National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for raster gis ascii

  1. ascii2gdocs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-11-30

    Enables UNIX and Mac OS X command line users to put (individually or batch mode) local ascii files into Google Documents, where the ascii is converted to Google Document format using formatting the user can specify.

  2. Tidal Stream Power Web GIS Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are generated by interpolating the model results from computational grids onto an ArcGIS raster grid with 0.003 resolution and are useful for a quick visual examination.1...

  3. Convertor of MAD Programs to a Set of ASCII files to load into SYBASE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-07-12

    Used in Lattice support and maintenance; current buffer in Emacs editor is converted into a bunch of ASCII files (each for specific MAD token type). These files are in some fixed format and are ready to be loaded into the database (sysbase).

  4. ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | Data Explorer Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan Title: ARM: Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan Ka-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (KASACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; Iosif [1] ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin Bharadwaj + Show Author Affiliations (Andrei) Lindenmaier Publication Date: 2012-07-19 OSTI Identifier: 1095596 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725

  5. Linear beam raster magnet driver based on H-bridge technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinkine, Nikolai I.; Yan, Chen; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Dail, Jeffrey Glenn; Wojcik, Randolph Frank; Gunning, William

    2006-06-06

    An improved raster magnet driver for a linear particle beam is based on an H-bridge technique. Four branches of power HEXFETs form a two-by-two switch. Switching the HEXFETs in a predetermined order and at the right frequency produces a triangular current waveform. An H-bridge controller controls switching sequence and timing. The magnetic field of the coil follows the shape of the waveform and thus steers the beam using a triangular rather than a sinusoidal waveform. The system produces a raster pattern having a highly uniform raster density distribution, eliminates target heating from non-uniform raster density distributions, and produces higher levels of beam current.

  6. Parallel processor-based raster graphics system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Littlefield, Richard J.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for generating raster graphics images from the graphics command stream includes a plurality of graphics processors connected in parallel, each adapted to receive any part of the graphics command stream for processing the command stream part into pixel data. The apparatus also includes a frame buffer for mapping the pixel data to pixel locations and an interconnection network for interconnecting the graphics processors to the frame buffer. Through the interconnection network, each graphics processor may access any part of the frame buffer concurrently with another graphics processor accessing any other part of the frame buffer. The plurality of graphics processors can thereby transmit concurrently pixel data to pixel locations in the frame buffer.

  7. ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | Data Explorer W-SACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan Title: ARM: X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan X-Band Scanning ARM Cloud Radar (W-SACR) Corner Reflector Raster Scan Authors: Dan Nelson ; Joseph Hardin ; Iosif [1] ; Bradley Isom ; Karen Johnson ; Nitin Bharadwaj + Show Author Affiliations (Andrei) Lindenmaier Publication Date: 2014-03-07 OSTI Identifier: 1150295 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric

  8. GIS data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS data Home NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(137) Contributor 25 June, 2012 - 21:45 GIS keyword geospatial data GIS GIS data Explore the geospatial datasets in OpenEI's...

  9. GIS | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GIS keyword and include US and global energy data. Search solar, wind, biomass and wave energy resources. Do you have GIS data you would like to share? Please add it to OpenEI's...

  10. Open-Source GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju; Burk, Thomas E; Lime, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

  11. Development of a raster electronics system for expanding the APT proton beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapelle, S.; Hubbard, E.L.; Smith, T.L.; Schulze, M.E.; Shafer, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    A 1700 MeV, 100 mA proton linear accelerator is being designed for Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT). A beam expansion system is required to uniformly irradiate a 19 x 190 cm tritium production target. This paper describes a beam expansion system consisting of eight ferrite dipole magnets to raster the beam in the x- and y-planes and also describes the salient features of the design of the electronics that are unique to the expander. Eight Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)-based modulators drive the raster magnets with triangular current waveforms that are synchronized using phase-locked loops (PLLs) and voltage controlled crystal oscillators (VCXOs). Fault detection circuitry shuts down the beam before the target can be damaged by a failure of the raster system. Test data are presented for the prototype system.

  12. OpenEI Community - GIS

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    keyword and include US and global energy data. Search solar, wind, biomass and wave energy resources.

    Do you have GIS data you would like to share? Please add it...

  13. Raster-scanning serial protein crystallography using micro- and nano-focused synchrotron beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Brewster, Aaron S.; Kapp, Ulrike; Shilova, Anastasya; Weinhausen, Britta; Burghammer, Manfred; Colletier, Jacques -Philippe

    2015-04-25

    High-resolution structural information was obtained from lysozyme microcrystals (20 µm in the largest dimension) using raster-scanning serial protein crystallography on micro- and nano-focused beamlines at the ESRF. Data were collected at room temperature (RT) from crystals sandwiched between two silicon nitride wafers, thereby preventing their drying, while limiting background scattering and sample consumption. In order to identify crystal hits, new multi-processing and GUI-driven Python-based pre-analysis software was developed, named NanoPeakCell, that was able to read data from a variety of crystallographic image formats. Further data processing was carried out using CrystFEL, and the resultant structures were refined to 1.7 Åmore » resolution. The data demonstrate the feasibility of RT raster-scanning serial micro- and nano-protein crystallography at synchrotrons and validate it as an alternative approach for the collection of high-resolution structural data from micro-sized crystals. Advantages of the proposed approach are its thriftiness, its handling-free nature, the reduced amount of sample required, the adjustable hit rate, the high indexing rate and the minimization of background scattering.« less

  14. Module greenhouse with high efficiency of transformation of solar energy, utilizing active and passive glass optical rasters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korecko, J.; Jirka, V.; Sourek, B.; Cerveny, J.

    2010-10-15

    Since the eighties of the 20th century, various types of linear glass rasters for architectural usage have been developed in the Czech Republic made by the continuous melting technology. The development was focused on two main groups of rasters - active rasters with linear Fresnel lenses in fixed installation and with movable photo-thermal and/or photo-thermal/photo-voltaic absorbers. The second group are passive rasters based on total reflection of rays on an optical prism. During the last years we have been working on their standardization, exact measuring of their optical and thermal-technical characteristics and on creation of a final product that could be applied in solar architecture. With the project supported by the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic we were able to build an experimental greenhouse using these active and passive optical glass rasters. The project followed the growing number of technical objectives. The concept of the greenhouse consisted of interdependence construction - structural design of the greenhouse with its technological equipment securing the required temperature and humidity conditions in the interior of the greenhouse. This article aims to show the merits of the proposed scheme and presents the results of the mathematical model in the TRNSYS environment through which we could predict the future energy balance carried out similar works, thus optimizing the investment and operating costs. In this article description of various technology applications for passive and active utilization of solar radiation is presented, as well as some results of short-term and long-term experiments, including evaluation of 1-year operation of the greenhouse from the energy and interior temperature viewpoints. A comparison of the calculated energy flows in the greenhouse to real measured values, for verification of the installed model is also involved. (author)

  15. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - About GIS at NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About GIS at NREL NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team analyzes renewable energy resources and many other data sources to determine which energy technologies are viable solutions across the globe and inputs the data into a geographic information system. GIS is a computer-based system used to manipulate, manage, and analyze multidisciplinary geographic and related attribute data. The GIS system is composed of hardware, software, data, and expertise. Using a GIS system allows the user to perform

  16. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geographic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic Information System Data Background NREL's GIS Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, including biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and...

  17. 06554_GreenRiverGIS | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Last ... GIS- (Geographic Information Systems) and web-based water resource geospatial ...

  18. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Nicaragua from NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nicaragua from NREL (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy...

  19. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Cuba from NREL -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuba from NREL (Abstract): Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data intended for use in the Geospatial toolkit or with any GIS software. (Purpose): The Solar and Wind Energy...

  20. DOE GIS core team - a best practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, J.; Bhaduri, Budhendra; Bleakly, D. R.; Brady-Sabeff, Liz; Guber, Al; Guziel, K. A.; Hargrove, Susan; Lee, J.; Lee, R.; Mickus, Kurt; Morehouse, David; Moore, K.; Ramsdell, Amy; Rich, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    Large government organizations such as the Department of Energy (DOE) are challenged with identifying and implementing best geospatial information management practices to ensure that operational needs are met and government objectives are achieved. Geographic Information System (GIS) professionals, complex wide within the Department, conduct spatial information management practices on a daily basis to complete a wide variety of science and engineering tasks. The DOE Office of the CIO recognized the wealth of geospatial information management knowledge within the DOE complex and formed the DOE GIS Core Team in 2001 as a result. The team is comprised of GIS experts-representing all major DOE labs, site facilities, and programs-who volunteer their time to address issues impacting the entire complex. These include the President's management agenda (with emphasis on the Geospatial One-Stop), homeland security, emergency response, site management, software and geospatial data licensing, and federal, national, and international standards governing the creation and dissemination of geospatial data. The strength of the DOE GIS Core Team is the wide diversity of GIS and scientific expertise represented on the team, which allows it to provide the DOE CIO's office with sound guidance on complex wide issues from a GIS practitioner's perspective. The Core Team's mission is 'to foster technical excellence and communication, to identify and advocate best business practices, and to provide sound recommendations on policy and standards.' As a first step toward identifying best practices the feam conducted a survey of all known GIS assets across the DOE complex. The survey identified each site's GIS expertise, operating systems architecture and software applications, major project areas supported, and a number of other metrics important to the operation of a GIS organization. Results of the survey will be discussed, along with the mission of the Core Team. A broad overview of best practices utilized by many of the leading GIS organizations across the complex will also be provided.

  1. A 200-A, 500-Hz, triangle current-wave modulator and magnet used for particle beam rastering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, C.R.; Shafer, R.E.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a simple 2D beam-rastering system to uniformly spread a 100-mA 6.7-MeV cw proton beam over a 50-cm by 50-cm beam stop. The basic circuit uses a 20-mF capacitor bank, a IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) full-wave inverter, and a 1-mH ferrite dipole magnet to produce a {+-} 500-Gauss peak triangular-waveform deflection field at 500 Hz. A dc input voltage of 200 volts at 2.6 amps (520 watts) produces a 160-ampere peak-to-peak triangular current waveform in the ferrite magnet at 500 Hz. For dual-axis rastering, two ferrite dipoles are used, one at 500 Hz, and the other at 575 Hz, to produce a uniform 2D beam distribution at the beam stop. The paper will discuss the IGBT modulator and ferrite deflector in detail, including current and voltage waveforms, and the ferrite magnet B-dot (dB/dt) signal.

  2. CyberGIS software: a synthetic review and integration roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shaowen; Anselin, Luc; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Cosby, Christopher; Goodchild, Michael; Liu, Yan; Nygers, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    CyberGIS defined as cyberinfrastructure-based geographic information systems (GIS) has emerged as a new generation of GIS representing an important research direction for both cyberinfrastructure and geographic information science. This study introduces a 5-year effort funded by the US National Science Foundation to advance the science and applications of CyberGIS, particularly for enabling the analysis of big spatial data, computationally intensive spatial analysis and modeling (SAM), and collaborative geospatial problem-solving and decision-making, simultaneously conducted by a large number of users. Several fundamental research questions are raised and addressed while a set of CyberGIS challenges and opportunities are identified from scientific perspectives. The study reviews several key CyberGIS software tools that are used to elucidate a vision and roadmap for CyberGIS software research. The roadmap focuses on software integration and synthesis of cyberinfrastructure, GIS, and SAM by defining several key integration dimensions and strategies. CyberGIS, based on this holistic integration roadmap, exhibits the following key characteristics: high-performance and scalable, open and distributed, collaborative, service-oriented, user-centric, and community-driven. As a major result of the roadmap, two key CyberGIS modalities gateway and toolkit combined with a community-driven and participatory approach have laid a solid foundation to achieve scientific breakthroughs across many geospatial communities that would be otherwise impossible.

  3. Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Download Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF SWERA UNEP atmospheric water v... solar Additional Info Field Value Source www.nrel.gov Author National Renewable...

  4. Web Mapping and Online GIS Applications for Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Web Mapping and Online GIS Applications for Renewable Energy AgencyCompany Organization:...

  5. NREL GIS Data: Bhutan High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NREL GIS Data: Bhutan High Resolution Wind Resource This shapefile containing 50 meter height data has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However,...

  6. eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration PDF icon eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration More Documents & Publications PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant

  7. GIS Framework for Large River Geomorphic Classification to Aid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2296 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 GIS Framework for Large River Geomorphic Classification to Aid in the Evaluation of Flow-Ecology ...

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Dynamic Maps, Geographic Information System (GIS) Data and Analysis Tools website provides maps, data and tools for renewable energy resources that determine which energy technologies are viable solutions in domestic and international regions. MapSearch - While this site contains detailed information and quality data, if you want to search for the latest and most up-to-date maps created by NREL, please visit our MapSearch: http://www.nrel.gov/gis/mapsearch/ Renewable Energy Technical

  9. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Data Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share Data Resources NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, as well as targeted analysis tools that can help determine availability of renewable energy resources. Geographic Information System Data NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops technology-specific GIS data maps for a variety of areas, including biomass, geothermal, solar, wind, and renewable hydrogen. The team has made some of our datasets available for

  10. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geospatial Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Data Science Team The following are members of NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team: Jon Duckworth Michael Gleason Nick Grue Pamela Gray-Hann Donna Heimiller Dylan Hettinger Jim Leyshon Anthony Lopez Galen Maclaurin Meghan Mooney Billy J. Roberts If you have questions about our programs or would like to contact our staff, please email Webmaster. Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources

  11. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster To contact the Webmaster, please provide your name, e-mail address, and message below. When you are finished, click "Send Message." NOTE: If you enter your e-mail address incorrectly, we will be unable to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version NREL GIS Home About NREL GIS Renewable Energy Technical Potential Renewable Energy Economic Potential Maps Data Resources Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools Geospatial Data Science Team

  12. 06554_GreenRiverGIS | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Last Reviewed 6/26/2013 DE-NT0006554 Goal The goal of this project is to develop a GIS- (Geographic Information Systems) and web-based water resource geospatial infrastructure, which contains the basin baseline datasets for surface and groundwater, customized analytical toolsets, and user interfaces (UIs). The water resource geospatial infrastructure will provide water management solutions that will facilitate

  13. GSG-GIS development program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.C.

    1992-10-15

    For the past 40 years, the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been subjected to numerous geological and geotechnical investigations in support of facility construction and waste site development and remediation. Over this period,.a variety of different subcontractors have collected large quantities of geoscience data. In addition, current programs involve numerous investigators from different departments, and consequently, earth science data and interpretations are scattered among the departments, investigators, and subcontractors at SRS. As a result, scientific and management decisions cannot take advantage of the significant body of information that exists at SRS. Recent DOE Orders (Systematic Evaluation Program, 1991) have put specific requirements on their contractors to compile geological databases to coordinate DOE site data gathering and interpretations, and to assist in compiling safety analysis reports. The Earth Science Advisory Committee and the Environmental Advisory Committee have also made specific recommendations on the management of SRS geoscience data. This plan describes a management system to identify, communicate, and compile SRS geological (including geohydrologic), seismological, and geotechnical (656) data and interpretations on a Geographic Information System (GIS).

  14. Evaluating the Potential of Commercial GIS for Accelerator Configuration Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.L. Larrieu; Y.R. Roblin; K. White; R. Slominski

    2005-10-10

    The Geographic Information System (GIS) is a tool used by industries needing to track information about spatially distributed assets. A water utility, for example, must know not only the precise location of each pipe and pump, but also the respective pressure rating and flow rate of each. In many ways, an accelerator such as CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) can be viewed as an ''electron utility''. Whereas the water utility uses pipes and pumps, the ''electron utility'' uses magnets and RF cavities. At Jefferson lab we are exploring the possibility of implementing ESRI's ArcGIS as the framework for building an all-encompassing accelerator configuration database that integrates location, configuration, maintenance, and connectivity details of all hardware and software. The possibilities of doing so are intriguing. From the GIS, software such as the model server could always extract the most-up-to-date layout information maintained by the Survey & Alignment for lattice modeling. The Mechanical Engineering department could use ArcGIS tools to generate CAD drawings of machine segments from the same database. Ultimately, the greatest benefit of the GIS implementation could be to liberate operators and engineers from the limitations of the current system-by-system view of machine configuration and allow a more integrated regional approach. The commercial GIS package provides a rich set of tools for database-connectivity, versioning, distributed editing, importing and exporting, and graphical analysis and querying, and therefore obviates the need for much custom development. However, formidable challenges to implementation exist and these challenges are not only technical and manpower issues, but also organizational ones. The GIS approach would crosscut organizational boundaries and require departments, which heretofore have had free reign to manage their own data, to cede some control and agree to a centralized framework.

  15. Development of a GIS Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, Frederick C.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Crandall, Duard W.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2004-08-12

    With residential areas moving closer to military training sites, the effects upon the environment and neighboring civilians due to dust generated by training exercises has become a growing concern. Under a project supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense, a custom application named DUSTRAN is currently under development that integrates a system of EPA atmospheric dispersion models with the ArcGIS application environment in order to simulate the dust dispersion generated by a planned training maneuver. This integration between modeling system and GIS application allows for the use of real world geospatial data such as terrain, land-use, and domain size as input by the modeling system. Output generated by the modeling system, such as concentration and deposition plumes, can then be displayed upon accurate maps representing the training site. This paper discusses the development of this integration between modeling system and Arc GIS application.

  16. Application of GIS in siting of linear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, G.A. III; Heatwole, D.W.; Schmidt, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) are powerful tools in the analysis and selection of environmentally acceptable corridors for linear facilities, such as roads and utility lines. GIS can serve several functions in corridor siting, including managing and manipulating extensive environmental databases, weighting and compositing data layers to enable spatial analysis for a path of least resistance,'' summarizing statistics for a comparison of alternative corridors, preparing color graphics for presentations and reports, and providing a record of alternative analysis for permitting reviews and legal challenges. In this paper, the authors examine the benefits and limitations of using GIS to site linear facilities, based mainly on their experience in siting a 600-mile natural gas pipeline in Florida. They implemented a phased analytical approach to define acceptable corridors several miles in width and then selected viable routes within the corridors using a magnified scale. This approach resulted in a dynamic siting process which required numerous iterations of analysis. Consequently, their experience has instilled the benefits derived by expending preliminary effort to create macros of the GIS analytical process so that subsequent effort is minimized during numerous iterations of corridor and route refinement.

  17. Web Mapping and Online GIS Applications for Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation at the May 26, 2010, TAP Webinar presented by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program Technical Assistance Project for state and local officials by National Renewable Energy Laboratory GIS Applications Developers Ted Quinby and Dan Getman.

  18. Lower granite GIS data description and collection guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Evans, B.J.; Perry, E.M.

    1995-12-01

    The Lower Granite Geographic Information System (GIS) was developed jointly by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) Walla Walla District and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of the project is to use GIS technology to analyze impacts of the drawdown mitigation option on the physical and biological environment of the Lower Granite Reservoir. The drawdown mitigation option is based on the hypothesis that faster juvenile salmon travel to the ocean would result in higher juvenile survival and greater smolt-to-adult return ratios; to accomplish this, reservoir elevations would be lowered to increase channel velocities. Altering the elevation of the reservoirs on the Snake River is expected to have a variety of impacts to the Physical environment including changes to water velocity, temperature, dissolved gases, and turbidity. The GIS was developed to evaluate these changes and the resulting impacts on the anadromous and resident fish of the Snake River, as well as other aquatic organisms and terrestrial wildlife residing in the adjacent riparian areas. The Lower Granite GIS was developed using commercial hardware and software and is supported by a commercial relational database. Much of the initial system development involved collecting and incorporating data describing the river channel characteristics, hydrologic properties, and aquatic ecology. Potentially meaningful data for the Lower Granite GIS were identified and an extensive data search was performed. Data were obtained from scientists who are analyzing the habitats, limnology, and hydrology of the Snake River. The next six sections of this document describe the bathymetry, fish abundance, substrate, sediment chemistry, and channel hydrology data.

  19. How can I open .ASC files contained in the following linkhttp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .ASC file format is also compatible with most common GIS software, such as ESRI ArcGIS or Quantum GIS (QGIS). The data will be added to the GIS interface as a raster layer....

  20. GIS applications to evaluate public health effects of global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regens, J.L.; Hodges, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    Modeling projections of future climatic conditions suggest changes in temperature and precipitation patterns that might induce direct adverse effects on human health by altering the extent and severity of infectious and vector-borne diseases. The incidence of mosquito-borne diseases, for example, could increase substantially in areas where temperature and relative humidity rise. The application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offers new methodologies to evaluate the impact of global warming on changes in the incidence of infectious and vector-borne diseases. This research illustrates the potential analytical and communication uses of GIS for monitoring historical patterns of climate and human health variables and for projecting changes in these health variables with global warming.

  1. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Maps These maps illustrate the biomass resources generated in the United States by county. Biomass feedstock data are analyzed both statistically and graphically using a geographic information system (GIS). The following feedstock categories are evaluated: crop residues, forest residues, primary and secondary mill residues, urban wood waste, and methane emissions from animal manure, landfills, wastewater treatment, and industrial, institutional, and commercial organic waste (e.g. food

  2. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Hydrogen Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Maps Below are some examples of how geographic information system (GIS) modeling is used in hydrogen infrastructure, demand, market and resource analyses. The JPG images are samples of the maps available in the following PDFs. Refer to the report for further information. Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Map of U.S. Hydrogen Infrastructure Demand - Consumer Strategy U.S. Hydrogen Infrastructure Demand - Consumer Strategy (JPG 129

  3. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Potential Technical Potential Figure 1: Defining 'Potential' Image of a triangle divided into sections called Market, Economic, Technical, and Resource that include the key assumptions for each section on a bullet list beside it. Enlarge image Renewable energy technical potential as defined in this report: U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis (PDF 2.7 MB) represents the achievable energy generation of a particular technology given system performance,

  4. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Wind Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional Resources Wind Prospector A web-based GIS applications designed to support resource assessment and data exploration associated with wind development. Wind Maps NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team offers both a national wind resource assessment of the United States and high-resolution wind data. The national wind resource assessment was created for the U.S. Department of Energy in 1986 by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and is documented in the Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard J. Herzog

    2004-03-01

    The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

  6. JeoViewer: Object-Oriented GIS Framework | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JeoViewer: Object-Oriented GIS Framework JeoViewer: Object-Oriented GIS Framework JeoViewer is an intelligent, object-oriented geographical information system (GIS) framework written in Java. It can provide links to any object's data and behaviors, and is optimized for spatial geometry representation. Unlike traditional "static" GIS systems, JeoViewer is dynamic and can be dynamically linked to objects, models and other live data streams. JeoViewer's object-oriented approach provides a

  7. The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PDF icon The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems More Documents & Publications CX-002853: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geospatial Technology Summit The Bioenergy ...

  8. A GIS approach to cultural resources management and NEPA compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, K.

    1996-06-01

    Cultural resources management and historic preservation compliance are best approached within the broader framework of natural resources planning and land management. Argonne National Laboratory is currently assisting federal agencies with the development of computer- based resource management systems for large facilities, and cultural resources management and preservation are components of these systems. In the area of cultural resources, Argonne is using the GIS tool to demonstrate how federal facilities can manage large, complex databases, integrate cultural resource data with other environmental variables, model distributions of resources to aid in inventory and evaluation, link the data to quantitative and impact modes, and effectively manage and monitor resource planning activities and environmental compliance.

  9. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - International Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Maps Below are some examples of how geographic information system (GIS) modeling is used in international resource analyses. The JPG images are samples of the maps available. Refer to the Geospatial Toolkits for further information. Map of the Republic of the Philippines Wind Speed at 100m Map of Republic of the Philippines Wind Power Density at 80m Map of Flat Plate Tilted at Latitude Resource of China Map of Republic of the Philippines Wind Speed at 100m JPG 6,336 KB Map of

  10. GIS-BASED PREDICTION OF HURRICANE FLOOD INUNDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID; KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY; BERSCHEID, ALAN

    2007-01-17

    A simulation environment is being developed for the prediction and analysis of the inundation consequences for infrastructure systems from extreme flood events. This decision support architecture includes a GIS-based environment for model input development, simulation integration tools for meteorological, hydrologic, and infrastructure system models and damage assessment tools for infrastructure systems. The GIS-based environment processes digital elevation models (30-m from the USGS), land use/cover (30-m NLCD), stream networks from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and soils data from the NRCS (STATSGO) to create stream network, subbasins, and cross-section shapefiles for drainage basins selected for analysis. Rainfall predictions are made by a numerical weather model and ingested in gridded format into the simulation environment. Runoff hydrographs are estimated using Green-Ampt infiltration excess runoff prediction and a 1D diffusive wave overland flow routing approach. The hydrographs are fed into the stream network and integrated in a dynamic wave routing module using the EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to predict flood depth. The flood depths are then transformed into inundation maps and exported for damage assessment. Hydrologic/hydraulic results are presented for Tropical Storm Allison.

