 2013 i. Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release, Energy information Administration,...

207

Analysis of FY 2005/2006 Hydrologic Testing and Sampling Results for Well ER-12-4, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the analysis of data collected for ER-12-4 during the fiscal year (FY) 2005 Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain well development and hydraulic testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program'') and hydraulic response data from the FY 2006 Sampling Program. Well ER-12-4 was constructed and tested as a part of the Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99, Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Phase I drilling program during FY 2005. These activities were conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject. As shown on Figure 1-1, ER-12-4 is located in central Rainier Mesa, in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Figure 1-2 shows the well location in relation to the tunnels under Rainier Mesa. The well was drilled to a total depth (TD) of 3,715 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs) (surface elevation 6,883.7 ft above mean sea level [amsl]) in the area of several tunnels mined into Rainier Mesa that were used historically for nuclear testing (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The closest nuclear test to the well location was MIGHTY OAK (U-12t.08), conducted in the U-12t Tunnel approximately 475 ft north of the well site. The MIGHTY OAK test working point elevation was located at approximately 5,620 ft amsl. The MIGHTY OAK test had an announced yield of ''less than 20 kilotons'' (DOE/NV, 2000). The purpose of this hydrogeologic investigation well is to evaluate the deep Tertiary volcanic section below the tunnel level, which is above the regional water table, and to provide information on the section of the lower carbonate aquifer - thrust plate (LCA3), located below the Tertiary volcanic section (SNJV, 2005b). Details on the drilling and completion program are presented in the ''Completion Report for Well ER-12-4 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain'' (NNSA/NSO, 2006). Participants in ER-12-4 testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture served as the lead contractor responsible for providing site supervision, development and testing services, and waste management services; BN provided construction and engineering support services; DRI provided well logging services and participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; LANL and LLNL participated in groundwater sampling and laboratory analyses; and the USGS performed laboratory analyses. Analyses of data from the ER-12-4 testing program presented in this document were performed by SNJV except as noted. These same contractors participated in the FY 2006 Sampling Program.

Bill Fryer

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram '. to'chiiracterlze the radjologital cbndif~on of ,sites formerly used byythe . . . ., Manhattan Engineer Dlstrlct (NED) and/or Atomjc Energy Co$n~~lssiqq (AEC); in.. the development of 'nuclear energy.. As part..of this -programi' DOE is 1~ I+ preparing, ,a' series of. brJef~ summaries ,-of .the' history:. of' tho ,#D/AEC~ : : ..; 'i ..relatecl activities and 'Conditions at .thc. sneclfic. sites. The surnaaries~ are to 'document the activities 'frcmi the ~nitlation 'of a contract with' j.'., F:ED/AEC,-to the terminationof the firial.F1EO/AEC contract; The ,historical .: '_ ,,:~,st&naries aIs. briefly' describe the. currant .conditi,on of .each site.

209

Electron microscopy studies of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of bulk microstructures of lutetium doped erbium silicide (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} (space group: Pnma) using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) reveals the existence of thin plates of a hexagonal phase (space group: P6{sub 3}/mcm) where the stoichiometric ratio in moles between the rare earths and Si is 5 to 3, i. e the 5:3 phase. The orientation relationship between the matrix and the plates was determined as [010]{sub m} {approx} -parallel [-1010]{sub p.} This observation adds credence to the assumption that all linear features noted in alloys of the rare-earth intermetallic family R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} are of the stoichiometric ratio 5:3 and possess a common orientation relationship with the parent 5:4 alloys. - Highlights: {yields} The linear features observed in the (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} sample are hexagonal 5:3 plates. {yields} Thickness of 5:3 plates in 5:4 alloys made by tri-arc pulling is greater than made by arc-melting. {yields} The orientation relationship between 5:3 plates and the matrix is [010]{sub m} {approx} ||[-1010]{sub p}.

Cao, Q., E-mail: qcao@iastate.edu; Chumbley, L.S.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Rebecca Peterson VIA U.S. Mail and E-mail: U.S. Department of Energy ERS2014@eia.gov  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 6, 2013 May 6, 2013 Rebecca Peterson VIA U.S. Mail and E-mail: U.S. Department of Energy ERS2014@eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Rebecca.Patterson@eia.doe.gov Mail Stop EI-23, Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Comments on Form EIA-930 Dear Ms. Peterson: Alaska Electric Light and Power (AEL&P), the electric utility serving Juneau, Alaska, offers these comments on the proposed implementation of Form EIA-930 "Balancing Authority Operations Report." (a) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility. AEL&P is a small, electrically isolated utility. AEL&P generates,

211

Analysis of In situ Observations of Cloud Microphysics from M-PACE Final Report, DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings and accomplishments of work performed under DOE Grant Agreement No. DE-FG02-06ER64168. The focus of the work was the analysis of in situ observations collected by the University of North Dakota Citation research aircraft during the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE). This project was conducted in 2004 along the North Slope of Alaska. The objectives of the research were: to characterize certain microphysical properties of clouds sampled during M-PACE, including spatial variability, precipitation formation, ice multiplication; to examine instrument performance and certain data processing algorithms; and to collaborate with other M-PACE investigators on case study analyses. A summary of the findings of the first two objectives is given here in parts 1 and 2; full results are contained in reports listed in part 3 of this report. The collaborative efforts are described in the publications listed in part 3.

Michael R. Poellot

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

212

Sub-threshold spinal cord stimulation facilitates spontaneous motor activity in spinal rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facilitates spontaneous motor activity in spinal rats.facilitates spontaneous motor activity in spinal rats Paragtreadmill (electrical enabling motor control, eEmc) after a

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Connects Rat Tails to Cancer and Heart Disease? Collagen is the main (and most abundant) protein in all mammalian connective tissues, including those of the heart, lungs,...

214

/sup 11/B study of spin dynamics in Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. [RE = Gd, Er  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been intense interest in re-entrance and coexistence in ternary rare earth magnetic superconductors of the form RE Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/. Of particular interest in this investigation is the effect of the superconducting state on the RKKY (Yosida, 1957) coupling between RE ions. Since one expects the conduction electron spin susceptibility chi/sup e/(q) to be cut off for q < 1/xi in the superconducting state, a depression f the RKKY coupling should follow. Such an effect would both depress the magnetic ordering temperature and result in slower relaxation rates tau/sub m//sup -1/ for the RE moments in the superconducting state. This paper reports on the spin dynamics of the RE ions using the /sup 11/B nuclear magnetic relaxation rate T/sub 1//sup -1/ in dilute Y/sub 1-x/RE/sub x/Rh/sub 4/B/sub 4/ (RE = Gd and Er).

Kumagai, K.; Fradin, F.Y.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

UV-Continuum Slopes of >4000 z~4-8 Galaxies from the HUDF/XDF, HUDF09, ERS, CANDELS-South, and CANDELS-North Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measure the UV-continuum slope beta for over 4000 high-redshift galaxies over a wide range of redshifts z~4-8 and luminosities from the HST HUDF/XDF, HUDF09-1, HUDF09-2, ERS, CANDELS-N, and CANDELS-S data sets. Our new beta results reach very faint levels at z~4 (-15.5 mag: 0.006 L*(z=3)), z~5 (-16.5 mag: 0.014L*(z=3)), and z~6 and z~7 (-17 mag: 0.025 L*(z=3)). Inconsistencies between previous studies led us to conduct a comprehensive review of systematic errors and develop a new technique for measuring beta that is robust against biases that arise from the impact of noise. We demonstrate, by object-by-object comparisons, that all previous studies, including our own and those done on the latest HUDF12 dataset, suffer from small systematic errors in beta. We find that after correcting for the systematic errors (typically d(beta) ~0.1-0.2) all beta results at z~7 from different groups are in excellent agreement. The mean beta we measure for faint (-18 mag: 0.1L*(z=3)) z~4, z~5, z~6, and z~7 galaxies is -2.03...

Bouwens, R J; Oesch, P A; Labbe, I; van Dokkum, P G; Trenti, M; Franx, M; Smit, R; Gonzalez, V; Magee, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modification of radiation damage in rat spinal cord by mitotane  

SciTech Connect

Modification of the paralytic response in rats after 6-MV photon irradiation of the spinal cord with either single or split exposures (two equal fractions given in a 24-hour period) by mitotane was investigated. Mitotane was administered as a suspension in physiologic saline (300 mg/kg/day) for either 5 days prior to or 5 days after irradiation. For rats receiving split doses of 6-MV photons, either the last two doses of mitotane were given 2 hours prior to each radiation fraction or mitotane was begun 2 hours after the second fraction and continued for 5 days. The data to 6 months after irradiation indicate that, in rats given mitotane for 5 days prior to single-dose photon irradiation, the paralytic response (as defined by the dose needed to produce paralysis in 50% of the irradiated groups of rats) was enhanced by a dose-enhancement factor (DEF) of 1.40. The DEF in the group of rats given mitotane after single doses of 6-MV photons was 1.15. In the split-dose irradiation experiments, the DEF for the groups of rats given mitotane prior to each radiation fraction was 1.36; while the DEF for the group of rats receiving mitotane beginning after the second fraction was 1.18. These data indicate that mitotane can potentiate the effects of 6-MV photon irradiation to the central nervous system, with mitotane administered prior to irradiation being the most effective sequence.

Glicksman, A.S.; Bliven, S.F.; Leith, J.T.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

miller-er-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Correction for Dry Bias in Vaisala Radiosonde RH Data Correction for Dry Bias in Vaisala Radiosonde RH Data E. R. Miller, J. Wang, and H. L. Cole National Center for Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Technology Division Boulder, Colorado Abstract Extensive data analysis of sounding data from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) and other research projects coupled with supporting evidence from other sources have lead to the conclusion that there is a dry bias in Vaisala radiosonde relative humidity (RH) measurements. This dry bias occurs in both the A-type and H-type radiosonde RH sensors. Convinced of the problem, Vaisala engineers conducted extensive chamber tests on Vaisala sondes of varying age. Vaisala determined that the dry bias was due to contamination

219

SMALL ALI ER GUIDED ULLET  

... for the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration. ... stakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actu-

220

Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-03ER25579; Development of High-Order Accurate Interface Tracking Algorithms and Improved Constitutive Models for Problems in Continuum Mechanics with Applications to Jetting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the work conducted under the auspices of DE-FG02-03ER25579 was characterized by an exceptionally close collaboration with researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). For example, Andy Nonaka, one of Professor Miller's graduate students in the Department of Applied Science at U. C. Davis (UCD) wrote his PhD thesis in an area of interest to researchers in the Applied Numerical Algorithms Group (ANAG), which is a part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. Dr. Nonaka collaborated closely with these researchers and subsequently published the results of this collaboration jointly with them, one article in a peer reviewed journal article and one paper in the proceedings of a conference. Dr. Nonaka is now a research scientist in the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering (CCSE), which is also part of the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) at LBNL. This collaboration with researchers at LBNL also included having one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the Graduate Group in Applied Mathematics (GGAM) at UCD, Sarah Williams, spend the summer working with Dr. Ann Almgren, who is a staff scientist in CCSE. As a result of this visit Sarah decided work on a problem suggested by the head of CCSE, Dr. John Bell, for her PhD thesis. Having finished all of the coursework and examinations required for a PhD, Sarah stayed at LBNL to work on her thesis under the guidance of Dr. Bell. Sarah finished her PhD thesis in June of 2007. Writing a PhD thesis while working at one of the University of California (UC) managed DOE laboratories is long established tradition at UC and Professor Puckett has always encouraged his students to consider doing this. Another one of Professor Puckett's graduate students in the GGAM at UCD, Christopher Algieri, was partially supported with funds from DE-FG02-03ER25579 while he wrote his MS thesis in which he analyzed and extended work originally published by Dr. Phillip Colella, the head of ANAG, and some of his colleagues. Chris Algieri is now employed as a staff member in Dr. Bill Collins' Climate Science Department in the Earth Sciences Division at LBNL working with computational models of climate change. Finally, it should be noted that the work conducted by Professor Puckett and his students Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri and described in this final report for DOE grant # DE-FC02-03ER25579 is closely related to work performed by Professor Puckett and his students under the auspices of Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER25473 An Algorithmic and Software Framework for Applied Partial Differential Equations: A DOE SciDAC Integrated Software Infrastructure Center (ISIC). Dr. Colella was the lead PI for this SciDAC grant, which was comprised of several research groups from DOE national laboratories and five university PI's from five different universities. In theory Professor Puckett tried to use funds from the SciDAC grant to support work directly involved in implementing algorithms developed by members of his research group at UCD as software that might be of use to Puckett's SciDAC CoPIs. (For example, see the work reported in Section 2.2.2 of this final report.) However, since there is considerable lead time spent developing such algorithms before they are ready to become `software' and research plans and goals change as the research progresses, Professor Puckett supported each member of his research group partially with funds from the SciDAC APDEC ISIC DE-FC02-01ER25473 and partially with funds from this DOE MICS grant DE-FC02-03ER25579. This has necessarily resulted in a significant overlap of project areas that were funded by both grants. In particular, both Sarah Williams and Chris Algieri were supported partially with funds from grant # DE-FG02-03ER25579, for which this is the final report, and in part with funds from Professor Puckett's DOE SciDAC grant # DE-FC02-01ER25473. For example, Sarah Williams received support from DE-FC02- 01ER25473 and DE-FC02-03ER25579, both while at UCD taking cla

Puckett, Elbridge Gerry [U.C. Davis, Department of Mathematics; Miller, Gregory Hale [.C. Davis, Department of Chemical Engineering

2012-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Quantitation of products from riboflavin in rat urine  

SciTech Connect

When (2-/sup 14/C) riboflavin is injected i.p. into rats, the excreted vitamin in urine and feces has been shown to be the intact vitamin with trace amounts of lumichrome and lumiflavin. Recent findings with /sup 14/C-riboflavin fed to rats indicated higher levels of riboflavin catabolites in urine, e.g., 7- and 8-carboxylumichromes. The authors have determined catabolites in urine from male rats fed 0, 2, and 6 ..mu..g riboflavin/g diet/day for six weeks. Two rats from each group were placed weekly in metabolic cages, and urine was collected for 24 hours. On the fourth week, a third animal from each group received an i.p. injection of /sup 14/C-riboflavin and the urine was collected for 48 hours. Urine samples were extracted with phenol for flavin components and with chloroform for derivatives of lumichrome and lumiflavin. Riboflavin was the predominant flavin excreted by all diet groups with trace amounts of coenzymes and 7- and 8-hydroxymethylriboflavin. Riboflavin accounted for 85% of all the radioactivity recovered from the deficient and sufficient rats and 90% in rats fed excess. Lumichrome-type compounds including carboxylumichromes accounted for only a few % of recovered radioactivity. Thus, these components are primarily a product of intestinal microfloral degradation rather than significant tissue catabolites of riboflavin.

Chastain, J.L.; McCormick, D.B.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615  

SciTech Connect

Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory directions for this program include expending new strategies for anti-Markovnikov addition of water, alcohols, and amines with olefins, developing catalytic reactions of CO to give formamides and formic esters, and evaluating the potential for coupling reactions of CO to produce organic building blocks.

Wayland, B.B.

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cluster Chemistry in Electron-Poor Ae-Pt-Cd Systems (Ae=Ca, Sr, Ba): (Sr,Ba)Pt2Cd4, Ca6Pt8Cd16, and Its Known Antitype Er6Pd16Sb8  

SciTech Connect

Three new ternary polar intermetallic compounds, cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16, and tetragonal (Sr, Ba)Pt2Cd4 have been discovered during explorations of the AePtCd systems. Cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16 (Fm-3m, Z = 4, a = 13.513(1) ) contains a 3D array of separate Cd8 tetrahedral stars (TS) that are both face capped along the axes and diagonally bridged by Pt atoms to generate the 3D anionic network Cd8[Pt(1)]6/2[Pt(2)]4/8. The complementary cationic surface of the cell consists of a face-centered cube of Pt(3)@Ca6 octahedra. This structure is an ordered ternary variant of Sc11Ir4 (Sc6Ir8Sc16), a stuffed version of the close relative Na6Au7Cd16, and a network inverse of the recent Er6Sb8Pd16 (compare Ca6Pt8Cd16). The three groups of elements each occur in only one structural version. The new AePt2Cd4, Ae = Sr, Ba, are tetragonal (P42/mnm,Z = 2, a ? 8.30 , c ? 4.47 ) and contain chains of edge-sharing Cd4 tetrahedra along c that are bridged by four-bonded Ba/Sr. LMTO-ASA and ICOHP calculation results and comparisons show that the major bonding (Hamilton) populations in Ca6Pt8Cd16 and Er6Sb8Pd16 come from polar PtCd and PdSb interactions, that Pt exhibits larger relativistic contributions than Pd, that characteristic size and orbital differences are most evident for Sb 5s, Pt8, and Pd16, and that some terms remain incomparable, CaCd versus ErPd.

Samal, Saroj L. [Ames Laboratory; Gulo, Fakhili [Ames Laboratory; Corbett, John D. [Ames Laboratory

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

The effect of dietary Cu and diabetes on indices of Cu nutriture in the rat  

SciTech Connect

The uptake-retention of 67Cu is affected by dietary Cu and diabetes. Consequently, the functional activities of select enzymes and tissue Cu status were assessed. STZ-diabetic and control rats were fed Cu suppl. or def. diets. Rats were gavaged with 28 {mu}Ci 67Cu, and killed 8, 16, 24, 32, 64, or 128 h later. Diabetic rats were hyperphagic, hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic; with no effect of diet. Plasma ceruloplasmin activity (Cp) was lower in Cu def. rats; diabetic rats tended to have higher Cp than controls. Cu def. rats had low Cu levels in liver, kidney and plasma. Cu suppl. diabetic rats had higher liver and kidney Cu compared to Cu def. diabetic rats. Gel chromatography of liver showed that with time, there was a transfer of 67Cu from low to higher MW ligands. In nondiabetic rats, more 67Cu was associated with the higher MW ligands. The converse was observed for diabetic rats. There was no effect of diabetes on liver 67Cu localization. Diabetic rats had higher metallothionein (MT) concentrations in liver and kidney compared to controls Cu deficiency lowered MT values in both diabetic and control rats. CuZn SOD Cu activity was lowered with Cu def. and diabetes, while Mn SOD activity was similar among groups. Plasma lipid peroxide levels were lower in diabetic rats than controls. The results show that Cu metabolism is affected in diabetes, and the changes are functionally significant.

Rucker, R.B.; Uriu-Hare, J.Y.; Tinker, D.; Keen, C.L. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

Antidotal effectiveness of activated charcoal in rats  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to investigate the relative adsorption of radiolabeled /sup 14/C-sodium pentobarbital by three types of activated charcoal. Factors affection adsorption of the drug by SuperChar, United States Pharmacopeia (USP), and Darco G-60 activated charcoals with surface areas of 2800-3500 m2/g, 1000 m/sup 2//g, and 650 m/sup 2//g, respectively, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro experiments, the drug was dissolved in water of 70% sorbitol (w/v), and the maximum binding capacity and dissociation constants for each of the charcoals were calculated. Rank order of maximum binding capacity was directly proportional to charcoal surface area in both water and sorbitol, while the dissociation constants for the charcoals in water were not different. For in vivo experiments, absorption of orally administered sodium pentobarbital (40 mg/kg) was studied in rats with and without activated charcoal administration. The results of this research suggest that: (1) SuperChar given in water possesses the greatest antidotal efficacy, (2) sorbitol induced catharsis does not reduce oral absorption of sodium pentobarbital, and (3) sorbitol enhances the antidotal efficacy of USP charcoal.

Curd-Sneed, C.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Dissection of Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Protein Body Formation in Maize Endosperm - DE-FG03-95-ER20183 B139  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissection of Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Protein Body Formation in Maize Endosperm - DE-FG03-95-ER20183 Final Technical Report and Patent Summary Dr. Brian A. Larkins, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 Endosperm texture is an important quality trait in maize, as it influences the shipping characteristics of the grain, its susceptibility to insects, the yield of grits from dry milling, energy costs during wet milling, and the baking and digestibility properties of the flour. There appears to be a causal relationship between kernel hardness and the formation of zein-containing protein bodies, as mutations affecting protein body number and structure are associated with a soft, starchy kernel. In this project we used a variety of approaches to better understand this relationship and investigate the molecular and biochemical changes associated with starchy endosperm mutants. We characterized the distribution of zein mRNAs on endosperm rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) membranes and the interactions between zein proteins, as each of these could influence the structure of protein bodies. Based on in situ hybridization, mRNAs encoding the 22-kD alpha- and 27-kD gamma-zeins are randomly distributed on RER; hence, mRNA targeting does not appear to influence the formation of protein bodies. Investigation of the interactions between zein proteins (alpha, beta, gamma, delta) with the yeast two-hybrid system showed that interactions between the 19- and 22-alpha-zeins are relatively weak, although each of them interacted strongly with the 10-kD delta-zein. Strong interactions were detected between the alpha- and delta-zeins and the 16-kD gamma- and 15-kD beta-zeins; however, the 50-kD and 27-kD gamma-zeins did not interact detectably with the alpha- and delta-zein proteins. The NH2- and COOH-terminal domains of the 22-kD alpha-zein were found to interact most strongly with the 15-kD beta- and 16-kD gamma-zeins, suggesting the 16-kD and 15-kD proteins bind and assemble alpha-zeins in protein bodies. Additional evidence supporting this hypothesis was obtained by showing that the starchy endosperm mutant, Mucuronate, appears to result from a defective 16-kD gamma-zein protein. By deletion mutagenesis, we identified domains within an alpha-zein that cause it to interact with other zein proteins, particularly gamma-zeins. This allowed us to develop a minimal alpha-zein gene construct that can be used as a vector to target heterologous proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, into protein bodies. We characterized the nature of storage proteins synthesized in the endosperm using a genomics analysis of endosperm ESTs. This study identified several new storage proteins and demonstrated the existence of novel protein storage vacuoles. We used mRNA transcript profiling of eight different starchy endosperm (opaque) mutants (o1, o2, o5, o9, o11, Mucronate, Defective endosperm B30, and floury2) to identify patterns of gene expression that are consistently altered in all of them, or that are unique to each one of them. These mutants fall into two subgroups: one systematically manifests an ''unfolded protein'' response (fl2, Mc, DeB30) and the other (o1, o2, o5, o9, o11) does not. Genes encoding cytoskeletal proteins are generally up-regulated in all the mutants, and this may be associated with higher lysine contents in several of them.

Brian A. Larkins

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Final Technical Report, DOE Grant DE-FG02-98ER54496, Physics of High-Energy-Density X Pinch Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Abstract for the Final Technical Report, DOE Grant DE-FG02-98ER54496 An X-pinch plasma is produced by driving a high current (100-500 kiloamperes) through two or more fine wires that cross and touch at a point, forming an X in the case of two wires. The wires explode because of the high current, and then the resulting plasma is imploded radially inward by the magnetic field from the current. When the imploding material briefly stagnates at very small radius and high density, an intense burst of x-rays is produced and the plasma disassembles as rapidly as it imploded. When this project began, we could confidently state that at its minimum radius, X pinch plasmas made from such materials as titanium and molybdenum might be as hot as 10,000,000 K and had densities almost as high as the solid wire density, but their X-ray pulse durations were below one billionth of a second. We could also say that the X pinch was useful for point-projection imaging of rapidly changing objects, such as exploding wires, with high resolution, indicative of a very small X-ray source spot size. We can now confidently say that X-pinch plasma temperatures at the moment of the X-ray burst are 10-25 million K in titanium, molybdenum and several other wire X-pinches based upon the spectrum of emitted X-rays in the radiation burst. By the same means, as well as from the penetration of X-rays through the dense plasma, we know that ion densities are close to or higher than one-tenth of the density of the original (solid) wire material in molybdenum and a few other X-pinch plasmas. Furthermore, using the diffraction of X-rays radiated by the X-pinch when it reaches minimum radius, we have determined that the x-ray source size is about 1 thousandth of a millimeter for such wire materials as molybdenum and niobium, while it is 2-10 times larger for tungsten, titanium and aluminum wires. Finally, using a very high speed X-ray imaging streak camera, we have determined that X pinch X-ray pulses can be as short as 30 trillionths of a second. Additional experiments have demonstrated that a spherical shell of plasma expands away from the cross point region after the x-ray burst. It reaches millimeter scale in a few billionths of a second, leaving a small (less than 0.1 millimeter) gap in the middle that enables energetic electrons to be accelerated to 10 or a few 10s of kilovolts of energy. In addition to gaining an understanding of the physics of the X pinch plasmas, we have had to develop several new X-ray diagnostic devices in order to obtain and verify the above results. On the non-technical side, 4 students have completed Ph.D.s working under the auspices of this project, including one woman, and another woman has begun her Ph.D. research under this project. In addition, several undergraduate students have worked with us on the X-pinch experiments, including one who is now a graduate student in plasma physics at Princeton University.

David Hammer

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atrial natriuretic polypeptide-like material in rat lung  

SciTech Connect

Atrial natriuretic polypeptide-like immunoreactive material (ANP-IR) was found in rat lung by radioimmunoassay, with the concentration ranging from 0.6-1.2 pmol/g of tissue in each lobe. PAP-immunohistochemical study demonstrated that specific staining of granules for ..cap alpha..-human ANP are mainly located in the muscular layer of the pulmonary vein. Fractionation of lung extract by gel filtration and reserve phase HPLC revealed the presence of multiple forms of ANP-IR, which possibly possessed molecular structure partially different from rat ANP, atriopeptin I and III. Intravenous injection of lung extract induced potent diuresis and natriuresis in rats. These responses could be abolished when the lung extract was preincubated with antiserum for ..cap alpha..-human ANP. Specific binding sites for /sup 125/I-labeled rat ANP were also found in lung membrane preparation by radioreceptor assay. Incubation of synthetic atriopeptin III (10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M) with lung tissue induced 1-28 fold increase in lung cGMP content. The results suggest that ANP-IR and its receptors existing in rat lung may be involved in the regulation of pulmonary function and have a synergic effect with ANP of cardiac origin in the control of water-electrolytes balance.

Chang, J.K.; Chang, D.; Xie, C.W.; Song, D.L.; Li, X.R.; Zhang, S.X.; Wang, T.L.; Tang, J.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

229

Luminescence properties of light-emitting diodes based on GaAs with the up-conversion Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Er,Yb luminophor  

SciTech Connect

Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S luminophors doped with Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions are produced by means of solid-phase synthesis and deposited onto standard AL123A infrared light-emitting diodes. When excited with 940 nm radiation from a light-emitting diode, the structures exhibit intense visible up-conversion luminescence. A maximal brightness of 2340 cd/m{sup 2} of green and red up-conversion luminescence at corresponding wavelengths around 550 and 600 nm is observed for the Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S compound doped with 2 at % Er{sup 3+} ions and 6 at % Yb{sup 3+} ions. The ratio of the intensity of green (or red) up-conversion luminescence to the intensity of infrared Stokes luminescence increases with increasing applied voltage. The efficiency of visible emission of the light-emitting diode structures is {eta} = 1.2 lm/W at an applied voltage of 1.5 V.