  11. Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M.

    2008-07-08

    A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS). Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

  12. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S

    2001-05-22

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the center-point of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  13. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-02-07

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the centerpoint of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  14. U.S. Regional Demand Forecasts Using NEMS and GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-07-01

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a multi-sector, integrated model of the U.S. energy system put out by the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. NEMS is used to produce the annual 20-year forecast of U.S. energy use aggregated to the nine-region census division level. The research objective was to disaggregate this regional energy forecast to the county level for select forecast years, for use in a more detailed and accurate regional analysis of energy usage across the U.S. The process of disaggregation using a geographic information system (GIS) was researched and a model was created utilizing available population forecasts and climate zone data. The model's primary purpose was to generate an energy demand forecast with greater spatial resolution than what is currently produced by NEMS, and to produce a flexible model that can be used repeatedly as an add-on to NEMS in which detailed analysis can be executed exogenously with results fed back into the NEMS data flow. The methods developed were then applied to the study data to obtain residential and commercial electricity demand forecasts. The model was subjected to comparative and statistical testing to assess predictive accuracy. Forecasts using this model were robust and accurate in slow-growing, temperate regions such as the Midwest and Mountain regions. Interestingly, however, the model performed with less accuracy in the Pacific and Northwest regions of the country where population growth was more active. In the future more refined methods will be necessary to improve the accuracy of these forecasts. The disaggregation method was written into a flexible tool within the ArcGIS environment which enables the user to output the results in five year intervals over the period 2000-2025. In addition, the outputs of this tool were used to develop a time-series simulation showing the temporal changes in electricity forecasts in terms of absolute, per capita, and density of demand.

  15. Intelligent Object-Oriented GIS Engine W/dynamic Coupling to Modeled Objects

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-02-12

    The GEOVIEWER is an intelligent object-oriented Geographic Information System (GIS) engine that provides not only a spatially-optimized object representation, but also direct linkage to the underlying object, its data and behaviors. Tools are incorporated to perform tasks involving typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, linkage to external models, and integration with other application frameworks. The GOEVIEWER module was designed to provide GIS functionality to create, query, view, and manipulate software objects within a selected area undermore » investigation in a simulation system. Many of these objects are not stored in a format conductive to efficient GIS usage. Their dynamic nature, complexity, and the sheer number of possible entity classes preclude effective integration with traditional GIS technologies due to the loosely coupled nature of their data representations. The primary difference between GEOVIEWER and standard GIS packages is that standard GIS packages offer static views of geospatial data while GEOVIEWER can be dynamically coupled to models and/or applications producing data and, therefore, display changes in geometry, attributes or behavior as they occur in the simulation.« less

  16. Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

    2009-12-31

    In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

  17. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A...

  18. Integrating GIS with Distributed Applications Using Dynamic Data-Sharing Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, Robert A. ); Tzemos, Spyridon ); Stoops, LaMar R. )

    2002-08-21

    Effective integration of a stand-alone GIS (e.g., ArcView 3.x) into a complex distributed software application requires an efficient, reliable mechanism for passing data and function requests to and from the GIS component. This paper describes the use of dynamic data-sharing and inter-process communication mechanisms to integrate GIS capability into a multi-jurisdictional distributed emergency management information system. These mechanisms include dynamic layer updates from spatial and attribute information shared via a distributed relational database across multiple sites; storage of private and shared ViewMarks to facilitate consistent GIS views; and asynchronous inter-process communication using function queuing and a data sharing library.

  19. Geographic Information System (GIS) Emergency Support for the May 2000 Cerro Grande Wildfire, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.R.Mynard; G.N.Keating; P.M.Rich; D.R. Bleakly

    2003-05-01

    In May 2000 the Cerro Grande wildfire swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, burning approximately 17,400 ha (43,000 acres) and causing evacuation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the communities of Los Alamos and White Rock. An integral part of emergency response during the fire was the use of geographic information system (GIS) technology, which continues to be used in support of post-fire restoration and environmental monitoring. During the fire Laboratory GIS staff and volunteers from other organizations worked to produce maps and provide support for emergency managers, including at an emergency GIS facility in Santa Fe. Subsequent to the fire, Laboratory GIS teams supported the multiagency Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) team to provide GIS data and maps for planning mitigation efforts. The GIS teams continue to help researchers, operations personnel, and managers deal with the tremendous changes caused by the fire. Much of the work is under the auspices of the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project (CGRP) to promote recovery from fire damage, improve information exchange, enhance emergency management, and conduct mitigation activities. GIS efforts during the fire provided important lessons about institutional matters, working relationships, and emergency preparedness. These lessons include the importance of (1) an integrated framework for assessing natural and human hazards in a landscape context; (2) a strong GIS capability for emergency response; (3) coordinated emergency plans for GIS operations; (4) a method for employees to report their whereabouts and receive authoritative information during an evacuation; (5) GIS data that are complete, backed-up, and available during an emergency; (6) adaptation of GIS to the circumstances of the emergency; (7) better coordination in the GIS community; (8) better integration of GIS into LANL operations; and (9) a central data warehouse for data and metadata. These lessons are important for planning future directions of GIS at LANL. Growing maturity of GIS is expected to lead to standardization and a better-integrated, more-coordinated approach to data sharing and emergency management at LANL, and within DOE, in accord with the federal government's increasing focus on electronic communication for its organizational and public interactions.

  20. Geographic information system (G.I.S.) research project at Navajo Community College - Shiprock Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazzie, R.; Peter, C.; Aaspas, B.; Isely, D.; Grey, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Navajo and Hopi GIS Project was established to assess the feasibility and impact of implementing GIS techology at Tribal institutions. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories funded the Navajo and Hopi Geographic Information System (G.I.S.) Project and assigned a mentor from LANL to help guide the project for three summer months of 1995. The six organizations involved were: LANL, LLNL, Navajo Community College, Navajo Nation Land Office, Northern Arizona University and San Juan College. The Navajo Land Office provided the system software, hardware and training. Northern Arizona University selected two students to work at Hopi Water Resource Department. Navajo Community College provided two students and two faculty members. San Juan College provided one student to work with the N.C.C. group. This made up two project teams which led to two project sites. The project sites are the Water Resource Department on the Hopi reservation and Navajo Community College in Shiprock, New Mexico.

  1. Use of ArcGIS in Environmental Monitoring at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    oertel; giles

    2007-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy site located in southeastern Idaho. The INL is required to perform environmental monitoring of anthropogenically introduced contaminants. One primary contaminant of interest is radioactive Cs-137 which is resident in INL soils due to past operational activities and atmospheric weapons testing. Collection of field data is performed using vehicle mounted and portable radiation detector units. All data is combined in ArcGIS and displayed over georeferenced satellite images and digital elevation models. The use of the ArcGIS geostatistical analysis package enhances the ability to look for areas of higher Cs-137 concentration. Combining current monitoring results with meteorological wind pattern maps allows for siting of new and improved monitoring locations. Use of the ArcGIS package provides an integrated analysis and mapping protocol for use in radioactive contaminant monitoring.

  2. GIS solutions for ecosystem management in developing countries: A case study of Sao Tome and Principe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, L.; Barrasso, T.; Pinto da Costa, H.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to promote awareness of the application of the Geographic information system (GIS) technology to the management of ecosystems in developing countries. The adoptation of systematic environmental research and management techniques by national and local conservation programs helps ensure the sustainability of important biological resources.

  3. RE Atlas: The U.S. Atlas of Renewable Resources (Interactive Map, GIS Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This interactive data map allows a user to explore the locations across the U.S. of many different basic, renewable energy resources. The many layers can be activated one at a time or in multiple combinations and the GIS display draws from a rich combination of data collections.

  4. Coastal water quality from remote sensing and GIS. A case study on South West Sardinia (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poli, U.; Ippoliti, M.; Venturini, C.; Falcone, P.; Marino, A.

    1997-08-01

    In this paper the application of remote sensing image processing and GIS techniques in monitoring and managing coastal areas is proposed. The methodology has been applied to South-West Sardinia Coast where the environment is endangered by industrial plants and other human activities. The area is characterized by the presence of many submarine springs aligned along coastal cliffs. Water quality parameters (chlorophyll, suspended sediments and temperature) spatial and temporal variations, have been studied using Landsat TM images. Particularly, in this paper are reported the results referred to sea surface thermal gradients, considered as one of the main water quality index. Thermal gradients have been mapped in order to outline water circulation, thermal pollution and presence and distribution of submarine springs. Furthermore, a GIS approach of relating mono and multitemporal TM data with ground referenced information on industrial plants characteristics and distribution has been applied.

  5. The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

    2005-10-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

  6. GIS-technologies for integrated assessment of the productive mining areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamaraev, R.Y.; Oparin, V.N.; Popov, S.E.; Potapov, V.P.; Pyastunovich,O.L.

    2008-05-15

    The paper describes the bases of a new application of GIS-technologies for integrated assessment and comparison of the productive mining areas, involving a wide range of mining and technological factors, considering mineral properties, mineral occurrence conditions and geographical advantages of a mineral deposit location. The model capabilities are exemplified by a comparison of technological characteristics of coals, transportation and power supply infrastructure of the productive mining areas at the Kuznetsk Coal Basin.

  7. Monitoring landscape response to climate change using remote sensing and GIS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhas, R.H.; Dolan, P.H.; Goetz, A.F.H. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Increasing concern over the threat of global warming has precipitated the need for study sites which can be scientifically monitored to detect and follow the effects of environmental landscape change. Extensive eolian dune deposits in northeastern Colorado provide an ideal study site. These dune complexes, found along the South Platte River, are currently stabilized by a thin cover of shortgrass prairie vegetation. However, stratigraphic evidence demonstrates that during at least four times in the past 10,000 years, the dunes were actively migrating across the landscape. In addition, climate models indicate that the High Plains could be one of the first areas to react to climate changes when they occur. The scaling relationships that contribute to the evolution of the landscape are nearly impossible to understand without the regional perspective that remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) techniques provide. Imagery acquired with the NASA/JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is processed to detect the amount of sand exposed, as well as the percent vegetation cover that is currently stabilizing the dunes. Excellent discrimination is found between areas of low and no vegetation, something not possible with traditional analysis methods. Seasonal changes are also emphasized. This information is incorporated into the GIS database the authors created, which also has information on parameters that influence the landscape: elevation, soil type, surface/subsurface hydrology, etc. With these data areas that are susceptible to climate change are highlighted, but more importantly, the reasons for the susceptibility are determined using the GIS's analytical capabilities.

  8. Potential Release Site Sediment Concentrations Correlated to Storm Water Station Runoff through GIS Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.T. McLean

    2005-06-01

    This research examined the relationship between sediment sample data taken at Potential Release Sites (PRSs) and storm water samples taken at selected sites in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The PRSs had been evaluated for erosion potential and a matrix scoring system implemented. It was assumed that there would be a stronger relationship between the high erosion PRSs and the storm water samples. To establish the relationship, the research was broken into two areas. The first area was raster-based modeling, and the second area was data analysis utilizing the raster based modeling results and the sediment and storm water sample results. Two geodatabases were created utilizing raster modeling functions and the Arc Hydro program. The geodatabase created using only Arc Hydro functions contains very fine catchment drainage areas in association with the geometric network and can be used for future contaminant tracking. The second geodatabase contains sub-watersheds for all storm water stations used in the study along with a geometric network. The second area of the study focused on data analysis. The analytical sediment data table was joined to the PRSs spatial data in ArcMap. All PRSs and PRSs with high erosion potential were joined separately to create two datasets for each of 14 analytes. Only the PRSs above the background value were retained. The storm water station spatial data were joined to the table of analyte values that were either greater than the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) benchmark value, or the Department of Energy (DOE) Drinking Water Defined Contribution Guideline (DWDCG). Only the storm water stations were retained that had sample values greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Separate maps were created for each analyte showing the sub-watersheds, the PRSs over background, and the storm water stations greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Tables were then created for each analyte that listed the PRSs average value by storm water station allowing a tabular view of the mapped data. The final table that was created listed the number of high erosion PRSs and regular PRSs over background values that were contained in each watershed. An overall relationship between the high erosion PRSs or the regular PRSs and the storm water stations was not identified through the methods used in this research. However, the Arc Hydro data models created for this analysis were used to track possible sources of contamination found through sampling at the storm water gaging stations. This geometric network tracing was used to identify possible relationships between the storm water stations and the PRSs. The methods outlined for the geometric network tracing could be used to find other relationships between the sites. A cursory statistical analysis was performed which could be expanded and applied to the data sets generated during this research to establish a broader relationship between the PRSs and storm water stations.

  9. An open source GIS tool to quantify the visual impact of wind turbines and photovoltaic panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minelli, Annalisa; Marchesini, Ivan; Taylor, Faith E.; De Rosa, Pierluigi; Casagrande, Luca; Cenci, Michele

    2014-11-15

    Although there are clear economic and environmental incentives for producing energy from solar and wind power, there can be local opposition to their installation due to their impact upon the landscape. To date, no international guidelines exist to guide quantitative visual impact assessment of these facilities, making the planning process somewhat subjective. In this paper we demonstrate the development of a method and an Open Source GIS tool to quantitatively assess the visual impact of these facilities using line-of-site techniques. The methods here build upon previous studies by (i) more accurately representing the shape of energy producing facilities, (ii) taking into account the distortion of the perceived shape and size of facilities caused by the location of the observer, (iii) calculating the possible obscuring of facilities caused by terrain morphology and (iv) allowing the combination of various facilities to more accurately represent the landscape. The tool has been applied to real and synthetic case studies and compared to recently published results from other models, and demonstrates an improvement in accuracy of the calculated visual impact of facilities. The tool is named r.wind.sun and is freely available from GRASS GIS AddOns. - Highlights: • We develop a tool to quantify wind turbine and photovoltaic panel visual impact. • The tool is freely available to download and edit as a module of GRASS GIS. • The tool takes into account visual distortion of the shape and size of objects. • The accuracy of calculation of visual impact is improved over previous methods.

  10. Emerging Technologies in the Built Environment: Geographic Information Science (GIS), 3D Printing, and Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract 1: Geographic information systems emerged as a computer application in the late 1960s, led in part by projects at ORNL. The concept of a GIS has shifted through time in response to new applications and new technologies, and is now part of a much larger world of geospatial technology. This presentation discusses the relationship of GIS and estimating hourly and seasonal energy consumption profiles in the building sector at spatial scales down to the individual parcel. The method combines annual building energy simulations for city-specific prototypical buildings and commonly available geospatial data in a GIS framework. Abstract 2: This presentation focuses on 3D printing technologies and how they have rapidly evolved over the past couple of years. At a basic level, 3D printing produces physical models quickly and easily from 3D CAD, BIM (Building Information Models), and other digital data. Many AEC firms have adopted 3D printing as part of commercial building design development and project delivery. This presentation includes an overview of 3D printing, discusses its current use in building design, and talks about its future in relation to the HVAC industry. Abstract 3: This presentation discusses additive manufacturing and how it is revolutionizing the design of commercial and residential facilities. Additive manufacturing utilizes a broad range of direct manufacturing technologies, including electron beam melting, ultrasonic, extrusion, and laser metal deposition for rapid prototyping. While there is some overlap with the 3D printing talk, this presentation focuses on the materials aspect of additive manufacturing and also some of the more advanced technologies involved with rapid prototyping. These technologies include design of carbon fiber composites, lightweight metals processing, transient field processing, and more.

  11. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - MapSearch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share MapSearch MapSearch Logo is a computer monitor with a magnifying glass suspended in the air before it. Use our MapSearch to easily search our collection of maps created by the Geospatial Data Science Team. Please use the search box and the filters on the left of the screen to limit results. June 2013 - The NREL GIS team released a new version of the Mapsearch tool. This new version should eliminate some of the browser issues experienced with the previous tool. This latest

  12. Development of analytic intermodal freight networks for use within a GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southworth, F.; Xiong, D.; Middendorf, D.

    1997-05-01

    The paper discusses the practical issues involved in constructing intermodal freight networks that can be used within GIS platforms to support inter-regional freight routing and subsequent (for example, commodity flow) analysis. The procedures described can be used to create freight-routable and traffic flowable interstate and intermodal networks using some combination of highway, rail, water and air freight transportation. Keys to realistic freight routing are the identification of intermodal transfer locations and associated terminal functions, a proper handling of carrier-owned and operated sub-networks within each of the primary modes of transport, and the ability to model the types of carrier services being offered.

  13. The application of GIS and remote sensing technologies for site characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, R.C.; McCord, R.A.; Dobson, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Environmental cleanup and restoration of hazardous waste sites are major activities at federal facilities around the US. Geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies are very useful computer tools to aid in site characterization, monitoring, assessment, and remediation efforts. Results from applying three technologies are presented to demonstrate examples of site characterization and environmental assessment for a federal facility. The first technology involves the development and use of GIS within the comprehensive Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) to integrate facility data, terrain models, aerial and satellite imagery, demographics, waste area information, and geographic data bases. The second technology presents 3-D subsurface analyses and displays of groundwater and contaminant measurements within waste areas. In the third application, aerial survey information is being used to characterize land cover and vegetative patterns, detect change, and study areas of previous waste activities and possible transport pathways. These computer technologies are required to manage, analyze, and display the large amounts of environmental and geographic data that must be handled in carrying out effective environmental restoration.

  14. The application of GIS and remote sensing technologies for site characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, R.C.; McCord, R.A.; Dobson, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental cleanup and restoration of hazardous waste sites are major activities at federal facilities around the US. Geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing technologies are very useful computer tools to aid in site characterization, monitoring, assessment, and remediation efforts. Results from applying three technologies are presented to demonstrate examples of site characterization and environmental assessment for a federal facility. The first technology involves the development and use of GIS within the comprehensive Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (OREIS) to integrate facility data, terrain models, aerial and satellite imagery, demographics, waste area information, and geographic data bases. The second technology presents 3-D subsurface analyses and displays of groundwater and contaminant measurements within waste areas. In the third application, aerial survey information is being used to characterize land cover and vegetative patterns, detect change, and study areas of previous waste activities and possible transport pathways. These computer technologies are required to manage, analyze, and display the large amounts of environmental and geographic data that must be handled in carrying out effective environmental restoration.

  15. CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY TOOL (CMT): A GIS-BASED AUTOMATED EXTRACTION MODEL FOR CHANNEL GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID; KALYANAPU, ALFRED; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY; BERSCHEID, ALAN

    2007-01-17

    This paper describes an automated Channel Morphology Tool (CMT) developed in ArcGIS 9.1 environment. The CMT creates cross-sections along a stream centerline and uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to create station points with elevations along each of the cross-sections. The generated cross-sections may then be exported into a hydraulic model. Along with the rapid cross-section generation the CMT also eliminates any cross-section overlaps that might occur due to the sinuosity of the channels using the Cross-section Overlap Correction Algorithm (COCoA). The CMT was tested by extracting cross-sections from a 5-m DEM for a 50-km channel length in Houston, Texas. The extracted cross-sections were compared directly with surveyed cross-sections in terms of the cross-section area. Results indicated that the CMT-generated cross-sections satisfactorily matched the surveyed data.

  16. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  17. GIS-and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle; Mattson, Earl

    2012-09-30

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) was awarded a grant by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a research project en- titled GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development in October of 2008. The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a water resource geo-spatial infrastructure that serves as “baseline data” for creating solutions on water resource management and for supporting decisions making on oil shale resource development. The project came to the end on September 30, 2012. This final project report will report the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research. At meantime, the gamma version (also known as Version 4.0) of the geodatabase as well as other various deliverables stored on digital storage media will be send to the program manager at NETL, DOE via express mail. The key findings from the project activity include the quantitative spatial and temporal distribution of the water resource throughout the Piceance Basin, water consumption with respect to oil shale production, and data gaps identified. Major accomplishments of this project include the creation of a relational geodatabase, automated data processing scripts (Matlab) for database link with surface water and geological model, ArcGIS Model for hydrogeologic data processing for groundwater model input, a 3D geological model, surface water/groundwater models, energy resource development systems model, as well as a web-based geo-spatial infrastructure for data exploration, visualization and dissemination. This research will have broad impacts of the devel- opment of the oil shale resources in the US. The geodatabase provides a “baseline” data for fur- ther study of the oil shale development and identification of further data collection needs. The 3D geological model provides better understanding through data interpolation and visualization techniques of the Piceance Basin structure spatial distribution of the oil shale resources. The sur- face water/groundwater models quantify the water shortage and better understanding the spatial distribution of the available water resources. The energy resource development systems model reveals the phase shift of water usage and the oil shale production, which will facilitate better planning for oil shale development. Detailed descriptions about the key findings from the project activity, major accomplishments, and expected impacts of the research will be given in the sec- tion of “ACCOMPLISHMENTS, RESULTS, AND DISCUSSION” of this report.

  18. Applying GIS characterizing and modeling contaminant transport in surface water at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M.; Van Eeckhout, E.; David, N.A.; Irvine, J.M.

    1995-10-01

    During World War II, Los Alamos, New Mexico was chosen as the site for the secret development of the first atomic bomb. The remote location in the southwestern United States was ideal for such a project. After the war, research activities continued at the Los Alamos installation, focusing on new nuclear weapons models as well as greater effectiveness and reliability of existing weapons. Due to the emphasis on nuclear and non-nuclear weapons development as well as associated nuclear research, a large inventory of radionuclides and heavy metals have been tested, expended, and disposed of in the local environment, a high plateau of tuffaceous volcanic rocks incised by deep canyons in a semi-arid climate. In recent years an intensive evaluation of the environmental, impact of weapons testing at Los Alamos and elsewhere has been undertaken. GIS system utilization and image processing of past and current data has been an important part of this evaluation. Important problems can be more easily displayed and understood using this methodology. The main objective in this paper is to illustrate how transport of depleted uranium and associated heavy metals (copper in this case) used in dynamic testing of weapons components at open air firing sites can be evaluated and visualized. In our studies, surface water has been found to be the predominant transport mechanism. We have sampled soils, sediments, fallout, runoff water and snowmelt over a number of years in order to understand contaminant transport on- and offsite. Statistical analyses of these data have assisted in our characterization of issues such as contaminant variability, spatially and temporally, as well as in development of transport rates.

  19. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yaxing; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  20. Evaluation of Open Geospatial Consortium Standards fur Use In LLNL Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R; Chubb, K; Schek, J

    2005-09-28

    The objective of this project is to evaluate existing and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards for use in LLNL programs that rely heavily on geographic data. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to avoid duplication of effort, lower development costs, and encourage competition based on improved capability and performance rather than vendor lock-in. Some of these standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, DOE and DHS. A serious evaluation of this technology is appropriate at this time due to increasing interest and mandated compliance in the Federal government in some situations. A subset of OGC standards is identified and reviewed with a focus on applications to LLNL programs. Each standard or recommendation reviewed was evaluated in general terms. In addition, for specific programs such as Gen&SIS and NARAC, a specific evaluation was made of several of the standards and how they could be used most effectively. It is also important to evaluate the acceptance of these standards in the commercial arena. The implementation of OGC standards by the largest GIS vendor (ESRI) was reviewed. At present, OGC standards are primary useful in specific situations. More generally, many of the standards are immature and their impact on the government and commercial sectors is unclear. Consequently, OGC and related developments need to be observed. As specific standards or groups of standards mature and establish their relevance, these can also be incorporated in LLNL programs as requirements dictate, especially if open implementations and commercial products are available.

  1. Web-GIS oriented systems viability for municipal solid waste selective collection optimization in developed and transient economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rada, E.C.; Ragazzi, M.; Fedrizzi, P.

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? As an appropriate solution for MSW management in developed and transient countries. ? As an option to increase the efficiency of MSW selective collection. ? As an opportunity to integrate MSW management needs and services inventories. ? As a tool to develop Urban Mining actions. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste management is a multidisciplinary activity that includes generation, source separation, storage, collection, transfer and transport, processing and recovery, and, last but not least, disposal. The optimization of waste collection, through source separation, is compulsory where a landfill based management must be overcome. In this paper, a few aspects related to the implementation of a Web-GIS based system are analyzed. This approach is critically analyzed referring to the experience of two Italian case studies and two additional extra-European case studies. The first case is one of the best examples of selective collection optimization in Italy. The obtained efficiency is very high: 80% of waste is source separated for recycling purposes. In the second reference case, the local administration is going to be faced with the optimization of waste collection through Web-GIS oriented technologies for the first time. The starting scenario is far from an optimized management of municipal solid waste. The last two case studies concern pilot experiences in China and Malaysia. Each step of the Web-GIS oriented strategy is comparatively discussed referring to typical scenarios of developed and transient economies. The main result is that transient economies are ready to move toward Web oriented tools for MSW management, but this opportunity is not yet well exploited in the sector.

  2. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  3. Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharifi, Mozafar Hadidi, Mosslem Vessali, Elahe Mosstafakhani, Parasto Taheri, Kamal Shahoie, Saber Khodamoradpour, Mehran

    2009-10-15

    The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

  4. Radiological Survey Tool Set for ArcGIS 8.3 and ArcPad 6.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROGER, COTTRELL

    2004-11-30

    The Radiological Control Operations (RCO) group at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is tasked with conducting routine surveys for the detection of radiological contaminants in the environment. The Radiological Survey Tool Set (RSTS) was developed by the Environmental & Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) group of SRS to assist RCO personnel in this survey process. The tool set consists of two major components. The first component is a custom extension for ArcGIS 8.3 that allows the user to interactively create a sampling plan prior to entering the field. Additionally, the extension allows the user to upload field-collected data to the GIS with post-processing functionality. The second component is a custom ArcPad 6.0 applet. This applet provides the user with navigational capabilities to a selected origin point with the help of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) technology, and the recording of the sample data results into a hand-held field computer via ArcPad 6.0 software.

  5. Speckle averaging system for laser raster-scan image projection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiszauer, D.H.; Hackel, L.A.

    1998-03-17

    The viewers` perception of laser speckle in a laser-scanned image projection system is modified or eliminated by the addition of an optical deflection system that effectively presents a new speckle realization at each point on the viewing screen to each viewer for every scan across the field. The speckle averaging is accomplished without introduction of spurious imaging artifacts. 5 figs.

  6. Speckle averaging system for laser raster-scan image projection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tiszauer, Detlev H.; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1998-03-17

    The viewers' perception of laser speckle in a laser-scanned image projection system is modified or eliminated by the addition of an optical deflection system that effectively presents a new speckle realization at each point on the viewing screen to each viewer for every scan across the field. The speckle averaging is accomplished without introduction of spurious imaging artifacts.

  7. Macroalgae Analysis A National GIS-based Analysis of Macroalgae Production Potential Summary Report and Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roesijadi, Guritno; Coleman, Andre M.; Judd, Chaeli; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Thom, Ronald M.; Buenau, Kate E.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-12-01

    The overall project objective is to conduct a strategic analysis to assess the state of macroalgae as a feedstock for biofuels production. The objective in FY11 is to develop a multi-year systematic national assessment to evaluate the U.S. potential for macroalgae production using a GIS-based assessment tool and biophysical growth model developed as part of these activities. The initial model development for both resource assessment and constraints was completed and applied to the demonstration areas. The model for macroalgal growth was extended to the EEZ off the East and West Coasts of the United States, and a plan to merge the findings for an initial composite assessment was developed. In parallel, an assessment of land-based, port, and offshore infrastructure needs based on published and grey literature was conducted. Major information gaps and challenges encountered during this analysis were identified. Also conducted was an analysis of the type of local, state, and federal requirements that pertain to permitting land-based facilities and nearshore/offshore culture operations

  8. Structural Analysis for Gold Mineralization Using Remote Sensing and Geochemical Techniques in a GIS Environment: Island of Lesvos, Hellas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokos, D. Argialas, D. Mavrantza, R. St Seymour, K.; Vamvoukakis, C.; Kouli, M.; Lamera, S.; Paraskevas, H.; Karfakis, I.; Denes, G

    2000-12-15

    Exploration for epithermal Au has been active lately in the Aegean Sea of the eastern Mediterranean Basin, both in the islands of the Quaternary arc and in those of the back-arc region. The purpose of this study was the structural mapping and analysis for a preliminary investigation of possible epithermal gold mineralization, using remotely sensed data and techniques, structural and field data, and geochemical information, for a specific area on the Island of Lesvos. Therefore, Landsat-TM and SPOT-Pan satellite images and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the study area were processed digitally using spatial filtering techniques for the enhancement and recognition of the geologically significant lineaments, as well as algebraic operations with band ratios and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), for the identification of alteration zones. Statistical rose diagrams and a SCHMIDT projection Stereo Net were generated from the lineament maps and the collected field data (dip and strike measurements of faults, joints, and veins), respectively. The derived lineament map and the band ratio images were manipulated in a GIS environment, in order to study the relation of the tectonic pattern to both the alteration zoning and the geomorphology of the volcanic field of the study area. Target areas of high interest for possible mineralization also were specified using geochemical techniques, such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, trace-element, and fluid-inclusion analysis. Finally, preliminary conclusions were derived about possible mineralization, the type (high or low sulfidation), and the extent of mineralization, by combining the structural information with geochemical information.

  9. GIS-based Geospatial Infrastructure of Water Resource Assessment for Supporting Oil Shale Development in Piceance Basin of Northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Wei; Minnick, Matthew D; Mattson, Earl D; Geza, Mengistu; Murray, Kyle E.

    2015-04-01

    Oil shale deposits of the Green River Formation (GRF) in Northwestern Colorado, Southwestern Wyoming, and Northeastern Utah may become one of the first oil shale deposits to be developed in the U.S. because of their richness, accessibility, and extensive prior characterization. Oil shale is an organic-rich fine-grained sedimentary rock that contains significant amounts of kerogen from which liquid hydrocarbons can be produced. Water is needed to retort or extract oil shale at an approximate rate of three volumes of water for every volume of oil produced. Concerns have been raised over the demand and availability of water to produce oil shale, particularly in semiarid regions where water consumption must be limited and optimized to meet demands from other sectors. The economic benefit of oil shale development in this region may have tradeoffs within the local and regional environment. Due to these potential environmental impacts of oil shale development, water usage issues need to be further studied. A basin-wide baseline for oil shale and water resource data is the foundation of the study. This paper focuses on the design and construction of a centralized geospatial infrastructure for managing a large amount of oil shale and water resource related baseline data, and for setting up the frameworks for analytical and numerical models including but not limited to three-dimensional (3D) geologic, energy resource development systems, and surface water models. Such a centralized geospatial infrastructure made it possible to directly generate model inputs from the same database and to indirectly couple the different models through inputs/outputs. Thus ensures consistency of analyses conducted by researchers from different institutions, and help decision makers to balance water budget based on the spatial distribution of the oil shale and water resources, and the spatial variations of geologic, topographic, and hydrogeological Characterization of the basin. This endeavor encountered many technical challenging and hasn't been done in the past for any oil shale basin. The database built during this study remains valuable for any other future studies involving oil shale and water resource management in the Piceance Basin. The methodology applied in the development of the GIS based Geospatial Infrastructure can be readily adapted for other professionals to develop database structure for other similar basins.

  10. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  11. Application of satellite and GIS technologies for land-cover and land-use mapping at the rural-urban fringe - A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treitz, P.M.; Howarth, P.J.; Gong, Peng )

    1992-04-01

    SPOT HRV multispectral and panchromatic data were recorded and coregistered for a portion of the rural-urban fringe of Toronto, Canada. A two-stage digital analysis algorithm incorporating a spectral-class frequency-based contextual classification of eight land-cover and land-use classes resulted in an overall Kappa coefficient of 82.2 percent for training-area data and a Kappa coefficient of 70.3 percent for test-area data. A matrix-overlay analysis was then performed within the geographic information system (GIS) to combine the land-cover and land-use classes generated from the SPOT digital classification with zoning information for the area. The map that was produced has an estimated interpretation accuracy of 78 percent. Global Positioning System (GPS) data provided a positional reference for new road networks. These networks, in addition to the new land-cover and land-use map derived from the SPOT HRV data, provide an up-to-date synthesis of change conditions in the area. 51 refs.

  12. A GIS COST MODEL TO ASSESS THE AVAILABILITY OF FRESHWATER, SEAWATER, AND SALINE GROUNDWATER FOR ALGAL BIOFUEL PRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Coleman, Andre M.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2013-03-15

    A key advantage of using microalgae for biofuel production is the ability of some algal strains to thrive in waters unsuitable for conventional crop irrigation such as saline groundwater or seawater. Nonetheless, the availability of sustainable water supplies will provide significant challenges for scale-up and development of algal biofuels. We conduct a limited techno-economic assessment based on the availability of freshwater, saline groundwater, and seawater for use in open pond algae cultivation systems. We explore water issues through GIS-based models of algae biofuel production, freshwater supply, and cost models for supplying seawater and saline groundwater. We estimate that combined, within the coterminous US these resources can support production on the order of 9.46E+7 m3 yr-1 (25 billion gallons yr-1) of renewable biodiesel. Achievement of larger targets requires the utilization of less water efficient sites and relatively expensive saline waters. Geographically, water availability is most favorable for the coast of the Gulf of Mexico and Florida peninsula, where evaporation relative to precipitation is moderate and various saline waters are economically available. As a whole, barren and scrub lands of the southwestern US have limited freshwater supplies so accurate assessment of alternative waters is critical.

  13. GIS-Based Infrastructure Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by NREL's Keith Parks at the 2010 - 2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting on August 9 - 10, 2006 in Washington, D.C.

  14. eGIS_Portal-PIA_WEB.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    cover_booked.indd cover_booked.indd PDF icon cover_booked.indd More Documents & Publications Three Year Rolling Timeline Order Module--DOE O 430.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT The Department of Energy Asset Management Plan (2015)

    Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Ultrasonic Acoustic Deterrent for Reducing Bat Fatalities at Wind Turbines Edward B. Arnett 1 * ¤ , Cris D. Hein 1 , Michael R. Schirmacher 1 , Manuela M. P. Huso 2 , Joseph M. Szewczak 3 1 Bat Conservation International,

  15. GIS keyword | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Open government map data initiatives in the USA or Canada? IRENA launches global atlas of renewable energy potential more Group members (8) Managers: NickL Recent members:...

  16. GIS Method for Developing Wind Supply Curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.; Heimiller, D.; Cowlin, S.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes work conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as part of the Wind Technology Partnership (WTP) sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This project has developed methods that the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) intends to use in the planning and development of China's 30 GW of planned capacity. Because of China's influence within the community of developing countries, the methods and the approaches here may help foster wind development in other countries.

  17. Developing shape analysis tools to assist complex spatial decision making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackey, H.E.; Ehler, G.B.; Cowen, D.

    1996-05-31

    The objective of this research was to develop and implement a shape identification measure within a geographic information system, specifically one that incorporates analytical modeling for site location planning. The application that was developed incorporated a location model within a raster-based GIS, which helped address critical performance issues for the decision support system. Binary matrices, which approximate the object`s geometrical form, are passed over the grided data structure and allow identification of irregular and regularly shaped objects. Lastly, the issue of shape rotation is addressed and is resolved by constructing unique matrices corresponding to the object`s orientation

  18. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W. ); Daniels, R.C. )

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude [times] 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  19. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude {times} 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  20. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal Prospector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting data layers that are NGDS compatible. Bookmark and Share Geothermal Prospector The Geothermal Prospector mapping tool provides an excellent data resource for visual exploration of geothermal resources using the tools and datasets required to produce and disseminate both exploration gap analysis and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) planning and analysis. In 2010, NREL developed Geothermal

  1. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Hydrogen Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass Geospatial Toolkits Geothermal Hydrogen International Marine & Hydrokinetic Solar Wind Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools Geospatial Team Publications Contact Us...

  2. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  3. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinet...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy...

  4. Recommendation 225: Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORSSAB recommends that DOE include future actions planned in fact sheets that are on the DOE Geographical Information System.

  5. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting dataset layers that are NGDS compatible. Bookmark and Share Geothermal Data...

  6. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Biomass Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Biomass Data These datasets represent the biomass resources available in the United States by...

  7. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Federal Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Program (FEMP) Maps Federal Energy Management Program The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) teamed with Geospatial Analysis staff at NREL to update the analysis for this project and created an interactive FEMP Screening Map application. The previous maps have been archived. If you have a need for one of the archived maps, please contact the Webmaster. This new application examines the viability of three solar technologies in the United States with a high-level annualized

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Geothermal Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geothermal Prospector Start exploring U.S. geothermal resources with an easy-to-use map by selecting dataset layers that are NGDS compatible. Bookmark and Share Geothermal Maps These maps show existing and developing geothermal power plants, geothermal resource potential estimates, and other information related to geothermal power. They are updated as information becomes available, but may not represent all available geothermal data. Resource Potential The geothermal resource potential map (JPG

  9. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark and Share Maps NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team develops maps for various renewable resources and for specific projects. As a benefit to the public, a majority of static maps are offered and Google Map (KML/KMZ) files on a tool called MapSearch. Biomass Maps Maps showing the biomass resources available in the United States by county. Feedstock categories include crop residues; forest residues; primary and secondary mill residues; urban wood waste; and methane emissions from manure

  10. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Click anywhere on the document title to see a summary or click on the PDF icon to see full text. PDF 3.5 MB Cassard, H.; Denholm, P.; Ong, S. (2011). Break-Even Cost for Residential Solar Water Heating in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities. 54 pp.; NREL Report No. TP-6A20-48986. PDF 5.6 MB Dahle, D.; Elliott, D.; Heimiller, D.; Mehos, M.; Robichaud, R.; Schwartz, M.; Stafford,

  11. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Renewable Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Potential Economic Potential Types of Renewable Generation Potential An image of a overlapping circles labelled Resource, Technical, Economic, and Market Potential that include the key assumptions for each segment on a bullet list inside it. Enlarge image The report Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for

  12. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MapSearch Searching for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Solar Maps Solar maps provide monthly average daily total solar resource information on grid cells. The insolation values represent the resource available to a flat plate collector, such as a photovoltaic panel, oriented due south at an angle from horizontal to equal to the latitude of the collector location. This is typical practice for PV system installation, although other orientations are

  13. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - International...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bhutan.htm Central America Wind 50m Resolution (includes Belize, Cayman Islands, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua (Zip 2.4 MB) 02192009 Central America.htm Chile...

  14. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Data 10-Kilometer This data provides monthly average and annual average daily total solar resource averaged over surface cells of 0.1 degrees in both latitude and longitude,...

  15. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for Oaxaca from NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show good potential for renewable energy projects. The toolkit displays renewable energy data along with information about the geography, location of population centers,...

  16. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit GIS data for India from NREL ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show good potential for renewable energy projects. The toolkit displays renewable energy data along with information about the geography, location of population centers,...

  17. Placing power linres : GIS helps site energy corridors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J. A.; Cantwell, B.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Moore, H. R.

    2011-08-01

    Turn the lights on when you enter a room, then turn the lights off when you leave. Most of us repeat this sequence many times each day, and never give it another thought. But that seemingly simple light switch on the wall connects us to one of the most complex systems in the world: the electrical grid. Most of the United States is served by a highly reliable and adequate supply of electrical power, which is distributed through a grid of thousands of miles of electricity-transmission lines. However, as the electricity-supply infrastructure ages and consumer demand for electricity grows, the capacity to deliver electrical power hasn't kept pace with demand, and upgrading the electrical-transmission grid has become a more pressing need. From 1988-1998, demand for transmission grew by 30 percent while transmission grew by only 15 percent. From 1999-2009, demand grew by 20 percent and transmission by only 3 percent Despite a short-term decline related to the economic downturn and improved efficiency, U.S. energy consumption is expected to increase by 14 percent between 2008 and 2035. This growth will drive the need to develop viable routes for new transmission lines. Because transmission lines extend over large distances, they typically cross many federal, tribal, state, local and private land jurisdictions, each with a complex and varying set of siting issues and land-management practices. And as the existing grid needs improvement to meet growing demand, the U.S. is rapidly developing renewable energy sources, particularly solar and wind energy, often in areas far removed from existing electricity-transmission infrastructure and energy-consumption areas.

  18. Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System (GIS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages environmental records from Cold War legacy sites spanning nearly 40 years. These records are a key LM asset and must be...

  19. Transmission/Resource Library/GIS Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wildlife connectivity areas in Montana. The aim of the mapping system is to consider fish, wildlife, and recreational resources earlier on when planning for future development....

  20. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Wind Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resource data at various hub heights and spatial resolutions for both land-based and offshore data including the data used in the maps located at the WINDExchange and U.S. DOE...

  1. eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power Administration | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Adminstration Ethics Helpline Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...

  2. The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond October 20, 2009 The RERF program is not a typical research program since it aims at fostering the health and welfare of the atomic-bomb survivors. A unique nurse's perspective on the RERF and the health of the A-bomb survivors is presented by Dr. Amy Knowles. PDF icon The Road to Hiroshima and Beyond More Documents & Publications Report of the Senior Review Panel on the Review of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

  3. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Tuscarora—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Detailed unit descriptions of stratigraphic units. - Five cross‐sections. - Locations of production, injection, and monitor wells. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  4. Evaluation of OGC Standards for Use in LLNL GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, H; Chou, R M; Chubb, K K; Schek, J L

    2006-06-23

    Over the summer of 2005, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Computer Applications and Research Department conducted a small project that examined whether Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards might be useful in meeting program mission requirements more effectively. OGC standards are intended to facilitate interoperability between geospatial processing systems to lower development costs and to avoid duplication of effort and vendor lock-in. Some OGC standards appear to be gaining traction in the geospatial data community, the Federal government, Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and so an evaluation was deemed appropriate.

  5. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Wabuska Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinz, Nick

    2013-09-30

    Wabuska—ESRI geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - One cross‐section.

  6. Geologic Map and GIS Data for the Patua Geothermal Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-10-31

    Patua—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, veins, dikes, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units. - Locations of geothermal wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar and tephra samples.

  7. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used ...

  8. Integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems for Great Lakes water quality monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lathrop, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The utility of three operational satellite remote sensing systems, namely, the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the SPOT High Resolution Visible (HRV) sensors and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), were evaluated as a means of estimating water quality and surface temperature. Empirical calibration through linear regression techniques was used to relate near-simultaneously acquired satellite radiance/reflectance data and water quality observations obtained in Green Bay and the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan. Four dates of TM and one date each of SPOT and AVHRR imagery/surface reference data were acquired and analyzed. Highly significant relationships were identified between the TM and SPOT data and secchi disk depth, nephelometric turbidity, chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS), absorbance, and surface temperature (TM only). The AVHRR data were not analyzed independently but were used for comparison with the TM data. Calibrated water quality image maps were input to a PC-based raster GIS package, EPPL7. Pattern interpretation and spatial analysis techniques were used to document the circulation dynamics and model mixing processes in Green Bay. A GIS facilitates the retrieval, query and spatial analysis of mapped information and provides the framework for an integrated operational monitoring system for the Great Lakes.

  9. A coastal hazards data base for the U.S. West Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M. |; Beaty, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1997-12-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US West Coast that are at risk to sea-level rise. This data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US West Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data bases. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data variables from the following seven data sets: elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. One variable from each data set was classified according to its susceptibility to sea-level rise and/or erosion to form 7 relative risk variables. These risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a Coastal Vulnerability Index (CVI). Algorithms used to calculate several CVIs are listed within this text.

  10. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Solar Maps Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Maps Development - How the Maps Were Made 10km The State University of New York/Albany satellite radiation model was developed by Richard Perez and collaborators at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and other universities for the U.S. Department of Energy. Specific information about this model can be found in Perez, et al. (2002). This model uses hourly radiance images from geostationary weather satellites, daily snow cover data, and monthly averages of atmospheric water vapor,

  11. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials. A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Anthony; Roberts, Billy; Heimiller, Donna; Blair, Nate; Porro, Gian

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  12. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Roberts, B.; Heimiller, D.; Blair, N.; Porro, G.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents the state-level results of a spatial analysis effort calculating energy technical potential, reported in square kilometers of available land, megawatts of capacity, and gigawatt-hours of generation, for six different renewable technologies. For this analysis, the system specific power density (or equivalent), efficiency (capacity factor), and land-use constraints were identified for each technology using independent research, published research, and professional contacts. This report also presents technical potential findings from previous reports.

  13. Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting...

  14. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  15. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Data Visualization &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Tools MapSearch Searching for maps has never been easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Bookmark and Share Data Visualization & Geospatial Tools NREL's Geospatial Data Science Team has developed tools that allow users to apply these data. These tools help determine things such as how much electricity can be produced from solar systems on a house or what renewable resources are available in a specific areas. Please visit http://maps.nrel.gov/ for the most

  16. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maps Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. There is significant opportunity for water power to provide large amounts of clean and renewable power. The Water Power Program is invested significantly in comprehensive analysis of ocean energy potential for future

  17. http://water.usgs.gov/GIS/metadata/usgswrd/XML/nv_dtw750nv_l...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Susan G. Buto Originator: Sienna Smith-Sager PublicationDate: 2006 Title: ... Reference Cited Lopes, T.J., Buto, S.G., Smith, J.L., and Welborn, T.L., 2006, Water-table ...

  18. Renewable Energy Deployment in Colorado and the West: A Modeling Sensitivity and GIS Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ‹ See All Petrolem Reports Renewable Energy Annual With Data for 2009 | Release Date: January 30, 2012 | Next Release Date: Discontinued | full report Previous Renewable Energy Annual Reports Year (PDF): 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Data Tables Renewable Energy Trends Consumption 1.1 U.S. energy consumption by energy source, 2005 - 2009 1.2 Renewable energy consumption by energy-use sector and energy source, 2005 - 2009 1.3 Renewable energy

  19. Integrating multisource imagery and GIS analysis for mapping Bermuda`s benthic habitats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierros, M.K.

    1997-06-01

    Bermuda is a group of isolated oceanic situated in the northwest Atlantic Ocean and surrounded by the Sargasso Sea. Bermuda possesses the northernmost coral reefs and mangroves in the Atlantic Ocean, and because of its high population density, both the terrestrial and marine environments are under intense human pressure. Although a long record of scientific research exists, this study is the first attempt to comprehensively map the area`s benthic habitats, despite the need for such a map for resource assessment and management purposes. Multi-source and multi-date imagery were used for producing the habitat map due to lack of a complete up-to-date image. Classifications were performed with SPOT data, and the results verified from recent aerial photography and current aerial video, along with extensive ground truthing. Stratification of the image into regions prior to classification reduced the confusing effects of varying water depth. Classification accuracy in shallow areas was increased by derivation of a texture pseudo-channel, while bathymetry was used as a classification tool in deeper areas, where local patterns of zonation were well known. Because of seasonal variation in extent of seagrasses, a classification scheme based on density could not be used. Instead, a set of classes based on the seagrass area`s exposure to the open ocean were developed. The resulting habitat map is currently being assessed for accuracy with promising preliminary results, indicating its usefulness as a basis for future resource assessment studies.

  20. Improving Rangeland Monitoring and Assessment: Integrating Remote Sensing, GIS, and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Paul Breckenridge

    2007-05-01

    Creeping environmental changes are impacting some of the largest remaining intact parcels of sagebrush steppe ecosystems in the western United States, creating major problems for land managers. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), located in southeastern Idaho, is part of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, one of the largest ecosystems on the continent. Scientists at the INL and the University of Idaho have integrated existing field and remotely sensed data with geographic information systems technology to analyze how recent fires on the INL have influenced the current distribution of terrestrial vegetation. Three vegetation mapping and classification systems were used to evaluate the changes in vegetation caused by fires between 1994 and 2003. Approximately 24% of the sagebrush steppe community on the INL was altered by fire, mostly over a 5-year period. There were notable differences between methods, especially for juniper woodland and grasslands. The Anderson system (Anderson et al. 1996) was superior for representing the landscape because it includes playa/bare ground/disturbed area and sagebrush steppe on lava as vegetation categories. This study found that assessing existing data sets is useful for quantifying fire impacts and should be helpful in future fire and land use planning. The evaluation identified that data from remote sensing technologies is not currently of sufficient quality to assess the percentage of cover. To fill this need, an approach was designed using both helicopter and fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and image processing software to evaluate six cover types on field plots located on the INL. The helicopter UAV provided the best system compared against field sampling, but is more dangerous and has spatial coverage limitations. It was reasonably accurate for dead shrubs and was very good in assessing percentage of bare ground, litter and grasses; accuracy for litter and shrubs is questionable. The fixed wing system proved to be feasible and can collect imagery for very large areas in a short period of time. It was accurate for bare ground and grasses. Both UAV systems have limitations, but these will be reduced as the technology advances. In both cases, the UAV systems collected data at a much faster rate than possible on the ground. The study concluded that improvements in automating the image processing efforts would greatly improve use of the technology. In the near future, UAV technology may revolutionize rangeland monitoring in the same way Global Positioning Systems have affected navigation while conducting field activities.

  1. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) routinely estimates the technical potential of specific renewable electricity generation technologies. These are technology-specific estimates of energy generation potential based on renewable resource availability and quality, technical system performance, topographic limitations, environmental, and land-use constraints only. The estimates do not consider (in most cases) economic or market constraints, and therefore do not represent a level of renewable generation that might actually be deployed. Technical potential estimates for six different renewable energy technologies were calculated by NREL, and methods and results for several other renewable technologies from previously published reports are also presented.