Gruzintsev, A. N., E-mail: gran@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Microelectronics Technology (Russian Federation); Barthou, C.; Benalloul, P. [Institute des NanoSciences (France)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

Saavedra, J.M.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The influence of dietary Cu and diabetes on tissue sup 67 Cu retention kinetics in rats  

SciTech Connect

Compared to controls, diabetes results in higher plasma, liver and kidney Cu concentrations. Since alterations in Cu metabolism may be associated with diabetic pathology, the authors investigated how Cu metabolism is affected by diabetes and dietary Cu intake. Nondiabetic and STZ diabetic rats were fed Cu suppl. or Cu def. diets for 5 wks. Rats were intubated with 28 {mu}Ci {sup 67}Cu and killed after 8, 16, 24, 32, 64, or 128 h. There were marked effects of both diet and diabetes on {sup 67}Cu metabolism. Independent of diabetes, deficient rats had a higher % of retained {sup 67}Cu, in liver, plasma, RBC, muscle, spleen, brain, lung, uterus, and intestine than adequate Cu rats. Independent of dietary Cu, diabetic rats had a lower % of retained {sup 67}Cu in liver, plasma, RBC, muscle, spleen, lung, bone, pancreas, skin, uterus and heart than controls. Differential effects were noted for kidney; adequate Cu diabetic rats had a higher % of retained {sup 67}Cu than all other groups. Marked effects of both diet and diabetes were evident when tissue Cu turnover was examined. Compared to Cu suppl. rats, Cu def. rats had a slower turnover of {sup 67}Cu, in liver, plasma, intestine, pancreas, eye, brain, muscle, spleen, lung and heart. Diabetic rats had a slower turnover of {sup 67}Cu than nondiabetic rats in liver, plasma, intestine, pancreas, eye, kidney, RBC and uterus. The data imply that a focus on Cu metabolism with regard to cellular Cu trafficking and pathology may be warranted.

Uriu-Hare, J.Y.; Rucker, R.B.; Keen, C.L. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

PLUS: CentrifUgaL forCeS n the wormS' tUrn n traCking rabbit fever MAGA ZINE of thE cuMMINGs school of vE tErINAry MEdIcINE SPring 2010 voL . 11 no. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thE cuMMINGs school of vE tErINAry MEdIcINE SPring 2010 voL . 11 no. 2 PLUS: fat CatS n man'S beSt o and littermates who each weigh about 180 pounds. anesthesiologist Lois wetmore used a tranquilizing dart to render

Tufts University

233

Sequence analysis of the rat Brca1 homolog and its promoter region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

dog, and human to help identify the important functional domains ... regions among the rat, mouse, and human genes. .... resulted in Taq polymerase errors.

234

Effect of Low Dose Radiation on Antioxidant Levels in Rat Brain  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation on Antioxidant Levels in Rat Brain Mohan Doss Fox Chase Cancer Center Abstract Background: Parkinsons disease (PD) is characterized by progressive...

235

PyRAT - python radiography analysis tool (u)  

SciTech Connect

PyRAT is a radiography analysis tool used to reconstruction images of unknown 1-0 objects. The tool is written in Python and developed for use on LINUX and Windows platforms. The tool is capable of performing nonlinear inversions of the images with minimal manual interaction in the optimization process. The tool utilizes the NOMAD mixed variable optimization tool to perform the optimization.

Temple, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Buescher, Kevin L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Armstrong, Jerawan C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Extraction of erythropoietin from normal kidneys. [Rats, dogs  

SciTech Connect

Significant amounts of active erythropoietin were extracted from the kidneys of normal rats, cattle, dogs, and rabbits by homogenization of the organs in 0.1 M phosphate buffer. The mean erythropoietin activities of the extracts, as determined by the starved-rat assay, were 0.26 U/g beef kidney, 0.41 U/g dog kidney, and 0.11 U/g rat kidney. The dog kidney extracts had a mean activity of 0.35 U/g, as measured by stimulation of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured bone marrow cells (in vitro assay) and produced a dose-dependent stimulation of /sup 59/Fe incorporation into circulating red cells when assayed in polycythemic mice. Extracts of rabbit kidney cortices had a mean activity of 2.12 U/g, as measured by stimulation of hemoglobin synthesis in cultured bone marrow cells. When the dog kidney homogenate was fractionated on DEAE-cellulose, all of the erythropoietin activity was adsorbed to the exchanger in the presence of 0.01 M acetate buffer, pH 4.5, and was completely eluted by 0.1 M Na/sub 2/HPO/sub 4/-0.5 M NaCl, pH 8. An antibody made aganist human urinary erythropoietin completely inactivated the erythropoietic factor in the dog kidney extract. Serum from a donor dog had no erythropoietin activity when assayed in the starved rat, suggesting that the factor in the extracts is intracellular erythropoietin rather than that contained in plasma trapped in the renal vasculature. The complete inactivation of the erythropoietic factor in these kidney homogenates by antierythropoietin and its behavior on DEAE-cellulose indicate that this factor is structurally similar to native plasma erythropoietin. The extracts are completely active without being incubated in the presence of serum.

Sherwood, J.B.; Goldwasser, E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relaxation Time Constants and Apparent Diffusion Coefficients of Rat Retina at 7 Tesla Govind Nair* and ADC of the rat eyes were measured at 50 3 50 3 800 lm at 7 Tesla. Profiles of T1, T2, T2* and ADC

Duong, Timothy Q.

238

EXCRETION OF ALPHA-FOETOPROTEIN IN THE URINE OF PREGNANT RATS AND HEPATOMA-BEARING ANIMALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Urine of normal rats, pregnant animals and animals bearing chemically induced hepatoma was tested with antisera to foetoproteins by the double immunodiffusion technique. Antigens were not detected in the urine of normal rats. Alpha-foetoprotein was demonstrated in the urine of pregnant rats and hepatomabearing animals. THREE specific embryonic proteins have been described in the rat. One antigen, the lipoprotein esterase, is present in the serum of the adult animal in minute amounts. The other two constituents, alpha-foetoprotein and alpha-M-foetoprotein, formerly termed LA antigen and alpha-2-glycoprotein, normally occur in the serum of the foetus, neonate and pregnant rat (Stanislawski-Birencwajg, 1967). Alpha-M-foetoprotein also appears in the serum of rats with acute toxic liver injury and following a variety of experimental procedures (van Gool and Ladiges, 1969; Heim and Lane, 1964). On the other hand, both foetoproteins are detected in the serum of rats with chemically induced hepatoma (Stanislawski-Birencwajg, Uriel and Grabar,. 1967). Since the alpha-foetoprotein (AFP) is present in the amniotic fluid, to which foetal urine contributes substantially (Pitkin, Reynolds and Burchell, 1968; Vernier and Smith, 1968), it is surprising that urinary excretion in the adult has received little attention (Masseyeff, 1972). In the rat, urinary excretion of non-plasma proteins, i.e. tissue antigens emanating from the accessory sex glands, kidneys, liver and testes, has been reported from

E. Okon; E. Rosenmann; T. Dishont; J. H. Boss

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Norepinephrine uptake by rat jejunum: Modulation by angiotensin II  

SciTech Connect

Angiotensin II (ANG II) is believed to stimulate sodium and water absorption from the small intestine by enhancing sympathetic nerve transmission. This study is designed to determine whether ANG II can enhance sympathetic neurotransmission within the small intestine by inhibition norepinephrine (NE) uptake. Intracellular NE accumulation by rat jejunum was concentration dependent and resolved into high- and low-affinity components. The high-affinity component (uptake 1) exhibited a Michaelis constant (K{sub m}) of 1.72 {mu}M and a maximum velocity (V{sub max}) of 1.19 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. The low-affinity component (uptake 2) exhibited a K{sub m} of 111.1 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 37.1 nmol {center dot} g{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 10 min{sup {minus}1}. Cocaine, an inhibitor of neuronal uptake, inhibited the intracellular accumulation of label by 80%. Treatment of animals with 6-hydroxydopamine, which depletes norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals, also attenuated NE uptake by 60%. Thus accumulation within sympathetic nerves constitutes the major form of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake into rat jejunum. ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. At a dose of 1 mM, ANG II inhibited intracellular ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation by 60%. Cocaine failed to potentiate the inhibition of ({sup 3}H)NE uptake produced by ANG II. Thus ANG II appears to prevent ({sup 3}H)NE accumulation within rat jejunum by inhibiting neuronal uptake.

Suvannapura, A.; Levens, N.R. (CIBA-GEIGY Corp., Summit, NJ (USA))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effect of co-exposure and cadmium in rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metabolism and toxicity of heavy metals may be influenced by certain factors such as protein malnutrition, essential element deficiency or alcoholism. Ethanol has been found to enhance the absorption of lead in body and alcoholics have been reported to be more susceptible to lead intoxication. As alcoholism may be common among industry workers and a significant section of population, who may be exposed to cadmium, it was considered of interest to investigate the influence of ethanol-cadmium co-exposure on cadmium sensitive hepatic, renal and serum enzymes, tissue accumulation of cadmium, essential trace element status and cadmium induced hepatic metallothione in synthesis in rats.

Tandon, S.K.; Tewari, P.C.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

A highly sensitive radioreceptor assay for atrial natriuretic peptide in rat plasma  

SciTech Connect

To enable serial measurements of plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations in the rat, a microradioreceptor assay (RRA) for this hormone was developed. Glomerular microsomes bearing ANP receptors were used to bind ANP. The smallest quantity of ANP detectable by this method was 0.2 fmol/sample. By contrast, a radioimmunoassay for ANP was sensitive to 2.4 fmol/sample. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation for the RRA were 4.1 and 11.6%, respectively. Recovery of 10, 20, 50, and 100 pM synthetic ANP added to unextracted rat plasma was essentially 100%. Biologically inactive, synthetic amino- and carboxy-terminal ANP fragments added to rat plasma were not detected. Plasma ANP was stable when measured four consecutive times at 90-min intervals in 10 fasting rats. In a separate group of rats, fasting plasma ANP levels averaged 34 {plus minus} 3 and rose to 57 {plus minus} 5 pM in the postprandial state, whereas levels in fasting time controls remained constant. It is concluded that the RRA for ANP described here detects ANP in microliter quantities of unextracted rat plasma. Thus serial measurements of ANP concentrations can be undertaken in rats without inducing major changes in the volume status.

Ballermann, B.J. (Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (USA) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A mode of action for induction of thyroid gland tumors by Pyrethrins in the rat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prolonged treatment with high doses of Pyrethrins results in thyroid gland tumors in the rat. To elucidate the mode of action for tumor formation, the effect of Pyrethrins on rat thyroid gland, thyroid hormone levels and hepatic thyroxine UDPglucuronosyltransferase activity was investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley CD rats were fed diets containing 0 (control) and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins and female rats diets containing 0, 100, 3000 and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins for periods of 7, 14 and 42 days and for 42 days followed by 42 days of reversal. As a positive control, rats were also fed diets containing 1200-1558 ppm sodium Phenobarbital (NaPB) for 7 and 14 days. The treatment of male rats with 8000 ppm Pyrethrins, female rats with 3000 and 8000 ppm Pyrethrins and both sexes with NaPB resulted in increased thyroid gland weights, which were associated with follicular cell hypertrophy. Thyroid follicular cell replicative DNA synthesis was increased by treatment with Pyrethrins and NaPB for 7 and/or 14 days. Treatment with Pyrethrins and NaPB increased hepatic microsomal thyroxine UDPglucuronosyltransferase activity and serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels (TSH), but reduced serum levels of either thyroxine (T{sub 4}) and/or triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}). The effects of Pyrethrins in female rats were dose-dependent, with 100 ppm being a no-effect level, and on cessation of treatment were essentially reversible in both sexes. The concordance between the effects of Pyrethrins and NaPB suggests that the mode of action for Pyrethrins-induced rat thyroid gland tumors is similar to that of some other non-genotoxic inducers of hepatic xenobiotic metabolism.

Finch, John M. [Inveresk Research, Tranent EH33 2NE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Osimitz, Thomas G. [Science Strategies LLC, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States)]. E-mail: perseus1@worldnet.att.net; Gabriel, Karl L. [ConTox Ltd, Fort Washington, PA 19034-0368 (United States); Martin, Tom [Inveresk Research, Tranent EH33 2NE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Henderson, Wendy J. [Inveresk Research, Tranent EH33 2NE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Capen, Charles C. [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43082 (United States); Butler, William H. [Glebe Cottage, Big Common Lane, Bletchingley, Surrey RH14QE, England (United Kingdom); Lake, Brian G. [BIBRA International Ltd, Woodmansterne Road, Carshalton, Surrey SM5 4DS, England (United Kingdom); Centre for Toxicology, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, England (United Kingdom)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Exercise training modulates apoptotic signaling in the aging rat heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in cardiac function. A critical contributor to the age-related impairment in heart function is the loss of cardiac myocytes through ??apoptosis??, or programmed cell death. A dramatic increase in the rate of apoptosis has been reported with aging in the rat left ventricle. In contrast, exercise training not only improves cardiac function, but also reduces the risk of heart disease. However, the ability of exercise training to modulate apoptotic signaling and apoptosis in the aging heart remains unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on apoptotic signaling and apoptosis in the aging heart. We hypothesized that (1) aging would increase pro-apoptotic signaling and apoptosis in the rat left ventricle, and (2) exercise training would ameliorate upregulation of Bcl-2 family-driven apoptosis in the heart. Four and 25 month old Fischer-344 rats were assigned to four groups: young control (YC), young trained (YT), old control (OC), and old trained (OT). Exercise training groups ran on a treadmill for 60 min/day at 15 m/min (15? incline), 5 d/wk for 12 wk. Protein expression of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-9, and cleaved caspase-3 was measured using Western immunoblot analysis. Apoptosis (DNA fragmentation) was assessed using a cell death detection ELISA. Bax levels in OC were dramatically higher (+176.0%) compared to YC. In contrast, exercise training resulted in a significant decrease (-53.4%) in Bax in OT compared to OC. Bcl-2 levels in OC were lower (-26.3%) compared to YC. Conversely, exercise training significantly increased Bcl-2 levels by 117.8% in OT compared to OC. Caspase-9 levels were higher (+98.7%) in OC than YC, while exercise training significantly reduced caspase-9 levels in YT (-52.6%) and OT (-76.9%), respectively. Aging resulted in a dramatic increase (+122.8%) in cleaved caspase-3 levels and a significant decrease (-32.9%) with exercise training. Finally, apoptosis (DNA fragmentation) significantly increased (+163.8%) with aging and decreased (-43.9%) with exercise training. These novel data indicate that aging increases pro-apoptotic signaling and apoptosis in the left ventricle, while exercise training is effective in diminishing pro-apoptotic signaling and apoptosis in the aging heart.

Kwak, Hyo Bum

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

S I M O N F RASE R U N I V ERS I T Y E N V I R O N M E N T A L H E A L T H & S A F E T Y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with. Rodents can transmit diseases such as Salmonellosis, Murin Typhus, Lyme Disease, Hantavirus etc, such as Salmonellosis, Murin Typhus, Lyme Disease, Hantavirus etc. Mice and rats can be found almost everywhere

245

Annuaire du 1er cycle 20102011 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristic to meet the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) requirement; (ii) a nonlinear speed regulator properties. Keywords: wind energy conversion; synchronous generators; speed regulation; MPPT; nonlinear point tracking (MPPT)' and its achievement guarantees optimal aerodynamic efficiency. Presently, we seek

Québec, Université du

246

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2Chapter 13 CLA and Bone Modeling in Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in Conjugated Linoleic Acid Research, Vol 2 Chapter 13 CLA and Bone Modeling in Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 13 C

247

Particulate oil shale inhalation and pulmonary inflammatory response in rats  

SciTech Connect

This experiment detrimetal that long-term inhalation of shale dusts by rats elicits a limited inflammatory response in the lung less profound than that observed in animals exposed to equivalent levels of quartz alone. This observation suggests that organic and inorganic constituents of shale may provide a protective effect. The implications for fibrogenic disease are two-fold: (1) inhalation of oil shale dusts appeared to be less detriemtal than the inhalation of quartz along, and (2) there was no apparent synergistic action of quartz and the complex of organic materials present in shale. Animals exposed to shale dusts failed to develop any significant lung lesions, while all of the animals exposed to quartz developed granulomas and some frank fibrosis.

Wilson, J.S.; Holland, L.M.; Halleck, M.S.; Martinez, E.; Saunders, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ultrastructural changes in rat hepatocytes following acute methyl mercury intoxication  

SciTech Connect

Male rats were given daily subcutaneous injections of methylmercuric chloride (CH/sub 3/HgCl) at a dosage of 10 mg/kg body weight for 4 days. The earliest ultrastructural changes consisted of dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, wavy transformation of the mitochondrial membranes and occasional accumulation of liposomes. Focal areas of cytoplasmic degradation were observed 1 day after the initial administration of mercury. An increased number of lysosomes as well as swelling and floccular degeneration of the mitochondria were frequently observed at 2 days. Sequestration of cytoplasmic organelles within the hepatocytes, extrusion of degenerated hepatic organelles and cytoplasmic debris into the sinusoid could be observed 24 hours after the initial mercury administration and became a frequent finding after 4 days of intoxication. (auth)

Desnoyers, P.A.; Chang, L.W.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cocaine hypophagia and hyperlocomotion in rats before and after exposure to a high-fat diet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relatively few studies have examined the effects of psychostimulants in obese subjects. Using the dietary obese rat model, the present experiments determined the reductions in food intake (hypophagia) and increases in locomotion (hyperlocomotion) induced by cocaine in diet-induced obese prone (DIO-prone) rats and diet resistant prone (DR-prone) rats as well as diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and diet resistant (DR) rats. In Experiment 1, thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats were given intra-peritoneal (i.p.) injections of cocaine (0, 10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) immediately prior to placement into locomotor chambers outfitted with a food source and a water source for a 60-minute test period. In Experiment 2, the same rats were exposed to a high-fat diet, and were subsequently divided into groups according to the extent of the weight gain (high weight gainers ? DIO group, low weight gainers ? DR group, and residual weight gainers ? MIX group). The rats were retested for reactivity to cocaine using conditions similar to those in Experiment 1. Rats injected with cocaine prior to high-fat exposure (Experiment 1) showed a dose dependent suppression of food intake, as well as a dose dependent increase in locomotor activity, with DR-prone rats exhibiting an enhanced degree of cocaine-induced hypophagia, as well as cocaine-induced hyperlocomotion as compared to the other groups. In Experiment 2, DIO rats exhibited a suppression of food intake after injection of 10 mg/kg cocaine, as well as an increase in locomotor activity that was significantly greater than noted in the other groups. When the results of Experiment 1 were analyzed as a function of prospective body weight gain (as opposed to placement into distinct groups), reactivity to cocaine decreased as body weight gain increased. In contrast, after high-fat exposure and weight gain, increased body weight gain was associated with an increased magnitude of suppression in food intake after cocaine administration. Similar patterns of differential cocaine sensitivity were observed for cocaine hyperlocomotion in Experiment 2. These studies indicate that although the propensity to develop obesity is associated with a diminished cocaine response, cocaine reactivity is enhanced after the induction of obesity.

Ho, Dao Hong

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Biomethylation of inorganic arsenic by the rat and some laboratory animals  

SciTech Connect

This article concerns the distribution (in the liver, kidney and blood) and excretion (in the urine, feces and bile) of arsenic metabolites such as dimethylated, monomethylated and inorganic arsenic in rats following a single oral and intravenous (iv) administration of arsenic acid. This paper also describes studies on the species difference in the arsenic methylation between the rats and some other laboratory animals as mice, hamsters, rabbits and cats.

Odanaka, Y.; Matano, O.; Goto, S.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

SciTech Connect

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: <7% of the rat contigs are aligned to multiple places in human and 97% of all alignments with human sequence > 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

253

Age-related changes in receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in various regions of rat brain  

SciTech Connect

The effects of age on cholinergic markers and receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was examined in the frontal cortex and striatum of male Fischer-344 rats. Choline acetyltransferase activity was decreased 27% in the striatum of aged rats compared to young controls. Muscarinic receptor density as measured by ({sup 3}H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate binding showed a similar 26% decrease in the striatum of aged rats. Phosphoinositide hydrolysis was measured by the release of inositol phosphate (IP) from tissue slices prelabeled with ({sup 3}H)myoinositol in response to carbachol, norepinephrine, and quisqualate. In the cortex, stimulated IP release was significantly greater in slices from aged rats compared to young rats for all three agonists. In contrast, stimulated IP release was significantly decreased in striatal slices from aged rats compared to young for all three agonists. These data indicate a differential effect of age on agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in the cortex and striatum. The decreased responsiveness in the latter area may result from the age-related loss of postsynaptic receptors.

Mundy, W.; Tandon, P.; Tilson, H. (Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Ali, S. (National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Autoradiographic localization and characterization of angiotensin II binding sites in the spleen of rats and mice  

SciTech Connect

Specific binding sites for angiotensin II (Ang II) were localized in the red pulp of the spleen of rats and mice by quantitative autoradiography using /sup 125/I-Sar1-Ang II as a ligand. In the rat, the binding was saturable and specific, and the rank order for Ang II derivatives as competitors of /sup 125/I-Sar1-Ang II binding correlates well with their affinity for Ang II receptors in other tissues. Kinetic analysis in the rat spleen revealed a single class of binding sites with a KD of 1.11 nM and a Bmax value of 81.6 fmol/mg protein. Ang II binding sites were also localized on isolated rat spleen cells with similar affinity but with much lower Bmax, 9.75 fmol/mg protein. Ang II receptors were not detected in thymus sections from rats or mice, or on isolated rat thymocytes. The binding sites described here might represent a functional Ang II receptor with a role in the regulation of splenic volume and blood flow and in the modulation of the lymphocyte function.

Castren, E.; Kurihara, M.; Saavedra, J.M.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Establishing a rodent (Fischer 344 rat) model of mild cognitive impairment in aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mild Cognitive Impairment is characterized by age-related decline in a variety of cognitive domains, including reference and working memory and olfactory function. Importantly, declining age-related mnemonic abilities is not inevitable; learning and memory deficits emerge in some people by middle-age while others remain largely cognitively-intact even at advanced chronological ages. The goal of this thesis is to establish a Fischer 344 (F344) rat model with some features of human cognitive aging which can then be utilized to undercover the neurobiological underpinnings of age-related cognitive deficits. Young (6 mo), middle-aged (11 mo), and aged (22 mo) F344 rats were behaviorally characterized in a well-established reference memory version of the Morris water maze task. Indeed, age-related impairments did occur across the lifespan. Moreover, the reference memory protocol used here was sufficiently sensitive to detect a difference in individual abilities among aged F344 rats such that approximately half of the rats performed on par with young while the other half performed outside this range, demonstrating impairment. These data mimic individual differences in declarative memory among aged humans. Subsequently, subsets of rats initially characterized on the reference memory version of the water maze were tested on either a spatial working memory water maze task or an olfactory discrimination task. Despite detecting an age-related delay-dependent decline in spatial working memory, this impairment was not correlated with spatial reference memory. In contrast, a strong and significant relationship was observed among aged rats in the odor discrimination task such that aged rats with the worst spatial reference memory were also the most impaired in their ability to discriminate odors for a food reward. Importantly, this subset of cognitively-impaired rats was not impaired on digging media discrimination problems with identical task demands, nor were they anosmic. These data are among the first to demonstrate a cross-domain cognitive deficit in a rodent model of human aging. Together, the current study both confirms the use of the naturalistic F344 rat model for the study of cognitive deficits within the context of aging and provides the most comprehensive cognitive profile of this rat population to date.

LaSarge, Candi Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

In vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroid pesticides in human and rat skin  

SciTech Connect

Dermal exposure to pyrethroid pesticides can occur during manufacture and application. This study examined the in vitro dermal absorption of pyrethroids using rat and human skin. Dermatomed skin from adult male Long Evans rats or human cadavers was mounted in flow-through diffusion cells, and radiolabeled bifenthrin, deltamethrin or cis-permethrin was applied in acetone to the skin. Fractions of receptor fluid were collected every 4 h. At 24 h, the skins were washed with soap and water to remove unabsorbed chemical. The skin was then solubilized. Two additional experiments were performed after washing the skin; the first was tape-stripping the skin and the second was the collection of receptor fluid for an additional 24 h. Receptor fluid, skin washes, tape strips and skin were analyzed for radioactivity. For rat skin, the wash removed 53-71% of the dose and 26-43% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid ranged from 1 to 5%. For human skin, the wash removed 71-83% of the dose and 14-25% remained in the skin. The cumulative percentage of the dose at 24 h in the receptor fluid was 1-2%. Tape-stripping removed 50-56% and 79-95% of the dose in rat and human skin, respectively, after the wash. From 24-48 h, 1-3% and about 1% of the dose diffused into the receptor fluid of rat and human skin, respectively. The pyrethroids bifenthrin, deltamethrin and cis-permethrin penetrated rat and human skin following dermal application in vitro. However, a skin wash removed 50% or more of the dose from rat and human skin. Rat skin was more permeable to the pyrethroids than human skin. Of the dose in skin, 50% or more was removed by tape-stripping, suggesting that permeation of pyrethroids into viable tissue could be impeded. The percentage of the dose absorbed into the receptor fluid was considerably less than the dose in rat and human skin. Therefore, consideration of the skin type used and fractions analyzed are important when using in vitro dermal absorption data for risk assessment.

Hughes, Michael F., E-mail: hughes.michaelf@epa.go [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Edwards, Brenda C. [Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium.

Smajilovic, Sanela [Laboratory of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Cardiac Arrhythmia (DARC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Hansen, Jakob Lerche [Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Cardiac Arrhythmia (DARC), Copenhagen (Denmark); Christoffersen, Tue E.H. [Laboratory of Molecular Cardiology, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet (Denmark); Danish National Research Foundation Centre for Cardiac Arrhythmia (DARC), Copenhagen (Denmark)] (and others)

2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Final Scientific/Technical Report, USDOE Award DE-FG-02ER54684, Recipient: CompX, Project Title: Fokker-Planck/Ray Tracing for Electron Bernstein and Fast Wave Modeling in Support of NSTX.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This DOE grant supported fusion energy research, a potential long-term solution to the world's energy needs. Magnetic fusion, exemplified by confinement of very hot ionized gases, i.e., plasmas, in donut-shaped tokamak vessels is a leading approach for this energy source. Thus far, a mixture of hydrogen isotopes has produced 10's of megawatts of fusion power for seconds in a tokamak reactor at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in New Jersey. The research grant under consideration, ER54684, uses computer models to aid in understanding and projecting efficacy of heating and current drive sources in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, a tokamak variant, at PPPL. The NSTX experiment explores the physics of very tight aspect ratio, almost spherical tokamaks, aiming at producing steady-state fusion plasmas. The current drive is an integral part of the steady-state concept, maintaining the magnetic geometry in the steady-state tokamak. CompX further developed and applied models for radiofrequency (rf) heating and current drive for applications to NSTX. These models build on a 30 year development of rf ray tracing (the all-frequencies GENRAY code) and higher dimensional Fokker-Planck rf-collisional modeling (the 3D collisional-quasilinear CQL3D code) at CompX. Two mainline current-drive rf modes are proposed for injection into NSTX: (1) electron Bernstein wave (EBW), and (2) high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) modes. Both these current drive systems provide a means for the rf to access the especially high density plasma--termed high beta plasma--compared to the strength of the required magnetic fields. The CompX studies entailed detailed modeling of the EBW to calculate the efficiency of the current drive system, and to determine its range of flexibility for driving current at spatial locations in the plasma cross-section. The ray tracing showed penetration into NSTX bulk plasma, relatively efficient current drive, but a limited ability to produce current over the whole radial plasma cross-section. The actual EBW experiment will cost several million dollars, and remains in the proposal stage. The HHFW current drive system has been experimentally implemented on NSTX, and successfully drives substantial current. The understanding of the experiment is to be accomplished in terms of general concepts of rf current drive, and also detailed modeling of the experiment which can discern the various competing processes which necessarily occur simultaneously in the experiment. An early discovery of the CompX codes, GENRAY and CQL3D, was that there could be significant interference between the neutral beam injection fast ions in the machine (injected for plasma heating) and the HHFW energy. Under many NSTX experimental conditions, power which could go to the fast ions would then be unavailable for current drive by the desired HHFW interaction with electrons. This result has been born out by experiments; the modeling helps in understanding difficulties with HHFW current drive, and has enabled adjustment of the experiment to avoid interaction with neutral beam injected fast ions thereby achieving stronger HHFW current drive. The detailed physics modeling of the various competing processes is almost always required in fusion energy plasma physics, to ensure a reasonably accurate and certain interpretation of the experiment, enabling the confident design of future, more advanced experiments and ultimately a commercial fusion reactor. More recent work entails detailed investigation of the interaction of the HHFW radiation for fast ions, accounting for the particularly large radius orbits in NSTX, and correlations between multiple HHFW-ion interactions. The spherical aspect of the NSTX experiment emphasized particular physics such as the large orbits which are present to some degree in all tokamaks, but gives clearer clues on the resulting physics phenomena since competing physics effects are reduced.