  2. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    Shapefiles and spreadsheets of structural data, including attitudes of faults and strata and slip orientations of faults. - Detailed geologic mapping of ~30 km2 was completed in the vicinity of the Columbus Marsh geothermal field to obtain critical structural data that would elucidate the structural controls of this field. - Documenting E‐ to ENE‐striking left lateral faults and N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults. - Some faults cut Quaternary basalts. - This field appears to occupy a displacement transfer zone near the eastern end of a system of left‐lateral faults. ENE‐striking sinistral faults diffuse into a system of N‐ to NNE‐striking normal faults within the displacement transfer zone. - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  3. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross‐sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill‐hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics.

  4. Geologic Map of the Neal Hot Springs Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-03-31

    Neal Hot Springs—ESRI Geodatabase (ArcGeology v1.3): - Contains all the geologic map data, including faults, contacts, folds, unit polygons, and attitudes of strata and faults. - List of stratigraphic units and stratigraphic correlation diagram. - Three cross‐sections. - Locations of production, injection, and exploration wells. - Locations of 40Ar/39Ar samples. - Location of XRF geochemical samples. - 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross‐sections, drill‐hole data, and geophysics (model not in the ESRI geodatabase).

  5. U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Offshore Wind Port Readiness U.S. Offshore Wind Port Readiness Report that reviews the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and assesses the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support as much as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind by 2030. PDF icon Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States.pdf More Documents & Publications Wind Offshore Port Readiness Assessment of Vessel Requirements for

  6. Geologic Map and Cross Sections of the McGinness Hills Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Geologic map data in shapefile format that includes faults, unit contacts, unit polygons, attitudes of strata and faults, and surficial geothermal features. 5 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format. Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. 3D model constructed with EarthVision using geologic map data, cross?sections, drill?hole data, and geophysics.

  7. Structural Data for the Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area - GIS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2011-12-31

    - Columbus Marsh therefore corresponds to an area of enhanced extension and contains a nexus of fault intersections, both conducive for geothermal activity.

  8. RAVEGRID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RAVEGRID RAVEGRID RaveGrid (Raster to vector Graphics for image data) version 2.5* is an image vectorization and image segmentation application that takes your raster images and...

  9. MHK ISDB/Instruments/Nortek Signature 1000/500 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Notes, Considerations & Recommendations Data conversion to ASCII and MatLab format. Call for quote and additional information. User Experience No user experiences...

  10. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Submit electronic comments in WordPerfect, Microsoft Word, portable data format (PDF), or American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) file format, and avoid the use ...

  11. Rainfall Manipulation Plot Study (RaMPS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Blair, John [Kansas State University; Fay, Phillip [USDA-ARS; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University; Collins, Scott [University of New Mexico; Smith, Melinda [Yale University

    Data sets are available as ASCII files, in Excel spreadsheets, and in SAS format. (Taken from http://www.konza.ksu.edu/ramps/backgrnd.html

  12. Monthly Energy Review - October 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    October 26, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  13. Monthly Energy Review - June 2000

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    June 27, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  14. Monthly Energy Review - April 200

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    April 26, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  15. Monthly Energy Review - September 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    September 27, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  16. Monthly Energy Review - December 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 22, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  17. Monthly Energy Review - February 2000

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    February 24, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  18. Monthly Energy Review, January 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    January 27, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also available through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  19. Monthly Energy Review - March 2000

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    March 28, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  20. Monthly Energy Review

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 23, 1997 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also available through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  1. Monthly Energy Review - January 2000

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    January 28, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  2. Monthly Energy Review - May 2000

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    May 26, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  3. Monthly Energy Review - July 2000

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    July 26, 2000 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  4. Monthly Energy Review, October 1997

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    October 27, 1997 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also available through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  5. Monthly Energy Review, September 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    September 25, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of...

  6. Monthly Energy Review, November 1997

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    November 24, 1997 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also available through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  7. Monthly Energy Review - November 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    November 23, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  8. A coastal hazards data base for the US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C.; Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US Gulf Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. To allow for the identification of coastlines at risk from sea-level rise, 7 of the 22 original data variables in this data base were classified by vulnerability and used to create 7 relative risk variables. These relative risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a coastal vulnerability index for each grid cell and/or line segment. The data for these 29 variables (i.e., the 22 original variables and 7 risk variables) have been placed into the following data formats: (1) Gridded polygon data for the 22 original data variables. Data include elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. (2) Gridded polygon data for the seven classified risk variables. The risk variables are classified versions of: mean coastal elevation, geology, geomorphology, local subsidence trend, mean shoreline displacement, maximum tidal range, and maximum significant wave height. (3) 1:2,000,000 line segment data containing the 29 data variables (the 22 original data variables and the seven classified risk variables). (4) Supplemental point data for the stations used in calculating the sea-level trend and tidal range data sets. (5) Supplemental line segment data containing a 1:2,000,000 digitized coastline of the US Gulf Coast as defined by this document.

  9. geospatial data | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geospatial data Home NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(137) Contributor 25 June, 2012 - 21:45 GIS keyword geospatial data GIS GIS data Explore the geospatial datasets in OpenEI's...

  10. Approach for assessing coastal vulnerability to oil spills for prevention and readiness using GIS and the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, J. R.; Grubesic, T. H.; Sim, L.; Rose, K.; Graham, J.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing interest in offshore hydrocarbon exploration has pushed the operational fronts associated with exploration efforts further offshore into deeper waters and more uncertain subsurface settings. This has become particularly common in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In this study we develop a spatial vulnerability approach and example assessment to support future spill prevention and improve future response readiness. This effort, which is part of a larger integrated assessment modeling spill prevention effort, incorporated economic and environmental data, and utilized a novel new oil spill simulation model from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Blowout and Spillmore » Occurrence Model (BLOSOM). Specifically, this study demonstrated a novel approach to evaluate potential impacts of hypothetical spill simulations at varying depths and locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The simulations are analyzed to assess spatial and temporal trends associated with the oil spill. The approach itself demonstrates how these data, tools and techniques can be used to evaluate potential spatial vulnerability of Gulf communities for various spill scenarios. Results of the hypothetical scenarios evaluated in this study suggest that under conditions like those simulated, a strong westward push by ocean currents and tides may increase the impacts of deep water spills along the Texas coastline, amplifying the vulnerability of communities on the local barrier islands. Ultimately, this approach can be used further to assess a range of conditions and scenarios to better understand potential risks and improve informed decision making for operators, responders, and stakeholders to support spill prevention as well as response readiness.« less

  11. Approach for assessing coastal vulnerability to oil spills for prevention and readiness using GIS and the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, J. R.; Grubesic, T. H.; Sim, L.; Rose, K.; Graham, J.

    2015-08-01

    Increasing interest in offshore hydrocarbon exploration has pushed the operational fronts associated with exploration efforts further offshore into deeper waters and more uncertain subsurface settings. This has become particularly common in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. In this study we develop a spatial vulnerability approach and example assessment to support future spill prevention and improve future response readiness. This effort, which is part of a larger integrated assessment modeling spill prevention effort, incorporated economic and environmental data, and utilized a novel new oil spill simulation model from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Blowout and Spill Occurrence Model (BLOSOM). Specifically, this study demonstrated a novel approach to evaluate potential impacts of hypothetical spill simulations at varying depths and locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico. The simulations are analyzed to assess spatial and temporal trends associated with the oil spill. The approach itself demonstrates how these data, tools and techniques can be used to evaluate potential spatial vulnerability of Gulf communities for various spill scenarios. Results of the hypothetical scenarios evaluated in this study suggest that under conditions like those simulated, a strong westward push by ocean currents and tides may increase the impacts of deep water spills along the Texas coastline, amplifying the vulnerability of communities on the local barrier islands. Ultimately, this approach can be used further to assess a range of conditions and scenarios to better understand potential risks and improve informed decision making for operators, responders, and stakeholders to support spill prevention as well as response readiness.

  12. Internet Based, GIS Catalog of Non-Traditional Sources of Cooling Water for Use at America's Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Daniel Arthur

    2011-09-30

    In recent years, rising populations and regional droughts have caused coal-fired power plants to temporarily curtail or cease production due to a lack of available water for cooling. In addition, concerns about the availability of adequate supplies of cooling water have resulted in cancellation of plans to build much-needed new power plants. These issues, coupled with concern over the possible impacts of global climate change, have caused industry and community planners to seek alternate sources of water to supplement or replace existing supplies. The Department of Energy, through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching ways to reduce the water demands of coal-fired power plants. As part of the NETL Program, ALL Consulting developed an internet-based Catalog of potential alternative sources of cooling water. The Catalog identifies alternative sources of water, such as mine discharge water, oil and gas produced water, saline aquifers, and publicly owned treatment works (POTWs), which could be used to supplement or replace existing surface water sources. This report provides an overview of the Catalog, and examines the benefits and challenges of using these alternative water sources for cooling water.

  13. Using remotely sensed imagery and GIS to monitor and research salmon spawning: A case study of the Hanford Reach fall chinook (Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RH Visser

    2000-03-16

    The alteration of ecological systems has greatly reduced salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest. The Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, for example, is a component of the last ecosystem in eastern Washington State that supports a relatively healthy population of fall chinook salmon ([Oncorhynchus tshawytscha], Huntington et al. 1996). This population of fall chinook may function as a metapopulation for the Mid-Columbia region (ISG 1996). Metapopulations can seed or re-colonize unused habitat through the mechanism of straying (spawning in non-natal areas) and may be critical to the salmon recovery process if lost or degraded habitat is restored (i.e., the Snake, Upper Columbia, and Yakima rivers). For these reasons, the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is extremely important for preservation of the species in the Columbia River Basin. Because this population is important to the region, non-intrusive techniques of analysis are essential for researching and monitoring population trends and spawning activities.

  14. NREL: Energy Analysis - Pamela Gray-Hann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Internet map server applications GIS web page PVWatts Outreach Meeting planning Project support Education and background training University of Minnesota-Duluth GIS Technical ...

  15. Using HyTrans to Study H2 Transition Scenarios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    early transition analysis? 4. How will we interface with NREL's detailed GIS analyses? ... S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 4. How will we interface with NREL's detailed GIS analyses? * ...

  16. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 0.5 1 0 50 100 150 200 250 u (ms) Time (s) z 0.125m z 0.425m * Developed in Matlab * Input: instantaneous velocity timeseries in ASCII format * Noise filtering methods:...

  17. Public Meetings and Comment Deadlines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Submit requests, along with an advance electronic copy of their statement in PDF (preferred), Microsoft Word or Excel, WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format to the appropriate ...

  18. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Survey Public Use Data The data from the 1991 RTECS is distributed in DBase and ASCii format on three diskettes each. The data on the six diskettes have been compressed...

  19. Sandia Network Intrusion Detection Q.2931 Sensor Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-09-20

    This program was developed to read, plot and translate data taken by another program (Monogrow) and make the data readable for processing by other programs like "EXCEL", or any program which requires ASCII data files.

  20. Monthly Energy Review, October 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    October 27, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  1. Monthly Energy Review, November 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    November 24, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  2. Monthly Energy Review, March 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    March 27, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  3. Monthly Energy Review, June 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    June 25, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the MER...

  4. Monthly Energy Review, August 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    August 25, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  5. Monthly Energy Review

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    May 26, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the MER...

  6. Monthly Energy Review - December 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 22, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the...

  7. Monthly Energy Review, July 1998

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    July 28, 1998 Electronic Access Monthly Energy Review (MER) data are also avail- able through these electronic means: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and Excel (xls) versions of the MER...

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from netcdf files. Data can be displayed graphically (line-plot, scatter-plot, overlay, color-intensity, etc.) or extracted as ASCII data. In either case, results can be saved to...

  9. Boosting Production of Radioisotopes for Diagnostics and Therapeutics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... and Production Program. "Painting" the beam The new beam raster system provides a more uniform distribution of the beam on the target by rapidly "painting" the beam on the target ...

  10. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  11. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  12. GPFA-AB_Phase1RiskAnalysisTask5DataUpload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This submission contains information used to compute the risk factors for the GPFA-AB project (DE-EE0006726). The risk factors are natural reservoir quality, thermal resource quality, potential for induced seismicity, and utilization. The methods used to combine the risk factors included taking the product, sum, and minimum of the four risk factors. The files are divided into images, rasters, shapefiles, and supporting information. The image files show what the raster and shapefiles should look like. The raster files contain the input risk factors, calculation of the scaled risk factors, and calculation of the combined risk factors. The shapefiles include definition of the fairways, definition of the US Census Places, the center of the raster cells, and locations of industries. Supporting information contains details of the calculations or processing used in generating the files. An image of the raster will have the same name except *.png as the file ending instead of *.tif. Images with “fairways” or “industries” added to the name are composed of a raster with the relevant shapefile added. The file About_GPFA-AB_Phase1RiskAnalysisTask5DataUpload.pdf contains information the citation, special use considerations, authorship, etc. More details on each file are given in the spreadsheet “list_of_contents.csv” in the folder “SupportingInfo”. Code used to calculate values is available at https://github.com/calvinwhealton/geothermal_pfa under the folder “combining_metrics”.

  13. GPFA-AB_Phase1RiskAnalysisTask5DataUpload

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This submission contains information used to compute the risk factors for the GPFA-AB project (DE-EE0006726). The risk factors are natural reservoir quality, thermal resource quality, potential for induced seismicity, and utilization. The methods used to combine the risk factors included taking the product, sum, and minimum of the four risk factors. The files are divided into images, rasters, shapefiles, and supporting information. The image files show what the raster and shapefiles should look like. The raster files contain the input risk factors, calculation of the scaled risk factors, and calculation of the combined risk factors. The shapefiles include definition of the fairways, definition of the US Census Places, the center of the raster cells, and locations of industries. Supporting information contains details of the calculations or processing used in generating the files. An image of the raster will have the same name except *.png as the file ending instead of *.tif. Images with fairways or industries added to the name are composed of a raster with the relevant shapefile added. The file About_GPFA-AB_Phase1RiskAnalysisTask5DataUpload.pdf contains information the citation, special use considerations, authorship, etc. More details on each file are given in the spreadsheet list_of_contents.csv in the folder SupportingInfo. Code used to calculate values is available at https://github.com/calvinwhealton/geothermal_pfa under the folder combining_metrics.

  14. Application of Spatial Data Modeling Systems, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Transportation Routing Optimization Methods for Evaluating Integrated Deployment of Interim Spent Fuel Storage Installations and Advanced Nuclear Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Sacit M; Howard, Rob L; Liu, Cheng; Mueller, Don; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Peterson, Steven K; Scaglione, John M

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this siting study work is to support DOE in evaluating integrated advanced nuclear plant and ISFSI deployment options in the future. This study looks at several nuclear power plant growth scenarios that consider the locations of existing and planned commercial nuclear power plants integrated with the establishment of consolidated interim spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs). This research project is aimed at providing methodologies, information, and insights that inform the process for determining and optimizing candidate areas for new advanced nuclear power generation plants and consolidated ISFSIs to meet projected US electric power demands for the future.

  15. Geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geospatial > Posts by term Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds ask queries (1) compound queries (1) data (1) developer (1) geospatial data (1) GIS (1) GIS data (1) Global...

  16. http://www.esri.com/data/data-maps/index.html

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Overview Data & Maps content is preconfigured to work with ArcGIS products and provided at no additional cost for ArcGIS users. Data & Maps-DVD containing ready-to-use basemaps and...

  17. geospatial | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geospatial Home Geospatial Description: Discuss and explore geospatial data available on OpenEI. geospatial GIS spatial analysis...

  18. Video flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1983-08-02

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid containing entrained particles is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly on the raster area of a low-light level television camera. The particles are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers surrounding the rod optic lens assembly. Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen. The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid. 4 figs.

  19. Video flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.

    1983-01-01

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid (10) containing entrained particles (12) is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly (31) on the raster area of a low-light level television camera (20). The particles (12) are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers (32) surrounding the rod optic lens assembly (31). Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen (40). The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid (10).

  20. Video flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1981-06-10

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid containing entrained particles is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly on the raster area of a low-light level television camera. The particles are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers surrounding the rod optic lens assembly. Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen. The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid.

  1. Method and apparatus for measuring areas of photoelectric cells and photoelectric cell performance parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterwald, C.R.; Emery, K.A.

    1984-05-29

    A laser scanning system for scanning the surface of photovoltaic cell in a precise, stepped raster pattern includes electric current detecting and measuring equipment for sensing the current response of the scanned cell to the laser beam at each stepped irradiated spot or pixel on the cell surface. A computer is used to control and monitor the raster position of the laser scan as well as monitoring the corresponding current responses, storing this data, operating on it, and for feeding the data to a graphical plotter for producing a visual, color-coded image of the current response of the cell to the laser scan. A translation platform driven by stepper motors in precise X and Y distances holds and rasters the cell being scanned under a stationary spot-focused laser beam.

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring areas of photoelectric cells and photoelectric cell performance parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Emery, Keith A.

    1987-01-01

    A laser scanning system for scanning the surface of a photovoltaic cell in a precise, stepped raster pattern includes electric current detecting and measuring equipment for sensing the current response of the scanned cell to the laser beam at each stepped irradiated spot or pixel on the cell surface. A computer is used to control and monitor the raster position of the laser scan as well as monitoring the corresponding current responses, storing this data, operating on it, and for feeding the data to a graphic plotter for producing a visual, color-coded image of the current response of the cell to the laser scan. A translation platform driven by stepper motors in precise X and Y distances holds and rasters the cell being scanned under a stationary spot-focused laser beam.

  3. Records Inventory Data Collection Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    DATALINK was created to provide an easy to use data collection program for records management software products. It provides several useful tools for capturing and validating record index data in the field. It also allows users to easily create a comma delimited, ASCII text file for data export into most records management software products.

  4. Cathodoluminescence Spectrum Imaging Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-04-07

    The software developed for spectrum imaging is applied to the analysis of the spectrum series generated by our cathodoluminescence instrumentation. This software provides advanced processing capabilities s such: reconstruction of photon intensity (resolved in energy) and photon energy maps, extraction of the spectrum from selected areas, quantitative imaging mode, pixel-to-pixel correlation spectrum line scans, ASCII, output, filling routines, drift correction, etc.

  5. Circumsolar Radiation Data: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Note that each data set is composed of 20 lines of information with each line consistingof 77 characters. These are archived ASCII files. [Information on sites, number of data sets, etc. taken from the online publication (out of print) at http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/pubs/circumsolar/index.html

  6. Sparse Image Format

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore » supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  7. Viscosity measuring using microcantilevers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Patrick Ian

    2001-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the viscosity of a fluid uses a micromachined cantilever mounted on a moveable base. As the base is rastered while in contact with the fluid, the deflection of the cantilever is measured and the viscosity determined by comparison with standards.

  8. Real-time graphic displays in Mars. [AVLIS process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treadway, T.

    1985-12-01

    Real-time diagnostic data of the AVLIS process is displayed in the form of a two-dimensional plot on selected monitors in the Mars Control Room. Each Mars workstation contains a HP2622 terminal for computer interface to the experiment and a Raster Technologies graphic controller driving a Conrac high resolution color monitor for graphics output.

  9. Geographic Perspective on the Current Biomass Resource Availability in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the biomass resources available in the United States and map the results using geographic information systems (GIS).

  10. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 2014 Welcome to the 78th quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue examines some recent developments and practices in the use of GIS for NEPA and related environmental reviews. NEPAnode_carosel_500.jpeg NEPAnode Pilot Site Articles in this issue include: DOE NEPA Practitioners To Test NEPAnode Using GIS Tools for NEPA Analysis Select Past LLQR Articles on GIS and NEPA Using GIS To See the Big Picture and "Zoom In"

  11. Property:Contact | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydropower Federal Preservation Officer (Federal Energy Regulatory Agency) + Alabama Oil and Gas BoardWebsiteGISDatabaseDeveloper + Alabama Oil and Gas Board: WebsiteGIS...

  12. Four County Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.facebook.compagesFour-County-Electric-Membership-Corporation188316197857616?reftntnmn Outage Hotline: (888)368-7289 Outage Map: gis.fourcty.orgpubmap.html...

  13. spatial analysis | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    spatial analysis Home Geospatial Description: Discuss and explore geospatial data available on OpenEI. geospatial GIS spatial analysis Syndicate content...

  14. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site....

  15. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site....

  16. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conventional and EGS capable geothermal systems by analyzing regional data in a GIS. Digital geothermal data will be made available to industry and researchers on a web site....

  17. Inside Idaho: Interactive Numeric and Spatial Information Data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GraphicMapChart Abstract Idaho GIS Clearinghouse Organization Idaho Geospatial Office Published Idaho Geospatial Office, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  18. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... a geographic information system (GIS)-based database ... -1 ) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (, ... rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in ...

  19. Oak Ridge ARI Overview | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications ARI Quarterly Newsletter Oak Ridge ARI Overview ARI: Creating a 2020 DOE Recommendation 225: Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets...

  20. CenterPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .centerpointenergy.comhome Twitter: @CNPalerts Outage Hotline: 800-332-7143 Outage Map: gis.centerpointenergy.comouta Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page:...

  1. Ethiopia-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ethiopia on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  2. Recommendation 211 : Recommendation on Availability of DOE Environment...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    211 More Documents & Publications Recommendation 225: Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets Recommendation 217: Stewardship Point of Contact for the Oak Ridge...

  3. Bangladesh-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Bangladesh on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  4. File:SWERA-247.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search File File history File usage Solar: monthly global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600...

  5. Weather and the Transport of Hazardous Materials | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and the Transport of Hazardous Materials More Documents & Publications The Role of GIS in Decision Support Systems Section 180(c) Ad Hoc Working Group Transportation Plan Ad...

  6. CenterPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Place: Houston, Texas Service Territory: Texas Website: www.centerpointenergy.comhome Twitter: @CNPalerts Outage Hotline: 800-332-7143 Outage Map: gis.centerpointenergy.co...

  7. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    integration for applications which: 1) support agencys geospatial information systems (GIS); 2) support Computer Aided Design systems (CAD) and knowledge workers; and 3) support...

  8. Rhode Island High Resolution Wind Resource - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Detailed license and usage information for this dataset Preview Download 50m GIS NREL Rhode Island energy high resoltuion renewable shapefile wind wind data wind...

  9. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Compiled existing He data for Cascades and Snake River Plain regions * Created GIS maps depicting results of existing data and locations of wells and thermal features to...

  10. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratory (NREL). It integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) - for integrated resource assessment. The Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based...

  11. Renewables Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable energy credit trades and purchases are tracked through the NEPOOL Generation Information System (NEPOOL-GIS). Renewables within the jurisdiction of New York,...

  12. PV Mapper Live Webinar_ R09_0083_edit_L

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    applications, and management of web based GIS application development projects. He holds a bachelor's degree in geography and environmental science from the University of Colorado. ...

  13. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The ...

  14. LEDSGP/sector/AFOLU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of its technical Reference Level training series. The videos demonstrate the use of ArcGIS and IDRISI software to link historical activity data to deforestation drivers (video...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - NTSF 2014 180(c) WG session_final [Compatibilit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More economical More user-oriented Easier to maintain and update ESRI ArcGIS recommended as tool development platform 26 National Transportation Stakeholders...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - NTPAHWG_Jones [Compatibility Mode

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    More economical More user-oriented Easier to maintain and update ESRI ArcGIS recommended as tool development platform Analyze alternative routing criteria ...

  17. Evaluation of Geothermal Potential of Lightning Dock KGRA, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with the interpretation of information obtained from digitized map layers created in ArcGIS. The evaluation indicates that the Lightning Dock area has high geothermal potential...

  18. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. ... (EERE) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 9 - BIOMASS FUELS

  19. untitled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA Environmental Assessment EFH essential fish habitat EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ESA Endangered Species Act FAD Fish aggregation device GIS Geographic Information ...

  20. Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    partnered with Afghanistan to develop high-resolution wind and solar resource maps and data products for Afghanistan. The data were output in Geographic Information Systems (GIS)...

  1. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Expedite Milestones C. Recommendation on DOE Oak Ridge GIS Fact Sheets (C. Staley) D. Election of FY 2015 Board Officers (B. Price) VII. Responses to Recommendations & Comments (D. ...

  2. Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Renewable Energy and Defense Geospatial Database Abstract This database provides GIS data...

  3. Transmission/Resource Library/NEPA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Library Jump to: navigation, search ResourceLibraryHeader.png Planning Public Involvement GIS Tools and Maps Environmental Resources and Mitigation NEPA MOUs General...

  4. Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Appendix A

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Area Power Administration Substation) Prepared for: U.S. Department of Interior Bureau of Land Management Las ... GIS geographic information system kV kilovolt MW megawatt ...