R.W. Harvey, CompX, Del Mar, CA 92014

2009-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

259

Automated whole-genome multiple alignment of rat, mouse, and human  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have built a whole genome multiple alignment of the three currently available mammalian genomes using a fully automated pipeline which combines the local/global approach of the Berkeley Genome Pipeline and the LAGAN program. The strategy is based on progressive alignment, and consists of two main steps: (1) alignment of the mouse and rat genomes; and (2) alignment of human to either the mouse-rat alignments from step 1, or the remaining unaligned mouse and rat sequences. The resulting alignments demonstrate high sensitivity, with 87% of all human gene-coding areas aligned in both mouse and rat. The specificity is also high: 100kb agree with a three-way synteny map built independently using predicted exons in the three genomes. At the nucleotide level <1% of the rat nucleotides are mapped to multiple places in the human sequence in the alignment; and 96.5% of human nucleotides within all alignments agree with the synteny map. The alignments are publicly available online, with visualization through the novel Multi-VISTA browser that we also present.

Brudno, Michael; Poliakov, Alexander; Salamov, Asaf; Cooper, Gregory M.; Sidow, Arend; Rubin, Edward M.; Solovyev, Victor; Batzoglou, Serafim; Dubchak, Inna

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

260

Endogenous N-nitroso compounds, and their precursors, present in bacon, do not initiate or promote aberrant crypt foci in the colon of rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

groups of 10 rats, whose diets contained 7, 14 or 28 fat. Tested meats were bacon, pork, chicken and beef by the number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in the colon of rats, 45 days after the start of a high-fat bacon similar. Rats fed a diet based on beef, pork or chicken meat had less fecal NOC than controls (most p

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Genome sequence of the brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution  

SciTech Connect

The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is an indispensable tool in experimental medicine and drug development, having made inestimable contributions to human health. We report here the genome sequence of the Brown Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality 'draft' covering over 90 percent of the genome. The BN rat sequence is the third complete mammalian genome to be deciphered, and three-way comparisons with the human and mouse genomes resolve details of mammalian evolution. This first comprehensive analysis includes genes and proteins and their relation to human disease, repeated sequences, comparative genome-wide studies of mammalian orthologous chromosomal regions and rearrangement breakpoints, reconstruction of ancestral karyotypes and the events leading to existing species, rates of variation, and lineage-specific and lineage-independent evolutionary events such as expansion of gene families, orthology relations and protein evolution.

Gibbs, Richard A.; Weinstock, George M.; Metzker, Michael L.; Muzny, Donna M.; Sodergren, Erica J.; Scherer, Steven; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Worley, Kim C.; Burch, Paula E.; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Hines, Sandra; Lewis, Lora; DeRamo, Christine; Delgado, Oliver; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Miner, George; Morgan, Margaret; Hawes, Alicia; Gill, Rachel; Holt, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Amanatides, Peter G.; Baden-Tillson, Holly; Barnstead, Mary; Chin, Soo; Evans, Cheryl A.; Ferriera, Steven; Fosler, Carl; Glodek, Anna; Gu, Zhiping; Jennings, Don; Kraft, Cheryl L.; Nguyen, Trixie; Pfannkoch, Cynthia M.; Sitter, Cynthia; Sutton, Granger G.; Venter, J. Craig; Woodage, Trevor; Smith, Douglas; Lee, Hong-Maei; Gustafson, Erik; Cahill, Patrick; Kana, Arnold; Doucette-Stamm, Lynn; Weinstock, Keith; Fechtel, Kim; Weiss, Robert B.; Dunn, Diane M.; Green, Eric D.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Zhu, Baoli; Marra, Marco; Schein, Jacqueline; Bosdet, Ian; Fjell, Chris; Jones, Steven; Krzywinski, Martin; Mathewson, Carrie; Siddiqui, Asim; Wye, Natasja; McPherson, John; Zhao, Shaying; Fraser, Claire M.; Shetty, Jyoti; Shatsman, Sofiya; Geer, Keita; Chen, Yixin; Abramzon, Sofyia; Nierman, William C.; Havlak, Paul H.; Chen, Rui; Durbin, K. James; Egan, Amy; Ren, Yanru; Song, Xing-Zhi; Li, Bingshan; Liu, Yue; Qin, Xiang; Cawley, Simon; Cooney, A.J.; D'Souza, Lisa M.; Martin, Kirt; Wu, Jia Qian; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L.; Jackson, Andrew R.; Kalafus, Kenneth J.; McLeod, Michael P.; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Virk, Davinder; Volkov, Andrei; Wheeler, David A.; Zhang, Zhengdong; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Tuzun, Eray; Birney, Ewan; Mongin, Emmanuel; Ureta-Vidal, Abel; Woodwark, Cara; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Torrents, David; Alexandersson, Marina; Trask, Barbara J.; Young, Janet M.; et al.

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Lighting Has a Selective Influence on Ethanol Intake in Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rats. PHYSIOL BEHAV 66(2) 323328, 1999.The effect of lighting condition on levels of absolute ethanol intake were systematically examined in the present study. Wistar rats were exposed to one of three lighting conditions: constant light, constant dark, and a standard 12?12 light/dark cycle. The animals were acclimatized to lighting conditions for 2 weeks prior to ethanol (EtOH) acquisition with water and food available ad lib. EtOH was then presented in increasing concentrations from 2 % (v/v; 95 % with tap water) to 10 % on alternate days in free choice with water. Immediately following the acquisition phase, a maintenance period was initiated that began with everyday presentations of 10 % EtOH solution in free choice with water. After 10 days, lighting conditions for the constant light and dark groups were switched to normal lighting (12/12 light/ dark). EtOH and water intake were recorded for an additional 10 days. Rats exposed to constant light during EtOH acquisition and maintenance consumed less EtOH during the maintenance period than rats exposed to normal lighting conditions. When lighting conditions were switched to a normal cycle, water consumption increased significantly but EtOH intake did not change. Rats living in constant dark during EtOH acquisition and maintenance consumed less EtOH during the acquisition period when compared with rats living in normal lighting conditions. Unlike animals trained under constant lighting, switching to normal lighting conditions had no effect on EtOH or water intake. There were no differences in water consumption levels among the groups during acquisition and maintenance, suggesting a specificity of the effects of lighting condition on EtOH intake. The present study, therefore, has attempted to show that an environmental variable such as lighting may exert

F. L. W. Goodwin; S. Amir; Z. Amit

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

RADIATION-INDUCED CONDITIONED AVOIDANCE BEVIOR IN RATS, MICE, AND CATS  

SciTech Connect

Association of a distinctive taste stimulus with exposure to x rays results in a conditioned aversion toward the stimulus in rats, mice, and cats. This is manifested by a progressive reduction in the amount of flavored fluid consumed during a series of x-ray exposures and subsequently by the acquired value of the flavored fluid to act as a con- ditioned stiraulus for aversive behavior in the absence of radiation. Saccharin-flavored water was effective as a conditioned stimulus for rats and mice, and chocolateflavored milk was effective for cats. Some implications of these observations for the study of behavior are discussed. (auth)

Kimeldorf, D.J.; Garcia, J.; Rubadeau, D.O.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dietary quercetin exacerbates the development of estrogen-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phytoestrogens are plant compounds that structurally mimic the endogenous estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}). Despite intense investigation, the net effect of phytoestrogen exposure on the breast remains unclear. The objective of the current study was to examine the effects of quercetin on E{sub 2}-induced breast cancer in vivo. Female ACI rats were given quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) for 8 months. Animals were monitored weekly for palpable tumors, and at the end of the experiment, rats were euthanized, breast tumor and different tissues excised so that they could be examined for histopathologic changes, estrogen metabolic activity and oxidant stress. Quercetin alone did not induce mammary tumors in female ACI rats. However, in rats implanted with E{sub 2} pellets, co-exposure to quercetin did not protect rats from E{sub 2}-induced breast tumor development with 100% of the animals developing breast tumors within 8 months of treatment. No changes in serum quercetin levels were observed in quercetin and quercetin + E{sub 2}-treated groups at the end of the experiment. Tumor latency was significantly decreased among rats from the quercetin + E{sub 2} group relative to those in the E{sub 2} group. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity was significantly downregulated in quercetin-exposed mammary tissue. Analysis of 8-isoprostane F{sub 2{alpha}} (8-iso-PGF{sub 2{alpha}}) levels as a marker of oxidant stress showed that quercetin did not decrease E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress. These results indicate that quercetin (2.5 g/kg food) does not confer protection against breast cancer, does not inhibit E{sub 2}-induced oxidant stress and may exacerbate breast carcinogenesis in E{sub 2}-treated ACI rats. Inhibition of COMT activity by quercetin may expose breast cells chronically to E{sub 2} and catechol estrogens. This would permit longer exposure times to the carcinogenic metabolites of E{sub 2} and chronic exposure to oxidant stress as a result of metabolic redox cycling to estrogen metabolites, and thus quercetin may exacerbate E{sub 2}-induced breast tumors in female ACI rats.

Singh, Bhupendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Mense, Sarah M. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Bhat, Nimee K. [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Putty, Sandeep; Guthiel, William A. [Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States); Remotti, Fabrizio [Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Bhat, Hari K., E-mail: bhath@umkc.ed [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64108 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Mutations of the Apc gene in experimental colorectal carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane in F344 rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary We investigated in the rat the role of the Apc gene, which is mutated in familial adenomatous polyposis and sporadic colon cancer in the process leading from normal colonic mucosa to aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and finally to adenomas and adenocarcinomas. We analysed mutations in exon 15 of the rat Apc gene using in vitro synthesized protein assay in 66 ACF and in 28 colon tumours induced by azoxymethane. No Apc mutations were found in ACF, whereas five mutations were found in the tumours. The data suggest that mutations of the Apc gene are associated with the transition from ACF to adenoma and adenocarcinoma and not from normal mucosa to ACF.

G Caderni; M Bazzicalupo; C Briani; A Giannini; M Fazi; P Dolaral

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Topics: PV, Wind, environmental justice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to compare the costs of generating electricity using solar energy in different parts of the United States. a. Let us consider a simple 10m2 rooftop installation of crystalline-silicon (c-Si) PV modules. Now remember that PV modules are rated to receive 1.000 kW/m2 of solar radiation. Assuming peak solar

Kammen, Daniel M.

267

Size of Tropical Cyclones as Inferred from ERS-1 and ERS-2 Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sizes of the tropical cyclones (TCs) occurring over the western North Pacific (WNP) and the North Atlantic between 1991 and 1996 are estimated to establish a database for the study of the climatology of TC size and the physical processes ...

K. S. Liu; Johnny C. L. Chan

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Space Radiation Effects on Er-Doped, Yb-Doped and Yb/Er Co ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2012. Symposium, Glass and Optical Materials. Presentation Title, Space Radiation Effects on...

269

Metabolism and disposition of 1-bromopropane in rats and mice following inhalation or intravenous administration  

SciTech Connect

Workplace exposure to 1-bromopropane (1-BrP) can potentially occur during its use in spray adhesives, fats, waxes, and resins. 1-BrP may be used to replace ozone depleting solvents, resulting in an increase in its annual production in the US, which currently exceeds 1 million pounds. The potential for human exposure to 1-BrP and the reports of adverse effects associated with potential occupational exposure to high levels of 1-BrP have increased the need for the development of biomarkers of exposure and an improved understanding of 1-BrP metabolism and disposition. In this study, the factors influencing the disposition and biotransformation of 1-BrP were examined in male F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice following inhalation exposure (800 ppm) or intravenous administration (5, 20, and 100 mg/kg). [1,2,3-{sup 13}C]1-BrP and [1-{sup 14}C]1-BrP were administered to enable characterization of urinary metabolites using NMR spectroscopy, LC-MS/MS, and HPLC coupled radiochromatography. Exhaled breath volatile organic chemicals (VOC), exhaled CO{sub 2}, urine, feces, and tissues were collected for up to 48 h post-administration for determination of radioactivity distribution. Rats and mice exhaled a majority of the administered dose as either VOC (40-72%) or {sup 14}CO{sub 2} (10-30%). For rats, but not mice, the percentage of the dose exhaled as VOC increased between the mid ({approx} 50%) and high ({approx} 71%) dose groups; while the percentage of the dose exhaled as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} decreased (19 to 10%). The molar ratio of exhaled {sup 14}CO{sub 2} to total released bromide, which decreased as dose increased, demonstrated that the proportion of 1-BrP metabolized via oxidation relative to pathways dependent on glutathione conjugation is inversely proportional to dose in the rat. [{sup 14}C]1-BrP equivalents were recovered in urine (13-17%, rats; 14-23% mice), feces (< 2%), or retained in the tissues and carcass (< 6%) of rats and mice administered i.v. 5 to 100 mg/kg [{sup 14}C]1-BrP. Metabolites characterized in urine of rats and mice include N-acetyl-S-propylcysteine, N-acetyl-3-(propylsulfinyl)alanine, N-acetyl-S-(2-hydroxypropyl)cysteine, 1-bromo-2-hydroxypropane-O-glucuronide, N-acetyl-S-(2-oxopropyl)cysteine, and N-acetyl-3-[(2-oxopropyl)sulfinyl]alanine. These metabolites may be formed following oxidation of 1-bromopropane to 1-bromo-2-propanol and bromoacetone and following subsequent glutathione conjugation with either of these compounds. Rats pretreated with 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT), a potent inhibitor of P450 excreted less in urine ({down_arrow}30%), exhaled as {sup 14}CO2 ({down_arrow}80%), or retained in liver ({down_arrow}90%), with a concomitant increase in radioactivity expired as VOC ({up_arrow}52%). Following ABT pretreatment, rat urinary metabolites were reduced in number from 10 to 1, N-acetyl-S-propylcysteine, which accounted for > 90% of the total urinary radioactivity in ABT pretreated rats. Together, these data demonstrate a role for cytochrome P450 and glutathione in the dose-dependent metabolism and disposition of 1-BrP in the rat.

Garner, C.E. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: cegarner@rti.org; Sumner, S.C.J. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Davis, J.G. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Burgess, J.P. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Yueh, Y. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Demeter, J. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Zhan, Q. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Valentine, J. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Jeffcoat, A.R. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Burka, L.T. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Mathews, J.M. [Department of Drug Metabolism and Disposition, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES OF THE THYROID GLAND IN RATS OF DIFFERENT AGE IN TOTAL X-RAY IRRADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The reaction of the thyroid gland of white male rats to x irradiation (800 r) depends upon the age and individual reactivity of the animal. In young rats the irradiation provokes marked changes in the thyroid gland, which in some instances are expressed by an insignificant rise of the activity (in the first hours and days after irradiation) followed by its decrease (from the 5th to 30th day). In other cases a drop of the activity is seen already in the first hours. In all rats of this group the thyroid gland reverts tu normal towards the second month. In adult rats (5- 7-month-old) the above dose of irradiation provokes less pronounced changes in the structure of the gland, as compared to young rats. Towards the l8th day after irradiation the structure of the thyroid gland normalizes. Irradiation (800 r) of old rats does not cause noticeable changes in the histological picture of the thyroid gland. In young rats with a severe course of radiation sickness, sacrificed in the agonal state on the 9th-l3th day following irradiation, there is a sharp drop of the thyroid gland activity. (auth)

Loskutova, E.A.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hyperamplification of centrosomes and asynchronous nuclear division induced by N-nitrosodimethylamine in rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanisms of hepatocyte multinucleation was investigated in rats exposed to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). By using immunohistochemical reaction to ?-tubulin it was established that the number of cells containing three and more centrosomes increased ... Keywords: asynchronous DNA synthesis, centrosomes, cytochrome P4502E1, multinucleated hepatocytes, multipolar mitosis, oxidative stress

Bauyrzhan Umbayev; Tamara Shalakhmetova; William Au

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Pulmonary toxicity, distribution, and clearance of intratracheally instilled silicon nanowires in rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are being manufactured for use as sensors and transistors for circuit applications. The goal was to assess pulmonary toxicity and fate of Si NWusing an in vivo experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intratracheally ...

Jenny R. Roberts; Robert R. Mercer; Rebecca S. Chapman; Guy M. Cohen; Sarunya Bangsaruntip; Diane Schwegler-Berry; James F. Scabilloni; Vincent Castranova; James M. Antonini; Stephen S. Leonard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Increased angiotensin II receptors in brain nuclei of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors by in vitro autoradiography in selective brain nuclei of control, salt-treated (1% NaCl in drinking water), deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-treated (DOCA pivalate, 25 mg/kg sc weekly), and DOCA-salt-treated (DOCA + salt treatments) uninephrectomized male Wistar-Kyoto rats. After 4 wk of treatment, only the DOCA-salt group developed hypertension. ANG II binding increased in median preoptic nucleus and subfornical organ of salt- and DOCA-treated rats. DOCA-treated rats also showed increased ANG II binding in paraventricular nucleus. DOCA-salt-treated rats showed higher ANG II binding in nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema, as well as in the areas mentioned before. Although salt and/or DOCA treatments alone increased ANG II receptors in some brain nuclei, after combined DOCA-salt treatment there was significantly higher ANG II binding in all areas, except the median preoptic nucleus. These results suggest that increased ANG II receptors in selected brain areas may play a role in the pathophysiology of mineralocorticoid-salt experimental hypertension.

Gutkind, J.S.; Kurihara, M.; Saavedra, J.M.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Evaluation of deltamethrin kinetics and dosimetry in the maturing rat using a PBPK model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study (Kim et al., in press) revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90 days old. The objective of the current study was to modify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DLM disposition in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat (Mirfazaelian et al., 2006), so blood and target organ dosimetry could be accurately predicted during maturation. Age-specific organ weights and age-dependent changes in the oxidative and hydrolytic clearance of DLM were modeled with a generalized Michaelis-Menten model for growth and the summary equations incorporated into the PBPK model. The model's simulations compared favorably with empirical DLM time-courses in plasma, blood, brain and fat for the four age-groups evaluated (10, 21, 40 and 90 days old). PND 10 pups' area under the 24-h brain concentration time curve (AUC{sub 0-24h}) was 3.8-fold higher than that of the PND 90 adults. Our maturing rat PBPK model allows for updating with age- and chemical-dependent parameters, so pyrethroid dosimetry can be forecast in young and aged individuals. Hence, this model provides a methodology for risk assessors to consider age-specific adjustments to oral Reference Doses on the basis of PK differences.

Tornero-Velez, Rogelio, E-mail: tornero-velez.rogelio@epa.go [National Exposure Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Mirfazaelian, Ahmad, E-mail: amirfazaelian@gmail.co [Department of Chemical Injuries, Baghiatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kim, Kyu-Bong, E-mail: kimkb@rx.uga.ed [Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Engineering, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyungnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Anand, Sathanandam S., E-mail: satheesh.s.anand@usa.dupont.co [Dupont Haskell Global Centers for Health and Environmental Sciences, 1090 Elkton Road, Newark, DE 19714 (United States); Kim, Hyo J., E-mail: hyokimm@yahoo.co.k [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2352 (United States); Haines, Wendy T., E-mail: toxicology@unc.ed [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, CB 7270, NC 27599-7270 (United States); Bruckner, James V., E-mail: bruckner@rx.uga.ed [Department of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2352 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jwfisher@uga.ed [Department of Environmental Health, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Glucose BioFuel Cell Implanted in Rats Philippe Cinquin1 *, Chantal Gondran2 , Fabien Giroud2 powerful ones, Glucose BioFuel Cells (GBFCs), are based on enzymes electrically wired by redox mediators applications. Citation: Cinquin P, Gondran C, Giroud F, Mazabrard S, Pellissier A, et al. (2010) A Glucose BioFuel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

276

The effect of methylsulfonylmethane on the experimental colitis in the rat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), naturally occurring in green plants, fruits and vegetables, has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. MSM is an organosulfur compound and a normal oxidative metabolite of dimethyl sulfoxide. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of MSM in a rat model of experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 1 ml of 5% of acetic acid. Rats were treated with MSM (400 mg/kg/day, orally) for 4 days. Animals were euthanized and distal colon evaluated histologically and biochemically. Tissue samples were used to measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH) and proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-{alpha} and IL-1{beta}) levels. Results showed that MSM decreased macroscopic and microscopic colonic damage scores caused by administration of acetic acid. MSM treatment also significantly reduced colonic levels of MDA, MPO and IL-1{beta}, while increased the levels of GSH and CAT compared with acetic acid-induced colitis group. It seems that MSM as a natural product may have a protective effect in an experimental ulcerative colitis. - Research Highlights: > Methylsulfonylmethane occurs naturally in some green plants, fruits and vegetables. > Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. > We evaluated the effects of MSM in a rat model of experimental ulcerative colitis. > MSM has protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis in rat.

Amirshahrokhi, K., E-mail: k.amirshahrokhi@arums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 56197, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bohlooli, S. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 56197, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chinifroush, M.M. [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Studies on Pentoxifylline and Tocopherol Combination for Radiation-Induced Heart Disease in Rats  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the application of pentoxifylline (PTX) and tocopherol l (Vit. E) could modify the development of radiation-induced heart disease and downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}1mRNA in rats. Methods and Materials: A total of 120 Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into four groups: control group, irradiated group, experimental group 1, and experiment group 2. Supplementation was started 3 days before irradiation; in experimental group 1, injection of PTX (15 mg/kg/d) and Vit. E (5.5 mg/kg/d) continued till the 12th week postirradiation, whereas in experimental group 2 it was continued until the 24th week postirradiation. All rats were administrated a single dose of 20 Gy irradiation to the heart except the control group. Histopathologic evaluation was performed at various time points (Days 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 and 24th week) up to 24 weeks after irradiation. Changes of levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA expression were also investigated at the same time points using competitive polymerase chain reaction. Results: Compared with the irradiated group, levels of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA of the rat hearts were relatively low in the two experimental groups on the 12th week postirradiation. In experimental group 1, there was a rebound expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA on the 24th week postirradiation, whereas that of the experimental group 2 remained low (p < 0.05). The proportions of collagen fibers of the two experimental groups were lower than that of irradiated group (p < 0.05). A rebound could be observed in the experimental group 1. Conclusion: PTX and Vit. E downregulated the expression of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA. The irradiated rat hearts showed a marked pathologic response to the drugs. The withdrawal of drugs in the 12th week postirradiation could cause rebound effects of the development of fibrosis.

Liu Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xiong Mai [Department of Cardiac Surgery, the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Xia Yunfei; Cui Nianji; Lu Rubiao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Radiotherapy, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Deng Ling [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Lin Yuehao [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Clinical Laboratory, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Rong Tiehua [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Department of Thoracic Surgery, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)], E-mail: esophagus2003@yahoo.com.cn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Effect of synthetic ANP on renal and loop of Henle functions in the young rat  

SciTech Connect

The present studies were undertaken to determine, by recollection micropuncture, the effect of a synthetic atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the absolute and fractional deliveries of water and sodium to the juxtamedullary end-descending limb. Two groups of young female Munich-Wistar rats were studied: 1) control received the vehicle only; and 2) ANP received a prime followed by the constant infusion of a synthetic rat atrial peptide (28 amino acids). With the infusion of ANP, clearance of p-( UC)aminohippurate (( UC(PAH) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) fell significantly. Despite this fall in GFR and renal plasma flow, ANP produced a 2-fold increase in urine volume and a 10-fold increase in sodium excretion. Absolute and fractional sodium deliveries to the end-descending limb increased by approx.30% in the ANP group, whereas mean juxtamedullary single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR) remained stable. In three additional rats prepared for micropuncture of the superficial end-accessible proximal tubule, ANP reduced cortical SNGFR by approx.15%. By contrast, GFR did not decline in response to ANP in larger rats, when treated identically. The authors conclude that 1) in young rats ANP can produce a natriuresis in the absence of a rise in GFR; 2) the fall in GFR observed following ANP is due presumably to the immaturity of the animals used in these studies; and 3) ANP produces a rise in absolute and fractional water and sodium deliveries to the end-descending limb that cannot be attributed to a change in SNGFR. The relatively small rise in fractional sodium delivery to the end-descending limb, most probably due to inhibition of sodium and water reabsorption in the juxtamedullary proximal tubule and/or thin descending limb, accounts for only a smallproportion of sodium excretion in the final urine.

Roy, D.R.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

EFFECTS OF FEEDING A VITAMIN K-DEFICIENT RATION CONTAINING IRRADIATED BEEF TO RATS, DOGS, AND CATS  

SciTech Connect

A ration containing 35% beef irradiated with 2.79 megarad fed to 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats caused the death of 9 rats because of hemorrhage. The mean reciprocal of the prothrombin time was 0.068 plus or minus 0.018 sec/sup -/. When 3 male cats and 3 male dogs were fed a ration containing irradiated bsef for 40 weeks, all gained weight and the prothrombin time of the blood remained normal. The amount of vitamin K in the ration was calculated to be 6 mu g/100 g of ration solids, which was adequate to prevent prolonged prothrombin times of the blood of cats and dogs, although it was inadequate for rats. Irradintion of beef with 2.8 megarad was previously shown to cause a 50--85% loss in vitamin K content. Rats fed a ration containing nonirradiated beef survived and there was no prolonged prothrombin time of the blood. (H.H.D.)

Reber, E.F.; Malhotra, Om.P.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Decreased angiotensin II binding affinity and binding capacity in the anterior pituitary gland of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats  

SciTech Connect

Angiotensin II (ANG) binding sites were quantified in single pituitary glands from 4-week-old and 14-week-old male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched male normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) control rats after incubation with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/)-ANG, autoradiography with computerized densitometry, and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. The maximum binding capacity (B/sub max/) decreased while the dissociation constant (K/sub d/) for ANG increased in 14-week-old SHR when compared to age-matched WKY control rats. Conversely, no difference between rat strains was found in 4-week-old animals. Our results suggest that pituitary ANG binding sites may play a role in the pathophysiology of established genetic hypertension.

Gutkind, J.S.; Castren, E.; Saavedra, J.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Critical period window for spectral tuning defined in the primary auditory cortex (A1) in the rat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Repair Critical Period Window for Spectral Tuning Defined inregulation of the CP window is tied to sensory experience,of the critical period window for the rat primary auditory

de Villers-Sidani, Etienne; Chang, Edward F; Bao, Shaowen; Merzenich, Michael M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Theoretical study of 3-D molecular similarity and ligand binding modes of orthologous human and rat D2 dopamine receptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The D"2 dopamine receptor (D"2DR) is an important target for the treatment of some central nervous system disorders, such as Parkinson disease, schizophrenia and drug-dependence. In this work, we built 3-D models of the long form of human and rat D"2DRs ... Keywords: 7TM receptor, D2 dopamine receptor ligands, Drug development, Molecular modeling, Parkinson's disease, Rat striatum

Marvin A. Soriano-Ursa; Jorge O. Ocampo-Lpez; Karina Ocampo-Mendoza; Jos G. Trujillo-Ferrara; Jos Correa-Basurto

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Cytogenetic Footprint for Mammary Carcinomas Induced by PhIP in Rats  

SciTech Connect

PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine), a mutagen/carcinogen belonging to the class of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) found in cooked meats, is a mammary gland carcinogen in rats and has been implicated in the etiology of certain human cancers including breast cancer. To gain insight into the genomic alterations associated with PhIP-induced mammary gland carcinogenesis, we used comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to examine chromosomal abnormalities in rat mammary carcinomas induced by PhIP, and for comparison, by DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene), a potent experimental mammary carcinogen. There was a consistent and characteristic pattern of chromosome-region loss in PhIP-induced carcinomas that clearly distinguished them from carcinomas induced by DMBA.

Christian, A T

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dynamic uptake of radioactive substance in rat salivary gland following /sup 3/H-melatonin administration  

SciTech Connect

Dynamics of radioactive accumulation in rat greater salivary gland following systemic administration of /sup 3/H-melatonin was studied to determine a possible action of the hormone in the gland. Progressive decline of /sup 3/H-melatonin concentrations was found in the serum, lung, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, and salivary gland during 60 min following the administration. On the contrary, there was a progressive accumulation of radioactive substance other than /sup 3/H-melatonin in the salivary gland but not in other tissues mentioned. The radioactivity was also progressively and preferentially localized in the nuclear fraction of the gland cells. These results suggest a possible direct action of melatonin derivative in rat salivary gland.

Withyachumnarnkul, B.; Wongprapairot, P.; Trakulrungsi, W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

PREFERRING sP RATS BY THE CANNABINOID ANTAGONIST SR-141716  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract The present study assessed the efficacy of the cannabinoid CBi receptor antagonist, SR-141716, in reducing voluntary ethanol intake in selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats. Ethanol (10%, v/v) and food were available in daily 4h scheduled access periods; water was present 24 h/day. The acute administration of a 2.5 and a 5 mg/kg dose of SR-141716 selectively reduced ethanol intake, whereas a 10 mg/kg dose of SR-141716 reduced to a similar extent both ethanol and food intake. These results suggest that the cannabinoid CBi receptor is involved in the mediation of the ethanolreinforcing effects in sP rats.

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of a multi-electrode array for spinal cord epidural stimulation to facilitate stepping and standing after a complete spinal cord injury in adult rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

segments via ascending projections from the sacral segmentsof hindlimb nerve projections to the rat spinal cord: a663. Nelson S, Mendell L: Projection of single knee flexor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography  

SciTech Connect

An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct investigation of mechanisms of vascular dysfunctions.

Umetani, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukushima, K. [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Hospital, Fujishirodai, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Cross-linking of atrial natriuretic peptide to binding sites in rat olfactory bulb membranes  

SciTech Connect

Binding sites for /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)2 in rat olfactory bulb membranes have been studied using pharmacological and biochemical methods. Various unlabeled ANP-related peptides were tested for the ability to inhibit the binding of the radioligand in membrane binding assays. ANP(92-126) and ANP(99-126) were the most potent inhibitors tested, both exhibiting an IC50 value of 0.40 nM. ANP(103-126) and ANP(103-123) were 3 and 70 times less potent, respectively. ANP(111-126) was unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand at a concentration of 1 microM. Several peptides unrelated to ANP were unable to inhibit the binding of the radioligand to rat olfactory bulb membranes. Membranes labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP were incubated with cross-linking agents and subjected to SDS-PAGE followed by autoradiography. A band possessing an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa was identified. The labeling of this band was progressively decreased by increasing concentrations of unlabeled ANP(99-126) (IC50 = 0.6 nM) and by several other ANP-related peptides at nanomolar concentrations. For comparison purposes, ANP binding sites in rat aorta membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I-ANP and cross-linked using identical techniques. Three bands possessing molecular masses of 120, 72, and 62 kDa were identified. These results indicate that the ANP binding site in rat olfactory bulb membranes displays pharmacological and biochemical properties similar to peripheral ANP receptors.

Wildey, G.M.; Glembotski, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Lipidomic changes in rat liver after long-term exposure to ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined the progression of ALD along with lipidomic changes in rats fed ethanol for 2 and 3 months to understand the mechanism, and identify possible biomarkers. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed 5% ethanol or caloric equivalent of maltose-dextrin in a Lieber-DeCarli diet. Animals were killed at the end of 2 and 3 months and plasma and livers were collected. Portions of the liver were fixed for histological and immunohistological studies. Plasma and the liver lipids were extracted and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A time dependent fatty infiltration was observed in the livers of ethanol-fed rats. Mild inflammation and oxidative stress were observed in some ethanol-fed rats at 3 months. The multivariate and principal component analysis of proton and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy data of extracted lipids from the plasma and livers showed segregation of ethanol-fed groups from the pair-fed controls. Significant hepatic lipids that were increased by ethanol exposure included fatty acids and triglycerides, whereas phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased. However, both free fatty acids and PC decreased in the plasma. In liver lipids unsaturation of fatty acyl chains increased, contrary to plasma, where it decreased. Our studies confirm that over-accumulation of lipids in ethanol-induced liver steatosis accompanied by mild inflammation on long duration of ethanol exposure. Identified metabolic profile using NMR lipidomics could be further explored to establish biomarker signatures representing the etiopathogenesis, progression and/or severity of ALD. - Highlights: > Long term exposure to ethanol was studied. > A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based lipidomic approach was used. > We examined the clustering pattern of the NMR data with principal component analysis. > NMR data were compared with histology and immunohistochemistry data. > Biochemical parameters were compared with the observed NMR lipid data.

Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kondraganti, Shakuntala [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Shakeel Ansari, G.A., E-mail: sansari@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The effects of ethanol on strychnine sensitive glycine receptors in the rat basolateral amygdala  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major relationship between ethanol and the behavioral response to environmental stressors indicates that ethanol functions to reduce the effects of stress. The most classical presentation of the anxiety-reduction hypothesis of alcoholism, presented by Cogner (1956), theorized that alcoholism was induced by the anxiolytic effects of ethanol, which in turn reinforced intake of ethanol. If this holds true, then it is reasonable to hypothesize that the CNS effects of ethanol may be dominant in the area of the brain that controls or influences anxiety. Given the known role of the amygdala in fear and anxiety-induced responses, we hypothesized that the anxiety reducing effects of ethanol would be observed within the amygdala and may be measured as alterations of neuronal excitability. The first aim of this thesis was to establish an animal model of alcoholism in the laboratory. This was done by introducing a nutritionally complete ethanol containing liquid diet. We compared two liquid diet formularies, one prepared in-house and one commercially prepared. The second aim enlisted a behavioral experiment to test our hypothesis of alterations of the anxiety response in the chronically ethanol treated rats. We utilized the light/dark box apparatus to measure the anxiolytic and anxiogenic effects of chronic ethanol ingestion and withdrawal. In these tests we found that both the ethanol and control rats displayed a slightly greater interest in exploring the dark side of the box, while the ethanol withdrawal rats spent a significant percent of their total time on the light side. The third aim was to use whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to study the cellular effects of ethanol on the rat basolateral amygdala neurons. Initially we were able to demonstrate that the acutely isolated BLA neurons contained strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. However, we found no significant alteration in the glycine-, GABA-, or NMDA-mediated response within these neurons with chronic ethanol exposure or withdrawal.

Botting, Shaleen Kaye

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The correlation dimension of rat hearts in an experimentally controlled environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric response of several isolated rat hearts in a controlled environment was studied experimentally. The correlation dimension D 2 was estimated and was found to be between 4 and 6.5 when the response was nearly periodic. The variation of D 2 with the concentration of calcium was studied and a general trend of its increase with increasing concentration was found. Two types of ventricular fibrillation (VF) were observed

Guy Dori; Shmuel Fishman; S. A. Ben-Haim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain  

SciTech Connect

The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

Rogulja, I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evidence for selective expression of angiotensin II receptors on atretic follicles in the rat ovary: an autoradiographic study  

SciTech Connect

Ovarian angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors display a cyclical pattern of variation during the rat estrous cycle. Ang II receptors, estimated by the specific binding of the Ang II receptor antagonist (/sup 125/I)iodo-(Sar1,Ile8) Ang II to ovarian membranes, were lowest at estrus (binding site density (Bmax) = 35 +/- 2 fmol/mg; binding site affinity (KD) = 2.0 +/- 0.2 nM) and highest at diestrus I (Bmax = 59 +/- 3 fmol/mg; KD = 1.6 +/- 0.1 nM). We have previously shown that Ang II receptors in the rat ovary predominantly exist on the granulosa cell layer of a subpopulation of follicles. Our present studies show that the Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary are mainly atretic (approximately 80%) or show signs of early atresia (approximately 15%) during all stages of the estrous cycle. A small number of Ang II receptor-containing follicles were healthy (approximately 5%). In contrast to the Ang II receptor-containing follicles, the FSH receptor-containing follicles were predominantly healthy (greater than 90%). Follicles which contained both Ang II receptors and FSH receptors were mainly early atretic. Since Ang II receptor-containing follicles in the rat ovary were mainly atretic these studies suggest that in the rat Ang II may be a major factor in regulating the function of atretic ovarian follicles.

Daud, A.I.; Bumpus, F.M.; Husain, A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Comparative in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel oxides and nickel-copper oxides to rat, mouse, and dog pulmonary alveolar macrophages  

SciTech Connect

Metal oxides containing either Ni alone (NiO's) or both Ni and Cu (Ni-CuO's) are encountered during Ni refining. Six NiO compounds calcined at temperatures ranging from < 650 to 1045/sup 0/ and four Ni-CuO's containing from 6.9 to 28% Cu and 44 to 69% Ni were screened for their in vitro cytotoxicity to alveolar macrophages (AM). NiO's were less toxic to rat AM than were the Ni-CuO compounds. The toxicity of the Ni-CuO compounds increased with increasing Cu content and decreasing Ni content of the molecules, indicating that the toxicity was due to the Cu content of the molecules. AM obtained from beagle dogs, F344/N rats, and B6C3F/sub 1/ mice displayed the following species sensitivities: dog > rat approx. = mouse, with dog AM being most sensitive. The observed differences in species sensitivities correlated with differences in the phagocytic abilities of dog, rat, and mouse AM, with the ranking of phagocytic abilities of the AM in decreasing order of ability being dog > rat > mouse.

Benson, J.M.; Henderson, R.F.; Pickrell, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Closeout for U.S. Department of Energy Final Technical Report for University of Arizona grant DOE Award Number DE-FG03-95ER40906 From 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004 Grant title: Theory and Phenomenology of Strong and Weak High Energy Physics (Task A) and Experimental Elementary Particle Physics (Task B)  

SciTech Connect

The following pages describe the high energy physics program at the University of Arizona which was funded by DOE grant DE-FG03-95ER40906, for the period 1 February 1995 to 31 January 2004. In this report, emphasis was placed on more recent accomplishments. This grant was divided into two tasks, a theory task (Task A) and an experimental task (Task B but called Task C early in the grant period) with separate budgets. Faculty supported by this grant, for at least part of this period, include, for the theory task, Adrian Patrascioiu (now deceased), Ina Sarcevic, and Douglas Toussaint., and, for the experimental task, Elliott Cheu, Geoffrey Forden, Kenneth Johns, John Rutherfoord, Michael Shupe, and Erich Varnes. Grant monitors from the Germantown DOE office, overseeing our grant, changed over the years. Dr. Marvin Gettner covered the first years and then he retired from the DOE. Dr. Patrick Rapp worked with us for just a few years and then left for a position at the University of Puerto Rico. Dr. Kathleen Turner took his place and continues as our grant monitor. The next section of this report covers the activities of the theory task (Task A) and the last section the activities of the experimental task (Task B).

Rutherfoord, John; Toussaint, Doug; Sarcevic, Ina

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

Localization of atrial natriuretic peptide mRNA and immunoreactivity in the rat heart and human atrial appendage  

SciTech Connect

The localization of mRNA encoding preproatrial natriuretic peptide was investigated in tissue sections and cultures of rat heart and in sections of human right atrial appendage using the technique of in situ hybridization with /sup 32/P- and /sup 35/S-labeled RNA probes. Rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) transcripts were demonstrated in numerous atrial myocytes and, to a lesser extent, in ventricular myocytes in both tissue sections and newborn rat heart cultures. These findings are consistent with those obtained by RNA blot analysis of rat heart total RNA, indicating that a single prepro-ANP transcript of approx. 900 nucleotides was present in the ventricles as well as the atria. Using a /sup 35/S-labeled RNA probe for human ANP mRNA, ANP transcripts were also localized to the majority of myocytes in the human right atrial appendage. Only background levels of autoradiographic labeling were obtained when RNA probes identical to the coding sequence of rat or human ANP mRNA were used. A close correlation was found between the distribution of ANP immunoreactivity and prepro-ANP mRNA in these preparations. These results provide unequivocal evidence for the expression of the ANP gene in the rat ventricles, as well as the atria, because myocytes in these tissues have been established as the sites of both ANP localization and precursor biosynthesis. The combined use of cardiac cultures and in situ hybridization may be of value in future studies investigating the regulation of ANP synthesis in cardiac myocytes.

Hamid, Q.; Wharton, J.; Terenghi, G.; Hassall, C.J.S.; Aimi, J.; Taylor, K.M.; Nakazato, H.; Dixon, J.E.; Burnstock, G.; Polak, J.M.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Charcterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors (ANP-R) in rat kidney and lung tissues  

SciTech Connect

The ability of several rat ANP analogues to compete with SVI-ANP(1-28) for binding to plasma membranes of rat kidney cortex (RKPM) and rat lung (RLPM) was examined. Their ability to compete on RKPM was: ANP(1-28)>pro-ANP>ANP(5-28)>ANP(5-27), ANP(5-25) being inactive. Conversely, the potency of the analogues on RLPM was: ANP(5-28)>ANP(5-27)>ANP(1-28)>ANP-(5-25), pro-ANP being unable to compete. The stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase by these peptides paralleled their ability to compete. Truncation of the C-terminal therefore decreases the binding of the peptide to RKPM. In contrast, the N-terminal seems to be important for interaction with ANP-R on RLPM. ANP-R were photolabeled with SVI-iodo-azidosalicylyl-ANP(1-28) (ASA-ANP) or azidobenzoyl- SVI-ANP(1-28) (AB-ANP) in which the C-terminal tyrosine is iodinated. In ASA-ANP, the iodine is located on the benzene ring. ASA-ANP identified a protein of approx.140 kDa in RKPM. AB-ANP recognized an additional protein of approx.120 kDa. The bulkier N-terminal of the ASA-ANP seems to hinder the binding of the analogue to the approx.120-kDa protein. In RLPM only the approx.120-kDa protein was detected by AB-ANP. The approx.140-kDa receptor may be unique to the kidney. ANF-R in RKPM and RLPM respectively, appear to interact with different domains of ANP suggesting the existence of two forms of the ANP-R.

Tallerico-Melnyk, T.; Yu, H.; Flynn, T.G.; Yip, C.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Reversal of docosahexaenoic acid deficiency in the rat brain, retina, liver, and serum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract The loss of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from the retina or brain has been associated with a loss in nervoussystem function in experimental animals, as well as in human infants fed vegetable oil-based formulas. The reversibility of the loss of DHA and the compensation by an increase in the n-6 docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6) was studied in young adult rats. Long-Evans rats were subjected to a very low level of n-3 fatty acids through two generations. The F2 generation, n-3-deficient animals at 7 weeks of age were provided a repletion diet containing both ?-linolenate and DHA. A separate group of F2 generation rats had been maintained on an n-3-adequate diet of the same composition. Tissues from the brain, retina, liver, and serum were collected on weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, and 8 from both groups of animals. The concentrations of DHA, DPAn-6, and other fatty acids were determined and the rate of recovery and length of time needed to complete DHA recovery were determined for each tissue. The DHA level in the brain at 1 and 2 weeks after diet reversal was only partially recovered, rising to approximately 20 % and 35%, respectively, of the n-3-adequate group level. Full recovery was not obtained until 8 weeks after initiation of the repletion diet. Although the initial rate of retinal DHA accretion was greater than that of brain DHA, the half-time for DHA recovery was only marginally greater. On the other hand, the levels of DHA in the serum and liver were approximately 90 % and 100 % replaced, respectively, within 2 weeks of diet reversal. A consideration of the total amounts and time courses of DHA repleted in the nervous system compared with the liver and circulation suggests that transport-related processes may limit the rate of DHA repletion in the retina and brain.Moriguchi, T., J.

Toru Moriguchi; James Loewke; Megan Garrison; Janice Nicklay Catalan; Norman Salem

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Effects of cadmium on the renal and skeletal muscle microcirculation in rats  

SciTech Connect

The effects of cadmium on the arteriolar diameters of the kidney and skeletal muscle were quantified, because of the hypertensive effect of cacmium. The effect of cacmium on the constrictor response of the renal arterioles to angiotensin II (Ang II) were also assessed. In vivo preparations of the rat hydronephrotic kidney and cremaster muscle were used for direct visualization of the microvessels with intravital television microscopy. Hydronephrosis was induced in twenty-seven male Wistar-Kyoto rats (150-180 g) by unilateral ureter ligation. The hydronephrotic kidney, with intact cortical circulation and innervation, was exteriorized in a specially designed bath for microcirculation observation 6-8 weeks following the ureter ligation. The cremaster muscle experiments were conducted in another thirty-seven male WKY rats (120-180 g). Disparate effects of cadmium were observed in these two microcirculation beds. Topical cadmium (1.35 [mu]M-0.45 mM) increased the diameters of the pre- and postglomerular vessels in the hydronephrotic kidney maximally by 15-26%. Cadmium (0.27 mM) inhibited the Ang II response of the arterioles non-competitively. However, intraperitoneally injected cadmium (2 mg/kg), which significantly increased the mean arterial pressure, did not dilate the arterioles nor alter the Ang II response. On the other hand, cadmium (13.5 [mu]M-0.72 mM) constricted the larger arterioles in the cremaster muscle (60-160 [mu]m) concentration-dependently, but not small arterioles (15-30 [mu]m). In summary, topical cadmium dilates renal arterioles and decreases their reactivity to Ang II, but constricts the larger cremaster arterioles. The disparate effects of cadmium suggest different Ca[sup 2+] utilization mechanisms in different vascular beds. The construction of the cremaster arterioles may contribute to cadmium-induced hypertension by increasing peripheral resistance.

Zhang Chong.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke  

SciTech Connect

Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Englander, Ella W. [Department of Surgery, University of Texas Medical Branch (United States); Shriners Hospitals for Children, Galveston, TX (United States)], E-mail: elenglan@utmb.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

RatBot: anti-enumeration peer-to-peer botnets  

SciTech Connect

Botnets have emerged as one of the most severe cyber threats in recent years. To obtain high resilience against a single point of failure, the new generation of botnets have adopted the peer-to-peer (P2P) structure. One critical question regarding these P2P botnets is: how big are they indeed? To address this question, researchers have proposed both actively crawling and passively monitoring methods to enumerate existing P2P botnets. In this work, we go further to explore the potential strategies that botnets may have to obfuscate their true sizes. Towards this end, this paper introduces RatBot, a P2P botnet that applies some statistical techniques to defeat existing P2P botnet enumeration methods. The key ideas of RatBot are two-fold: (1) there exist a fraction of bots that are indistinguishable from their fake identities, which are spoofing IP addresses they use to hide themselves; (2) we use a heavy-tailed distribution to generate the number of fake identities for each of these bots so that the sum of observed fake identities converges only slowly and thus has high variation. We use large-scale high-fidelity simulation to quantify the estimation errors under diverse settings, and the results show that a naive enumeration technique can overestimate the sizes of P2P botnets by one order of magnitude. We believe that our work reveals new challenges of accurately estimating the sizes of P2P botnets, and hope that it will raise the awareness of security practitioners with these challenges. We further suggest a few countermeasures that can potentially defeat RatBot's anti-enumeration scheme.

Yan, Guanhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eidenbenz, Stephan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Songqing [GEORGE MASON UNIV.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

INTERMITTENT PRESENTATIONS OF ETHANOL SIPPER TUBE INDUCE ETHANOL DRINKING IN RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Aims: Intermittent presentations of the ethanol sipper have been reported to induce more ethanol drinking in rats than when the ethanol sipper was continuously available during the session. This intermittent sipper effect was observed in a social drinking situation, in which subjects experienced intermittent opportunities to interact briefly with a conspecific rat. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the intermittent sipper procedure in situations providing for intermittent presentations of food, and, in addition, in situations that do not provide for intermittent presentations of another rewarding event. Methods: Four groups of male Long-Evans hooded rats, arranged in a 2 2 factorial design with two levels of Sipper Procedure (Intermittent vs Continuous) and two levels of Food procedure (Food vs No Food), were trained in drinking chambers. During each daily session, Intermittent Sipper groups received access to the ethanol sipper during each of 25 trials of 10 s each, while Continuous Sipper groups had access to the ethanol sipper during the entire session ( 30 min). During each session, Food groups received 25 presentations of food pellets while No Food groups received no food pellets. Ethanol concentrations in the sipper [3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 % (vol./vol.)] increased across sessions. Results: More rapid escalation of ethanol intake was observed in the Intermittent Sipper groups than in the Continuous Sipper groups, and this effect was observed in both the Food and No Food conditions (Ps ethanol sipper, yet induced more ethanol drinking than Continuous Sipper procedures. The intermittent sipper effect is not dependent on presentations of food. Implications for scheduleinduced polydipsia and Pavlovian autoshaping are discussed.

Arthur Tomie; William C. Miller; Erik Dranoff; Larissa A. Pohorecky

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Altered cardiovascular reactivity and osmoregulation during hyperosmotic stress in adult rats developmentally exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally similar chemicals polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) disrupt the function of multiple endocrine systems. PCBs and PBDEs disrupt the secretion of vasopressin (VP) from the hypothalamus during osmotic activation. Since the peripheral and central vasopressinergic axes are critical for osmotic and cardiovascular regulation, we examined whether perinatal PBDE exposure could impact these functions during physiological activation. Rats were perinatally dosed with a commercial PBDE mixture, DE-71. Dams were given 0 (corn oil control), 1.7 (low dose) or 30.6 mg/kg/day (high dose) in corn oil from gestational day (GD) 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21 by oral gavage. In the male offspring exposed to high dose PBDE plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine levels were reduced at PND 21 and recovered to control levels by PND 60 when thyroid stimulating hormone levels were elevated. At 14-18 months of age, cardiovascular responses were measured in four groups of rats: Normal (Oil, normosmotic condition), Hyper (Oil, hyperosmotic stress), Hyper PBDE low (1.7 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress), and Hyper PBDE high (30.6 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress). Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and heart rate (HR) were determined using tail cuff sphygmomanometry and normalized to pretreatment values (baseline) measured under basal conditions. Hyperosmotic treatment yielded significant changes in systolic BP in PBDE exposed rats only. Hyper PBDE low and high dose rats showed 36.1 and 64.7% greater systolic BP responses at 3 h post hyperosmotic injection relative to pretreatment baseline, respectively. No treatment effects were measured for diastolic BP and HR. Hyper and Hyper PBDE rats showed increased mean plasma osmolality values by 45 min after injection relative to normosmotic controls. In contrast to Hyper rats, Hyper PBDE (high) rats showed a further increase in mean plasma osmolality at 3 h (358.3 {+-} 12.4 mOsm/L) relative to 45 min post hyperosmotic injection (325.1 {+-} 11.4 mOsm/L). Impaired osmoregulation in PBDE-treated animals could not be attributed to decreased levels of plasma vasopressin. Our findings suggest that developmental exposure to PBDEs may disrupt cardiovascular reactivity and osmoregulatory responses to physiological activation in late adulthood. - Highlights: > We examined whether PBDE exposure could impact osmotic and cardiovascular regulation. > Hyperosmotic treatment yielded significant changes in systolic BP in PBDE exposed rats only. > PBDEs may disrupt cardiovascular and osmoregulatory responses to physiological activation.

Shah, Ashini [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Coburn, Cary G. [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Watson-Siriboe, Abena; Whitley, Rebecca; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Gillard, Elizabeth R.; Nichol, Robert [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Leon-Olea, Martha [Neuromorfologia Funcional, Direccion de Investigaciones en Neurociencias, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatria Ramon de la Fuente Muniz, Mexico City (Mexico); Gaertner, Mark [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S. [Neurotoxicology Branch, NHEERL/ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Curras-Collazo, Margarita C., E-mail: margarita.curras@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

PERIODICITY OF ESTROUS CYCLE IN ALBINO RATS; RESPONSE TO SOME CRUDE DRUG COMBINATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The extracts of bark, leaves and stem of A. indica, fruits of P. longum, berries of E. officinalis and seeds of G. indicum were prepared using different solvents. Three different combinations of these extracts were tried on the female albino rats for their effect on the estrous cycle. The combination consisting of alcoholic extracts of leaves and stem of A. indica, fruits of P. longum, berries of E. officinalis and seeds of G. indicum has exhibited considerable effect on estrous cycle by prolongation of diestrous phase.

C. K. Kokate; M. Krishna; Reddy; N. Chari

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Therapeutic efficacy of dimercaptosuccinic acid and thiamine/ascorbic acid on lead intoxication in rats  

SciTech Connect

Thiamine, folic acid, pyridoxine and ascorbic acid either individually or in combination have been proven to be effective in reducing the toxic manifestations of lead and in enhancing the antidotal efficacy of CaNa{sub 2}EDTA. In a recent report from the authors' laboratory, it was observed that given combination of thiamine and ascorbic acid with thiol chelators improved the ability of the animals to excrete lead thereby reducing body lead burden. In view of the beneficial effect of these two vitamins, it was considered of interest to evaluate their potential to modify the prophylactic action of DMS in lead intoxication in rat after repeated administration.

Tandon, S.K.; Flora, S.J.S. (Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, Lucknow (India))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Exercise training regulation of extracellular matrix and remodeling in the aging rat heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging is characterized by a progressive impairment of cardiac structure and function. The cardiac remodeling involves loss of cardiac myocytes, reactive hypertrophy of the remaining cells, and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) and fibrosis in the aging heart. In contrast, exercise training not only improves cardiac function, but also reduces the risk of heart disease. However, the ability of exercise training to modulate ECM and remodeling in the aging heart remains unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of exercise training on ECM remodeling in the aging heart. We hypothesized that (1) exercise training would attenuate age-related changes in left ventricle morphology including extramyocyte space and collagen contents, and (2) exercise training would ameliorate age-induced changes in ECM-related factors including MMPs, TIMPs, TNF-?, TGF-?1, and ?-SMA in the heart. Three and 31 month old Fischer 344 Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats were assigned to four groups: young sedentary (YS), young exercise-trained (YE), old sedentary (OS), and old exercise-trained (OE). Exercise training groups walked briskly on a treadmill for 45 min/day (12 incline) at 20m/min (young) or 10 m/min (old), 5 d/wk for 12 wk. We found that endurance exercise training might ameliorate the ageinduced increase in extramyocyte space and collagen contents of the left ventricle. Exercise training might protect against age-induced fibrosis by increasing MMP-2, MMP-14 in the soluble fraction and MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-14 in the insoluble fraction of old rat hearts. Conversely, exercise training might reduce the fibrosis by decreasing TIMP-1 in the soluble fraction of old rat hearts. Further, exercise training reduced potential upstream pro-fibrotic mediators including TNF-? and TGF-?1 in the aging rat hearts. These results are the first to demonstrate that exercise training has a protective effect against age-induced extracellular collagen matrix remodeling in the aging heart, associated with increased MMP-1, -2, -3, -14 and decreased TIMP-1, TNF-?, and TGF- ?1.