  5. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    critical elements. - Construction of Critical Element Charts that assess probability of success vs. data confidence for each play type. - Use of Arc GIS to compile data for each...

  6. GAMMAV1.2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-06-26

    This program was developed to read, plot and translate data taken by Sandia's Thermogrow program. It also allows one to determine the "gamma factor" for correcting small systematic errors in reflectance-correcting pyrometry. The computed gamma factor is used in Sandia's Thermogrow data collection and relectance-correcting pyrometer software. Data may be saved for processing by other programs like "Excel", Power point", "Origin" or any other program which requires ASCII data files.

  7. Report on Matters Identified at Strategic Petroleum Reserve During Audit of Statement of Financial Position, CR-FS-96-03

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is an ASCII-formatted version of a printed document. The page numbers in this electronic version may not be in the same order as those in the printed document. The printed document may also contain charts and photographs which are not reproduced in this electronic version. If you require the printed version of this document, contact the Office of Inspector General (IG-1), Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC, 20585, or call the Office of Inspector General Reports

  8. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    2014-05-05

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  9. GSOD Based Daily Global Mean Surface Temperature and Mean Sea Level Air Pressure (1982-2011)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xuan Shi, Dali Wang

    This data product contains all the gridded data set at 1/4 degree resolution in ASCII format. Both mean temperature and mean sea level air pressure data are available. It also contains the GSOD data (1982-2011) from NOAA site, contains station number, location, temperature and pressures (sea level and station level). The data package also contains information related to the data processing methods

  10. Improving Water Management: Applying ModelBuilder to site water impoundments using AEM survey data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Harbert, W.P.; Ackman, T.E.

    2007-01-01

    ArcGIS ModelBuilder was used to create a GIS-based decision support model that incorporated digital elevation data and electromagnetic geophysical results gathered by helicopter to screen potential sites for water disposal impoundments produced from coal bed natural gas.

  11. Workshop on user experience with gas-insulated substations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graybill, H.W.

    1981-12-01

    There is widespread interest among American and Canadian utilities in the interchange of operating and maintenance experience with gas-insulated substations (GIS). Those utilities who do not yet have GIS on their systems are likewise interested in the operating experience of those who do. A two-day workshop on GIS was held in Portland, Oregon, on July 30 and 31, 1981. The first day of the workshop was open to users only, and the agenda for the day consisted of user presentations on the following subjects: GIS station design and layout; specification and acquisition of GIS equipment; installation and commissioning; and operation and maintenance. On the second day, manufacturers were invited to present their experience, status, and progress in recent developments and improvements. The session was concluded with a general discussion of experience, problems, etc. No formal written papers were presented. The highlights of each verbal presentation and of ensuing discussion are presented in this report.

  12. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covrig, S. D.

    2013-11-07

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 ?A rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 ?A beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  13. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1990-01-01

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  14. HIGH INTENSITY LOW-ENERGY POSITRON SOURCE AT JEFFERSON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serkan Golge, Bogdan Wojtsekhowski, Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel concept of a low-energy e{sup +} source with projected intensity on the order of 10{sup 10} slow e{sup +}/s. The key components of this concept are a continuous wave e{sup -} beam, a rotating positron-production target, a synchronized raster/anti-raster, a transport channel, and extraction of e{sup +} into a field-free area through a magnetic plug for moderation in a cryogenic solid. Components were designed in the framework of GEANT4-based (G4beamline) Monte Carlo simulation and TOSCA magnetic field calculation codes. Experimental data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the magnetic plug is presented.

  15. Scanning Tunneling Microscope Data Acquistion and Control System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-02-01

    SHOESCAN is a PC based code that acquires and displays data for Scanning Tunneling Microscopes (STM). SHOESCAN interfaces with the STM through external electronic feedback and raster control circuits that are controlled by I/O boards on the PC bus. Data is displayed on a separate color monitor that is interfaced to the PC through an additional frame-grabber board. SHOESCAN can acquire a wide range of surface topographic information as well as surface electronic structure information.

  16. Exploiting Photo-induced Reactions in Polymer Blends to Create Hierarchically Ordered, Defect-free Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Balazs, Anna [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

    2010-01-08

    Computer simulations reveal how photo-induced chemical reactions can be exploited to create long-range order in binary and ternary polymeric materials. The process is initiated by shining a spatially uniform light over a photosensitive AB binary blend, which undergoes both a reversible chemical reaction and phase separation. We then introduce a well-collimated, higher-intensity light source. Rastering this secondary light over the sample locally increases the reaction rate and causes formation of defect-free, spatially periodic structures. These binary structures resemble either the lamellar or hexagonal phases of microphase-separated di-block copolymers. We measure the regularity of the ordered structures as a function of the relative reaction rates for different values of the rastering speed and determine the optimal conditions for creating defect-free structures in the binary systems. We then add a non-reactive homo-polymer C, which is immiscible with both A and B. We show that this component migrates to regions that are illuminated by the secondary, higher-intensity light, allowing us to effectively write a pattern of C onto the AB film. Rastering over the ternary blend with this collimated light now leads to hierarchically ordered patterns of A, B, and C. The findings point to a facile, non-intrusive process for manufacturing high-quality polymeric devices in a low-cost, efficient manner.

  17. An Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2012-01-01

    Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) by centrally-located operations staff is well established in the area of emergency response, utilization by first responders in the field is uneven. Cost, complexity, and connectivity are often the deciding factors preventing wider adoption. For the past several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing a mobile GIS solution using free and open-source software targeting the needs of front-line personnel. Termed IMPACT, for Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit, this ORNL application can complement existing GIS infrastructure and extend its power and capabilities to responders first on the scene of a natural or man-made disaster.

  18. RPF: An Extensible, Cross-Platform, Binary File Format for Radiation Physics Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ham, C L

    2002-09-10

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Radiation Technology Group (RTG) uses a number of computer codes for simulation and analysis of radiation data. The number of incompatible data formats that these data presented themselves in have continued to multiply. In the 1980's a Common Data Format (CDF, see Appendix A) was devised for internal use by the RTG. This format represented a single gamma-ray spectrum as ASCII energy/count pairs preceded by an ASCII header. The ASCII representation of the data assured that it was compatible on any computing platform and this format is still in use. In the mid 1990's it became apparent that instrument systems of greater complexity would demand a file format of larger capacity to support systems then on the drawing board, including networks of sensors collecting time series of gamma-ray spectra. These systems were in the planning stage and defined data structures were not available. It became apparent that a new storage format for nuclear measurements data would be needed and it would have to be flexible and extensible to accommodate the requirements of systems of the future. As part of an LDRD, we began to investigate what others were doing, especially in the high-energy physics community, to deal with the large volumes of data being generated. Of particular interest was the very general Hierarchical Data Format (HDF), developed and maintained by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), that we ultimately used to develop the Radiation Physics Format (RPF). The HDF subroutine library provides users with the ability to customize a data file format based on standard calls to the HDF subroutine library. The RPF was developed and deployed on Sun and Hewlett-Packard workstations running their proprietary versions of UNIX.

  19. Laser goniometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fairer, George M.; Boernge, James M.; Harris, David W.; Campbell, DeWayne A.; Tuttle, Gene E.; McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    The laser goniometer is an apparatus which permits an operator to sight along a geologic feature and orient a collimated lamer beam to match the attitude of the feature directly. The horizontal orientation (strike) and the angle from horizontal (dip), are detected by rotary incremental encoders attached to the laser goniometer which provide a digital readout of the azimuth and tilt of the collimated laser beam. A microprocessor then translates the square wave signal encoder outputs into an ASCII signal for use by data recording equipment.

  20. File:SWERA-212.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar: monthly global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Central America from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  1. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS ... but with "smu" suffix added to name. The first layer must contain the well points ...

  2. File:SWERA-202.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Sri Lanka from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600...

  3. NREL: MapSearch

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to easily search our collection of maps created by the Geographic Information System (GIS) team. Please use the search box and the filters on the left of the screen to limit...

  4. Kenya-DLR Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Kenya on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  5. Ghana-DLR Resource Assessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2001 to 2004 the German Aerospace Center (DLR) worked with Ghana on solar resource and GIS analysis as part of UNEP's Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Programme....

  6. File:SWERA-253.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 40km resolution for Nepal from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels....

  7. File:SWERA-213.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    File usage Solar: annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Cuba from SUNY Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  8. File:SWERA-214.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    usage Solar: annual average global horizontal (GHI) GIS data at 10km resolution for Cuba from SUNY Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275...

  9. Women @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek March 29, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Emily Zvolanek is a senior GIS analyst in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, where she...

  10. Help:Citations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Cite template. For example, to cite U.S. Renewable Energy Technical Potentials: A GIS-Based Analysis in this page, just add the following code: Cite|Billy's paper|U.S....

  11. Map Data: Alternative Fuel Stations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The geospatial vector data has been compressed into one file.  You will need to uncompress it before using a geographic information systems (GIS) program to view the data.

  12. FEI Nova 200 Dual-Beam SEM/FIB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    milling * GIS for Pt deposition * Kleindiek nanomanipulator for specimen lift-out * Oxford Inca EDS system * AutoTEM, AutoFIB, and slice and view automation software Fabricating...

  13. Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by Gary Edmondo (MiniGIS, Inc., Reno, NV)24 modified by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy to include symbols for geothermal surface features was used to actively...

  14. File:SWERA-203.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual average latitude tilt GIS data at 40km for Sri Lanka from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full...

  15. File:SWERA-254.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search File File history File usage Solar: monthly and annual latitude tilt horizontal GIS data at 40km resolution for Nepal from NREL Size of this preview: 776 ...

  16. File:SWERA-248.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Solar: monthly latitude tilt GIS data at 40km resolution for Bangladesh from NREL Size of this preview: 776 600...

  17. Regional Consumer Hydrogen Demand and Optimal Hydrogen Refueling Station Siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2008-04-01

    Using a GIS approach to spatially analyze key attributes affecting hydrogen market transformation, this study proposes hypothetical hydrogen refueling station locations in select subregions to demonstrate a method for determining station locations based on geographic criteria.

  18. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and model data on high performance computers with pre-loaded software, such as ArcGIS, Petra, EarthVision, GoldSim, MATLAB, and other advanced analytical, statistical and...

  19. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample to develop call list 94 The resulting list of 167 trade allies was entered into ArcGIS, a geographic information system platform, and mapped using the zip code of each trade...

  20. Diapositiva 1

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    se utilizaron los siguientes parmetros en el mdulo de anlisis geoestadstico de ArcGis: Tamao del lag igual a 9000 metros. Para ello se utiliz la regla emprica de que...

  1. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    their datasets using top-of-the-line research computers with key software, such as ArcGIS, Petra, GoldSim, and Earthvision, among other advanced geostatistical and analytical...

  2. How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    display and how it is stored. I agree that it is not an ideal format for using with ArcGIS, but this can be easily modified using your favorite spreadsheet editor. Since Excel...

  3. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin A.; Fritz, Hermann M.; French, Steven P.; Smith, Brennan T.; Neary, Vincent

    2011-06-29

    The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology.

  4. Integrated: Geospatial Toolkit for Honduras from NREL - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and easy to use geographic toolkit that allows non-GIS users to relate the renewable energy resource (solar and wind) data to other geographic data, such as land use, protected...

  5. Question about Map of Wind Farms | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    farms using GIS software. Submitted by Wzeng on 13 July, 2012 - 13:59 1 answer Points: 1 Hi, there is a button labeled "Download CSV" below the map. A recent change was made to...

  6. Tags | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    local utility grid lagi green apps blog department of energy wind vision logo software solar land use REEEP REEGLE Texas contest Database gateway pv land use Colorado GIS tcdb...

  7. Renewable Energy Atlas of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Hlava, K.; Greenwood, H.; Carr, A.

    2013-12-13

    The Renewable Energy Atlas (Atlas) of the United States is a compilation of geospatial data focused on renewable energy resources, federal land ownership, and base map reference information. This report explains how to add the Atlas to your computer and install the associated software. The report also includes: A description of each of the components of the Atlas; Lists of the Geographic Information System (GIS) database content and sources; and A brief introduction to the major renewable energy technologies. The Atlas includes the following: A GIS database organized as a set of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS Personal GeoDatabases, and ESRI ArcReader and ArcGIS project files providing an interactive map visualization and analysis interface.

  8. Datasets - OpenEI Datasets

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    License Info DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory... ZIP Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km...

  9. Rail Coal Transportation Rates

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    on research by the U.S. Department of Energy and was only incorporated into the GIS analysis below; it is not in any other elements of this report. See Methodology for greater...

  10. enhanced_oil_current_proj | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology DE-NT0006554 GIS and Web-Based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development Colorado School of Mines DE-FE0006015 ...

  11. Chad Rowan | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    His specialized background in GIS and geospatial analysis-fields that gave him a thorough grounding in data management, storing, and analysis-has been a strong asset for EDX. As ...

  12. Poly 3D fault modeling scripts/data for permeability potential of Washington State geothermal prospects

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Swyer

    2015-02-05

    Matlab scripts/functions and data used to build Poly3D models and create permeability potential GIS layers for 1) Mount St Helen's, 2) Wind River Valley, and 3) Mount Baker geothermal prospect areas located in Washington state.

  13. Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to Prichard to improve its decision-making process through Geographic Information System (GIS) as a decision-making tool. The agency has...

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated and Improved Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Geographic Information System Data and Maps A. Cialella and R. Wagener Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Overview A geographic information system (GIS) allows for multiple datasets with spatial information to be overlaid and layers combined and analyzed. Although the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program surface characterization data have been incorporated into a GIS since the early

  15. Women @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Zvolanek Women @ Energy: Emily Zvolanek March 29, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Emily Zvolanek is a senior GIS analyst in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, where she has worked since 2010. Emily Zvolanek is a senior GIS analyst in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, where she has worked since 2010. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Editor's Note: View this video about Emily's work,

  16. NREL: Solar Research - News Release Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 November 30, 2006 More Than Pretty Maps-NREL Uses GIS to Find Workable Energy Solutions NREL's geographic information systems (GIS) team produces maps of renewable energy resources that demonstrate which technologies, whether solar, wind, hydrogen or biomass, are the best, most workable energy solutions. But that's not all. October 12, 2006 Energy Secretary Announces $13 Million to Expand Solar Energy Technologies U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced more

  17. Register to

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Siting Guidelines | Department of Energy Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines Regional Geology: GIS Database for Alternative Host Rocks and Potential Siting Guidelines The objective of this work is to develop a spatial database that integrates both geologic data for alternative host-rock formations and information that has been historically used for siting guidelines, both in the US and other countries. The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign

  18. DAQMAN - A flexible configurable data acquisition system

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    DAQMAN is a flexible configurable interface that allows the user to build and operate a VME-based data acquisition system on a Linux workstation. It consists of two parts: a Java-based Graphical User Interface to configure the system, and a C-based utility that reads out the data and creates the output ASCII data file, with two levels of diagnostic tools. The data acquisition system requires a CAEN CONET-VME Bridge to communicate between the hardware in themore » VME crate and the Linux workstation. Data acquisition modules, such as ADCs, TDC, Scalers, can be loaded into the system, or removed easily. The GUI allows users to activate modules, and channels within modules by clicking on icons. Running configurations are stored; data are collected and can be viewed either as raw numbers, or by charts and histograms that update as the data are accumulated. Data files are written to disk in ASCII format, with a date and time stamp.« less

  19. Physical database port to workstations project plan. Version 2.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoades, C.E. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The project goal is to port those physical databases used on the Cray by our important production codes to high-performance Unix workstations while maintaining the current computational capabilities and accuracies, and achieving reasonably efficient execution on the workstations. The port must strike a judicious balance between (a) not changing the current N/LTSS databases, accessing libraries, generating codes and using codes, and (b) adversely impacting the maintenance or performance of the various codes that create or use the databases on the Cray. (Because of its forthcoming delivery, the Sun Sparcstation 2, using SunOS 4.0.3 or later, is the initial hardware platform selected for the first workstation port.) The purpose in undertaking this project is to enable the production codes, Tart, Lasnex, Meg, Xraser, Sandyl (and its planned successor), Nike3d and Dyna3d to get up and running on the Unix platforms as soon as possible. Since most Cray file formats are not available on the workstations, the workstation databases and their libraries may have to use a variety of techniques to provide the same capabilities. The project`s primary approach will be to support either an ascii portable format (where this is readily feasible) or a bit-for-bit Cray identical absolute binary format (where ascii is not available or suitable). The physical databases are identified.

  20. A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated Atmospheric CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.H.

    1999-11-24

    To perform a statistically rigorous meta-analysis of research results on the response by herbaceous vegetation to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, a multiparameter database of responses was compiled from the published literature. Seventy-eight independent CO{sub 2}-enrichment studies, covering 53 species and 26 response parameters, reported mean response, sample size, and variance of the response (either as standard deviation or standard error). An additional 43 studies, covering 25 species and 6 response parameters, did not report variances. This numeric data package accompanies the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center's (CDIAC's) NDP-072, which provides similar information for woody vegetation. This numeric data package contains a 30-field data set of CO{sub 2}-exposure experiment responses by herbaceous plants (as both a flat ASCII file and a spreadsheet file), files listing the references to the CO{sub 2}-exposure experiments and specific comments relevant to the data in the data sets, and this documentation file (which includes SAS{reg_sign} and Fortran codes to read the ASCII data file). The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from CDIAC.

  1. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  2. High sensitivity charge amplifier for ion beam uniformity monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  3. Method and apparatus for analyzing the internal chemistry and compositional variations of materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for obtaining and mapping chemical compositional data for solid devices. It includes a SIMS mass analyzer or similar system capable of being rastered over a surface of the solid to sample the material at a pattern of selected points, as the surface is being eroded away by sputtering or a similar process. The data for each point sampled in a volume of the solid is digitally processed and indexed by element or molecule type, exact spacial location within the volume, and the concentration levels of the detected element or molecule types. This data can then be recalled and displayed for any desired planar view in the volume.

  4. Method and apparatus for analyzing the internal chemistry and compositional variations of materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1985-04-30

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for obtaining and mapping chemical compositional data for solid devices. It includes a SIMS mass analyzer or similar system capable of being rastered over a surface of the solid to sample the material at a pattern of selected points, as the surface is being eroded away by sputtering or a similar process. The data for each point sampled in a volume of the solid is digitally processed and indexed by element or molecule type, exact spacial location within the volume, and the concentration levels of the detected element or molecule types. This data can then be recalled and displayed for any desired planar view in the volume.

  5. Boosting Production of Radioisotopes for Diagnostics and Therapeutics: Upgrades to Brookhaven Lab's isotope production and research facility increase the yield of key medical isotopes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Office of Science’s Nuclear Physics Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications program (DOE Isotope Program) seeks to make critical isotopes more readily available for energy, medical, and national security applications and for basic research. Under this program, scientists, engineers, and technicians at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory recently completed the installation of a beam raster (or scanning) system designed to increase the yield of critical isotopes produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP), the Lab’s radioisotope production and research facility, in operation since 1972.

  6. Superconducting accelerator cavity with a heat affected zone having a higher RRR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brawley, John; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for welding accelerator cavities without the need for time consuming and expensive faying surface treatments comprising electron beam welding such cavities in a vacuum welding chamber within a vacuum envelope and using the following welding parameters: a beam voltage of between about 45 KV and 55 KV; a beam current between about 38 ma and 47 ma; a weld speed of about 15 cm/min; and a sharp focus and a rhombic raster of between about 9 KHz and 10 Khz. A welded cavity made according to the method of the present invention is also described.

  7. Laser polishing of niobium for SRF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, J. Michael; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Smooth interior surfaces are desired for niobium SRF cavities, now obtained by buffered chemical polish (BCP) and/or electropolish (EP). Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from chemistry and in-process inspection. Here we show that laser polishing can produce smooth topography with Power Spectral Density (PSD) measurements similar to that obtained by EP. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damaging it. Computational modeling was used to simulate the surface temperature and explain the mechanism of laser polishing.

  8. Method of nitriding niobium to form a superconducting surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Michael J.; Klopf, John Michael; Singaravelu, Senthilaraja

    2014-08-19

    A method of forming a delta niobium nitride .delta.-NbN layer on the surface of a niobium object including cleaning the surface of the niobium object; providing a treatment chamber; placing the niobium object in the treatment chamber; evacuating the chamber; passing pure nitrogen into the treatment chamber; focusing a laser spot on the niobium object; delivering laser fluences at the laser spot until the surface of the niobium object reaches above its boiling temperature; and rastering the laser spot over the surface of the niobium object.

  9. SchemaOnRead Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    North, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    SchemaOnRead provides tools for implementing schema-on-read including a single function call (e.g., schemaOnRead("filename")) that reads text (TXT), comma separated value (CSV), raster image (BMP, PNG, GIF, TIFF, and JPG), R data (RDS), HDF5, NetCDF, spreadsheet (XLS, XLSX, ODS, and DIF), Weka Attribute-Relation File Format (ARFF), Epi Info (REC), Pajek network (PAJ), R network (NET), Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), SPSS (SAV), Systat (SYS), and Stata (DTA) files. It also recursively reads folders (e.g., schemaOnRead("folder")), returning a nested list of the contained elements.

  10. Millimeter Wave Nondestructive Evaluation of Corrosion Under Paint in Steel Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharkovsky, S.; Zoughi, R.

    2006-03-06

    Millimeter wave nondestructive evaluation techniques have shown great potential for detection of corrosion under paint in steel structures. They may also provide for detection of other anomalies associated with the corrosion process such as precursor pitting. This paper presents the results of an extensive investigation spanning a frequency range of 30-100 GHz and using magnitude- and phase-sensitive reflectometers. Using 2D automated scanning mechanisms, raster images of two corrosion patches are produced showing the spatial resolution capabilities of these systems as well as their potential for evaluating localized corrosion severity.

  11. Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease figure 1 Fig. 1. Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping ex perimental setup. Synchrotron x-rays at 11 keV passed through a 50 µm aperture (Ap). The beam intensity was monitored with a N2-filled ion chamber (I0). The brain slice was mounted vertically on a motorized stage (St) at 45° to the incident x-ray beam and raster scanned in the beam. A 13-element Ge detector (Ge) was positioned at a 90° angle to the beam. We all require iron, copper and

  12. Object-oriented Geographic Information System Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-03-01

    JeoViewer is an intelligent object-oriented geographic information system (GIS) framework written in Java that provides transparent linkage to any object’s data, behaviors, and optimized spatial geometry representation. Tools are provided for typical GIS functionality, data ingestion, data export, and integration with other frameworks. The primary difference between Jeo Viewer and traditional GIS systems is that traditional GIS systems offer static views of geo-spatial data while JeoViewer can be dynamically coupled to models and live datamore » streams which dynamically change the state of the object which can be immediately represented in JeoViewer. Additionally, JeoViewer’s object-oriented paradigm provides a more natural representation of spatial data. A rich layer hierarchy allows arbitrary grouping of objects based on any relationship as well as the traditional GIS vertical ordering of objects. JeoViewer can run as a standalone product, extended with additional analysis functionality, or embedded in another framework.« less

  13. Approaching the exa-scale: a real-world evaluation of rendering extremely large data sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patchett, John M; Ahrens, James P; Lo, Li - Ta; Browniee, Carson S; Mitchell, Christopher J; Hansen, Chuck

    2010-10-15

    Extremely large scale analysis is becoming increasingly important as supercomputers and their simulations move from petascale to exascale. The lack of dedicated hardware acceleration for rendering on today's supercomputing platforms motivates our detailed evaluation of the possibility of interactive rendering on the supercomputer. In order to facilitate our understanding of rendering on the supercomputing platform, we focus on scalability of rendering algorithms and architecture envisioned for exascale datasets. To understand tradeoffs for dealing with extremely large datasets, we compare three different rendering algorithms for large polygonal data: software based ray tracing, software based rasterization and hardware accelerated rasterization. We present a case study of strong and weak scaling of rendering extremely large data on both GPU and CPU based parallel supercomputers using Para View, a parallel visualization tool. Wc use three different data sets: two synthetic and one from a scientific application. At an extreme scale, algorithmic rendering choices make a difference and should be considered while approaching exascale computing, visualization, and analysis. We find software based ray-tracing offers a viable approach for scalable rendering of the projected future massive data sizes.

  14. Beam Position Reconstruction for the g2p Experiment in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Pengjia; Allada, Kalyan; Allison, Trent; Badman, Toby; Camsonne, Alexandre; Chen, Jian-ping; Cummings, Melissa; Gu, Chao; Huang, Min; Liu, Jie; et al

    2015-11-03

    Beam-line equipment was upgraded for experiment E08-027 (g2p) in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Two beam position monitors (BPMs) were necessary to measure the beam position and angle at the target. A new BPM receiver was designed and built to handle the low beam currents (50-100 nA) used for this experiment. Two new super-harps were installed for calibrating the BPMs. In addition to the existing fast raster system, a slow raster system was installed. We found that before and during the experiment, these new devices were tested and debugged, and their performance was also evaluated. In order to achieve themore » required accuracy (1-2 mm in position and 1-2 mrad in angle at the target location), the data of the BPMs and harps were carefully analyzed, as well as reconstructing the beam position and angle event by event at the target location. Finally, the calculated beam position will be used in the data analysis to accurately determine the kinematics for each event.« less

  15. NREL: Energy Analysis - Nick Grue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nick Grue Nick Grue is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Scientist II - GIS On staff since June 2014 Phone number: 303-384-7278 E-mail: nick.grue@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis Web GIS Primary research interests Open source energy data Web visualization of energy data Renewable energy policy Education and background training B.A. in Geography and Environmental Science, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO, 2012

  16. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  17. Design of the improved plutonium canister assay system (IPCAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhold, M. E.; Baker, M. C.; Bourret, S. C.; Polk, P. J.; Vo, Duc T.

    2001-01-01

    The improved Plutonium Canister Assay System (iPCAS) is designed to detect gross and partial defects in the declared plutonium content of plutonium and MOX storage canisters during transfer to storage and process areas of the MOX fuel fabrication facility in Kokkasho, Japan. In addition, an associated Gamma Isotopics System (GIS) will be used to confirm facility-declared plutonium isotopics with accuracy sufficient to reduce the amount of destructive isotopic analysis needed. The design of the iPCAS instrument and its associated GIS is described and the expected performance of the instrument is discussed.

  18. Geospatial Products and Techniques at the Center for Transportation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, Shih-Miao; Hwang, Ho-Ling; Peterson, Bruce E

    2008-01-01

    This paper highlights geospatial science-related innovations and developments conducted by the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. CTA researchers have been developing integrated inter-modal transportation solutions through innovative and cost-effective research and development for many years. Specifically, this paper profiles CTA-developed Geographic Information System (GIS) products that are publicly available. Examples of these GIS-related products include: the CTA Transportation Networks; GeoFreight system; and the web-based Multi-Modal Routing Analysis System. In addition, an application on assessment of railroad Hazmat routing alternatives is also discussed.

  19. Gauge Configurations for Lattice QCD from The Gauge Connection

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Gauge Connection is an experimental archive for lattice QCD and a repository of gauge configurations made freely available to the community. Contributors to the archive include the Columbia QCDSP collaboration, the MILC collaboration, and others. Configurations are stored in QCD archive format, consisting of an ASCII header which defines various parameters, followed by binary data. NERSC has also provided some utilities and examples that will aid users in handling the data. Users may browse the archive, but are required to register for a password in order to download data. Contents of the archive are organized under four broad headings: Quenched (more than 1200 configurations); Dynamical, Zero Temperature (more than 300 configurations); MILC Improved Staggered Asqtad Lattices (more than 7000 configurations); and Dynamical, Finite Temperature (more than 1200 configurations)

  20. CHARICE1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-10-25

    CHARICE analyzes velcity waveform data from ramp-wave experiments to determine a sample material's quasi-isentropic loading response in stress and density. A graphical interface handles all user interaction. CHARICE uses a generalized ASCII file format for input waveform data, obviating the need for pre-processing of these data. Capabilities include calculation of uncertainty bounds, correction for non-uniform baseplate thickness, and user-provided ramp-wave loading response for interferometer window materials. Output consists of particle velocity, lagrangian wave speed, density,more » and stress along the loading quasi-isentrope, as well as in-situ time istory for any of these variables at the front or back surface of each sample.« less

  1. Work Order Generation Macros for Word Perfect 6.X for Windows

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-09-02

    Included are three general WP macros (two independent and one multiple) and a template used at the Test Reactor Area (TRA) for the generation of the Work Orders (WO's) used to perform corrective and preventative maintenance, as well as modifications of existing systems and installation of new systems. They incorporate facility specific requirements as well as selected federal/state orders. These macros are used to generate a WP document which is then converted into ASCII textmore » for import to the maintenance software. Currently we are using MCRS but should be compatible with other platforms such as Passport. Reference the included file Wogen.txt for installation and usage instructions.« less

  2. Seismic Waves, 4th order accurate

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-16

    SW4 is a program for simulating seismic wave propagation on parallel computers. SW4 colves the seismic wave equations in Cartesian corrdinates. It is therefore appropriate for regional simulations, where the curvature of the earth can be neglected. SW4 implements a free surface boundary condition on a realistic topography, absorbing super-grid conditions on the far-field boundaries, and a kinematic source model consisting of point force and/or point moment tensor source terms. SW4 supports a fully 3-Dmore » heterogeneous material model that can be specified in several formats. SW4 can output synthetic seismograms in an ASCII test format, or in the SAC finary format. It can also present simulation information as GMT scripts, whixh can be used to create annotated maps. Furthermore, SW4 can output the solution as well as the material model along 2-D grid planes.« less

  3. A Pyrolysis and Primary Migration Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-08-11

    PMOD-Version 1.6 is a copyrighted computer program for simulating oil generation, cracking, and other chemical reactions occurring during the pyrolysis of petroleum source rocks over a specified history of temperature and either depth or hydrostatic pressure. The chemical reaction mechanism is defined by the user and, within limits, can be as simple or complex as desired. The model also simulates compaction of the source rock and expulsion of a liquid water phase and a liquidmore » hydrocarbon phase. The expulsion is done by either a simple, constant-fluid-density model or by a more rigorous model using a modified Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state. The latter model also calculates overpressuring. An auxiliary program, PLOTPMOD, permits graphical display and hardcopy of the results, as well as preparation of ASCII-file subsets of the results for use with a spreadsheet or other graphics program.« less

  4. Flow and Containment Transport Code for Modeling Variably Saturated Porous Media

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-14

    FACT is a finite element based code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport. It was designed to perform transient three-dimensional calculations that simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogenous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problemsmore »are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates. FACT writes out both ascii and graphical binary files that are TECPLOT-ready. Special features are also available within FACT for handling the typical groundwater modeling needs for remediation efforts at the Savannah River Site.« less

  5. Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-07-29

    SIMPLEV2.0 is an electric vehicle simulation code which can be used with any IBM compatible personal computer. This general purpose simulation program is useful for performing parametric studies of electric and series hybrid electric vehicle performance on user input driving cycles.. The program is run interactively and guides the user through all of the necessary inputs. Driveline components and the traction battery are described and defined by ASCII files which may be customized by themore » user. Scaling of these components is also possible. Detailed simulation results are plotted on the PC monitor and may also be printed on a printer attached to the PC.« less

  6. Flow and Containment Transport Code for Modeling Variably Saturated Porous Media

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-14

    FACT is a finite element based code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport. It was designed to perform transient three-dimensional calculations that simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogenous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problemsmore » are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates. FACT writes out both ascii and graphical binary files that are TECPLOT-ready. Special features are also available within FACT for handling the typical groundwater modeling needs for remediation efforts at the Savannah River Site.« less

  7. Updated Users' Guide for RSAP -- A Code for Display and Manipulation of Neutron Cross Section Data and SAMMY Fit Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayer, R.O.

    2003-07-29

    RSAP [1] is a computer code for display and manipulation of neutron cross section data and selected SAMMY output. SAMMY [2] is a multilevel R-matrix code for fitting neutron time-of-flight cross-section data using Bayes' method. This users' guide provides documentation for the recently updated RSAP code (version 6). The code has been ported to the Linux platform, and several new features have been added, including the capability to read cross section data from ASCII pointwise ENDF files as well as double-precision PLT output from SAMMY. A number of bugs have been found and corrected, and the input formats have been improved. Input items are parsed so that items may be separated by spaces or commas.

  8. Method for guessing the response of a physical system to an arbitrary input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolpert, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Stacked generalization is used to minimize the generalization errors of one or more generalizers acting on a known set of input values and output values representing a physical manifestation and a transformation of that manifestation, e.g., hand-written characters to ASCII characters, spoken speech to computer command, etc. Stacked generalization acts to deduce the biases of the generalizer(s) with respect to a known learning set and then correct for those biases. This deduction proceeds by generalizing in a second space whose inputs are the guesses of the original generalizers when taught with part of the learning set and trying to guess the rest of it, and whose output is the correct guess. Stacked generalization can be used to combine multiple generalizers or to provide a correction to a guess from a single generalizer.

  9. SIMPLEV: A simple electric vehicle simulation program, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, G.H.

    1991-06-01

    An electric vehicle simulation code which can be used with any IBM compatible personal computer was written. This general purpose simulation program is useful for performing parametric studies of electric vehicle performance on user input driving cycles. The program is run interactively and guides the user through all of the necessary inputs. Driveline components and the traction battery are described and defined by ASCII files which may be customized by the user. Scaling of these components is also possible. Detailed simulation results are plotted on the PC monitor and may also be printed on a printer attached to the PC. This report serves as a users` manual and documents the mathematical relationships used in the simulation.

  10. Environmental geographic information system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peek, Dennis; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  11. Solar Energy — Capturing and Using Power and Heat from the Sun

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials TAP Webinar presentation by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Geographic Information System (GIS) Developer Christopher Helm on the In My Backyard estimator for PV output at a given location in the United States.

  12. Omega Bridge To Los Alamos "Town Site" W E S T J E M E Z R O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ct ur e Research Park University House F ir e S ta ti o n 1 1 4 0 0 2 7 1 IP, SPPI GIS, September 2012 S T 2 0 5 4 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY E A S T J E M E Z R O A D (...

  13. Database for Regional Geology, Phase 1: A Tool for Informing Regional Evaluations of Alternative Geologic Media and Decision Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Frank Vinton; Kelley, Richard E.; Birdsell, Suzanne M.; Lugo, Alexander Bryan; Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2014-11-12

    Reported is progress in the following areas: Phase 1 and 2 websites for the regional geology GIS database; terrane maps of crystalline basement rocks; inventory of shale formations in the US; and rock properties and in-situ conditions for shale estimated from sonic velocity measurements.

  14. #WomenInSTEM: Making a Cleaner Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Mallory

    2014-11-24

    Mallory Lindgren uses geographic information systems or GIS - a mapping software that she compares to "a real-life videogame" - to assess how various constraints, such as wetlands or an airport, may interact with potential renewable energy projects. Her aim is to site and design projects that can effectively co-exist with the surrounding environment.

  15. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Lane

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  16. Resource characterization and residuals remediation, Task 1.0: Air quality assessment and control, Task 2.0: Advanced power systems, Task 3.0: Advanced fuel forms and coproducts, Task 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Timpe, R.C.; Hartman, J.H.

    1994-02-01

    This report addresses three subtasks related to the Resource Characterization and Residuals Remediation program: (1) sulfur forms in coal and their thermal transformations, (2) data resource evaluation and integration using GIS (Geographic Information Systems), and (3) supplementary research related to the Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) UCG (Underground Coal Gasification) test program.

  17. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  18. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System: Validation Integration - Results of Future Architecture Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-06-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects. This report is second in a series of reports detailing this effort.

  19. How Do I Use Renewable Energy in My Region?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-11-01

    NREL can asses renewable energy resource information and integrate it with data using geographic information systems (GIS) and interface the data with key analytical models. Planners and energy developers use these integrated resource assessments to make decisions about the feasibility, cost-effectiveness, and risks of developing projects in specific locations and for regional planning.

  20. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Michael Lane

    2010-01-01

    Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines.

  1. United States Atlas of Renewable Resources

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atlas is an interactive application of the renewable energy resources in the contiguous United States, Alaska and Hawaii. It illustrates the geographic distribution of wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass resources, as well as other pertinent information such as transportation network and administrative boundaries.[Copied from http://www.nrel.gov/gis/maps.html

  2. #WomenInSTEM: Making a Cleaner Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindgren, Mallory

    2014-09-09

    Mallory Lindgren uses geographic information systems or GIS - a mapping software that she compares to "a real-life videogame" - to assess how various constraints, such as wetlands or an airport, may interact with potential renewable energy projects. Her aim is to site and design projects that can effectively co-exist with the surrounding environment.

  3. The use of information systems to transform utilities and regulatory commissions: The application of geographic information systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirick, D.W.; Montgomery, G.E.; Wagman, D.C.; Spiers, J.

    1995-09-01

    One technology that can assist utilities remain financially viable in competitive markets and help utilities and regulators to better serve the public is information technology. Because geography is an important part of an electric, natural gas, telecommunications, or water utility, computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related Automated Mapping/Facilities Management systems are emerging as core technologies for managing an ever-expanding variety of formerly manual or paper-based tasks. This report focuses on GIS as an example of the types of information systems that can be used by utilities and regulatory commissions. Chapter 2 provides general information about information systems and effects of information on organizations; Chapter 3 explores the conversion of an organization to an information-based one; Chapters 4 and 5 set out GIS as an example of the use of information technologies to transform the operations of utilities and commissions; Chapter 6 describes the use of GIS and other information systems for organizational reengineering efforts; and Chapter 7 examines the regulatory treatment of information systems.

  4. Geographic information system applications in coal transportation analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmes, G.

    1996-12-31

    Geographic information systems (GIS) offer great potential to the coal transportation industry for capitalizing on the growing availability of spatially-referenced data. As computer-based systems for the collection, storage, retrieval and analysis of spatial data, generating information products in a variety of formats, GIS have a great capability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of coal transportation operations, planning, engineering, and facilities management. Currently GIS are used in the transportation industry at large to analyze, and display information about network infrastructure, fleet operations, property ownership, routing and scheduling, and utilities. Current coal transportation applications include consumer service inquiries, train and locomotive scheduling, and evaluation of network usage. The paper describes the significant potential uses of GIS in the coal transportation sector when integrated with optimization and decision support systems, scientific visualization, data forecasting, and strategic system planning approaches. Ultimately consumer demand and the drive for economic efficiency are likely to stimulate the integration and management of spatial information across the entire coal chain.

  5. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  6. Geospatial Analysis and Optimization of Fleet Logistics to Exploit Alternative Fuels and Advanced Transportation Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparks, W.; Singer, M.

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing geographical information system (GIS) tools to evaluate alternative fuel availability in relation to garage locations and to perform automated fleet-wide optimization to determine where to deploy alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

  7. Image intensifier gain uniformity improvements in sealed tubes by selective scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Stanley W.

    1995-01-01

    The gain uniformity of sealed microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPIs) is improved by selectively scrubbing the high gain sections with a controlled bright light source. Using the premise that ions returning to the cathode from the microchannel plate (MCP) damage the cathode and reduce its sensitivity, a HeNe laser beam light source is raster scanned across the cathode of a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI) tube. Cathode current is monitored and when it exceeds a preset threshold, the sweep rate is decreased 1000 times, giving 1000 times the exposure to cathode areas with sensitivity greater than the threshold. The threshold is set at the cathode current corresponding to the lowest sensitivity in the active cathode area so that sensitivity of the entire cathode is reduced to this level. This process reduces tube gain by between 10% and 30% in the high gain areas while gain reduction in low gain areas is negligible.

  8. Micro-Bubble Experiments at the Van de Graaff Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Z. J.; Wardle, Kent E.; Quigley, K. J.; Gromov, Roman; Youker, A. J.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Bailey, James; Stepinski, D. C.; Chemerisov, S. D.; Vandegrift, G. F.

    2015-02-01

    In order to test and verify the experimental designs at the linear accelerator (LINAC), several micro-scale bubble ("micro-bubble") experiments were conducted with the 3-MeV Van de Graaff (VDG) electron accelerator. The experimental setups included a square quartz tube, sodium bisulfate solution with different concentrations, cooling coils, gas chromatography (GC) system, raster magnets, and two high-resolution cameras that were controlled by a LabVIEW program. Different beam currents were applied in the VDG irradiation. Bubble generation (radiolysis), thermal expansion, thermal convection, and radiation damage were observed in the experiments. Photographs, videos, and gas formation (O2 + H2) data were collected. The micro-bubble experiments at VDG indicate that the design of the full-scale bubble experiments at the LINAC is reasonable.

  9. Optical Properties of CdSe Nanoparticle Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huser, T; Gerion, D; Zaitseva, N; Krol, D M; Leon, F R

    2003-11-24

    We report on three-dimensional fluorescence imaging of micron-size faceted crystals precipitated from solutions of CdSe nanocrystals. Such crystals have previously been suggested to be superlattices of CdSe quantum dots [1,2]. Possible applications for these materials include their use in optical and optoelectronic devices. The micron-size crystals were grown by slow evaporation from toluene solutions of CdSe nanocrystals in the range of 3-6 nm, produced by traditional wet-chemistry techniques. By using a confocal microscope with laser illumination, three-dimensional raster-scanning and synchronized hyper-spectral detection, we have generated spatial profiles of the fluorescence emission intensity and spectrum. The fluorescence data of the micro-crystals were compared with spectra of individual nanocrystals obtained from the same solution. The results do not support the assertion that these microcrystals consist of CdSe superlattices.

  10. Laser polishing of niobium for superconducting radio-frequency accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Liang; Klopf, John M.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2014-08-01

    Interior surfaces of niobium cavities used in superconducting radio frequency accelerators are now obtained by buffered chemical polish and/or electropolish. Laser polishing is a potential alternative, having advantages of speed, freedom from noxious chemistry and availability of in-process inspection. We studied the influence of the laser power density and laser beam raster rate on the surface topography. These two factors need to be combined carefully to smooth the surface without damage. Computational modeling was used to estimate the surface temperature and gain insight into the mechanism of laser polishing. Power spectral density analysis of surface topography measurements shows that laser polishing can produce smooth topography similar to that obtained by electropolish. This is a necessary first step toward introducing laser polishing as an alternative to the currently practiced chemical polishing.

  11. A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamura, N.; Kunz, M.; Chen, K.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Warwick, T.

    2009-03-10

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to {approx} 1 um size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  12. Vector generator scan converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  13. Vector generator scan converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  14. Photothermal method of determining calorific properties of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amer, N.M.

    1983-05-16

    Predetermined amounts of heat are generated within a coal sample by directing pump light pulses of predetermined energy content into a small surface region of the sample. A beam of probe light is directed along the sample surface and deflection of the probe beam from thermally induced changes of index of refraction in the fluid medium adjacent the heated region are detected. Deflection amplitude and the phase lag of the deflection, relative to the initiating pump light pulse, are indicative of the calorific value and the porosity of the sample. The method provides rapid, accurate and nondestructive analysis of the heat producing capabilities of coal samples. In the preferred form, sequences of pump light pulses of increasing durations are directed into the sample at each of a series of minute regions situated along a raster scan path enabling detailed analysis of variations of thermal properties at different areas of the sample and at different depths.

  15. MTV Utility Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-02-29

    The MSV Java Utility Library contains software developed over many years for many sponsors. (This work is not a derivative of CB-EMIS), but rather support to the CB-EMIS software). Projects that have used and contributed to code in this library: CB-EMIS (PROTECT), BWIC, Fort Future, Teva, Integrated Oceans, ENKIMDU, RCW, JEMS, JWACS, EPA watershed, and many others. This library will continue to be used in other non-CB-EMIS related projects. The components include: Spatial components: Multi-coordinatemore » system spatial objects. 2D spatial indexing system, and polygon griding system. Data translation: Allows import and export of file based data to and from object oriented systems. Multi-platform data streams: Allows platform specific data streams to operate on any support platform. Other items include printing, custom GUI components, support for NIMA Raster Product Format, program logging utilities and others.« less

  16. Image intensifier gain uniformity improvements in sealed tubes by selective scrubbing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, S.W.

    1995-04-18

    The gain uniformity of sealed microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPIs) is improved by selectively scrubbing the high gain sections with a controlled bright light source. Using the premise that ions returning to the cathode from the microchannel plate (MCP) damage the cathode and reduce its sensitivity, a HeNe laser beam light source is raster scanned across the cathode of a microchannel plate image intensifier (MCPI) tube. Cathode current is monitored and when it exceeds a preset threshold, the sweep rate is decreased 1000 times, giving 1000 times the exposure to cathode areas with sensitivity greater than the threshold. The threshold is set at the cathode current corresponding to the lowest sensitivity in the active cathode area so that sensitivity of the entire cathode is reduced to this level. This process reduces tube gain by between 10% and 30% in the high gain areas while gain reduction in low gain areas is negligible. 4 figs.

  17. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  18. The ORNL Basemapping and Imagery Project: Data collection, processing and dissemination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuttle, M.; Pace, P.

    1996-04-01

    Over the past three years, the GIS and Computer Modeling (GCM) Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been engaged in creating a very comprehensive geospatial data base for Department of Energy (DOE) installations managed by the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO). This effort encompasses topographic, planimetric, land use/land cover, flood plain, digital elevation, and digital imagery data for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. The ORR covers approximately 34,800 acres and includes ORNL, the K-25 Site and the Y-12 Plant. The geographic extent of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project covers the ORR and surrounding area and two other DOE plants (Portsmouth, Ohio and Paducah, Kentucky) for a total of 166,000 acres. The resulting data represent a major improvement in the spatial accuracy and currency of data which are used as a foundation for environmental restoration, facility studies, and other GIS data applications. A GIS data server was also created in order to store and disseminate the new basemapping data. This paper describes the history of the Base Mapping and Imagery Project with emphasis on the logistical aspects of data quality assessment. data tracking, and data product work flow for a large comprehensive spatial data base. The paper then describes the evolution of the GIS data server including its design from an FTP server to a NetScape-based World Wide Web interface. This combination of data and data access provides the ORR environmental community with a carefully configured and managed GIS dataset.

  19. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed “mDn”, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  20. Deactivation and Decommissioning Planning and Analysis with Geographic Information Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollinger, James S.; Koffman, Larry D.; Austin, William E.

    2008-01-15

    From the mid-1950's through the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site produced nuclear materials for the weapons stockpile, for medical and industrial applications, and for space exploration. Although SRS has a continuing defense-related mission, the overall site mission is now oriented toward environmental restoration and management of legacy chemical and nuclear waste. With the change in mission, SRS no longer has a need for much of the infrastructure developed to support the weapons program. This excess infrastructure, which includes over 1000 facilities, will be decommissioned and demolished over the forthcoming years. Dis-positioning facilities for decommissioning and deactivation requires significant resources to determine hazards, structure type, and a rough-order-of-magnitude estimate for the decommissioning and demolition cost. Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to help manage the process of dis-positioning infrastructure and for reporting the future status of impacted facilities. Several thousand facilities of various ages and conditions are present at SRS. Many of these facilities, built to support previous defense-related missions, now represent a potential hazard and cost for maintenance and surveillance. To reduce costs and the hazards associated with this excess infrastructure, SRS has developed an ambitious plan to decommission and demolish unneeded facilities in a systematic fashion. GIS technology was used to assist development of this plan by: providing locational information for remote facilities, identifying the location of known waste units adjacent to buildings slated for demolition, and for providing a powerful visual representation of the impact of the overall plan. Several steps were required for the development of the infrastructure GIS model. The first step involved creating an accurate and current GIS representation of the infrastructure data. This data is maintained in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) system and had to be imported into a GIS framework. Since the data is maintained in a different format in CAD, import into GIS involved several spatial processing steps to convert various geometric shapes present in the CAD data to self-closing polygons. The polygons represent facility footprints in plan or map view. Once these were successfully imported and converted, building identifier attributes from the CAD had to be associated with the appropriate polygons in GIS. Attributes are stored as graphical information in a CAD system and are not 'attached' to a building in a relational sense. In GIS, attributes such as building names, building area, hazards, or other descriptive information, must be associated or related to the spatial polygon representing a particular building. This spatial relationship between building polygons and the descriptive attribute information is very similar to relating tables of information in a relational database in which each table record has a unique identifier that can be used to join or relate that table to other tables of information present in the database. The CAD building identifiers were imported into the GIS and several spatial processing steps were used to associate building polygons with the correct identifiers. These spatial steps involved determining the intersection of and nearest identifiers with each building polygon in the GIS. Automating this process in GIS saved a significant amount of time. Once a current and geographically correct representation of the infrastructure data had been created in GIS, field-engineering teams collected information for each facility. This information included the building area, radiological hazards and the associated area, industrial hazards such as asbestos or mercury, structure type (e.g. hardened, industrial, nuclear), annual surveillance and monitoring cost, and other engineering data. The facility engineering data was used in a simple model to determine the rough-order-of-magnitude cost for decontaminating and demolishing each facility. Finally, the engineering and cost data was linked to the GIS model so that this data could be rapidly displayed and analyzed in its geographic context. Once the GIS representing SRS infrastructure and associated descriptive attribute information was developed, detailed maps depicting the future status of all site facilities were created. These maps display the relationship between known waste units and buildings that will be decommissioned and demolished. Cost and hazard information was also depicted illustrating areas and facilities that could present a particular demolition challenge. Although the GIS was quite helpful as an engineering and planning tool, its real power was evident in communicating the impact of the facilities disposition plan to senior management and other stakeholders.