Kwak, Hyo Bum

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

An integrated functional genomic study of acute phenobarbital exposure in the rat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in drinking water following exposure for three years [8]. Isenberg et al. reported that in F344 rats, exposure to 500 ppm PB in the diet for 1-2 weeks produces an increase in relative liver weight which is reversible on returning the animals to control diet... ) in PB treated animals compared to controls (table 1) at all time points for 500 and 1000 ppm. Body weight was significantly increased in the 500 and 1000 ppm groups at day 14 (p intake for the 500...

Waterman, Claire L; Currie, Richard A; Cottrell, Lisa A; Dow, Jacky; Wright, Jayne; Waterfield, Catherine J; Griffin, Julian L

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

309

THE CHEMISTRY OF 1,4-DEHYDROBENZENES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isolated by bulb to bulb distillation at torr Pr rat of 1,4-dried over Mgso 4 ; distillation through a Ta wire column atcru er as eluent (7:3 distillation ( 03 torr) ev e alcohol

Lockhart, Thomas P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Intracranial electrode implantation produces regional neuroinflammation and memory deficits in rats  

SciTech Connect

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The procedure entails intracranial implantation of an electrode in a specific brain structure followed by chronic stimulation. Although the beneficial effects of DBS on motor symptoms in PD are well known, it is often accompanied by cognitive impairments, the origin of which is not fully understood. To explore the possible contribution of the surgical procedure itself, we studied the effect of electrode implantation in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on regional neuroinflammation and memory function in rats implanted bilaterally with stainless steel electrodes. Age-matched sham and intact rats were used as controls. Brains were removed 1 or 8 weeks post-implantation and processed for in vitro autoradiography with [(3)H]PK11195, an established marker of microglial activation. Memory function was assessed by the novel object recognition test (ORT) before surgery and 2 and 8 weeks after surgery. Electrode implantation produced region-dependent changes in ligand binding density in the implanted brains at 1 as well as 8 weeks post-implantation. Cortical regions showed more intense and widespread neuroinflammation than striatal or thalamic structures. Furthermore, implanted animals showed deficits in ORT performance 2 and 8 weeks post-implantation. Thus, electrode implantation resulted in a widespread and persistent neuroinflammation and sustained memory impairment. These results suggest that the insertion and continued presence of electrodes in the brain, even without stimulation, may lead to inflammation-mediated cognitive deficits in susceptible individuals, as observed in patients treated with DBS.

Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Biegon, A.; Kuttner-Hirshler, Y.; Polat, U.; Biegon, A.

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Availability of cadmium to rats from crops grown on cadmium-enriched soil  

SciTech Connect

The research was initiated to enhance understanding of the availability to animals of Cd present in edible plants. Such information is of considerable importance since agricultural crops can accumulate high concentrations of the metal when grown in certain soils or with sewage sludge as a fertilizer. Edible plants were labeled with /sup 109/Cd by growing them on /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/ treated soil. The availability of /sup 109/Cd to male and female rats was then determined by feeding semisynthetic diets containing either freeze-dried radioactive spinach, lettuce, soybean, carrots, tomatoes, or wheat flour, or comparable nonradioactive plant powders spiked with /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/. Retention of /sup 109/Cd by liver and kidney was determined after a 14-day feeding period. With the exception of spinach, Cd accumulation by rats was not found to be significantly influenced by the form of Cd in the diet whether supplied as plant-bound /sup 109/Cd or added to nonradioactive diets as /sup 109/CdCl/sup 2/. The mean retention of Cd in liver and kidney was 0.17% of the dose consumed for males and 0.26% for females consuming diets containing wheat, soybean, carrots, lettuce, or tomatoes.

Buhler, D.R.; Tinsley, I.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gel entrapment culture of rat hepatocytes for investigation of tetracycline-induced toxicity  

SciTech Connect

This paper aimed to explore three-dimensionally cultured hepatocytes for testing drug-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Gel entrapped rat hepatocytes were applied for investigation of the tetracycline-induced steatohepatitis, while hepatocyte monolayer was set as a control. The toxic responses of hepatocytes were systematically evaluated by measuring cell viability, liver-specific function, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, adenosine triphosphate content and mitochondrial membrane potential. The results suggested that gel entrapped hepatocytes showed cell death after 96 h of tetracycline treatment at 25 {mu}M which is equivalent to toxic serum concentration in rats, while hepatocyte monolayer showed cell death at a high dose of 200 {mu}M. The concentration-dependent accumulation of lipid as well as mitochondrial damage were regarded as two early events for tetracycline hepatotoxicity in gel entrapment culture due to their detectability ahead of subsequent increase of oxidative stress and a final cell death. Furthermore, the potent protection of fenofibrate and fructose-1,6-diphosphate were evidenced in only gel entrapment culture with higher expressions on the genes related to {beta}-oxidation than hepatocyte monolayer, suggesting the mediation of lipid metabolism and mitochondrial damage in tetracycline toxicity. Overall, gel entrapped hepatocytes in three-dimension reflected more of the tetracycline toxicity in vivo than hepatocyte monolayer and thus was suggested as a more relevant system for evaluating steatogenic drugs.

Shen Chong [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Meng Qin [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)], E-mail: mengq@zju.edu.cn; Schmelzer, Eva; Bader, Augustinus [Biotechnological-Biomedical Center, Cell Techniques and Applied Stem Cell Biology, University of Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, Leipzig 04103 (Germany)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Autofluorescence dynamics during reperfusion following long-term renal ischemia in a rat model  

SciTech Connect

Optical properties of near-surface kidney tissue were monitored in order to assess response during reperfusion to long (20 minutes) versus prolonged (150 minutes) ischemia in an in vivo rat model. Specifically, autofluorescence images of the exposed surfaces of both the normal and the ischemic kidneys were acquired during both injury and reperfusion alternately under 355 nm and 266 nm excitations. The temporal profile of the emission of the injured kidney during the reperfusion phase under 355 nm excitation was normalized to that under 266 nm as a means to account for changes in tissue optical properties independent of ischemia as well as changes in the illumination/collection geometrical parameters in future clinical implementation of this technique using a hand-held probe. The scattered excitation light signal was also evaluated as a reference signal and found to be inadequate. Characteristic time constants were extracted using fit to a relaxation model and found to have larger mean values following 150 minutes of injury. The mean values were then compared with the outcome of a chronic survival study where the control kidney had been removed. Rat kidneys exhibiting longer time constants were much more likely to fail. This may lead to a method to assess kidney viability and predict its ability to recover in the initial period following transplantation or resuscitation.

Raman, R N; Pivetti, C D; Matthews, D L; Troppmann, C; Demos, S G

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

In vitro macro- and micro-autoradiographic localization of atrial natriuretic peptide in the rat kidney  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the receptor localization of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in the rat kidney, by in vitro macro- and micro-autoradiography (ARG) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP using nonfixed frozen sections. First, we examined the optimum conditions for ARG with respect to the effects of polyethylenimine (PEI), thickness of section, incubation time and degradation of (/sup 125/I)-ANP. Saturation experiments of (/sup 125/I)-ANP using rat kidney sections revealed the presence of high affinity binding sites of (/sup 125/I)-ANP in the renal cortex (Kd = 0.52 nM). Macro-autoradiograms showed that the dense grains representing specific binding sites of (/sup 125/I)-ANP were distributed in the cortex in a punctate pattern. Using micro-autoradiography, the localization of the dense grains on the emulsion was compared with the staining pattern of the same section subjected to double staining. In the renal cortex, the dense grains were observed on the glomerulus, blood vessels and proximal tubules. Dense grains were also observed in the mesangium area of glomeruli, the inside wall of blood vessels (especially endothelium), and the inside wall of proximal tubules (possibly brush border). These results suggested that the physiological action of ANP in the kidney is mediated by its receptors. Also, ARG was useful for accurately detecting the action sites of ANP.

Yamamoto, I.; Ogura, T.; Ota, Z.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Changes in expression of a functional G sub i protein in cultured rat heart cells  

SciTech Connect

The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G{sub i}) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G{sub i} in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated {sup 32}P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G{sub i} is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G{sub i} is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G{sub i} in heart.

Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Angiotensin receptors and angiotensin I-converting enzyme in rat intestine  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to map the distribution of angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors and ANG I-converting enzyme (ACE) in rat intestine. ANG II binding sites were visualized by in vitro autoradiography using iodinated (Sar1, Ile8)ANG II. The distribution of ACE was mapped using an iodinated derivative of lisinopril. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were killed and the interior of the whole intestine washed with ice-cold saline. Segments of duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and colon were quickly frozen in a mixture of isopentane and dry ice. Twenty-micron frozen sections were thaw-mounted onto gelatin-coated slides, incubated with either ligand, and exposed to X-ray film. After exposure and subsequent development, the films were quantitated by computerized densitometry. ANG II receptors were most dense in the colon, followed by the ileum, duodenum, and jejunum. Within each segment of intestine, specific ANG II binding sites were localized exclusively to the muscularis. In contrast, ACE was present in both the mucosa and the muscularis. The colocalization of ANG II receptors and ACE may suggest a role for locally generated ANG II in the control of intestinal function. The luminal orientation of ACE in the mucosa of the small intestine may suggest that at this site ACE serves primarily to hydrolyze dietary peptides.

Duggan, K.A.; Mendelsohn, F.A.; Levens, N.R. (Austin Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Estrogen effects on angiotensin receptors are modulated by pituitary in female rats  

SciTech Connect

The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that changes in angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors might modulate the layered target tissue responsiveness accompanying estradiol administration. Estradiol was infused continuously in oophorectomized female rats. Aldosterone was also infused in control and experimental animals to avoid estrogen-induced changes in renin and ANG II. ANG II binding constants were determined in radioreceptor assays. Estradiol increased binding site concentration in adrenal glomerulosa by 76% and decreased binding sites of uterine myometrium and glomeruli by 45 and 24%, respectively. There was an accompanying increase in the affinity of ANG II binding to adrenal glomerulosa and uterine myometrium. Because estrogen is a potent stimulus of prolactin release from the pituitary of rodents, studies were also designed to test the hypothesis that prolactin may mediate some or all of the estrogen-induced effects observed. Hypophysectomy abolished estradiol stimulation of prolactin release and most ANG II receptor changes. Prolactin administration to pituitary intact rats was associated with a 50% increase in receptor density of adrenal glomerulosa simulating estradiol administration. However, the changes in glomeruli and uterine myometrium were opposite in that both tissues also increased receptor density, suggesting that prolactin was not the sole mediator of the estrogen-induced receptor changes. In conclusion, regulation of ANG II receptors in a number of diverse target tissues by estradiol is complex with contributions from estrogens and pituitary factors, which include but do not exclusively involve prolactin.

Douglas, J.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Distinct angiotensin II receptor in primary cultures of glial cells from rat brain  

SciTech Connect

Angiotensin II (Ang-II) has profound effects on the brain. Receptors for Ang-II have been demonstrated on neurons, but no relationship between glial cells and Agn-II has been established. Glial cells (from the hypothalamus and brain stem of 1-day-old rat brains) in primary culture have been used to demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors. Binding of /sup 125/I-Ang-II to glial cultures was rapid, reversible, saturable, and specific for Ang-II. The rank order of potency of /sup 125/I-Ang-II binding was determined. Scatchard analysis revealed a homogeneous population of high-affinity binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 110 fmol/mg of protein. Light-microscopic autoradiography of /sup 125/I-Ang-II binding supported the kinetic data, documenting specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells. Ang-II stimulated a dose-dependent hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositols in glial cells, an effect mediated by Ang-II receptors. However, Ang-II failed to influence (/sup 3/H) norepinephrine uptake, and catecholamines failed to regulate Ang-II receptors, effects that occur in neurons. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific Ang-II receptors on the glial cells in primary cultures derived from normotensive rat brain. The receptors are kinetically similar to, but functionally distinct from, the neuronal Ang-II receptors.

Raizada, M.K.; Phillips, M.I.; Crews, F.T.; Sumners, C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Dynamics of some parameters of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats during cold adaptation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the combined behavior of the endocrine and lymphatic systems in rats at stages of long-term adaptation of the animals to moderate cold. After decapitation of male Wister rats, the corticosterone concentration in the blood plasma was determined by saturation analysis and serum levels of thyroxine (T/sub 4/) and triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) were determined by radioimmunoassay. The thymus was weighed and the structure of the popliteal lymph nodes (LN) was studied in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin and with azure II-eosin. Morphometry of the structural components of LN was undertaken and the numbers of the various cell forms per 1000 cells were counted in different zones of LN. The increase in activity of the lymphoid tissue in the phase of adaptation may be connected with intensification of the peripheral action of thyroid hormones. During long-term adaptation, in the phase of consistently increased specific resistance, a new type of endocrine-lymphoid relation is formed, and it differs significantly both in the original state and in the acute phase of stress.

Borodin, Yu.I.; Sedova, L.A.; Selyatitskaya, V.G.; Shorin, Yu.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Absorption of zinc and iron by rats fed meals containing sorghum food products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc and iron absorption from freeze-dried traditionally-prepared sorghum food products was studied in rats. After a period of marginal zinc or iron depletion, rats were fed test meals containing 1 of 4 sorghum foods cooked maize gruel or an inorganic mineral each of which was extrinsically labeled with either /sup 65/Zn or /sup 59/Fe before being added to the diets. Absorption was determined by whole body percent retention of the initial radioisotope dose over a period of 19 days. Iron was highly available from all products tested (75-83%) with no significant differences in absorption among groups (p>0.05). Zinc from fermented Aceta (97%) was more available than that from the other sorghum products (69-78%) or maize gruel (76%). Zinc from acid To (78%) and Aceta (97%) was as available as that from zinc oxide in the control diet (93%) (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in zinc absorption among groups fed Acid To (78%), neutral To (76), alkali To (69%) or maize gruel (76%) (psorghum foods. Iron and zinc were highly available from all sorghum foods. Reduction phytate by fermentation increased Zn availability.

Stuart, S.M.A.; Johnson, P.E.; Hamaker, B.; Kirleis, A.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes  

SciTech Connect

The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. (Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca2+o). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca2+]o, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca2+o. Further, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G-protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca2+o-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca2+o. This is consistent with the known expression of TGFa by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR mediated response to increased Ca2+o in Rat-1 fibroblasts, and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

Tomlins, Scott A.; Bollinger, Nikki; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Rodland, Karin D.

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Detecting Radiation-Induced Injury Using Rapid 3D Variogram Analysis of CT Images of Rat Lungs  

SciTech Connect

A new heterogeneity analysis approach to discern radiation-induced lung damage was tested on CT images of irradiated rats. The method, combining octree decomposition with variogram analysis, demonstrated a significant correlation with radiation exposure levels, whereas conventional measurements and pulmonary function tests did not. The results suggest the new approach may be highly sensitive for assessing even subtle radiation-induced changes

Jacob, Rick E.; Murphy, Mark K.; Creim, Jeffrey A.; Carson, James P.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

PhyloChip microarray analysis reveals altered gastrointestinal microbial communities in a rat model of colonic hypersensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, episodic gastrointestinal disorder that is prevalent in a significant fraction of western human populations; and changes in the microbiota of the large bowel have been implicated in the pathology of the disease. Using a novel comprehensive, high-density DNA microarray (PhyloChip) we performed a phylogenetic analysis of the microbial community of the large bowel in a rat model in which intracolonic acetic acid in neonates was used to induce long lasting colonic hypersensitivity and decreased stool water content and frequency, representing the equivalent of human constipation-predominant IBS. Our results revealed a significantly increased compositional difference in the microbial communities in rats with neonatal irritation as compared with controls. Even more striking was the dramatic change in the ratio of Firmicutes relative to Bacteroidetes, where neonatally irritated rats were enriched more with Bacteroidetes and also contained a different composition of species within this phylum. Our study also revealed differences at the level of bacterial families and species. The PhyloChip is a useful and convenient method to study enteric microflora. Further, this rat model system may be a useful experimental platform to study the causes and consequences of changes in microbial community composition associated with IBS.

Nelson, T.A.; Holmes, S.; Alekseyenko, A.V.; Shenoy, M.; DeSantis, T.; Wu, C.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Winston, J.; Sonnenburg, J.; Pasricha, P.J.; Spormann, A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agh256 PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF RESVERATROL ON ETHANOL-INDUCED LIPID PEROXIDATION IN RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Aim: Chronic ethanol treatment induces an increase in oxidative stress. As polyphenolic compounds are potent antioxidants, we aimed to examine whether dietary supplementation of resveratrol may attenuate lipid peroxidation, the major end-point of oxidative damage resulting from chronic ethanol administration. Method: Three groups of male Wistar rats were used. The first group served as control and received a daily intraperitoneal injection of 0.9 % saline. The second group of rats was daily injected with 35% ethanol at 3 g/kg body weight. The third group was given the same dose of ethanol and supplemented with resveratrol (5 g/kg) in the standard diet. Malondialdehyde (MDA), an indicator of oxidative stress, was measured in the liver, heart, brain, and testis. Results: At the end of a 6 weeks treatment period, MDA levels were significantly increased by 51.5, 53.7, 72.7, and 40.5 % in the liver, heart, brain, and testis, respectively. However, when ethanol treated rats were given resveratrol the increase in MDA levels was significantly reduced in all organs to nearly those of control rats. Conclusion: Resveratrol is able to inhibit the ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation and have protective effect against oxidative injury.

A. Kasdallah-grissa; B. Mornagui; E. Aouani; M. Hammami; N. Gharbi; A. Kamoun; S. El-fazaa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Metabolism of selenium (Se) in rats chronically poisoned with D- or L-selenomethionine (SeMet), selenite or selenate  

SciTech Connect

L-SeMet is a potential cancer chemoprevention agent for humans. Little difference was seen in the acute toxicity of L vs. D-SeMet in rats. To study chronic toxicity, weanling male rats were fed purified diets containing 2.5, 5.0 or 10 ppm Se as L-SeMet, D-SeMet, Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 3/ or Na/sub 2/SeO/sub 4/ for 6 weeks. Controls received 0.1 ppm Se as selenite. All rats fed 10 ppm Se died within 29 days. Se fed as D-SeMet was retained in the tissues as strongly as L-SeMet. Rats fed D or L-SeMet deposited large amounts of Se in muscle not reflected by proportionate increases in either plasma or RBC Se. Therefore, attempts to follow increases in Se body burden in individuals supplemented with large doses of L-SeMet by monitoring plasma or whole blood Se levels should be interpreted with caution.

McAdam, P.A.; Levander, O.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Assistant Director Office of the Treasurer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director Bob Barto Sr. Inspector Doug McGinnis Sr. Inspector George Levinthal Project Manager Jeff Enge Sr. Inspector Mark Peppers Project Manager Peter Ryan Sr. Inspector Rick Whitehead Sr. Inspector Tom Haas Sr. Inspector Ray Aronson Associate Director Daniel Belding Project Manager Anne-Marie Nething Analyst 1 Dan

Indiana University

328

CH Last Name CH First Name CH Center Office name Alexander Tina (HQ) International and Interagency Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Director Bob Barto Sr. Inspector Doug McGinnis Sr. Inspector George Levinthal Project Manager Jeff Enge Sr. Inspector Mark Peppers Project Manager Peter Ryan Sr. Inspector Rick Whitehead Sr. Inspector Tom Haas Sr. Inspector Ray Aronson Associate Director Daniel Belding Project Manager Anne-Marie Nething Analyst 1 Dan

Christian, Eric

329

Effects of head-up tilt on mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and regional cardiac output distribution in aging rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many senescent individuals demonstrate an inability to regulate mean arterial pressure (MAP) in response to standing or head-up tilt; however, whether this aging effect is the result of depressed cardiac function or an inability to reduce peripheral vascular conductance remains unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of aging on MAP, heart rate (HR), regional blood flow (via radioactive-microspheres), and vascular conductance during head-up tilt in conscious young (4 mo; n=12) and old (24 mo; n=10) male Fischer-344 rats. Heart rate and MAP were measured continuously during normal posture and during 10 minutes of head-up tilt. Blood flow was determined during normal posture and at the end of 10 minutes of head-up tilt. Young rats increased MAP significantly at the onset of head-up tilt and generally maintained the increase in MAP for the duration of head-up tilt, while aged rats showed a significant reduction in MAP after 10 minutes of head-up tilt. In the normal posture, aged rats demonstrated lower blood flow to splanchnic, bone, renal, and skin tissues versus young rats. With tilt there were decreases in blood flow to skin, bone, and hind-limb in both age groups and in fat, splanchnic, reproductive, and renal tissues in the young. Bone blood flow was attenuated with age across both conditions in hind foot, distal femur, femur marrow, and proximal and distal tibia. Head-up tilt caused a decrease in blood flow across both age groups in all bones sampled with the exception of the hind foot. These results provide evidence that the initial maintenance of MAP in aged rats during head-up tilt occurs through decreased regional blood flow and vascular conductance, and that the fall in pressure is not attributable to an increase in tissue blood flow and vascular conductance. Therefore, reductions in arterial pressure during headup tilt are likely a result of an old age-induced reduction in cardiac performance. In addition, this is the first study to demonstrate a decreased bone vascular conductance in both young and old rats during head-up tilt.

Ramsey, Michael Wiechmann

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Expression of the Bcl-2 protein in nasal epithelia of F344/N rats during mucous cell metaplasia and remodeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure to ozone induces mucous cell metaplasia in rat airway epithelia. During the regeneration process, apoptotic mechanisms may be responsible for eliminating metaplastic cells. Therefore, the present study investigated expression of Bcl-2, a regulator of apoptosis, in ozone-induced mucous cell metaplasias. Adjacent metaplastic mucous cells in nasal airway epithelia that were exposed to ozone were heterogeneous in their expression of Bcl-2; some cells expressed high levels, whereas others expressed low levels or no Bcl-2. On Western blot analysis, Bcl-2 was detected in protein extracts from nasal epithelia of rats exposed to 0.5 ppm ozone for 1 mo but not in control rats exposed to filtered air. The number of metaplastic mucous cells in transitional epithelia of rat nasal airways was increased from 0 to about 200 after 3 and 6 mo of exposure to ozone; only 0 to 10 metaplastic mucous cells remained after a recovery period of 13 wk in rats exposed to ozone for 3 mo. The number of mucous cells of the respiratory epithelium lining the midseptum did not change after ozone exposure or recovery. The percentage of Bcl-2-positive cells lining the midseptum increased from 7 to 14 % after a 3- and 6-mo ozone exposure, respectively. In transitional epithelia of the lateral wall and the nasoturbinates and maxilloturbinates, 35 to 55 % of cells were Bcl-2-positive after a 1-mo exposure and 10 to 18 % after both a 3- and a 6-mo exposure to ozone. Bcl-2 reactivity decreased to 0 to 8 % after a recovery period of 13 wk. These observations suggest that Bcl-2 plays a role in

Johannes Tesfaigzi; Jon A. Hotchkiss; Jack R. Harkema

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Autoradiographic localization and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system and adrenal gland  

SciTech Connect

Atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) have recently been identified in both heart and CNS. These peptides possess potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasorelaxant activities, and are all apparently derived from a single prohormone. Specific ANP binding sites have been characterized in the adrenal zona glomerulosa and kidney cortex, and one study reported ANP binding sites in the CNS. However, a detailed examination of the localization of ANP binding sites throughout the brain has not been reported. In this study, quantitative autoradiography was employed to examine the distribution of ANP receptors in the rat CNS. The binding of (3-/sup 125/I-iodotyrosyl28) rat ANP-28 to binding sites in the rat CNS was saturable, specific for ANP-related peptides, and displayed high affinity (Kd = 600 pM). When the relative concentrations of ANP binding sites were determined throughout the rat brain, the highest levels of ANP binding were localized to the circumventricular organs, including the area postrema and subfornical organ, and the olfactory apparatus. Moderate levels of ANP binding sites were present throughout the midbrain and brain stem, while low levels were found in the forebrain, diencephalon, basal ganglia, cortex, and cerebellum. The presence of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ and the area postrema, regions considered to be outside the blood-brain barrier, suggests that peripheral ANP levels may regulate some aspects of CNS control of salt and water balance. The possible functions of ANP binding sites in other regions of the rat brain are not known, but, like many other peptides, ANP may act as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator at these loci.

Gibson, T.R.; Wildey, G.M.; Manaker, S.; Glembotski, C.C.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL ENDOTOXIN ON WATER INTAKE, FOOD INTAKE, AND BODY TEMPERATURE IN THE ALBINO RAT*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1961, Dubos and Schaedler (1) reported a reduction in water intake in animals treated with bacterial endotoxin. Mice were raised in a pathogen-free environment and subsequently tested with one of several toxins. Alteration in daily water intake was found to occur at doses well below the LDs0. Because of the long-standing interest in this laboratory in drive states, their behavioral consequences, and physiological basis (2), this property of endotoxin was explored in the albino rat. Our animals were not raised in a pathogen-free environment. Using fairly large doses of toxin, we were able to confirm the findings of Dubos and Schaedler, and, in addition, demonstrate a profound toxin effect on food intake and body temperature. Using behavioral and physiological techniques, we made exploratory studies of resistance and sensitization to toxin and of its possible site of action. Materials and Methods Animals.--AU the animals were male Sprague-Dawley albino rats, 90 to 120 days old, weighing 300 gm or more. They were housed in individual wire cages in a temperature-controlled room, and were fed Purina lab chow and tap water. Water intakes were measured by making water bottles available for 30 minutes every day and weighing the bottles before and after consumption. After several "familiarization " days the rats would drink a fairly standard amount each day. Food intake was measured by weighing the food in the cages every 24 hours, the food being continuously available. Animals on food-intake measurement were given water ad lib and those on water-intake measurement were given food ad lib. Temperatures were taken with an ordinary rectal thermometer, lubricated and inserted almost its entire length. The animals showed no unusual distress and tolerated the procedure day after day. Thermometers were left in place 3 to 5 minutes and then read. Thermometem that dropped out were replaced for 3 additional minutes. A paper towel on the cage floor facilitated recovery of lost thermometers. Toxin.--A eommerdally prepared lipopolysaccharide extract of Eschericlda coli was used

E. Holmes; Neal; E. Miller, Ph.D.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Level of osteopenia and bone recovery in alcohol-fed adolescent rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adolescence is a period in human growth and development that is a time of rapid and drastic change. It is also known to be an age of widespread alcohol abuse. Studies addressing the reversibility of the deleterious effects of chronic alcohol consumption on young, actively growing adolescent bones have not been done. The objective of this study was to determine the level of bone recovery, if any, once an adolescent ceases alcohol consumption. Fifty, 4-week old, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were individually housed and maintained in an American Association for the Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care-accredited facility at Texas A&M. The rats (n = 6 or 7 per group) were fed either alcohol (35% ethanol-derived calories), isocaloric liquid diet, or chow for 2 or 4 weeks, depending on the experimental group. The weekly blood alcohol concentrations averaged 309 [] 9 mg/dl. The rats were sacrificed 2 and 4 weeks after the experimental feeding began. The BioQuant Morphometric System was used to perform the histomorphometric analyses of the proximal tibia. Tibia bone volume per trabecular volume (BV/TV) in both age groups of alcohol and pair-fed animals was significantly less when compared to the chow 4 week animals. BV/TV was increased in the alcohol recovery group when compared to the alcohol 2 and 4 week groups, but the level of growth never reached the chow-fed 4 week group. Femur length, diameter and volume measurements increased in the alcohol recovery group when compared to both the alcohol 2 and 4 week groups. However, the length and volume parameters did not fully recover to equal those of the control chow 4 week animals, or even the some-age pair-fed animals. Femur diameter of the alcohol recovery animals was comparable to the alcohol 4 week animals, but less than the chow-fed. Alcohol also suppressed IGF-I levels. Full bone recovery did not occur within two weeks after removal of alcohol from the diet, suggesting the detrimental effects due to alcohol were not completely reversible during this time frame.

Spears, Heather Lynae

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 7 Dietary Conjugated Linolenic Acid Modifies Body Fat Mass, and Serum and Liver Lipid Levels in Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 7 Dietary Conjugated Linolenic Acid Modifies Body Fat Mass, and Serum and Liver Lipid Levels in Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

335

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic DiseaseChapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dietary Fats and Risk of Chronic Disease Chapter 17 Docosahexaenoic Acid Intake and Lipid peroxidation in Retinal Membranes of Rats Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Download

336

Finansaktrer i gassrr : Er reguleringen av gasseksportsystemet robust?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I april 2010 inngikk oljeselskapet ExxonMobil en avtale med nyoppstartede Njord Gas Infrastructure om salg av ExxonMobils eierandel p 9,4 prosent i det norske gassrrsystemet (more)

Lvs, Jostein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Final Report: Towards Optimal Petascale Simulations (TOPS), ER25785  

SciTech Connect

Multiscale, multirate scientific and engineering applications in the SciDAC portfolio possess resolution requirements that are practically inexhaustible and demand execution on the highest-capability computers available, which will soon reach the petascale. While the variety of applications is enormous, their needs for mathematical software infrastructure are surprisingly coincident; moreover the chief bottleneck is often the solver. At their current scalability limits, many applications spend a vast majority of their operations in solvers, due to solver algorithmic complexity that is superlinear in the problem size, whereas other phases scale linearly. Furthermore, the solver may be the phase of the simulation with the poorest parallel scalability, due to intrinsic global dependencies. This project brings together the providers of some of the world??s most widely distributed, freely available, scalable solver software and focuses them on relieving this bottleneck for many specific applications within SciDAC, which are representative of many others outside. Solver software directly supported under TOPS includes: hypre, PETSc, SUNDIALS, SuperLU, TAO, and Trilinos. Transparent access is also provided to other solver software through the TOPS interface. The primary goals of TOPS are the development, testing, and dissemination of solver software, especially for systems governed by PDEs. Upon discretization, these systems possess mathematical structure that must be exploited for optimal scalability; therefore, application-targeted algorithmic research is included. TOPS software development includes attention to high performance as well as interoperability among the solver components. Support for integration of TOPS solvers into SciDAC applications is also directly supported by this proposal. The role of the UCSD PI in this overall CET, is one of direct interaction between the TOPS software partners and various DOE applications scientists ?? specifically toward magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations with the Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling (CEMM) SciDAC and Applied Partial Differential Equations Center (APDEC) SciDAC, and toward core-collapse supernova simulations with the previous Terascale Supernova Initiative (TSI) SciDAC and in continued work on INCITE projects headed by Doug Swesty, SUNY Stony Brook. In addition to these DOE applications scientists, the UCSD PI works to bring leading-edge DOE solver technology to applications scientists in cosmology and large-scale galactic structure formation. Unfortunately, the funding for this grant ended after only two years of its five-year duration, in August 2008, due to difficulties at DOE in transferring the grant to the PI??s new faculty position at Southern Methodist University. Therefore, this report only describes two years?? worth of effort.

Daniel R. Reynolds

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Final Report-DE FG02 92ER20061  

SciTech Connect

A dosage analysis of gene expression was conducted using aneuploids of maize. The findings of this project led to the concept that regulatory genes in higher eukaryotes has mostly dosage dependent and are the underlying basis of quantitative traits and aneuploid syndromes.

James A. Birchler

2004-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

SMALL ALI ER GUIDED ULLET - Sandia National Laboratories ...  

owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND #2011-1847 TE HNOLOGY INQUIRY?

340

www.fas.umontreal.ca PROGRAMMES DE 1ER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matériel pédagogique. > Observatoire linguistique Sens-Texte, regroupant trois disciplines langa- gières: la linguistique, la termino- logie et la didactique. Modélisation formelle des phénomènes lexicaux et de la traduction, de la terminologie et de l'interprétation. Le Département de linguistique et de

Parrott, Lael

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341

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Plan ARM Program Plan Forward In 1978 the Department of Energy initiated the Carbon Dioxide Research Program to address climate change from the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Over the years the Program has studied the many facets of the issue, from the carbon cycle, the climate diagnostics, the vegetative effects, to the societal impacts. The Program is presently the Department's principal entry in the U.S. Global Change Research Program coordinated by the Committee on Earth Sciences (CES) of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The recent heightened concern about global warming from an enhanced greenhouse effect has prompted the Department to accelerate the research to improve predictions of climate change. The emphasis is on

342

Final Report DE-FG02-04ER63719  

SciTech Connect

The studies completed under this grant significantly advanced the understanding and design of strategies for in situ uranium bioremediation. Novel strategies identified show promise to make in situ uranium bioremediation technically simpler and less expensive. As detailed, important findings included: (1) Development of an electron donor delivery strategy to prolong the in situ activity of Geobacter species and enhance the removal of uranium from the groundwater; (2) Demonstration that reproducible year-to-year field experiments were possible at the ERSP study site in Rifle, CO, making hypothesis-driven field experimentation possible; (3) Elucidation of the geochemical and microbiological heterogeneities with the subsurface during in situ uranium bioremediation, which must be accounted for to accurately model the bioremediation process; (4) The discovery that most of the U(VI) contamination at the Rifle site is sediment-associated rather than mobile in the groundwater, as previously considered; (5) The finding that unlike soluble U(VI), sediment-associated U(VI) is not microbially reducible; (6) The demonstration that electrodes may be an effective alternative to acetate as an electron donor to promote microbial U(VI) reduction in the subsurface with the added benefit that electrode-promoted microbial U(VI) reduction offers the possibility of removing the immobilized uranium from the subsurface; and (7) The finding that, after extended acetate inputs, U(VI) continues to be removed from groundwater long after the introduction of acetate into the subsurface is terminated and that this appears to be due to adsorption onto biomass. This potentially will make in situ uranium bioremediation much less expensive than previously envisioned.

Lovley, Derek, R.

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

343

Audit of Groundwater Remediation Plans at Savannah River, ER...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ombudsman FOIA Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work...

344

DOE Joint Genome Institute: IMG ER Goes Primetime: Provides Expert...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that regulate our environment. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the Biological Data Management and Technology Center...

345

Thomases'er'tm-117'r1\text.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

remediation goal RAC Risk Assessment Council RAIS Risk Assessment Information System RAM Risk Assessment Manager RAP Risk Assessment Program RATL Risk Assessment Technical...

346

Energy and Resources Group Spring 2013 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will discuss her new book documenting the story of China's rapid rise in the global wind power industry. China is beginning to serve as a center for global technological innovation, and green innovation from China could play a crucial role in the global transition to a low-carbon economy. China's wind industry not only

Kammen, Daniel M.

347

A. Vinegar', ER Kinkead', HF Leahy', JH English , and GW ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Urinary bladder Je jmum Ileum Salivary glands Esophagus Stomach ... Thyroid w/parathyroid Nasal turbinates Zymbal gland Pancreas Lachrymal ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

348

FINAL REPORT: DOE-FG03-95ER25250  

SciTech Connect

The research conducted in this project concerns the geometry of extremal surfaces, embedded minimal surfaces in particular. The methods include geometric analysis, computational simulation, mathematical visualization and software development. Minimal surface research stands at the intersection of partial differential equations, calculus of variations, complex function theory and topology. Advances in this area are often---as is the case with our research---tied to the development and implementation of computational methods and tools of mathematical visualization. Understanding the structure of the space of minimal surfaces has been important in applications from cosmology to structural engineering, as well as other applied areas including polymer physics. The subject has benefited from the discovery of new examples by the use of computation, examples far beyond the range current theoretical construction techniques. Not only are these surfaces important for the understanding of equilibrium morphology via inter-material dividing surfaces, they arise in the study of grain boundaries and dislocations. These same examples are in turn signposts for the further theoretical development in mathematics. This research project has made fundamental advances in the study of equilibrium interfaces. Carrying on the parent project that was based at the University of Massachusetts, we have: Proved the existence of large families of periodic minimal surfaces that serve as models for compound polymers. Developed software to simulate the transmission electron microscopy of the nanostructure of block copolymers, and in the understanding of materials whose structure was previously not known. Pioneered the use of numerical approximation and image simulation for minimal and CMC surfaces in the theoretical investigation of these variationally define equilibrium interfaces. Developed and maintained an archival site and model libraries This website was one of the first such sites and has served as a model for others. We have proved the existence of an embedded minimal surface of genus one with one helicoidal end. This is the first properly embedded minimal surface with infinite total curvature and finite topology to be found since the helicoid was shown to minimal by Muesnier in the 1770's. During the period that this project was carried out at MSRI, we provided support and consultation for mathematicians who had interests in using our graphical software and expertise in their research. In addition, Hoffman organized, initiated or acted as MSRI coordinator for a variety of scientific meetings and workshops on topics ranging from visualizat

David Hoffman

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Docket No. ER10-_____-000 Dear Secretary Bose:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Commission filing and acceptance the Dynamic Scheduling Host Balancing Authority Operating Agreement (DSHBAOA) between the ISO and Griffith Energy, LLC as a non-conforming service agreement. 1 This agreement sets forth the terms by which Griffith Energy will facilitate dynamic scheduling from its balancing authority area to the ISO balancing authority area. The ISO requests that the Griffith Energy DSHBAOA be made effective as of September 27, 2010, sixty-one days following the submittal of this filing. I. Purpose of the DSHBAOA The ISOs pro forma DSHBAOA is applicable to the operators of balancing authority areas hosting resources located outside the ISOs balancing authority area that wish to schedule dynamic imports of energy and energy associated with ancillary services (except regulation service, unless otherwise specified) into the ISO balancing authority area. 2 The DSHBAOA establishes the framework of operating requirements for the dynamic scheduling functionality and requires the host balancing authority area responsible for the functionality to comply with the applicable provisions of the ISO tariff, including the ISO Dynamic Scheduling Protocol (DSP). 3 The DSP contains several important operating and scheduling 1

Filing Non-conforming; Service Agreement No

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Scientific Report - DE-FG02-01ER15261  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our studies were a small part of the specific aims of the grant ''Global Regulation of the Methane-Producing Archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis'' (P.I. John Leigh, University of Washington). We proposed to determine the correlation of the levels of aminoacyl-tRNA and free amino acids under different growth conditions (varying phosphate, amino acid, or hydrogen concentrations). We did determine the levels of several aminoacyl-tRNAs under the growth conditions used by our collaborators in their experiments (J. Leigh and W. Whitman, University of Georgia). These data will be incorporated into a publication currently being prepared by John Leigh.

Soell, Dieter G.

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

351

DE-FG02-04ER84058 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Phase I research was to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a high performance SPECT/CT detector module based on a combination of microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an EMCCD readout. We are very pleased to report that our Phase I research has demonstrated the technical feasibility of our approach with a very high degree of success. Specifically, we were able to implement a back-thinned EMCCD with a fiberoptic window which was successfully used to demonstrate the feasibility of near simultaneous radionuclide/CT using the proposed concept. Although significantly limited in imaging area (24 x 24 mm{sup 2}) and pixel resolution (512 x 512), this prototype has shown exceptional capabilities such as a single optical photon sensitivity, very low noise, an intrinsic resolution of 64 {micro}m for radionuclide imaging, and a resolution in excess of 10 lp/mm for x-ray imaging. Furthermore, the combination of newly developed, thick, microcolumnar CsI and an EMCCD has shown to be capable of operating in a photon counting mode, and that the position and energy information obtained from these data can be used to improve resolution in radionuclide imaging. Finally, the prototype system has successfully been employed for near simultaneous SPECT/CT imaging using both, {sup 125}I and {sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. The tomographic reconstruction data obtained using a mouse heart phantom and other phantoms clearly demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of the detector in small animal research. The following were the objectives specified in the Phase I proposal: (1) In consultation with Professor Hasegawa, develop specifications for the Phase I/Phase II prototype detector; (2) Modify current vapor deposition protocols to fabricate {approx}2 mm thick microcolumnar CsI(Tl) scintillators with excellent columnar structure, high light yield, and high spatial resolution; (3) Perform detailed characterization of the film morphology, light output, and spatial resolution, and use these data to refine deposition protocols; (4) Develop suitable designs of a collimator to be fabricated during the Phase II; (5) Integrate thick CsI(Tl) films into the existing IGCCD camera to form a prototype dual-imaging detector module; (6) Conduct evaluation of the prototype SPECT/CT detector to determine its suitability for x-ray CT and radionuclide imaging; and (7) Write the Phase I final report and prepare the Phase II research plan. Our work in Phase I has not only accomplished all the above stated goals, but has surpassed them in many aspects. The data presented in the report below show that the proposed combined detector will not only minimize the complexity and cost associated with conventional readouts, but will also improve system reliability necessary for the development of a dual modality system. This is a substantial accomplishment, which brings us a step closer to our Phase II goal of developing a much larger area, higher pixel resolution detector and minimizes risk associated with implementation of the proposed design.

Vivek Nagarkar

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

352

Combined Transistor Sizing with Bu er Insertion for Timing Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. on CAD, vol. CAD-2, pp. 202 211, July 1983. 8 K. O. Jeppson, Modeling the in uence of the transistor gain

Sapatnekar, Sachin

353

Insect Repellent For Older 4-H'ers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seen with West Nile Virus and Lyme disease). Forms and Concentrations: Aerosol and pump-spray products Now sold as 3M Ultrathon Avon Skin-So-Soft Bug Guard Pump spray, .1% citronella 0.67 n/a Not labeled oil 0.46 2­4 hours Not labeled for ticks Renamed Blocker BugOut Aerosol, 15% deet 0.11 3­7 hours 1

354

ANNUAIRE DU 1er CYCLE 2011-2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Résumé : Mots-clés : DC/DC SI MIMO, MPPT, générateur piézoélectrique, cellule photovoltaïque, batterie MIMO) associé à un circuit de recherche du point de puissance maximal (MPPT) très basse consommation, MPPT, piezoelectric generator, photovoltaic cell, LIPON battery, WSN Energy supply of embedded systems

Québec, Université du

355

schtzen. 1997 ent-wickelte er den Ro-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Wann wird man Kraftwerke drosseln müssen, weil es an Kühlwasser fehlt? Forstämter wollen wissen, wo

Spang, Rainer

356

Vulkanausbrche zhlen zu den spekta kulrsten Naturphnomenen unserer Er  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Einfluss auf die deutsche Geschichte, wie auch die Entwicklung Heidelbergs und der Kur pfalz. Dort konnten realisiert werden. Für Studenten in Deutsch land und der Mongolei werden Seminare zum Thema Klima und Wasser, Mechanik und Biomechanik, Chemie, Verfahrenstech nik, Systembiologie und Biomedizin. I Prof. Leena Bruckner

Heermann, Dieter W.

357

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2012 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Environmental Design, and a pioneer in passive solar, daylighting and sustainable-design research and teaching. He has published seminal articles on the design potential of sustainable systems and urban-design principles for transit-oriented neighborhoods. An award-winning architect, Fraker is pursuing a whole-systems

Kammen, Daniel M.

358

Energy and Resources Group Fall 2011 Colloquium Series (ER295)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation, Energy and Environment ­ Scenarios for the Future 110 Barrows Hall / 4:00 p.m. #12; served as Director of the UC Transportation Center, which she helped to found in 1989. In addition, from research focuses on transportation and land use policy, the environmental impacts of transportation

Silver, Whendee

359

The Calibration of ERS-1 Satellite Scatterometer Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the period mid-September to mid-December 1991, the RENE-91 campaign took place off the of Norway. Extensive in situ measurements of winds and waves were made from several platforms in order to calibrate thew parameters derived from radar ...

D. Offiler

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Electrorheological (ER) fluids: A research needs assessment. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of seven sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) Introduction, (3) Overview, (4) Recommendations, (5) Panelist Reports, (6) Overseas Research and Development, and (7) Extended Bibliography. The Appendix contains the reports of site visits and contacts and other supplementary documents.

Krieger, I.M.; Collins, E.A. [Consultec Scientific, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Alternative energifremtider Hvilke? og hvor langt er de vk?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Bioethanol fra sukker · Bioethanol fra ligno- cellulose materialer (f.eks. strå) · Biodiesel fra planteolie-based conversions · Advanced bioconversion schemes · Other novel conversion pathways (e.g. electro- chemical

362

Begrnset Garanti Research In Motion Limited (RIM), der er ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Handheld Limited Warranty - Denmark (Danish) 031605 (UK Version 082504) Begrnset Garanti Research In ...

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

FINAL REPORT DE-FG02-07ER15894  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the greatest technological hurdles to deployment of fuel cells relates to the sluggish activity, low durability and the high cost of the catalysts that are currently employed. For automotive PEM fuel cells to become commercially viable, the Pt-specific power density would need to be reduced to less than 0.2gPt/kW (at cell voltages >0.65 V). This would require the Pt loadings to be less than 0.15 mgPt/cm2MEA within the membrane electrode assembly. This could be achieved by enhancing the catalytic activity at the cathode, thus lowering its overpotential. Various different Pt-alloys have shown 2-4 times enhanced activities over Pt alone but still suffer some of the same durability issues as that of the pure Pt. There is a general loss of active Pt due to dissolution and sintering. While there have been a number of elegant fundamental experimental and theoretical studies on ideal single crystal Pt and Pt alloy surfaces which have helped to elucidate the factors that control the activity, there have been very few fundamental studies focused on the stability, reactivity and durability of well-defined Pt nanoparticles. We carried out ab initio density functional theory together with a novel double reference method that we developed to simulate constant potential electrochemical systems in order to model the electrocatalytic reduction of oxygen over model Pt alloy surfaces and nanoparticles. These simulations were used to probe the factors that control the electrocatalytic activity, guide the potential selection of new materials and test their stability under reaction conditions. Ab initio calculations were used to determine the reaction energies and activation barriers for a comprehensive array of different elementary adsorption, desorption, surface reaction and diffusion steps over Pt and Pt alloys involved in the electroreduction of oxygen as a function of surface coverage, the electrochemical potential and temperature. The calculations were used to simulate the potential dependent adsorption and surface reaction energies along with activation barriers in order to determine the kinetics for different surface structures and structural features (step edge and corner sites) to provide the necessary input for kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to follow the rates of reaction. More coarse-grained simulated annealing methods were used to help establish the lowest energy structures and morphologies for different Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticles that form. The results from the DFT calculations were used to establish an ab initio-derived kinetic database that was used in both 2D and 3D kinetic Monte Carlo simulations that were used to follow the electrocatalytic performance over different particle sizes, shapes and compositions. The ab initio calculations together with the kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to complete the following objectives: 1) Determine the controlling elementary reaction pathways and intrinsic kinetics involved in ORR and their potential dependent behavior; 2) Establish the influence of the extrinsic reaction environment including surface structure, alloy composition and spatial arrangement and the humidity on ORR kinetics; 3) Elucidate the effects of particle size and morphology as well as the atomic structure and composition of nanoparticles of Pt, Pt3Co, Pt3Ni, Pt3Fe and other Pt-alloys on the electrocatalytic activity and reaction selectivity; 5) Construct surface Pourbaix phase diagrams for different Pt and Pt-alloys in order to map out the most stable surface phases for different material compositions and reaction conditions; 6) Elucidate the mechanisms that control dissolution and re-deposition of Pt.

Neurock, Matthew [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Virginia

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Final Report for Project FG02-05ER25685  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the PI summarizes the results and achievements obtained in the sponsored project. Overall, the project has been very successful and produced both research results in massive data-intensive computing and data management for large scale supercomputers today, and in open-source software products. During the project period, 14 conference/journal publications, as well as two PhD students, have been produced due to exclusive or shared support from this award. In addition, the PI has recently been granted tenure from NC State University.

Xiaosong Ma

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

HOt Water SavEr (HOWSE) Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The dishwasher effluent is pumped into the flue of the exchange tank by the normal dishwasher pump (or auxiliary pump). The effluent is stored in this tank until next operation of the dishwasher. Thus, thermal equilibrium can be reached between the tank and the effluent, promoting high efficiency. The output from the exchange tank feeds the household normal hot water tank, reducing its requirement for fuel as the input water temperature is higher. Counterflow exchangers may be used for other hot water users where the flow and drain is continuous. In this case the discharged hot (or warm) water flows counter to the flow of cold water into the hot water heater. The two flows are closely coupled thermally but not in direct contract so they cannot mix. Counter flow exchangers and storage type exchangers may be used in the same installation.

Olson, W.R.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

DOE/ER-0441 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Plan - February...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

43 15 An artist's conception of the radiometric calibration facility at the Solar Energy Research Institute......

367

Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause disorders associated with prostatic hyperplasia and hyperactivity.

Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi, E-mail: urmichatterji@gmail.com

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Autoradiographic localization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptor subtypes in rat kidney  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) clearance receptors in rat kidney was investigated by in vitro autoradiography using des(Gln18,Ser19,Gly20,Leu21,Gly22)-ANP-(4- 23) (C-ANP) and 125I-Tyr0-ANP-(5-25) as relatively specific ligands of this receptor. Alpha-125I-ANP (100 pM) bound reversibly but with high affinity to glomeruli, outer medullary vasa recta bundles, and inner medulla. C-ANP (10 microM) inhibited greater than 60% of this glomerular binding but did not inhibit the binding of alpha-125I-ANP to medullary tissues. Alpha-125I-ANP also bound reversibly to the renal arteries up to the glomerulus. This arterial binding was only partly inhibited by 10 microM C-ANP. In the presence of 10 microM C-ANP, increasing concentrations of alpha-125I-ANP bound to a residue of glomerular sites with apparent dissociation constants of 0.82 +/- 0.16 to 2.73 +/- 1.20 nM at different cortical levels. 125I-Tyr0-ANP-(5-25) bound significantly to glomeruli and intrarenal arteries but not to vasa recta bundles or inner medulla. This glomerular binding also occurred with nanomolar dissociation constants. It was completely inhibited by 1 microM alpha-ANP and 10 microM C-ANP, but not by unrelated peptides such as gastrin. These results suggest that renal ANP clearance receptors are restricted in vivo to the glomeruli and renal arterial system of the rat.

Brown, J.; Salas, S.P.; Singleton, A.; Polak, J.M. (Univ. of Cambridge (England))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wen Fuqiang, E-mail: wenfuqiang.scu@gmail.co [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Effect of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 on recovery from spinal cord injury in rats given uncontrollable stimulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eventual outcome of spinal cord injury is largely influenced by damage that occurs after the injury. Damaged connections between spinal cord cells and the brain allow a positive feedback mechanism to go unchecked when activated by ascending pain messages. Over-excitation then causes secondary damage. This study examines whether a pharmacological manipulation that should attenuate over-excitation reduces the adverse effects of shock treatment. Rats received spinal impact injuries and, the next day, were given the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.08 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle before receiving either a bout of uncontrollable stimulation or identical treatment without the stimulation itself. Their hindlimb motor activity was monitored for 21 days. Results indicate a significant effect of the drug on rats that received uncontrollable stimulation. The study has clinical implications for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in humans.

Petrich, Christine

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.  

SciTech Connect

Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: Role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microsomal glutathione transferase (MGST1) is activated by oxidative stress. Although MGST1 is found in mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1), there is no information about the oxidative activation of mtMGST1. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether mtMGST1 also undergoes activation and about its function. When rats were treated with galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), mtMGST1 activity was significantly increased, and the increased activity was reduced by the disulfide reducing agent dithiothreitol. In mitochondria from GalN/LPS-treated rats, disulfide-linked mtMGST1 dimer and mixed protein glutathione disulfides (glutathionylation) were detected. In addition, cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from GalN/LPS-treated rats was observed, and the release was inhibited by anti-MGST1 antibodies. Incubation of mitochondria from control rats with diamide and diamide plus GSH in vitro resulted in dimer- and mixed disulfide bond-mediated activation of mtMGST1, respectively. The activation of mtMGST1 by diamide plus GSH caused cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, and the release was prevented by treatment with anti-MGST1 antibodies. In addition, diamide plus GSH treatment caused mitochondrial swelling accompanied by cytochrome c release, which was inhibited by cyclosporin A (CsA) and bongkrekic acid (BKA), inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. Furthermore, mtMGST1 activity was also inhibited by CsA and BKA. These results indicate that mtMGST1 is activated through mixed disulfide bond formation that contributes to cytochrome c release from mitochondria through the MPT pore.

Lee, Kang Kwang; Shimoji, Manami; Hossain, Quazi Sohel [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Sunakawa, Hajime [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Functional Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Aniya, Yoko [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan)], E-mail: yaniya@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cross-talk between the calcium-sensing receptor and the epidermal growth factor receptor in Rat-1 fibroblasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is activated by extracellular calcium (Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}). Rat-1 fibroblasts have been shown to proliferate and increase ERK activity in response to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}] {sub o}, and these responses are dependent on functional CaR expression. In this report, we examined the role of cross-talk between the CaR and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mediating these responses in Rat-1 cells. This report shows that AG1478, a specific inhibitor of the EGFR kinase, significantly inhibits the increase in proliferation induced by elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. Furthermore, we show that AG1478 acts downstream or separately from G protein subunit activation of phospholipase C. AG1478 significantly inhibits Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}-stimulated ERK phosphorylation and in vitro kinase activity. A similar inhibition of ERK phosphorylation was observed in response to the inhibitor AG494. In addition, treatment with inhibitors of metalloproteases involved in shedding of membrane anchored EGF family ligands substantially inhibited the increase in ERK activation in response to elevated Ca {sub o} {sup 2+}. This is consistent with the known expression of TGF{alpha} by Rat-1 cells. These results indicate that EGFR transactivation is an important component of the CaR-mediated response to increased Ca {sub o} {sup 2+} in Rat-1 fibroblasts and most likely involves CaR-mediated induction of regulated proteolysis and ligand shedding.

Tomlins, Scott A. [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bolllinger, Nikki [Biological Sciences Division, Battelle for the US DOE, PO Box 999, 790 Sixth Street, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Creim, Jeffrey [Biological Sciences Division, Battelle for the US DOE, PO Box 999, 790 Sixth Street, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Rodland, Karin D. [Biological Sciences Division, Battelle for the US DOE, PO Box 999, 790 Sixth Street, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)]. E-mail: Karin.rodland@pnl.gov

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effect of Hypericum perforatum CO2 extract on the motivational properties of ethanol in alcohol-preferring rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Aims: Extracts of Hypericum perforatum (HPE) attenuate voluntary ethanol intake in different lines of alcohol-preferring rats. The present study evaluated the effect of the intragastric (IG) administration of a CO 2 Hypericum perforatum extract (HPCO 2) on operant ethanol self-administration, as well as on voluntary ethanol intake, after a period of ethanol deprivation in genetically selected Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats. Methods: HPCO 2 was administered by means of an indwelling IG catheter, 1 h before the tests. For the self-administration experiments, the rats were trained to self-administer 10 % (v/v) ethanol in 30-min daily sessions under a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement. HPCO 2 was also tested on 0.2 % w/v saccharin self-administration. For the ethanol deprivation experiments, rats that had a previous experience with voluntary ethanol drinking were deprived of ethanol for 9 days, whereas water and food were freely available; HPCO 2 was given by IG injection 1 h before the ethanol re-presentation. Results: HPCO 2 in doses of 31 or 125 mg/kg but not 7 mg/kg, significantly reduced ethanol self-administration, while it did not modify saccharin self-administration. The same doses of the extract abolished the increased ethanol intake following ethanol deprivation. Conclusions: These findings provide evidence that HPCO 2 markedly reduces the reinforcing properties of ethanol in the selfadministration paradigm, as well as the increase of ethanol intake following ethanol deprivation. These findings further support the view that the use of HPE may represent an interesting pharmacological approach in the treatment of alcohol abuse and alcoholism.