  1. Geospatial Analysis and Technical Assistance for Power Plant Siting Interagency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neher, L A

    2002-03-07

    The focus of this contract (in the summer and fall of 2001) was originally to help the California Energy Commission (CEC) locate and evaluate potential sites for electric power generation facilities and to assist the CEC in addressing areas of congestion on transmission lines and natural gas supply line corridors. Subsequent events have reduced the immediate urgency, although not the ultimate need for such analyses. Software technology for deploying interactive geographic information systems (GIS) accessible over the Internet have developed to the point that it is now practical to develop and publish GIS web sites that have substantial viewing, movement, query, and even map-making capabilities. As part of a separate project not funded by the CEC, the GIS Center at LLNL, on an experimental basis, has developed a web site to explore the technical difficulties as well as the interest in such a web site by agencies and others concerned with energy research. This exploratory effort offers the potential or developing an interactive GIS web site for use by the CEC for energy research, policy analysis, site evaluation, and permit and regulatory matters. To help ground the geospatial capabilities in the realistic requirements and needs of the CEC staff, the CEC requested that the GIS Center conduct interviews of several CEC staff persons to establish their current and envisioned use of spatial data and requirements for geospatial analyses. This survey will help define a web-accessible central GIS database for the CEC, which will augment the well-received work of the CEC Cartography Unit. Individuals within each siting discipline have been contacted and their responses to three question areas have been summarized. The web-based geospatial data and analytical tools developed within this project will be available to CEC staff for initial area studies, queries, and informal, small-format maps. It is not designed for fine cartography or for large-format posters such as the Cartographic Unit is excellent at producing for public meetings. Nor is it designed for the specialized geospatial analyses that the Cartographic Unit maintains a deservedly excellent reputation for producing. The web-based system could be used by the Cartographic Unit staff in support of CEC technical and policy staff to respond during meetings to questions posed by senior management or the public.

  2. Using DRASTIC'' to improve the accuracy of a geographical information system used for solid waste disposal facility siting: A case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, D.A. . Dept. of Geography)

    1993-01-01

    Beginning in 1989, the citizens and commissioners of Alachua County, Florida began to develop a siting plan for a new solid waste disposal facility (SWDF). Through a cooperative effort with a private consulting firm, several evaluative criteria were selected and then translated into parameters for a geographical information system (GIS). Despite efforts to avoid vulnerable hydrogeology, the preferred site selected was in close proximity to the well field supplying Gainesville, Florida, home to approximately 75 percent of the county's population. The results brought forth a wave of protests from local residents claiming that leachate from the proposed SWDF would contaminate their drinking water. In this study, DRASTIC'' was applied in order to improve the accuracy and defensibility of the aquifer protection-based GIS parameters. DRASTIC'', a method for evaluating ground water contamination potential, is an acronym which stands for Depth to Water, Net Recharge, Aquifer Media, Soil Media, Topography, Impact of Vadose Zone Media, and Conductivity (Hydraulic)''.

  3. Building Height-Characteristics in Three U.S. Cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burian, S. J.; Brown, M. J.; Velugubantla, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    Urban canopy parameterizations have been used to represent urban effects in numerical models of mesoscale meteorology, the surface energy budget, and pollutant dispersion. The urban canopy parameterization accounts for the drag exerted by urban roughness elements, the enhancement of turbulent kinetic energy, and the alteration of the surface energy budget (Brown 2000). Accurate representation of urban effects in numerical simulations requires the determination of urban morphological parameters, including building height statistics. Computer analysis of 3-D building digital datasets can provide details of the urban environment in an efficient manner. Ratti ut al. (2001) describe a method for obtaining urban canopy parameters from digital imagery using image processing techniques, Burian et al. (2002) present an alternative analysis approach using a geographic information system (GIS). In this paper, building height statistics computed for three U.S. cities following the GIS approach are presented.

  4. RAPID MAPPING TOOL: AN ARCMAP EXTENSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEVE P. LINGER; PAUL M. RICH; DOUG WALTHER; MARC S. WITKOWSKI; MARCIA A. JONES; HARI S. KHALSA

    2002-06-18

    Cartographic production laboratories produce large volumes of maps for diverse customers. Turnaround time and consistency are key concerns. The Rapid Mapping Tool is an ArcMap based tool that enables rapid creation of maps to meet customer needs. This tool was constructed using VB/VBA, ArcObjects, and ArcGIS templates. The core capability of ArcMap is extended for custom map production by storing specifications associated with a map or template in a companion XML document. These specifications include settings and preferences used to create custom maps. The tool was developed as a component of an enterprise GIS, which enables spatial data management and delivery using ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Oracle, and a web-based request tracking system.

  5. Rapid mapping tool : an ArcMap extension /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linger, S. P.; Rich, P. M.; Walther, D.; Witkowski, M. S.; Jones, M. A.; Khalsa, H. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cartographic production laboratories produce large volumes of maps for diverse customers. Turnaround time and consistency are key concerns. The Rapid Mapping Tool is an ArcMap based tool that enables rapid creation of maps to meet customer needs. This tool was constructed using VB/VBA, ArcObjects, and ArcGIS templates. The core capability of ArcMap is extended for custom map production by storing specifications associated with a map or template in a companion XML document. These specifications include settings and preferences used to create custom maps. The tool was developed as a component of an enterprise GIS, which enables spatial data management and delivery using ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Oracle, and a web-based request tracking system.

  6. An integrated computer modeling environment for regional land use, air quality, and transportation planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanley, C.J.; Marshall, N.L.

    1997-04-01

    The Land Use, Air Quality, and Transportation Integrated Modeling Environment (LATIME) represents an integrated approach to computer modeling and simulation of land use allocation, travel demand, and mobile source emissions for the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area. This environment provides predictive capability combined with a graphical and geographical interface. The graphical interface shows the causal relationships between data and policy scenarios and supports alternative model formulations. Scenarios are launched from within a Geographic Information System (GIS), and data produced by each model component at each time step within a simulation is stored in the GIS. A menu-driven query system is utilized to review link-based results and regional and area-wide results. These results can also be compared across time or between alternative land use scenarios. Using this environment, policies can be developed and implemented based on comparative analysis, rather than on single-step future projections. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Assessing deforestation in the coastal zone of the Campeche State, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mas, J.F.; Vega, A.P.; Aponte, G.P.; Lomeli, D.Z.

    1997-06-01

    In order to determine rates of deforestation in the State of Campeche, Mexico, forest maps of 1978/80 and 1992 were compared within a geographic information system (GIS). Results indicate that more than 25 per cent of the tropical forest and mangroves were deforested and other 29 per cent were fragmented during this period. The rate of deforestation in the whole state is about 4.4 per cent per year, but the analysis showed that rates of deforestation are much higher in the coastal zone. For this reason an attempt was made to study deforestation patterns in the coastal zone. Data such as distance from roads and from settlements images were incorporated in the GIS data base and a model which represents influence of population on its environment was developed in order to establish the influence of socioeconomic factors on forest clearing. Results indicate that deforestation presents a higher correlation with levels of poverty and social abandonment than with demographic aspects.

  8. Geographic information system for Long Island: An epidemiologic systems approach to identify environmental breast cancer risks on Long Island. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barancik, J.I.; Kramer, C.F.; Thode, H.C. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    BNL is developing and implementing the project ``Geographic Information System (GIS) for Long Island`` to address the potential relationship of environmental and occupational exposures to breast cancer etiology on Long Island. The project is divided into two major phases: The four month-feasibility project (Phase 1), and the major development and implementation project (Phase 2). This report summarizes the work completed in the four month Phase 1 Project, ``Feasibility of a Geographic Information System for Long Island.`` It provides the baseline information needed to further define and prioritize the scope of work for subsequent tasks. Phase 2 will build upon this foundation to develop an operational GIS for the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP).

  9. A brief history of geospatial science in the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a rich history of significant contributions to geospatial science spanning the past four decades. In the early years, work focused on basic research, such as development of algorithms for processing geographic data and early use of LANDSAT imagery. The emphasis shifted in the mid-1970s to development of geographic information system (GIS) applications to support programs such as the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), and later to issue-oriented GIS applications supporting programs such as environmental restoration and management (mid-1980s through present). Throughout this period, the DOE national laboratories represented a strong chorus of voices advocating the importance of geospatial science and technology in the decades to come. The establishment of a Geospatial Science Program by the DOE Office of the Chief Information Officer in 2005 reflects the continued potential of geospatial science to enhance DOE's science, projects, and operations, as is well demonstrated by historical analysis.

  10. Estimating Rooftop Suitability for PV: A Review of Methods, Patents, and Validation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, J.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A number of methods have been developed using remote sensing data to estimate rooftop area suitable for the installation of photovoltaics (PV) at various geospatial resolutions. This report reviews the literature and patents on methods for estimating rooftop-area appropriate for PV, including constant-value methods, manual selection methods, and GIS-based methods. This report also presents NREL's proposed method for estimating suitable rooftop area for PV using Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in conjunction with a GIS model to predict areas with appropriate slope, orientation, and sunlight. NREL's method is validated against solar installation data from New Jersey, Colorado, and California to compare modeled results to actual on-the-ground measurements.

  11. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2012 The need for timely preparation of quality EISs has not lessened since DOE initiated the NEPA Lessons Learned program in 1994. This issue provides advice on developing and maintaining EIS schedules from some of the Department's most experienced NEPA practitioners and highlights guidance and GIS tools that can help DOE prepare NEPA documents more efficiently. Articles in this issue include: How to Manage an EIS Schedule Successfully EPA Electronic

  12. Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2012 This issue features suggestions from experienced NEPA practitioners on ways to meet Secretary Chu's challenge to make better use of existing tools and integrate project management with NEPA compliance. Articles in this issue include: Secretary's Memorandum Key Principles OLC Training Suggestions from NETL Effective EIS Management Teams EPA Requires Electronic EIS Filing 2012 DOE NEPA Stakeholders Directory DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update GIS

  13. Lummi Indian Reservation Wind Energy Development Feasibility Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lummi Indian Reservation Wind Energy Development Feasibility Assessment Jeremy Freimund, Water Resources Manager Victor Johnson, GIS/Water Resources Tech. III Lummi Natural Resources Department U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review November 15, 2011 Purpose Statement l The purpose of this presentation is to: l Provide summary information about the Lummi Nation; l Describe the Lummi Indian Reservation Wind Energy Development Feasibility Assessment Project; and l Provide an update

  14. & Immobilization Plant Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PDF icon eCommerce Suite, PIA, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - WEB iPASS System DOE PIA Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

    eGIS Portal PIA, Bonneville Power

  15. Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Dataset) | Data Explorer Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010 Title: Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010 Seismic Line Location Map Hot Pot Project, Humboldt County, Nevada 2010. ArcGIS map package containing topographic base map, Township and Range layer, Oski BLM and private leases at time of survey, and locations, with selected shot points, of the five seismic lines. Authors: Michael Lane Publication Date: 2010-01-01

  16. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States | Department of Energy Tidal Streams in the United States Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States The project documented in this report created a national database of tidal stream energy potential, as well as a GIS tool usable by industry in order to accelerate the market for tidal energy conversion technology. PDF icon Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Tidal Streams in the United States More Documents & Publications Project

  17. The ARRA EAP Energy Assurance Planning Bulletin

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1, 2010 THE AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT VOLUME 1, NUMBER 2 Need to Know LEAP Grant Award Recipients Action Items Recovery Act Report Quarterly Report Plan Updates Contact Updates Upcoming Events April 2010 Energy Conference April 2010 Summer Energy Outlook and Energy Data Workshop Training GIS Webinar NASEO Conf. Calls Other Useful Links and Information FEMA's Lessons Learned Website NIST's Cyber Standards News from the States S.D. Ethanol Bill Energy Conference Locality Notes CARRI

  18. NREL: International Activities - Geospatial Toolkits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geospatial Toolkit The Geospatial Toolkit is an NREL-developed map-based software application that integrates resource data and other geographic information systems (GIS) data for integrated resource assessment. The non-resource, country-specific data for each toolkit comes from a variety of agencies within each country as well as from global datasets. Funding for the toolkit was provided by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), United States Trade and Development

  19. NREL: International Activities - Philippines Wind Resource Maps and Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A map depicting wind resources at 100 meters of the republic of the Philippines. Additional Resources Wind Prospector A web-based GIS applications designed to support resource assessment and data exploration associated with wind development. Philippines Wind Viewer Tutorial Learn how to navigate, display, query and download Philippines data in the Wind Prospector. Philippines Geospatial Toolkit EXE 926.5 MB Philippines Wind Resource Maps and Data In 2014, under the Enhancing Capacity for Low

  20. NREL: Energy Analysis - Anthony Lopez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anthony Lopez Photo of Anthony Lopez Anthony Lopez is the section supervisor of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. GIS Scientist IV - Section Supervisor On staff since April 2009 Phone number: 303-275-3654 E-mail: anthony.lopez@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Spatial database design and utilization High performance computing Parallel processing and analysis of large geospatial datasets Visualization of complex spatial-temporal datasets Renewable

  1. NREL: Energy Analysis - Donna Heimiller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Donna Heimiller Photo of Donna Heimiller. Donna Heimiller is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Sr. GIS Analyst On staff since June 1998 Phone number: 303-275-4667 E-mail: donna.heimiller@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis and modeling supporting multiple resource assessment technologies, regional-scale site evaluation, and energy system modeling Electricity infrastructure analysis Data visualization Primary research

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Dylan Hettinger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dylan Hettinger Photo of Dylan Hettinger. Dylan Hettinger is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. GIS Programmer Analyst On staff since 2010 Phone number: 303-275-3750 E-mail: dylan.hettinger@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Information design Spatial analysis and cartography Prior work experience AMEC Earth & Environmental, Denver, CO Greenhorne & O'Mara, Raleigh, NC Personal interests/hobbies All kinds of climbing and cycling

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Michael Gleason

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gleason Michael Gleason is a member of the Data Analysis and Visualization Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Scientist III - GIS On staff since April 2014 Phone number: 303-275-4109 E-mail: Michael.Gleason@nrel.gov Areas of expertise Geospatial analysis and modeling Scientific programming Multivariate data visualization Technical writing and editing Primary research interests Modeling technical resource potential for renewable technologies Modeling market diffusion of distributed

  4. Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

    2001-04-03

    While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

  5. Probabilistic seismic risk of the territory of Bishkek city, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamchybekov, Murataly Pakirovich

    2008-07-08

    For seismic risk analysis were gathered information about district's seismicity, tectonics, topography, and engineering--geotechnical conditions, which present in apartments, infrastructures and demographies. All of these informations are joined within the limits of GIS for father probabilistic evaluations from different losses levels from earthquake, and also definitions of effective arrangements by reaction. There were given analysis of obtained results with the purpose to take into the consideration and falling of seismic risk's levels.

  6. Evaluation of Potential Locations for Siting Small Modular Reactors near Federal Energy Clusters to Support Federal Clean Energy Goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, Randy J.; Omitaomu, Olufemi A.

    2014-09-01

    Geographic information systems (GIS) technology was applied to analyze federal energy demand across the contiguous US. Several federal energy clusters were previously identified, including Hampton Roads, Virginia, which was subsequently studied in detail. This study provides an analysis of three additional diverse federal energy clusters. The analysis shows that there are potential sites in various federal energy clusters that could be evaluated further for placement of an integral pressurized-water reactor (iPWR) to support meeting federal clean energy goals.

  7. Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Calendar Year 2015

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7 include annual weed distribution data (for selected species), annual weed control locations, biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's mouse and wetland mitigation areas, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS-compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial

  8. Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    6 and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's meadow jumping mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's meadow jumping mouse and wetland mitigation work, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS ® compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different time frames, including pre- and post-closure. 3.4 Validation

  9. Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Spatial ecology data for the Site are available for several data types and are stored in the GIS on the servers in Grand Junction, Colorado. The types of ecological spatial data that are available include annual weed distribution data (for selected species), annual weed control locations, biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations,

  10. Microsoft Word - S09641_2012Annual.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8 biocontrol release locations, vegetation and wildlife monitoring locations (transect endpoints and sample points), vegetation community classifications, Preble's mouse habitat, wetland locations, wildfire/prescribed burn locations, Preble's mouse and wetland mitigation areas, and rare plant locations. These data are available in various ArcGIS-compatible formats. In addition to these types of spatial data, orthorectified aerial and satellite imagery is also available for the Site for different

  11. Mapping Suitability Areas for Concentrated Solar Power Plants Using Remote Sensing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2015-01-01

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. We present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.

  12. Using geographic information systems in the delineation of wellhead protection areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Horton, C.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The 1986 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act established the nationwide wellhead protection program to be administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although individual states have the responsibility to implement wellhead protection, the US EPA provides technical guidance, and approves each wellhead protection plan prepared by the states. A major aspect of wellhead protection strategies is the delineation of wellhead protection areas. These are zones around municipal water supply wells that receive special land use considerations intended to minimize the threat of contamination of the wells. The US EPA has recommended several technical approaches to delineating wellhead protection areas, ranging in sophistication from simple concentric circles around wells to irregular areas determined from groundwater flow and transport analyses. Regardless of the wellhead protection area delineation technique, the resulting area surrounding the municipal well must be accurately mapped. A geographic information system (GIS) approach to mapping the results of wellhead protection area delineation is demonstrated. Using hypothetical groundwater flow regimes, each EPA recommended approach to wellhead protection area delineation is presented in a GIS format. A visual comparison of delineation techniques in terms of area and configuration of the resulting wellhead protection areas is made. Finally, the advantages of using a GIS for representing wellhead protection areas is provided.

  13. Method for preparing polyaniline fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  14. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    1999-11-09

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  15. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; Wang, Hsing-Lin

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  16. Mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants using remote sensing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A.; Singh, Nagendra; Bhaduri, Budhendra L.

    2015-05-14

    The political push to increase power generation from renewable sources such as solar energy requires knowing the best places to site new solar power plants with respect to the applicable regulatory, operational, engineering, environmental, and socioeconomic criteria. Therefore, in this paper, we present applications of remote sensing data for mapping suitability areas for concentrated solar power plants. Our approach uses digital elevation model derived from NASA s Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) at a resolution of 3 arc second (approx. 90m resolution) for estimating global solar radiation for the study area. Then, we develop a computational model built on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform that divides the study area into a grid of cells and estimates site suitability value for each cell by computing a list of metrics based on applicable siting requirements using GIS data. The computed metrics include population density, solar energy potential, federal lands, and hazardous facilities. Overall, some 30 GIS data are used to compute eight metrics. The site suitability value for each cell is computed as an algebraic sum of all metrics for the cell with the assumption that all metrics have equal weight. Finally, we color each cell according to its suitability value. Furthermore, we present results for concentrated solar power that drives a stream turbine and parabolic mirror connected to a Stirling Engine.

  17. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  18. PFIDL Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-05-15

    PFIDL is an analysis and visualization package written to assist scientists in obtaining a better understanding of experimental and theoretical data and for the graphical generation of theoretical code input. PFIDL is written in Fortran, C, and the IDL procedural language. It extends the functionality and provides a more user-friendly interface for the commercial software IDL from Research Systems, Inc. In addition to several standard ASCII data set formats, PFIDL provides a convenient interface to the PFF, Exodus-II, SAF, PDS, PDB and ACIS data file formats, and has convenient output routines for standard image formats. Full IDL functionality is maintained to facilitate redundant analysis of multiple data sets. Special purpose analysis routines, the rich selection of input routines, and extensive comparison, mathematical, and display routines, facilitate the rapid understanding of experimental and theoretical data sets. PFIDL also includes a Fortran library and graphical user interface for IDL that facilitates the use of PFIDL graphics and analysis procedures in Fortran programs while maintaining the command recall and command editing functionality of IDL. On-line documentation is included.

  19. Designs for Risk Evaluation and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-12-01

    The Designs for Risk Evaluation and Management (DREAM) tool was developed as part of the effort to quantify the risk of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). DREAM is an optimization tool created to identify optimal monitoring schemes that minimize the time to first detection of CO2 leakage from a subsurface storage formation. DREAM acts as a post-processer on user-provided output from subsurface leakage simulations. While DREAM was developed for CO2 leakage scenarios, it is applicable to any subsurface leakage simulation of the same output format. The DREAM tool is comprised of three main components: (1) a Java wizard used to configure and execute the simulations, (2) a visualization tool to view the domain space and optimization results, and (3) a plotting tool used to analyze the results. A secondary Java application is provided to aid users in converting common American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) output data to the standard DREAM hierarchical data format (HDF5). DREAM employs a simulated annealing approach that searches the solution space by iteratively mutating potential monitoring schemes built of various configurations of monitoring locations and leak detection parameters. This approach has proven to be orders of magnitude faster than an exhaustive search of the entire solution space. The user’s manual illustrates the program graphical user interface (GUI), describes the tool inputs, and includes an example application.

  20. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    A system and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded "D" character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the "D" interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available.

  1. System and method for simultaneously collecting serial number information from numerous identity tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, M.A.

    1997-01-07

    A system and method are disclosed for simultaneously collecting serial number information reports from numerous colliding coded-radio-frequency identity tags. Each tag has a unique multi-digit serial number that is stored in non-volatile RAM. A reader transmits an ASCII coded ``D`` character on a carrier of about 900 MHz and a power illumination field having a frequency of about 1.6 Ghz. A one MHz tone is modulated on the 1.6 Ghz carrier as a timing clock for a microprocessor in each of the identity tags. Over a thousand such tags may be in the vicinity and each is powered-up and clocked by the 1.6 Ghz power illumination field. Each identity tag looks for the ``D`` interrogator modulated on the 900 MHz carrier, and each uses a digit of its serial number to time a response. Clear responses received by the reader are repeated for verification. If no verification or a wrong number is received by any identity tag, it uses a second digital together with the first to time out a more extended period for response. Ultimately, the entire serial number will be used in the worst case collision environments; and since the serial numbers are defined as being unique, the final possibility will be successful because a clear time-slot channel will be available. 5 figs.

  2. PFIDL Version 2.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-15

    PFIDL is an analysis and visualization package written to assist scientists in obtaining a better understanding of experimental and theoretical data and for the graphical generation of theoretical code input. PFIDL is written in Fortran, C, and the IDL procedural language. It extends the functionality and provides a more user-friendly interface for the commercial software IDL from Research Systems, Inc. In addition to several standard ASCII data set formats, PFIDL provides a convenient interface tomore » the PFF, Exodus-II, SAF, PDS, PDB and ACIS data file formats, and has convenient output routines for standard image formats. Full IDL functionality is maintained to facilitate redundant analysis of multiple data sets. Special purpose analysis routines, the rich selection of input routines, and extensive comparison, mathematical, and display routines, facilitate the rapid understanding of experimental and theoretical data sets. PFIDL also includes a Fortran library and graphical user interface for IDL that facilitates the use of PFIDL graphics and analysis procedures in Fortran programs while maintaining the command recall and command editing functionality of IDL. On-line documentation is included.« less

  3. Express Primer Tool for high-throughput gene cloning and expression

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-12-01

    A tool to assist in the design of primers for DNA amplification. The Express Primer web-based tool generates primer sequences specifically for the generation of expression clones for both lab scale and high-throughput projects. The application is designed not only to allow the user complete flexibility to specify primer design parameters but also to minimize the amount of manual intervention needed to generate a large number of primers for simultaneous amplification of multiple target genes.more » The Express Primer Tool enables the user to specify various experimental parameters (e.g. optimal Tm, Tm range, maximum Tm difference) for single or multiple candidate sequence(s) in FASTA format input as a flat text (ASCII) file. The application generates condidate primers, selects optimal primer pairs, and writes the forward and reverse primers pairs to an Excel file that is suitable for electronic submission to a synthesis facility. The program parameters emphasize high-throughput but allow for target atrition at various stages of the project.« less

  4. Task-parallel message passing interface implementation of Autodock4 for docking of very large databases of compounds using high-performance super-computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collignon, Barbara C; Schultz, Roland; Smith, Jeremy C; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    A message passing interface (MPI)-based implementation (Autodock4.lga.MPI) of the grid-based docking program Autodock4 has been developed to allow simultaneous and independent docking of multiple compounds on up to thousands of central processing units (CPUs) using the Lamarkian genetic algorithm. The MPI version reads a single binary file containing precalculated grids that represent the protein-ligand interactions, i.e., van der Waals, electrostatic, and desolvation potentials, and needs only two input parameter files for the entire docking run. In comparison, the serial version of Autodock4 reads ASCII grid files and requires one parameter file per compound. The modifications performed result in significantly reduced input/output activity compared with the serial version. Autodock4.lga.MPI scales up to 8192 CPUs with a maximal overhead of 16.3%, of which two thirds is due to input/output operations and one third originates from MPI operations. The optimal docking strategy, which minimizes docking CPU time without lowering the quality of the database enrichments, comprises the docking of ligands preordered from the most to the least flexible and the assignment of the number of energy evaluations as a function of the number of rotatable bounds. In 24 h, on 8192 high-performance computing CPUs, the present MPI version would allow docking to a rigid protein of about 300K small flexible compounds or 11 million rigid compounds.