Marina Perfumi; Laura Mattioli; Laura Forti; Maurizio Massi; Roberto Ciccocioppo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo arrays, with over 20,000 target genes, were used to evaluate o-NT- and BCA-induced RPMs, when compared to a non-transformed mesothelial cell line (Fred-PE). Analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software revealed 169 cancer-related genes that were categorized into binding activity, growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and invasion and metastasis. The microarray data were validated by positive correlation with quantitative real-time RT-PCR on 16 selected genes including igf1, tgfb3 and nov. Important carcinogenic pathways involved in RPM formation included insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), p38 MAPkinase, Wnt/{beta}-catenin and integrin signaling pathways. This study demonstrated that mesotheliomas in rats exposed to o-NT- and BCA were similar to mesotheliomas in humans, at least at the cellular and molecular level.

Kim, Yongbaek [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Thai-Vu Ton [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); De Angelo, Anthony B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Morgan, Kevin [Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ 08807 (United States); Devereux, Theodora R. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Anna, Colleen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Collins, Jennifer B. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Paules, Richard S. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Crosby, Lynn M. [Wyeth Research, Chazy, NY 12921 (United States); Sills, Robert C. [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Phytic acid plus calcium, but not phytic acid alone, decreases fluoride bioavailability in the rat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of in vitro studies have suggested that fluoride becomes insoluble when some soy-based infant formulas are diluted with fluoridated water because of the presence of phytate, added calcium or a combination of these factors. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis in vivo. Male albino rats were fed a purified diet containing phytic acid, calcium and fluoride for 4 weeks in a factorial design of treatments. Phytic acid was added to the diet by chemically reacting a phytic acid concentrate with casein prior to diet preparation to mimic a soy-protein. Food intake, weight gain and femur P were unaffected by dietary treatments. Both phytic acid and supplemental calcium alone had little or no effect upon fluoride uptake into either bone or teeth. The combination of phytic acid plus supplemental calcium, however, significantly increased % of fluoride intake found in the feces which was reflected in a significant decrease in fluoride concentration of femur, 2nd molar teeth and vertebrate bone. These results provide evidence that insoluble complex formation produced by a calcium and phytate interaction can explain reduced fluoride solubility in some soy-based infant formulas as well as decreased fluoride absorbability in vivo.

Cerklewski, F.L. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increases urinary albumin excretion (UAE) in intact and uninephrectomized (UNX) rats  

SciTech Connect

Previous experimental observations have suggested that ANP increases the transcapillary shift of water and albumin. The present studies were conducted in anesthetized euvolemic rats 6 weeks after UNX or sham operation. The effect of iv infusion of 103-126 hANP was assessed on GFR and ERPF ({sup 99}Tc.DTPA and {sup 131}I-hippuran clearances), and UAE (nephelemetric method). ANP infusion was associated with no change in mean arterial pressure during the low dose (LD) and a 30 mm Hg decrease during the high dose (HD). ANP induced a dose-dependent and reversible increase in UNaV. Both proximal (as assessed by lithium excretion) and distal reabsorption of sodium were decreased by ANP. GFR was altered whereas ERPF decreased only during HD-AMP; filtration fraction (FF) dose-dependently increased in response to ANP. UAE increased dose-dependently and to a similar extent in both groups in response to ANP. The increase in UAE was readily reversible after discontinuation of ANP. There was a positive correlation between changes in UAE and changes in FF induced by ANP. These results indicate that ANP has a potent albuminuric effect. The simultaneous increase in UAE and FF, which could explain the effect of ANP on proximal tubular handling of sodium, may result from an ANP-induced rise in intraglomerular capillary pressure and/or an increase in glomerular permeability to albumin.

Valentin, J.P.; Ribstein, J.; Mimran, A. (CHU, Montpellier (France))

1990-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Gene Expression of ANP, BNP and ET-1 in the Heart of Rats during Pulmonary Embolism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: Atrial natriuretic petide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) may reflect the severity of right ventricular dysfunction (RVD) in patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). The exact nature and source of BNP, ANP and ET-1 expression and secretion following PE has not previously been studied. Methods and Results: Polystyrene microparticles were injected to induce PE in rats. Gene expression of BNP, ANP and ET-1 were determined in the 4 cardiac chambers by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Plasma levels of ANP, BNP, ET-1 and cardiac troponin I (TNI) were measured in plasma. PE dose-dependently increased gene expression of ANP and BNP in the right ventricle (RV) and increased gene expression of ANP in the right atrium (RA). In contrast PE dosedependently decreased BNP gene expression in both the left ventricle (LV) and the left atrium (LA). Plasma levels of BNP, TNI and ET-1 levels dose-dependently increased with the degree of PE. Conclusion: We found a close correlation between PE degree and gene-expression of ANP, and BNP in the cardiac chambers with a selective increase in the right chambers of the heart. The present data supports the idea of natriuretic peptides as

Henrik Gutte; Jytte Oxbl; Ulrik Sloth Kristoffersen; Jann Mortensen; Andreas Kjr

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Influence of copper and iron on subacute cadmium intoxication in protein-malnourished rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male albino rats maintained on low-protein (9%) diets were dosed intraperitoneally with 0.75 mg Cd/kg, as cadmium chloride, for 20 days. Groups of these animals were provided with diets supplemented with 40 ppm Cu, 400 ppm Fe or a combination of both during the exposure period. Hepatic and renal distribution of Cd, Zn, Cu, and Fe along with activity of acid and alkaline phosphatases and ribonuclease and glutathione content were studied. Uptake of Cd both in liver and in kidney was significant and was accompanied by increased Zn and depletion of Fe concentration. The Cu level remained unaltered. Dietary supplementation of Cu or Fe interacted effectively and influenced the metal distribution. Acid and alkaline phosphatases in both liver and kidney were inhibited by Cd exposure. However, Cu and/or Fe supplements could to a varying degree offset the Cd-induced inhibition. Cadmium exposure did not, however, elicit any effect on hepatic and renal ribonuclease activity of low-protein-fed animals. The glutathione concentration registered profound increase on Cd exposure, possibly to act as a defense mechanism.

Tewari, P.C.; Kachru, D.N.; Tandon, S.K.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rat neth er" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system modulates glomerular angiotensin receptors in the rat  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulates glomerular angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors. In one protocol ANG II receptors were measured 7 days after unilateral denervation of the left kidney in rats. There were 50% more receptors in the glomeruli from denervated compared with innervated kidneys, which was associated with a 63% reduction in left renal vein renin. The differences in ANG II receptors between the left and right kidneys were not longer present when angiotensin-converting enzyme was inhibited with enalapril or when pharmacological amounts of ANG II were infused. In a second protocol, renal cortical renin content was raised in the left kidney by placing a 0.20-mm clip on the left renal artery. At 7 days, glomerular ANG II receptors were reduced by 72.3% in the clipped compared with the contralateral kidneys. The differences in ANG II receptors were no longer present after enalapril treatment. Pharmacological maneuvers that either blocked ANG II formation or increased circulating ANG II resulted in an equal number of ANG II receptors in the right and left kidneys. The data indicate that the intrarenal RAS modulates the density of glomerular ANG II receptors and is a more important receptor modulation than plasma ANG II.

Wilkes, B.M.; Pion, I.; Sollott, S.; Michaels, S.; Kiesel, G. (North Shore Univ. Hospital and Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (USA))

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa  

SciTech Connect

Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. (Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH (USA))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Piezoelectric Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printing of Rat Fibroblast Cells: Survivability Study and Pattern Printing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel piezoelectric, drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet system has been developed and used to print L929 rat fibroblast cells. We investigate the survivability of the cells subjected to the large stresses during the printing process. These stresses are varied by changing the diameter of the orifice (36 to 119 microns) through which the cells are dispensed, as well as changing the electrical pulse used to drive the piezoelectric element. It is shown that for the smallest 36 microns diameter orifice, cell survival rates fall from 95% to approximately 76% when the ejection velocity is increased from 2 to 16 m/s. This decrease in survival rates is less significant when the larger orifice diameters of 81 microns and 119 microns are used. Analysis shows that there is a clear inverse relationship between cell survival rates and the mean shear rates during drop formation. By using the same printing set-up, fibroblast cells are printed onto alginate and collagen into patterns. Printed cells are cultured over a period of da...

Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur Tryggvi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

In vivo determination of triglyceride (TG) secretion in rats fed different dietary saturated fats using (2- sup 3 H)-glycerol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (154{plus minus}1 g) were fed diets containing 2% corn oil (CO) + 14% butterfat (BF), beef tallow (BT), olive oil (OO) or coconut oil (CN) vs a 16% CO control diet for 5 weeks. Changes in plasma TG specific activity (dpm/mg TG) were determined in individual unanesthetized rats after injection of 100 {mu}Ci (2-{sup 3}H)-glycerol via a carotid cannula. Fractional rate constants were obtained using a 2-compartment model and nonlinear regression analysis. Results demonstrated no difference in the fractional rate constants among dietary groups; but, differences in the rates of hepatic TG secretion were noted. Rats fed BT showed a higher rate of hepatic TG secretion than rats fed CO. Rats fed BF, OO or CN showed somewhat higher rates of hepatic TG secretion than CO. VLDL TG, phospholipid, and apolipoprotein B and E levels were higher with saturated fats vs CO. The data suggest that the higher plasma TG levels noted in response to feeding saturated fats vs corn oil can be explained, in part, by an increased flux of hepatic TG secretion.

Lai, H.C.; Yang, H.; Lasekan, J.; Clayton, M.; Ney, D.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

1990-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of S-values and dose distributions for {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 188}Re in seven lobes of the rat liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Rats have been widely used in radionuclide therapy research for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This has created the need to assess rat liver absorbed radiation dose. In most dose estimation studies, the rat liver is considered as a homogeneous integrated target organ with a tissue composition assumed to be similar to that of human liver tissue. However, the rat liver is composed of several lobes having different anatomical and chemical characteristics. To assess the overall impact on rat liver dose calculation, the authors use a new voxel-based rat model with identified suborgan regions of the liver. Methods: The liver in the original cryosectional color images was manually segmented into seven individual lobes and subsequently integrated into a voxel-based computational rat model. Photon and electron particle transport was simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate absorbed fractions and S-values for {sup 90}Y, {sup 131}I, {sup 166}Ho, and {sup 188}Re for the seven liver lobes. The effect of chemical composition on organ-specific absorbed dose was investigated by changing the chemical composition of the voxel filling liver material. Radionuclide-specific absorbed doses at the voxel level were further assessed for a small spherical hepatic tumor. Results: The self-absorbed dose for different liver lobes varied depending on their respective masses. A maximum difference of 3.5% was observed for the liver self-absorbed fraction between rat and human tissues for photon energies below 100 keV. {sup 166}Ho and {sup 188}Re produce a uniformly distributed high dose in the tumor and relatively low absorbed dose for surrounding tissues. Conclusions: The authors evaluated rat liver radiation doses from various radionuclides used in HCC treatments using a realistic computational rat model. This work contributes to a better understanding of all aspects influencing radiation transport in organ-specific radiation dose evaluation for preclinical therapy studies, from tissue composition to organ morphology and activity distribution.

Xie Tianwu; Liu Qian; Zaidi, Habib [Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China) and Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Britton Chance Center for Biomedical Photonics, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Key Laboratory of Biomedical Photonics of Ministry of Education, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China) and Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland) and Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Gronigen, University of Groningen, 9700 RB Groningen (Netherlands)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Rat MHC-linked peptide transporter alleles strongly influence peptide binding by HLA-B27 but not B27-associated inflammatory disease  

SciTech Connect

Rats transgenic for the human MHC molecule HLA-B27 were used to study the effect of two alleles, cim{sup a} and cim{sup b}, which are associated with peptide transport by the MHC-encoded Tap2 transporter, on the function of HLA-B27 as a restriction element for CTL recognition of the male H-Y minor H Ag and on the multisystem inflammatory disease characteristic of B27 transgenic rats. Anti-H-Y CTL generated in cim{sup a} B27 transgenic rats lysed male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets significantly less well than cim{sup a/a} or cim{sup a/b} targets. Addition of exogenous H-Y peptides to male B27 cim{sup b/b} targets increased susceptibility to lysis to the level of cim{sup a/a} targets sensitized with exogenous H-Y peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled peptides eluted from B27 molecules of lymphoblasts from rats of two cim{sup b} and three cim{sup a} RT1 haplotypes showed that the cim{sup b} peptide pool favors comparatively longer and/or more hydrophobic peptides. These results indicate that RT1-linked Tap2 polymorphism in the rat strongly influences peptide loading of HLA-B27. Nonetheless, the prevalence and severity of multisystem inflammatory lesions were comparable in backcross rats bearing either cim{sup a/b} or cim{sup b/b}. It thus appears either that binding of specific peptides to B27 is unimportant in the pathogenesis of B27-associated disease or that the critical peptides, unlike H-Y and many others, are not influenced by Tap transporter polymorphism. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Simmons, W.A.; Satumtira, Nimman; Taurog, J.D. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)] [and others

1996-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

MRP2 and the handling of mercuric ions in rats exposed acutely to inorganic and organic species of mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercuric ions accumulate preferentially in renal tubular epithelial cells and bond with intracellular thiols. Certain metal-complexing agents have been shown to promote extraction of mercuric ions via the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2). Following exposure to a non-toxic dose of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), in the absence of complexing agents, tubular cells are capable of exporting a small fraction of intracellular Hg{sup 2+} through one or more undetermined mechanisms. We hypothesize that MRP2 plays a role in this export. To test this hypothesis, Wistar (control) and TR{sup -} rats were injected intravenously with a non-nephrotoxic dose of HgCl{sub 2} (0.5 {mu}mol/kg) or CH{sub 3}HgCl (5 mg/kg), containing [{sup 203}Hg], in the presence or absence of cysteine (Cys; 1.25 {mu}mol/kg or 12.5 mg/kg, respectively). Animals were sacrificed 24 h after exposure to mercury and the content of [{sup 203}Hg] in blood, kidneys, liver, urine and feces was determined. In addition, uptake of Cys-S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} and methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}) was measured in inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from either control Sf9 cells or Sf9 cells transfected with human MRP2. The amount of mercury in the total renal mass and liver was significantly greater in TR{sup -} rats than in controls. In contrast, the amount of mercury in urine and feces was significantly lower in TR{sup -} rats than in controls. Data from membrane vesicles indicate that Cys-S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} are transportable substrates of MRP2. Collectively, these data indicate that MRP2 plays a role in the physiological handling and elimination of mercuric ions from the kidney.

Bridges, Christy C., E-mail: Bridges_cc@mercer.edu; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Retinal ganglion cell survival and axon regeneration in WldS transgenic rats after optic nerve crush and lens injury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the latter inactive in WldS trans- genic rats. WldS is a fusion protein that consists of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl-transferase-1 (Nmnat1) and a short fragment of the ubiquitin assem- bly protein UFD2. Whilst several reports have suggested... - fered saline (PBS) followed by 4% paraformaldehyde. Eyes and optic nerves were removed and post-fixed by immersion overnight in cold 4% paraformaldehyde. Tis- sue was then washed with PBS and transferred to 30% sucrose solution (overnight at 4 C...

Lorber, Barbara; Tassoni, Alessia; Bull, Natalie D; Moschos, Marilita M; Martin, Keith R

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for developmental exposure to BDE-47 in rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used commercially as additive flame retardants and have been shown to transfer into environmental compartments, where they have the potential to bioaccumulate in wildlife and humans. Of the 209 possible PBDEs, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) is usually the dominant congener found in human blood and milk samples. BDE-47 has been shown to have endocrine activity and produce developmental, reproductive, and neurotoxic effects. The objective of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for BDE-47 in male and female (pregnant and non-pregnant) adult rats to facilitate investigations of developmental exposure. This model consists of eight compartments: liver, brain, adipose tissue, kidney, placenta, fetus, blood, and the rest of the body. Concentrations of BDE-47 from the literature and from maternal-fetal pharmacokinetic studies conducted at RTI International were used to parameterize and evaluate the model. The results showed that the model simulated BDE-47 tissue concentrations in adult male, maternal, and fetal compartments within the standard deviations of the experimental data. The model's ability to estimate BDE-47 concentrations in the fetus after maternal exposure will be useful to design in utero exposure/effect studies. This PBPK model is the first one designed for any PBDE pharmaco/toxicokinetic description. The next steps will be to expand this model to simulate BDE-47 pharmacokinetics and distributions across species (mice), and then extrapolate it to humans. After mouse and human model development, additional PBDE congeners will be incorporated into the model and simulated as a mixture.

Emond, Claude, E-mail: claude.emond@umontreal.c [Departement de sante environnementale et sante au travail Faculte de medecine, Universite de Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Main Station, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3J7 (Canada); BioSimulation Consulting Inc., Newark, DE 19711 (United States); Raymer, James H.; Studabaker, William B.; Garner, C. Edwin [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Birnbaum, Linda S. [Office of Research and Development, National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Piezoelectric Drop-on-Demand Inkjet Printing of Rat Fibroblast Cells: Survivability Study and Pattern Printing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel piezoelectric, drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet system has been developed and used to print L929 rat fibroblast cells. We investigate the survivability of the cells subjected to the large stresses during the printing process. These stresses are varied by changing the diameter of the orifice (36 to 119 microns) through which the cells are dispensed, as well as changing the electrical pulse used to drive the piezoelectric element. It is shown that for the smallest 36 microns diameter orifice, cell survival rates fall from 95% to approximately 76% when the ejection velocity is increased from 2 to 16 m/s. This decrease in survival rates is less significant when the larger orifice diameters of 81 microns and 119 microns are used. Analysis shows that there is a clear inverse relationship between cell survival rates and the mean shear rates during drop formation. By using the same printing set-up, fibroblast cells are printed onto alginate and collagen into patterns. Printed cells are cultured over a period of days to verify their long-term viability. Fibroblasts printed onto the collagen are found to successfully adhere, spread and proliferate, subsequently forming a denser patterns after 5 days in culture. Cell agglomeration is found to affect the printing performance, especially for the printhead with the smallest orifice, leading to frequent clogging of the nozzle. We also study the number of cells in each droplet, when printed under optimal conditions. The probability density of this number follows a binomial distribution, which consistent with a uniform distribution of cells in the medium and within the printhead.

Er Qiang Li; Eng Khoon Tan; Sigurdur Tryggvi Thoroddsen

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

391

Synthesis, internalization, and localization of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat adrenal medulla  

SciTech Connect

Some, though not all studies, have indicated that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) can bind to adrenal medullary cells. ANP-like immunoreactivity (ANP-LI) has also been identified in catecholamine-secreting cells. Together, these findings suggest that ANP may be taken up and/or synthesized in the adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to ascertain, by in situ hybridization, whether adrenal chromaffin cells could synthesize ANP, to define by an in vivo ultrastructural autoradiographic approach, whether ANP could, in fact, bind to rat adrenal medulla cells, to determine whether there was a cellular (noradrenaline (NA) vs. adrenaline (A)) selectivity in the binding process, and to establish whether extracellular (125I)ANP could be internalized by these cells. The cellular and subcellular distribution of endogenous ANP-LI was also investigated in both cell types by cryoultramicrotomy and immunocytochemical approaches. The in situ hybridization studies indicate the presence of mRNA to ANP in about 15% of adrenal medullary cells. Intravenous injection of (125I)ANP resulted in a 3-fold, preferential and specific radiolabeling of A-as compared to NA-containing cells. In A-containing cells, plasma membranes were significantly labeled 2 and 5 min post injection; cytoplasmic matrix, mitochondria, and secretory granules throughout the time course studied (1-30 min post injection). Lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and nuclei were not labeled. ANP-LI was identified in both NA- and A-containing cells; in the former, it was almost exclusively localized in secretory vesicles, in the latter it was detected in plasma membranes, cytoplasmic matrix, nuclear euchromatin, some mitochondria and relatively fewer granules than in NA-containing cells.

Morel, G.; Chabot, J.G.; Garcia-Caballero, T.; Gossard, F.; Dihl, F.; Belles-Isles, M.; Heisler, S.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Involvement of calcium-sensing receptor in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor, which activates intracellular effectors, for example, it causes inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation to increase the release of intracellular calcium. Although intracellular calcium overload has been implicated in the cardiac ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced apoptosis, the role of CaR in the induction of apoptosis has not been fully understood. This study tested the hypothesis that CaR is involved in I/R cardiomyocyte apoptosis by increasing [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The isolated rat hearts were subjected to 40-min ischemia followed by 2 h of reperfusion, meanwhile GdCl{sub 3} was added to reperfusion solution. The expression of CaR increased at the exposure to GdCl{sub 3} during I/R. By laser confocal microscopy, it was observed that the intracellular calcium was significantly increased and exhibited a collapsed {delta}{psi} {sub m}, as monitored by 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'- tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1) during reperfusion with GdCl{sub 3}. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic cells was significantly increased as shown by TUNEL assay. Typical apoptotic cells were observed with transmission electron microscopy in I/R with GdCl{sub 3} but not in the control group. The expression of cytosolic cytochrome c and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 was significantly increased whereas the expression of mitochondrial cytochrome c significantly decreased in I/R with GdCl{sub 3} in comparison to the control. In conclusion, these results suggest that CaR is involved in the induction of cardiomyocyte apoptosis during ischemia/reperfusion through activation of cytochrome c-caspase-3 signaling pathway.

Zhang Weihua [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Fu Songbin [Department of Genetics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Bio-pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150086 (China); Lu Fanghao [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)]. E-mail: lufanghao1973@yahoo.com.cn; Wu Bo [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Gong Dongmei [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Pan, Zhen-wei [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Lv Yanjie [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Zhao Yajun [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Li Quanfeng [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Wang Rui [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Department of Biology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ont., P7B5E1 (Canada); Yang Baofeng [Department of Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Bio-pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150086 (China); Xu Changqing [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China) and Bio-pharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150086 (China)]. E-mail: xucq@163.com

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

INFLUENCE OF TUMOUR GROWTH ON THE EVOLUTION OF CYTOTOXIC LYMPHOID CELLS IN RATS BEARING A SPONTANEOUSLY METASTASIZING SYNGENEIC FIBROSARCOMA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Regional and distant lymph node cells, thoracic duct cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes from rats bearing a spontaneously metastasizing and apparently non-immunogenic sarcoma were assayed for cytotoxic activity on microcultures of tumour cells at 7, 14 and 21 days of tumour growth. In the regional lymph nodes detectable cytotoxicity was present at 7 days and the overall activity remained constant at 14 and 21 days. At Day 7 of tumour growth the cytotoxic cell population in the regional node was tumour specific in its cytotoxic effect, very radiosensitive and could not be removed by nylon wool column purification. In contrast the cells in the regional nodes at Day 21 were nonspecifically cytotoxic and could be completely removed by nylon wool treatment. In the peripheral blood, cytotoxic lymphoid cells not removed by nylon wool, were detectable at all stages of tumour growth. The thoracic duct lymph cells were, however, without cytotoxic activity throughout the period of tumour growth studied. Distant lymph node cells were assayed for cytotoxicity and it was found that they acquired significant cytocidal properties only late in tumour growth. The sera from tumour-bearing rats were tested for inhibitory

G. A. Currii; J. Gage

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Schwann cell but not olfactory ensheathing glia transplants improve hindlimb locomotor performance in the moderately contused adult rat thoracic spinal cord  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cultured adult rat Schwann cells (SCs) or olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG), or both, were transplanted in the adult Fischer rat thoracic (T9) spinal cord 1 week after a moderate contusion (10 gm, 12.5 mm, NYU impactor). Rats received either a total of 2 ? 10 6 cells suspended in culture medium or culture medium only (controls). At 12 weeks after injury, all grafted animals exhibited diminished cavitation. Although in medium-injected rats 33 % of spinal tissue within a 5-mm-long segment of cord centered at the injury site was spared, significantly more tissue was spared in SC (51%), OEG (43%), and SC/OEG (44%) grafted animals. All three types of glial grafts were filled with axons, primarily of spinal origin. SC grafts contained more myelinated axons than SC/OEG and OEG grafts. Both types of SC-containing grafts expressed more intense staining for glial fibrillary acidic protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan compared with OEG-only

Toshihiro Takami; Martin Oudega; Margaret L. Bates; Patrick M. Wood; Naomi Kleitman; Mary Bartlett Bunge

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Printed in U.S.A. Copyright 2001 by The Endocrine Society Soy Isoflavone Supplements Antagonize Reproductive Behavior and Estrogen Receptor ?- and ?-Dependent Gene Expression in the Brain*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiological evidence suggests that isoflavone phytoestrogens may reduce the risk of cancer, osteoporosis, and heart disease, effects at least partially mediated by estrogen receptors ? and ? (ER ? and ER?). Because isoflavone dietary supplements are becoming increasingly popular and are frequently advertised as natural alternatives to estrogen replacement therapy, we have examined the effects of one of these supplements on estrogen-dependent behavior and ER?- and ER?-dependent gene expression in the brain. In the adult female rat brain, 17?-estradiol treatment decreased ER ? messenger RNA signal in the paraventricular nucleus by 41%, but supplement treatment resulted in a 27 % increase. The regulation of ER ? in the paraventricular nucleus is probably via an ER?-dependent mechanism. Similarly, in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus, supplement treatment diminished the estrogen-dependent up-regulation of oxytocin receptor by 10.5%. The regulation of oxytocin receptor expression in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus is via an ER?dependent mechanism. Supplement treatment also resulted in a significant decrease in receptive behavior in estrogen- and progesterone-primed females. The observed disruption of sexual receptivity by the isoflavone supplement is probably due to antiestrogenic effects observed in the brain. These results suggest that isoflavone phytoestrogens are antiestrogenic on both ER?- and ?R?-dependent gene expression in the brain and estrogen-dependent behavior. (Endocrinology

Heather B. Patisaul; Marietta Dindo; Patricia L. Whitten; Larry J. Young

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dietary apigenin and naringenin protect against colon carcinogenesis by lowering high multiplicity aberrant crypt foci and enhancing apoptosis in azoxymethane-treated rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in the United States. However, evidence indicates that a proper diet abundant in fruits and vegetables may be protective against colon cancer development. Bioactive compounds in fruits and vegetables, such as flavonoids and limonoids, have been shown to possess anti-proliferative and antitumorigenic effects in various in vitro and in vivo models of cancer. Since there are few animal studies involving flavonoids and limonoids and colon cancer, this experiment investigated the potentially protective effects of four citrus flavonoids and one limonoid mixture against the promotion stage of chemically-induced colon cancer in rats. Male SD rats (n =60; 10 rats/group) were assigned to receive diets containing 0.1% apigenin, 0.02% naringenin, 0.1% hesperidin, 0.01% nobiletin, 0.035% limonin glucoside/obacunone glucoside mixture, or a control diet (0% flavonoid/limonoid). Rats received the diets for 10 wk and were injected with azoxymethane (15 mg/kg) at wk 3 and 4. The excised colons were evaluated for aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation, cell proliferation (PCNA assay), apoptosis (TUNEL assay), and iNOS and COX-2 expression. When compared to the control diet, apigenin lowered the number of high multiplicity ACF (> 4 AC/focus) by 57% (PACF by 51% (PACF are indicative of future tumor development in both humans and rats. Furthermore, dysregulated proliferation and apoptosis may also lead to tumorigenesis. Therefore, the ability of dietary apigenin and naringenin to reduce high multiplicity ACF, lower proliferation, and increase apoptosis may contribute toward colon cancer prevention. However, their protection is not due to their influence on iNOS and COX-2 protein levels.

Leonardi, Tety

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

On-off intermittency of thalamo-cortical oscillations in the electroencephalogram of rats with genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spike-wave discharges (SWD) are electroencephalographic hallmarks of absence epilepsy. SWD are known to originate from thalamo-cortical neuronal network that normally produce sleep spindle oscillations. Although both sleep spindles and SWD are considered as thalamo-cortical oscillations, functional relationship between them is still uncertain. The present study describes temporal dynamics of SWD and sleep spindles as determined in long-term EEG recordings in WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy. It was found that non-linear dynamics of SWD fits well to the law of 'on-off intermittency'. Typical sleep spindles that occur during slow-wave sleep (SWS) also demonstrated 'on-off intermittency' behavior, in contrast to high-voltage spindles during intermediate sleep stage, whose dynamics was uncertain. This implies that both SWS sleep spindles and SWD are controlled by a system-level mechanism that is responsible for regulating circadian activity and/or sleep-wake transitions.

Evgenia Sitnikova; Alexander E. Hramov; Alexey A. Ovchinnikov; Alexey A. Koronovskii

2013-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effects of x-irradiation on steroid biotransformations by testicular tissue. Final report, May 1, 1966--July 31, 1976. [Rats  

SciTech Connect

A number of parameters of testicular and body function were investigated after various dosages of x-irradiation to ascertain: what relationship they have to the radiation syndrome and testicular repression and regeneration of the rat; and how sensitive these parameters are to radiation. Changes in androgen synthesis were not well correlated with either body or gonad weights, hematocrit values or testicular histology. Lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, metabolism of testosterone, prostaglandins, cyclic nucleotides and serotonin metabolism were all related to the direct effects of radiation on the male gonad. Indirect effects on the testis appear to be mediated by serotonin and the pineal gland. The pineal gland appeared to be responsible for variations in androgen synthesis and radiosensitivity of the testis through its secretory products-melatonin and arginine vasopressin. These compounds have the capacity of inducing endocrine rhythms by affecting: the hypothalamus-pituitary axis; the liver; and/or the gonad directly.

Ellis, L.C.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Characterization of Solubilized Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Receptors from Rat Olfactory Bulb and A10 Cultured Smooth Muscle Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors from Al 0 cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and rat olfactory bulbs have been solubilized and then pharmacologically and biochemically compared. The dissociation constant for *% ANP(99-126) was 12.7 PM for the VSMC-derived receptor and 164 PM for the olfactory receptor. Competition binding between 1251-ANP(99-1 26) and several unlabeled ANP analogs with the soluble olfactory receptor, demonstrated a rank order potency of ANP(99-126) = ANP ( 103-l 26)>>> ANP ( 103-l 23). However, the rank order potency of the soluble VSMC ANP receptor was ANP(99-126) = ANP ( 103-l 26) = ANP ( 103-l 23). Therefore, the olfactory ANP receptor appears to require the complete COOH-terminal sequence of ANP as compared with the VSMC ANP receptor. When the 2 soluble receptor preparations were applied to a GTP-agarose

T. Ft. Gibson; A. D. Zyskind; C. C. Glembotski

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Original article Microinjection of NMDA Receptor Agents into the Central Nucleus of the Amygdale Alters Water Intake in Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objective(s) The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a forebrain structure which is important in regulation of ingestive behavior and there is direct and circumstantial evidence to indicate that some circuits involved with feeding behavior include glutamatergic elements. The present study examined whether administration of NMA (N-Methyl-DL-aspartic acid) or MK801 into the CeA altered water intake under deprivation. Materials and Methods Animals were deprived for 24 hr before tested for water intake. NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) glutamatergic receptor agonist, NMA and its antagonist, MK801 were infused bilaterally, and water intake measured for 1 hr thereafter. Results The intra-CeA injection of NMDA glutamatergic agonist, NMA (0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 g/rat) increased water intake (Pwater intake significantly (Pwater intake in this nucleus.

Jalal Solati; Ramin Hajikhani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Printed in U.S.A. Effect of Acute Ethanol on Striatal Dopamine Neurotransmission in Ambulatory Rats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of ethanol on evoked dopamine release in the caudate putamen has been measured in behaving animals with in vivo electrochemistry. Dopamine was measured with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in adult male rats to resolve the competing processes of dopamine uptake and release. Ethanol dose dependently decreased dopamine efflux compared with salinetreated animals: to 89 % of controls with 0.5 g/kg, 70 % with 1 g/kg, 34 % with 2.5 g/kg, and 18 % with 5 g/kg. This decrease was not due to a change in uptake, as measured by the rate of dopamine disappearance after stimulation, and therefore can be attributed to decreased dopamine release. Additionally, it was not mediated by a decrease in biosynthesis, as measured by L-DOPA accumulation after NSD 1015 administration. The selective dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12909 compensated

Evgeny A. Budygin; Paul E. M. Phillips; Donita L. Robinson; Andrew P. Kennedy; Raul R. Gainetdinov; R. Mark Wightman

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Block of voltage-gated potassium channels by Pacific ciguatoxin-1 contributes to increased neuronal excitability in rat sensory neurons  

SciTech Connect

The present study investigated the actions of the polyether marine toxin Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on neuronal excitability in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, bath application of 2-20 nM P-CTX-1 caused a rapid, concentration-dependent depolarization of the resting membrane potential in neurons expressing tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium (Na{sub v}) channels. This action was completely suppressed by the addition of 200 nM TTX to the external solution, indicating that this effect was mediated through TTX-sensitive Na{sub v} channels. In addition, P-CTX-1 also prolonged action potential and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) duration. In a subpopulation of neurons, P-CTX-1 also produced tonic action potential firing, an effect that was not accompanied by significant oscillation of the resting membrane potential. Conversely, in neurons expressing TTX-resistant Na{sub v} currents, P-CTX-1 failed to alter any parameter of neuronal excitability examined in this study. Under voltage-clamp conditions in rat DRG neurons, P-CTX-1 inhibited both delayed-rectifier and 'A-type' potassium currents in a dose-dependent manner, actions that occurred in the absence of alterations to the voltage dependence of activation. These actions appear to underlie the prolongation of the action potential and AHP, and contribute to repetitive firing. These data indicate that a block of potassium channels contributes to the increase in neuronal excitability, associated with a modulation of Na{sub v} channel gating, observed clinically in response to ciguatera poisoning.

Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C. [Neurotoxin Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW (Australia); Gunning, Simon J. [Neurotoxin Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW (Australia); Lewis, Richard J. [Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD (Australia); Nicholson, Graham M. [Neurotoxin Research Group, Department of Health Sciences, University of Technology, Sydney, Broadway NSW (Australia)]. E-mail: Graham.Nicholson@uts.edu.au

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies of the antiarrhythmic drug meobentine (N-(4-methoxybenzyl)-N prime , N double prime -dimethylguanidine) and its N-(4-trifluoromethyoxybenzyl)-N prime , N double prime - dimethylguanidine analogue, fluorobentine in the rat, dog and man  

SciTech Connect

A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed that was able to detect 40 pg meobentine (M) in 0.1 ml plasma. Cross-reactivity of suspected M metabolites was very low. This RIA was later also used to assay for fluorobentine (F), a fluorine analogue of M. M exhibits three-compartment open model iv kinetics in the rat, dog, and man. Terminal drug half-life in the rat, dog, and man; total-body clearance in the rat, dog, and man; and terminal-phase volume of distribution in the rat, dog, and man were determined. (14C)-M absorption is essentially complete in the rat and dog, but this parameter could not be directly ascertained in man. Relative oral drug bioavailability is linear in the rat and dog but falls off between 5-10 mg/kg in man. F was synthesized in an attempt to counteract suspected problems with M's poor absorption or extensive metabolism that might be affecting its efficacy in humans. F would likely be unavailable for O-demethylation, might well be more lipophilic than M, and yet still be active.

Warren, J.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Bath and Shower Effects in the Rat Parotid Gland Explain Increased Relative Risk of Parotid Gland Dysfunction After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess in a rat model whether adding a subtolerance dose in a region adjacent to a high-dose irradiated subvolume of the parotid gland influences its response (bath-and-shower effect). Methods and Materials: Irradiation of the whole, cranial 50%, and/or the caudal 50% of the parotid glands of Wistar rats was performed using 150-MeV protons. To determine suitable (i.e., subtolerance) dose levels for a bath-dose, both whole parotid glands were irradiated with 5 to 25 Gy. Subsequently groups of Wistar rats received 30 Gy to the caudal 50% (shower) and 0 to 10 Gy to the cranial 50% (bath) of both parotid glands. Stimulated saliva flow rate (function) was measured before and up to 240 days after irradiation. Results: Irradiation of both glands up to a dose of 10 Gy did not result in late loss of function and is thus regarded subtolerance. Addition of a dose bath of 1 to 10 Gy to a high-dose in the caudal 50% of the glands resulted in enhanced function loss. Conclusion: Similar to the spinal cord, the parotid gland demonstrates a bath and shower effect, which may explain the less-than-expected sparing of function after IMRT.

Luijk, Peter van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: p.van.luijk@rt.umcg.nl; Faber, Hette [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schippers, Jacobus M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Accelerator Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Brandenburg, Sytze [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Meertens, Harm [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agl085 THE GLYCINE REUPTAKE INHIBITOR ORG 25935 DECREASES ETHANOL INTAKE AND PREFERENCE IN MALE WISTAR RATS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Previous findings from our group indicate that accumbal glycine receptors (GlyRs) are involved in mediating the dopamine (DA) activating effects of ethanol (EtOH), and that administration of glycine locally into the nucleus accumbens (nAc) reduces EtOH consumption in EtOH high-preferring rats. Aims: The present study examines the influence of a systemically administered glycine reuptake inhibitor, Org 25935, on EtOH preference and intake, in male Wistar rats with an EtOH preference>60 % (during continuous access to a bottle of EtOH, 6 % v/v, and a bottle of water), called EP>60 rats, as well as in animals with an EtOH preference 60 and EPwater. Results: Org 25935 decreased EtOH intake and EtOH preference, as compared with vehicle, whereas water intake was unaffected. This effect was dose-dependent, developed gradually and was sustained for up to 40 days, also after introduction of an alcohol deprivation period. Conclusion: It is suggested that Org 25935, and possibly also other GlyT1 inhibitors, can represent a new pharmacological treatment principle for alcohol dependence or abuse.

Anna Molander; Helga Hifdt Lid; Elin Lf; Mia Ericson; Bo Sderpalm

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Effects of aging and exercise training on the mechanisms of Angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction in rat skeletal muscle arterioles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging is associated with increases in regional and systemic vascular resistance and impaired ability to increase blood flow to active muscles during exercise. Aging enhances vasoconstrictor responsiveness in both humans and animals, and an increase in Angiotensin II-induced vasoconstriction is one possible mechanism for old age-associated increase in muscle vascular resistance. The purpose of this study was to determine 1) whether aging alters Ang II-induced vasoconstriction, 2) whether exercise training attenuates the age-associated alteration in Ang II-mediated vasoconstriction, and 3) the mechanism(s) through which aging and exercise training alter Ang II-induced vasoconstriction in rat skeletal muscle arterioles. Male Fischer 344 rats were assigned to 4 groups: Young sedentary (YS; 4 months), old sedentary (OS; 24 months), young trained (YT) and old trained (OT). Exercise-trained groups performed treadmill exercises for 60 min/day at 15 m/min, on a 15 incline for 5 days/week for 10-12 weeks. First-order (1A) arterioles were isolated from soleus and gastrocnemius muscles for in vitro experimentation. Intraluminal diameter changes were determined in response to the cumulative addition of Ang II (310-11 - 310-5 M). Ang II dose responses were then determined following the removal of endothelium and treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10-5 M), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Ang II-induced vasoconstriction was augmented in the aged skeletal muscle arterioles, both in soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, and age-associated increases in Ang II-induced vasoconstriction were abolished with the removal of endothelium and with L-NAME. Exercise training ameliorated the age-induced increase in Ang II-vasoconstriction, and this alteration was eliminated by the removal of endothelium and with NOS inhibition. These findings suggest that aging enhances Ang II-induced vasoconstrictor responses in the arterioles from both soleus, high oxidative, and white portion of gastrocnemius, low oxidative glycolytic muscles, and this age-associated change occurs through an endothelium-dependent NOS signaling pathway. These results also demonstrated that exercise training can ameliorate the age-associated increase in Ang II vasoconstriction in the arterioles from both high oxidative and low oxidative glycolytic muscles through an endothelium-mediated NOS mechanism.

Park, Yoonjung

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Effect of angiotensin II on Ca sup 2+ kinetics and contraction in cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells  

SciTech Connect

This in vitro study was undertaken to determine the changes in Ca{sup 2+} kinetics and cell shape of cultured putative glomerular mesangial cells in the rat in response to angoitensin II (ANG II). Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ((Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}) was measured using quin 2. ANG II-stimulated {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux was also determined. ANG II induced rapid concentration-dependent increases in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} and {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux. ANG II also induced contraction of mesangial cells as assessed by alterations in cell shape. Even in Ca{sup 2+}-free medium, ANG II increased (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} and {sup 45}Ca{sub 2+} efflux, but to a lesser extent. Under this condition, contraction of mesangial cells induced by ANG II was also observed. Readdition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} and the ANG II-induced increase in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} caused a second and slower (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} increase. High potassium (50 mM) induced a change of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}, but to a lesser extent compared with the ANG II-induced change. The Ca{sup 2+} channel blocker verapamil partially inhibited ANG II-induced {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} influx but totally blocked the increase in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} induced by high potassium. Verapamil did not inhibit ANG II-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} efflux or the change in cell shape. Dantrolene (10{sup {minus}4} M), a blocker of Ca{sup 2+} release from endoplasmic reticulum, inhibited ANG II-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} efflux and change in cell shape. These results indicate that ANG II rapidly increases (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} in cultured rat mesangial cells, in part by mobilizing Ca{sup 2+} from dantrolene-sensitive intracellular pools and in part through activation of receptor-operated and voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels. The (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} mobilization, however, seems to be the primary modulator of initial glomerular mesangial cell contraction.

Takeda, Katsuji; Meyer-Lehnert, H.; Kim, J.K.; Schrier, R.W. (Univ. of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver (USA))

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Characterization of the Bone Loss and Recovery Response at the Distal Femur Metaphysis of the Adult Male Hindlimb Unloaded Rat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended periods of mechanical unloading are known to be detrimental to bone health. Astronauts who spend months in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are at particular risk. It is anticipated that NASA will not drastically increase the size of the astronaut corps, and this will mean increased likelihood of repeat missions for more astronauts. Thus, it is important to better understand the effects that prolonged, multiple bouts of unloading have on bone. This study utilized the hindlimb unloaded (HU) rat model to examine bone loss and recovery for single and double unloading bouts. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 months old) were randomized into the following groups: baseline (sacrificed at 6 months), 1HU7 (unloaded for 1 month, weight-bearing recovery for 3 months), 2HU10 (unloaded for 1 month, recovered for 2 months, unloaded for another month, and then recovered 2 months), 1HU10 (normal cage activity until 1 month HU ending at month 10, 2 month recovery followed), and aging controls (remained ambulatory throughout experiment). Every month (28 days), animals were terminated and the left femurs were excised, resulting in n=15 per group for each time point. Mineral and geometric properties were measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the distal femur metaphysis, and quasi-static reduced platen compression (RPC) was used to estimate the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. Strength indices based on pQCT parameters were calculated as predictors of mechanical properties. Bone mass properties decreased due to HU and recovered within 2-3 months post-HU. A combination of increased periosteal apposition and endocortical resorption also occurred during HU. The initial HU bout suppressed normal age-related increases in mechanical properties and recovered within 1-2 months. Cancellous compressive strength index (CSI) most closely matched changes in mechanical properties. A second HU bout after two months recovery had a less detrimental effect on pQCT parameters but a greater negative impact on mechanical properties, when compared to pre-HU values. The opposite is true for mechanical properties if loss is characterized relative to aging controls. Recovery after the second HU period did not appear to be significantly affected by a previous bout of HU.

Davis, Joshua Morgan

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels Contribute to Thromboxane A2-Induced Contraction of Rat Small Mesenteric Arteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Thromboxane A 2 (TxA 2)-induced smooth muscle contraction has been implicated in cardiovascular, renal and respiratory diseases. This contraction can be partly attributed to TxA2-induced Ca 2+ influx, which resulted in vascular contraction via Ca 2+-calmodulin-MLCK pathway. This study aims to identify the channels that mediate TxA2-induced Ca 2+ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells. Methodology/Principal Findings: Application of U-46619, a thromboxane A2 mimic, resulted in a constriction in endothelium-denuded small mesenteric artery segments. The constriction relies on the presence of extracellular Ca 2+, because removal of extracellular Ca 2+ abolished the constriction. This constriction was partially inhibited by an L-type Ca 2+ channel inhibitor nifedipine (0.51 mM). The remaining component was inhibited by L-cis-diltiazem, a selective inhibitor for CNG channels, in a dose-dependent manner. Another CNG channel blocker LY83583 [6-(phenylamino)-5,8-quinolinedione] had similar effect. In the primary cultured smooth muscle cells derived from rat aorta, application of U46619 (100 nM) induced a rise in cytosolic Ca 2+ ([Ca 2+]i), which was inhibited by L-cis-diltiazem. Immunoblot experiments confirmed the presence of CNGA2 protein in vascular smooth muscle cells. Conclusions/Significance: These data suggest a functional role of CNG channels in U-46619-induced Ca 2+ influx and contraction of smooth muscle cells.

Yuk Ki Leung; Juan Du; Yu Huang; Xiaoqiang Yao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

but Not of MMP-9, Depends on the Emergence of GAP-43 Positive Axons in the Adult Rat Cochlear Nucleus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9 and MMP-2, major modulators of the extracellular matrix (ECM), were changed in amount and distribution in the rat anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN) following its sensory deafferentation by cochlear ablation. To determine what causal relationships exist between the redistribution of MMP-9 and MMP-2 and deafferentation-induced reinnervation, kainic acid was stereotaxically injected into the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB) prior to cochlear ablation, killing cells that deliver the growth associated protein 43 (GAP-43) into AVCN. Deafferentation-induced changes in the pattern of MMP-9 staining remained unaffected by VNTB lesions. By contrast, changes in the distribution of MMP-2 normally evoked by sensory deafferentation were reversed if GAP-43 positive axons were prevented to grow in AVCN. In conclusion, GAP-43-containing axons emerging in AVCN after cochlear ablation seem to be causal for the maintenance of MMP-2-mediated ECM remodeling. 1.

Michaela Fredrich; Robert-benjamin Illing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Multiphoton spectral analysis of benzo[a]pyrene uptake and metabolism in a rat liver cell line  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic analysis of the uptake and metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites within live cells in real time has the potential to provide novel insights into genotoxic and non-genotoxic mechanisms of cellular injury caused by PAHs. The present work, combining the use of metabolite spectra generated from metabolite standards using multiphoton spectral analysis and an 'advanced unmixing process', identifies and quantifies the uptake, partitioning, and metabolite formation of one of the most important PAHs (benzo[a]pyrene, BaP) in viable cultured rat liver cells over a period of 24 h. The application of the advanced unmixing process resulted in the simultaneous identification of 8 metabolites in live cells at any single time. The accuracy of this unmixing process was verified using specific microsomal epoxide hydrolase inhibitors, glucuronidation and sulfation inhibitors as well as several mixtures of metabolite standards. Our findings prove that the two-photon microscopy imaging surpasses the conventional fluorescence imaging techniques and the unmixing process is a mathematical technique that seems applicable to the analysis of BaP metabolites in living cells especially for analysis of changes of the ultimate carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene-r-7,t-8-dihydrodiol-t-9,10-epoxide. Therefore, the combination of the two-photon acquisition with the unmixing process should provide important insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which BaP and other PAHs alter cellular homeostasis.

Barhoumi, Rola, E-mail: rmouneimne@cvm.tamu.edu [Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4458 (United States); Mouneimne, Youssef [American University of Beirut, Beirut (Lebanon); Ramos, Ernesto [Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4458 (United States); Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D. [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Safe, Stephen [Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Parrish, Alan R. [Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Missouri, Colombia, MO 65211 (United States); Burghardt, Robert C., E-mail: rburghardt@cvm.tamu.edu [Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4458 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses DE-FG02-05 ER 63947 Final Technical Report 15 May 2005 ???????????????¢???????????????????????????????? 14 May 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a complete summary of the work undertaken and results obtained under US Department of Energy grant DF-FG02-05 ER 63947, Radiation leukaemogenesis at low doses. There is ample epidemiological evidence indicating that ionizing radiation is carcinogenic in the higher dose range. This evidence, however, weakens and carries increasing uncertainties at doses below 100-200 mSv. At these low dose levels the form of the dose-response curve for radiation-induced cancer cannot be determined reliably or directly from studies of human populations. Therefore animal, cellular and other experimental systems must be employed to provide supporting evidence on which to base judgements of risk at low doses. Currently in radiological protection a linear non-threshold (LNT) extrapolation of risk estimates derived from human epidemiological studies is used to estimate risks in the dose range of interest for protection purposes. Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation (eg UNSCEAR 2006; IARC 2000). Good animal models of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) are available including strains such as CBA, RFM and SJL (eg Major and Mole 1978; Ullrich et al 1976; Resnitzky et al 1985). Early mechanistic studies using cytogenetic methods in these mouse models established that the majority of radiation-induced AMLs carried substantial interstitial deletions in one copy of chromosome (chr) 2 (eg Hayata et al 1983; Trakhtenbrot et al 1988; Breckon et al 1991; Rithidech et al 1993; Bouffler et al 1996). Chr2 aberrations are known to occur in bone marrow cells as early as 24 hours after in vivo irradiation (Bouffler et al 1997). Subsequent molecular mapping studies defined a distinct region of chr2 that is commonly lost in AMLs (Clark et al 1996; Silver et al 1999). Further, more detailed, analysis identified point mutations at a specific region of the Sfpi1/PU.1 haemopoietic transcription factor gene which lies in the commonly deleted region of chr2 (Cook et al 2004; Suraweera et al 2005). These lines of evidence strongly implicate the Sfpi1/PU.1 gene as a tumour suppressor gene, dysregulation of which leads to myeloid leukaemia. The main focus of this project was to utilize the CBA mouse model of radiation leukaemogenesis to explore mechanisms of low dose and low dose-rate leukaemogenesis. A series of mechanistic investigations were undertaken, the central aim of which was to identify the events that convert normal cells into myeloid leukaemia cells and explore the dose-response relationships for these. Much of the work centred on the Sfpi1/PU.1 gene and its role in leukaemogenesis. Specific studies considered the dose-response and time-course relationships for loss of the gene, the functional consequences of Sfpi1/PU.1 loss and mutation on transcriptional programmes and developing an in vivo reporter gene system for radiation-induced alterations to PU.1 expression. Additional work sought further genetic changes associated with radiation-induced AMLs and a better characterization of the cell of origin or 'target cell' for radiation-induced AML. All the information gathered is of potential use in developing biologically realistic mathematical models for low dose cancer risk projection.

Simon Bouffler

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2013 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Due October 10, in class, or before 5pm outside: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Due October 10, in class peripheral buildings; at peak output, the plant generates 185,000 pounds of steam each hour. It has been

Kammen, Daniel M.

414

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2011 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Due October 6. Grade by October 18. Total Points: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3 Solutions Due October 6. Grade/PP284) Fall 2011 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3

Kammen, Daniel M.

415

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power plant emissions; Peak Oil Problem Set #3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Power plant emissions; Peak Oil Problem Set #3 Due October 4, in class, or before 5pm outside 310; Peak Oil Problem Set #3 Due October 4, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Total Points: 100 of California's total oil/gas generation capacity is cogenerated? [Hint: Sort the spreadsheet by GENERAL

Kammen, Daniel M.

416

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Buildings, whole-system design, transportation Problem Set #7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-site with steam methane reforming. [45 points] a. In an ideal reaction, electrolyzing H2O into H2 and O2 requires each day for AC Transit is produced via steam methane reforming and trucked to AC Transit from off-site. The process of steam methane reforming actually involves two processes, described by the chemical reactions

Kammen, Daniel M.

417

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Environmental Justice, Renewable Energy Problem Set #6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[24 points] In this question we are going to compare the costs of generating electricity using solar energy in different parts of the United States. a. Let us consider a simple 10m2 rooftop installation of crystalline-silicon (c-Si) PV modules. Now remember that PV modules are rated to receive 1kW/m2 of solar

Kammen, Daniel M.

418

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2012 Topics: Energy & Development, Stoichiometry, Exponential Growth Models Problem Set #2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from two power plants: one which burns natural gas, and one which burns pulverized coal. [20 points. [6 points] b) What is the efficiency of a natural gas power plant that releases 480g of CO2 per k, Exponential Growth Models Problem Set #2 Due September 20, in class, or before 5pm outside 310 Barrows Total

Kammen, Daniel M.

419

doi:10.1093/alcalc/agh065, available online at www.alcalc.oupjournals.org DUAL EFFECT OF ETHANOL ON CELL DEATH IN PRIMARY CULTURE OF HUMAN AND RAT HEPATOCYTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Aims: In-vivo and in-vitro studies have shown that ethanol induces hepatocyte damage. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a broad range of ethanol concentrations on apoptosis and necrosis in primary culture of human and rat hepatocytes. Methods: Human and rat hepatocytes were isolated from human hepatectomies and male Wistar rats (200250 g) using the classical collagenase perfusion method. After stabilization of cell culture, ethanol (010 mmol/l) was administered and the parameters were measured 24 h after ethanol addition. Apoptosis was studied by DNA fragmentation, iodide propidiumDNA staining, caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding in hepatocytes. Necrosis was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and GSH/GSSG were used as parameters of oxidative stress. Results: Ethanol enhanced dose-dependently all the parameters associated with apoptosis in human and rat hepatocytes. Low or high ethanol concentrations induced an opposite action against cell necrosis in cultured hepatocytes. Low concentrations of ethanol (12 mmol/l) reduced LDH release from human and rat hepatocytes. However, the highest ethanol concentration (10 mmol/l) induced a sharp increase in cell necrosis. The effect of ethanol on cell necrosis was related to lipid peroxidation in hepatocytes. Conclusions: Ethanol differentially regulates apoptosis or necrosis in cultured hepatocytes. Although ethanol exerted a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis, low ethanol concentrations were able to reduce basal lipid peroxidation and necrosis in hepatocytes. The highest ethanol concentration (10 mmol/l) induced apoptosis and necrosis in human and rat cultured hepatocytes.

Rafael Castilla; Ral Gonzlez; Dalia Fouad; Enrique Fraga; Jordi Muntan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A SUBCHRONIC INHALATION STUDY OF FISCHER 344 RATS EXPOSED TO 0, 0.4, 1.4 OR 4.0 PPM ACROLEIN.  

SciTech Connect

Fischer 344 rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.4, 1.4, or 4.0 ppm acrolein for 62 days. The major objective of the study was to relate the results of a series of pulmonary function tests to biochemical and pathological alterations observed in the lung. Cytological and reproductive potential endpoints were also assessed after acrolein exposure. Rats were exposed to acrolein for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week for 62 days. Mortality was observed only in the 4.0 ppm chamber where 32 of 57 exposed males died; however, none of the 8 exposed females died. Most of the mortality occurred within the first 10 exposure days. Histologic examination indicated that the animals died of acute bronchopneumonia. The surviving males and females exposed to 4.0 ppm acrolein gained weight at a significantly slower rate than control animals. The growth of both sexes in the 0.4 and 1.4 ppm groups was similar to that of their respective controls. Histopathologic examination of animals after 62 days of exposure revealed bronchiolar epithelial necrosis and sloughing, bronchiolar edema with macrophages, and focal pulmonary edema in the 4.0 ppm group. These lesions were, in some cases, associated with edema of the trachea and peribronchial lymph nodes, and acute rhinitis which indicated an upper respiratory tract effect of acrolein. Of particular interest was the variability of response between