  5. Grid Logging: Best Practices Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tierney, Brian L; Tierney, Brian L; Gunter, Dan

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to help developers of Grid middleware and application software generate log files that will be useful to Grid administrators, users, developers and Grid middleware itself. Currently, most of the currently generated log files are only useful to the author of the program. Good logging practices are instrumental to performance analysis, problem diagnosis, and security auditing tasks such as incident tracing and damage assessment. This document does not discuss the issue of a logging API. It is assumed that a standard log API such as syslog (C), log4j (Java), or logger (Python) is being used. Other custom logging API or even printf could be used. The key point is that the logs must contain the required information in the required format. At a high level of abstraction, the best practices for Grid logging are: (1) Consistently structured, typed, log events; (2) A standard high-resolution timestamp; (3) Use of logging levels and categories to separate logs by detail and purpose; (4) Consistent use of global and local identifiers; and (5) Use of some regular, newline-delimited ASCII text format. The rest of this document describes each of these recommendations in detail.

  6. Source Catalog Data from FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Becker, Robert H.; Helfand, David J.; White, Richard L.; Gregg, Michael D.; Laurent-Muehleisen, Sally A.

    FIRST, Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters, is a project designed to produce the radio equivalent of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey over 10,000 square degrees of the North Galactic Cap. Using the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's (NRAO) Very Large Array (VLA) in its B-configuration, the Survey acquired 3-minute snapshots covering a hexagonal grid using 2?7 3-MHz frequency channels centered at 1365 and 1435 MHz. The data were edited, self-calibrated, mapped, and CLEANed using an automated pipeline based largely on routines in the Astronomical Image Processing System (AIPS). A final atlas of maps is produced by coadding the twelve images adjacent to each pointing center. Source catalogs with flux densities and size information are generated from the coadded images also. The 2011 catalog is the latest version and has been tested to ensure reliability and completness. The catalog, generated from the 1993 through 2004 images, contains 816,000 sources and covers more than 9000 square degrees. A specialized search interface for the catalog resides at this website, and the catalog is also available as a compressed ASCII file. The user may also view earlier versions of the source catalog. The FIRST survey area was chosen to coincide with that of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS); at the m(v)~24 limit of SDSS, ~50% of the optical counterparts to FIRST sources will be detected.

  7. Groundwater Screen

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore » the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  8. Brain-Emulating Cognition and Control Architecture (BECCA) V1.0 beta

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-09-30

    BECCA is a learning and control method based on the function of the human brain. The goal behind its creation is to learn to control robots in unfamiliar environments in a way that is very robust, similar to the way that an infant learns to interact with her environment by trial and error. As of this release, this software contains two simulations of BECCA controlling robots: one is a one degree-of-freedom spinner robot and themore » other is a 7 degree-of-freedom serial link arm with a terminal gripper. In addition, the software contains code that identifies synonyms in a untagged corpus of ASCII words. This last is a demonstration of BECCA's ability to generate abstract concepts from concrete experience. The BECCA simulation is coded so as to make it extensible to new applications. It is modular, object-oriented code in which the portions of the code that are specific to one simulation are easily separable from those portions that are the constant between implementations. BECCA makes very few assumptions about the robot and environment it is learning, and so is applicable to a wide range of learning and control problems.« less

  9. High-Energy Cosmic Ray Event Data from the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory in Mendoza, Argentina is the result of an international collaboration funded by 15 countries and many different organizations. Its mission is to capture high-energy cosmic ray events or air showers for research into their origin and nature. The Pierre Auger Collaboration agreed to make 1% of its data available to the public. The Public Event Explorer is a search tool that allows users to browse or search for and display figures and data plots of events collected since 2004. The repository is updated daily, and, as of June, 2014, makes more than 35,000 events publicly available. The energy of a cosmic ray is measured in Exa electron volts or EeV. These event displays can be browsed in order of their energy level from 0.1 to 41.1 EeV. Each event has an individual identification number.

    The event displays provide station data, cosmic ray incoming direction, various energy measurements, plots, vector-based images, and an ASCII data file.

  10. Coal Preparation Plant Simulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-25

    COALPREP assesses the degree of cleaning obtained with different coal feeds for a given plant configuration and mode of operation. It allows the user to simulate coal preparation plants to determine an optimum plant configuration for a given degree of cleaning. The user can compare the performance of alternative plant configurations as well as determine the impact of various modes of operation for a proposed configuration. The devices that can be modelled include froth flotationmore » devices, washers, dewatering equipment, thermal dryers, rotary breakers, roll crushers, classifiers, screens, blenders and splitters, and gravity thickeners. The user must specify the plant configuration and operating conditions and a description of the coal feed. COALPREP then determines the flowrates within the plant and a description of each flow stream (i.e. the weight distribution, percent ash, pyritic sulfur and total sulfur, moisture, BTU content, recoveries, and specific gravity of separation). COALPREP also includes a capability for calculating the cleaning cost per ton of coal. The IBM PC version contains two auxiliary programs, DATAPREP and FORLIST. DATAPREP is an interactive preprocessor for creating and editing COALPREP input data. FORLIST converts carriage-control characters in FORTRAN output data to ASCII line-feed (X''0A'') characters.« less

  11. SAPHIRE 8 Volume 7 - Data Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood; C. L. Smith; S. R. Prescott

    2011-03-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE Version 8 is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 8. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  12. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  13. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  14. Automated D/3 to Visio Analog Diagrams

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-08-10

    ADVAD1 reads an ASCII file containing the D/3 DCS MDL input for analog points for a D/3 continuous database. It uses the information in the files to create a series of Visio files representing the structure of each analog chain, one drawing per Visio file. The actual drawing function is performed by Visio (requires Visio version 4.5+). The user can configure the program to select which fields in the database are shown on the diagrammore » and how the information is to be presented. This gives a visual representation of the structure of the analog chains, showing selected fields in a consistent manner. Updating documentation can be done easily and the automated approach eliminates human error in the cadding process. The program can also create the drawings far faster than a human operator is capable, able to create approximately 270 typical diagrams in about 8 minutes on a Pentium II 400 MHz PC. The program allows for multiple option sets to be saved to provide different settings (i.e., different fields, different field presentations, and /or different diagram layouts) for various scenarios or facilities on one workstation. Option sets may be exported from the Windows registry to allow duplication of settings on another workstation.« less

  15. Solving iTOUGH2 simulation and optimization problems using the PEST protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.A.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-02-01

    The PEST protocol has been implemented into the iTOUGH2 code, allowing the user to link any simulation program (with ASCII-based inputs and outputs) to iTOUGH2's sensitivity analysis, inverse modeling, and uncertainty quantification capabilities. These application models can be pre- or post-processors of the TOUGH2 non-isothermal multiphase flow and transport simulator, or programs that are unrelated to the TOUGH suite of codes. PEST-style template and instruction files are used, respectively, to pass input parameters updated by the iTOUGH2 optimization routines to the model, and to retrieve the model-calculated values that correspond to observable variables. We summarize the iTOUGH2 capabilities and demonstrate the flexibility added by the PEST protocol for the solution of a variety of simulation-optimization problems. In particular, the combination of loosely coupled and tightly integrated simulation and optimization routines provides both the flexibility and control needed to solve challenging inversion problems for the analysis of multiphase subsurface flow and transport systems.

  16. Real time, TV-based, point-image quantizer and sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Case, Arthur L.; Davidson, Jackson B.

    1976-01-01

    A device is provided for improving the vertical resolution in a television-based, two-dimensional readout for radiation detection systems such as are used to determine the location of light or nuclear radiation impinging a target area viewed by a television camera, where it is desired to store the data indicative of the centroid location of such images. In the example embodiment, impinging nuclear radiation detected in the form of a scintillation occurring in a crystal is stored as a charge image on a television camera tube target. The target is scanned in a raster and the image position is stored according to a corresponding vertical scan number and horizontal position number along the scan. To determine the centroid location of an image that may overlap a number of horizontal scan lines along the vertical axis of the raster, digital logic circuits are provided with at least four series-connected shift registers, each having 512 bit positions according to a selected 512 horizontal increment of resolutions along a scan line. The registers are shifted by clock pulses at a rate of 512 pulses per scan line. When an image or portion thereof is detected along a scan, its horizontal center location is determined and the present front bit is set in the first shift register and shifted through the registers one at a time for each horizontal scan. Each register is compared bit-by-bit with the preceding register to detect coincident set bit positions until the last scan line detecting a portion of the image is determined. Depending on the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the image is shifted, circuitry is provided to store the vertical center position of the event according to the number of shift registers through which the first detection of the event is shifted. Interpolation circuitry is provided to determine if the event centroid is between adjacent scan lines and stored in a vertical address accordingly. The horizontal location of the event is stored in a separate address memory.

  17. SIMULATION OF NET INFILTRATION FOR MODERN AND POTENTIAL FUTURE CLIMATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Heveal

    2000-06-16

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes enhancements made to the infiltration model documented in Flint et al. (1996) and documents an analysis using the enhanced model to generate spatial and temporal distributions over a model domain encompassing the Yucca Mountain site, Nevada. Net infiltration is the component of infiltrated precipitation, snowmelt, or surface water run-on that has percolated below the zone of evapotranspiration as defined by the depth of the effective root zone, the average depth below the ground surface (at a given location) from which water is removed by evapotranspiration. The estimates of net infiltration are used for defining the upper boundary condition for the site-scale 3-dimensional Unsaturated-Zone Ground Water Flow and Transport (UZ flow and transport) Model (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The UZ flow and transport model is one of several process models abstracted by the Total System Performance Assessment model to evaluate expected performance of the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in terms of radionuclide transport (CRWMS M&O 1998). The net-infiltration model is important for assessing potential repository-system performance because output from this model provides the upper boundary condition for the UZ flow and transport model that is used to generate flow fields for evaluating potential radionuclide transport through the unsaturated zone. Estimates of net infiltration are provided as raster-based, 2-dimensional grids of spatially distributed, time-averaged rates for three different climate stages estimated as likely conditions for the next 10,000 years beyond the present. Each climate stage is represented using a lower bound, a mean, and an upper bound climate and corresponding net-infiltration scenario for representing uncertainty in the characterization of daily climate conditions for each climate stage, as well as potential climate variability within each climate stage. The set of nine raster grid maps provide spatially detailed representations of the magnitude and distribution of net-infiltration rates that are used to define specified flux upper boundary conditions for the UZ flow and transport model.

  18. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  19. Photon induced Schottky barrier effects in inverse-extraordinary optoconductance structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, L.; Solin, S. A.; Gilbertson, A.; Cohen, L. F.

    2013-12-04

    We expand upon our previous work and characterize the photo-dependence of the effective Schottky barrier in EOC and I-EOC heterostructures by measuring the open circuit voltage and the change in the reverse bias resistance. Under full illumination by a 5 mW, 632.8 nm HeNe laser, the barrier is effectively eliminated and the Ti-GaAs interface becomes Ohmic. The reverse bias resistance changes by a factor of 209 over an illumination intensity change of 105:1. While this work illustrates the behavior of the Schottky interface upon illumination, it also demonstrates the effectiveness of the four-point, van der Pauw measurement fundamental to EOC/I-EOC phenomena at monitoring changes in the active region of the mesa. The resistance is largely unaffected by the photovoltaic, DC offset of the surrounding leads, as indicated by the radial symmetry of 2-D resistance maps obtained by rastering the laser across EOC/IEOC devices.

  20. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of themore » beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.« less

  1. Pizza.py Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    Pizza.py is a loosely integrated collection of tools, many of which provide support for the LAMMPS molecular dynamics and ChemCell cell modeling packages. There are tools to create input files. convert between file formats, process log and dump files, create plots, and visualize and animate simulation snapshots. Software packages that are wrapped by Pizza.py. so they can invoked from within Python, include GnuPlot, MatLab, Raster3d. and RasMol. Pizza.py is written in Python and runs onmore » any platform that supports Python. Pizza.py enhances the standard Python interpreter in a few simple ways. Its tools are Python modules which can be invoked interactively, from scripts, or from GUIs when appropriate. Some of the tools require additional Python packages to be installed as part of the users Python. Others are wrappers on software packages (as listed above) which must be available on the users system. It is easy to modify or extend Pizza.py with new functionality or new tools, which need not have anything to do with LAMMPS or ChemCell.« less

  2. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  3. EDS operator and control software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, L.L.

    1985-04-01

    The Enrichment Diagnostic System (EDS) was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to acquire, display and analyze large quantities of transient data for a real-time Advanced Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) experiment. Major topics discussed in this paper are the EDS operator interface (SHELL) program, the data acquisition and analysis scheduling software, and the graphics software. The workstation concept used in EDS, the software used to configure a user's workstation, and the ownership and management of a diagnostic are described. An EDS diagnostic is a combination of hardware and software designed to study specific aspects of the process. Overall system performance is discussed from the standpoint of scheduling techniques, evaluation tools, optimization techniques, and program-to-program communication methods. EDS is based on a data driven design which keeps the need to modify software to a minimum. This design requires a fast and reliable data base management system. A third party data base management product, Berkeley Software System Database, written explicitly for HP1000's, is used for all EDS data bases. All graphics is done with an in-house graphics product, Device Independent Graphics Library (DIGLIB). Examples of devices supported by DIGLIB are: Versatec printer/plotters, Raster Technologies Graphic Display Controllers, and HP terminals (HP264x and HP262x). The benefits derived by using HP hardware and software as well as obstacles imposed by the HP environment are presented in relation to EDS development and implementation.

  4. High-intensity positron microprobe at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golge, Serkan; Vlahovic, Branislav; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B.

    2014-06-19

    We present a conceptual design for a novel continuous wave electron-linac based high-intensity slow-positron production source with a projected intensity on the order of 1010 e+/s. Reaching this intensity in our design relies on the transport of positrons (T+ below 600 keV) from the electron-positron pair production converter target to a low-radiation and low-temperature area for moderation in a high-efficiency cryogenic rare gas moderator, solid Ne. The performance of the integrated beamline has been verified through computational studies. The computational results include Monte Carlo calculations of the optimized electron/positron beam energies, converter target thickness, synchronized raster system, transport of the beam from the converter target to the moderator, extraction of the beam from the channel, and moderation efficiency calculations. For the extraction of positrons from the magnetic channel a magnetic field terminator plug prototype has been built and experimental data on the effectiveness of this prototype are presented. The dissipation of the heat away from the converter target and radiation protection measures are also discussed.

  5. A Distributed Modeling System for Short-Term to Seasonal Ensemble Streamflow Forecasting in Snowmelt Dominated Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Gill, Muhammad K.; Coleman, Andre M.; Prasad, Rajiv; Vail, Lance W.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a distributed modeling system for short-term to seasonal water supply forecasts with the ability to utilize remotely-sensed snow cover products and real-time streamflow measurements. Spatial variability in basin characteristics and meteorology is represented using a raster-based computational grid. Canopy interception, snow accumulation and melt, and simplified soil water movement are simulated in each computational unit. The model is run at a daily time step with surface runoff and subsurface flow aggregated at the basin scale. This approach allows the model to be updated with spatial snow cover and measured streamflow using an Ensemble Kalman-based data assimilation strategy that accounts for uncertainty in weather forecasts, model parameters, and observations used for updating. Model inflow forecasts for the Dworshak Reservoir in northern Idaho are compared to observations and to April-July volumetric forecasts issued by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) for Water Years 2000 2006. October 1 volumetric forecasts are superior to those issued by the NRCS, while March 1 forecasts are comparable. The ensemble spread brackets the observed April-July volumetric inflows in all years. Short-term (one and three day) forecasts also show excellent agreement with observations.

  6. Development and applications of the positron microscope. Progress report, October 1988--September 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Progress on the positron microscope during the past year has been steady, and we currently project that initial microscope images can be collected during mid to late summer of 1992. Work during the year has mainly been divided among four areas of effort: hardware construction; power supply and control system development; radioactive source fabrication; and planning of initial experimental projects. Details of progress in these areas will be given below. An initial optical design of the microscope was completed during 1990, but during the past year, significant improvements have been made to this design, and several limiting cases of microscope performance have been evaluated. The results of these evaluations have been extremely encouraging, giving us strong indications that the optical performance of the microscope will be better than originally anticipated. In particular, we should be able to explore ultimate performance capabilities of positron microscopy using our currently planned optical system, with improvements only in the image detector system, and the positron-source/moderator configuration. We should be able to study imaging reemission microscopy with resolutions approaching 10 {Angstrom} and be able to produce beam spots for rastered microscope work with diameters below the 1000 {Angstrom} diffusion limit. Because of these exciting new possibilities, we have decided to upgrade several microscope subsystems to levels consistent with ultimate performance earlier in our construction schedule than we had previously intended. In particular, alignment facilities in the optical system, vibration isolation, and power supply and control system flexibility have all been upgraded in their design over the past year.

  7. Indexing amyloid peptide diffraction from serial femtosecond crystallography: New algorithms for sparse patterns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brewster, Aaron S.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rodriguez, Jose; Hattne, Johan; Echols, Nathaniel; McFarlane, Heather T.; Cascio, Duilio; Adams, Paul D.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.

    2015-01-23

    Still diffraction patterns from peptide nanocrystals with small unit cells are challenging to index using conventional methods owing to the limited number of spots and the lack of crystal orientation information for individual images. New indexing algorithms have been developed as part of theComputational Crystallography Toolbox(cctbx) to overcome these challenges. Accurate unit-cell information derived from an aggregate data set from thousands of diffraction patterns can be used to determine a crystal orientation matrix for individual images with as few as five reflections. These algorithms are potentially applicable not only to amyloid peptides but also to any set of diffraction patternsmore » with sparse properties, such as low-resolution virus structures or high-throughput screening of still images captured by raster-scanning at synchrotron sources. As a proof of concept for this technique, successful integration of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to 2.5 Å resolution for the amyloid segment GNNQQNY from the Sup35 yeast prion is presented.« less

  8. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in industrial and security applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; Liu Chunyi; Plumer, John R.; Russo, Richard E.

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers rapid, localized chemical analysis of solid or liquid materials with high spatial resolution in lateral and depth profiling, without the need for sample preparation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares algorithms were applied to identify a variety of complex organic and inorganic samples. This work illustrates how LIBS analyzers can answer a multitude of real-world needs for rapid analysis, such as determination of lead in paint and children's toys, analysis of electronic and solder materials, quality control of fiberglass panels, discrimination of coffee beans from different vendors, and identification of generic versus brand-name drugs. Lateral and depth profiling was performed on children's toys and paint layers. Traditional one-element calibration or multivariate chemometric procedures were applied for elemental quantification, from single laser shot determination of metal traces at {approx}10 {mu}g/g to determination of halogens at 90 {mu}g/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation. The effectiveness of LIBS for security applications was demonstrated in the field by testing the 50-m standoff LIBS rasterizing detector.

  9. Task 12: Laser cleaning of contaminated painted surfaces. Semi-annual report, April 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grisanti, A.A.; Hassett, D.J.

    1997-05-01

    Paint contaminated with radionuclides and other hazardous materials is common in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Facility decommissioning and decontamination requires the removal of contaminated paint. Paint removal technologies include laser- and abrasive-based systems. F2 Associates are utilizing a pulsed-repetition CO{sub 2} laser that produces a 2.5-cm x 2.5-cm beam which can be scanned across a 30- x 100-cm raster and, when placed on a robot, can be designed to clean any surface that the robot can be programmed to follow. Causing little or no damage to the substrate (concrete, steel, etc.), the laser ablates the material to be removed from a given surface. Ablated material is then pulled into a filtration and collection (VAC-PAC) system to prevent the hazardous substances from entering into the atmosphere. The VAC-PAC system deposits the ablated material into waste drums which may be removed from the system without compromising the integrity of the seal, allowing a new drum to be set up for collection without leakage of the ablated material into the atmosphere.

  10. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  11. Demonstration of scan path optimization in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Joanne H.; Wilkens, Jan J.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2007-09-15

    A three-dimensional (3D) intensity modulated proton therapy treatment plan to be delivered by magnetic scanning may comprise thousands of discrete beam positions. This research presents the minimization of the total scan path length by application of a fast simulated annealing (FSA) optimization algorithm. Treatment plans for clinical prostate and head and neck cases were sequenced for continuous raster scanning in two ways, and the resulting scan path lengths were compared: (1) A simple back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) succession, and (2) an optimized path produced as a solution of the FSA algorithm. Using a first approximation of the scanning dynamics, the delivery times for the scan sequences before and after path optimization were calculated for comparison. In these clinical examples, the FSA optimization shortened the total scan path length for the 3D target volumes by approximately 13%-56%. The number of extraneous spilled particles was correspondingly reduced by about 13%-54% due to the more efficient scanning maps that eliminated multiple crossings through regions of zero fluence. The relative decrease in delivery time due to path length minimization was estimated to be less than 1%, due to both a high scanning speed and time requirements that could not be altered by optimization (e.g., time required to change the beam energy). In a preliminary consideration of application to rescanning techniques, the decrease in delivery time was estimated to be 4%-20%.

  12. Evolution of pores in the fuel cladding of the electrogenerating channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilev, I. V. Ivanov, A. S.

    2014-12-15

    The results of reactor tests of carbonitride fuel in a monocrystalline cladding from a molybdenum-based alloy that were carried out earlier on an experimental setup Ya-82 for 8 to 300 h at a temperature of ?1500C can be used in order to prove the operational reliability of fuel elements in the design of a megawatt nuclear power plant for a spacecraft. A raster image of the surface of a sample of cladding shows that the interfaces between the layers are decorated by pores. This result is explained in this work by the theory of coalescence. The mechanisms responsible for the evolution of pores taking place at the parameters of a Ya-82 setup are considered. The effect of decoration by pores of the interfaces between the layers of a sample of cladding of the electrogenerating channel by carrying out reactor tests is explained. The dependence of the average radius of pores on the duration of the experiment is obtained. An evaluation of the average sizes of pores arising under the conditions of the experiment gives a value of ?2 ?m, which is in agreement with the experimental data. A computational study of swelling of the cladding material in the process of irradiation is performed. Predictive estimates of the behavior of the porous system and swelling of the cladding material for a megawatt class nuclear power plant are made.

  13. Handsfree Surface Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-11-01

    The HANDSFREE SURFACE ANALYSIS software code enables unattended analysis of surfaces by desorption electrospray (DESI) and liquid-junction surface sampling probe (SSP) mass spectrometry. The software allows automated lane scanning, imaging (e.g. lane rastering), spot and array sampling, and array scanning methods by controlling the movement of the sample attached to a computer-controlled stage. The software is able to collect, visualize and analyze mass spectrometry data real-time for surface analysis purposes by interacting with mass spectrometrymore » instrumentation software. The software also enables data post processing for imaging and other analytical purposes. The software also contains image analysis approaches to control the sampling capillary-to-surface distance when used with DESI, and for automated formation and real-time reoptimization of the sampling probe-to-surface liquid microjunction when used with SSP. Control of these distances is essential to automated, hands-free operation of a DESI or SSP mass spectrometry system.« less

  14. Comparison of absolute spectral irradiance responsivity measurement techniques using wavelength-tunable lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahtee, Ville; Brown, Steven W.; Larason, Thomas C.; Lykke, Keith R.; Ikonen, Erkki; Noorma, Mart

    2007-07-10

    Independent methods for measuring the absolute spectral irradiance responsivity of detectors have been compared between the calibration facilities at two national metrology institutes, the Helsinki University of Technology (TKK), Finland, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The emphasis is on the comparison of two different techniques for generating a uniform irradiance at a reference plane using wavelength-tunable lasers. At TKK's Laser Scanning Facility (LSF) the irradiance is generated by raster scanning a single collimated laser beam, while at the NIST facility for Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations with Uniform Sources (SIRCUS), lasers are introduced into integrating spheres to generate a uniform irradiance at a reference plane. The laser-based irradiance responsivity results are compared to a traditional lamp-monochromator-based irradiance responsivity calibration obtained at the NIST Spectral Comparator Facility (SCF). A narrowband filter radiometer with a24 nm bandwidth and an effective band-center wavelength of 801 nm was used as the artifact. The results of the comparison between the different facilities, reported for the first time in the near-infrared wavelength range, demonstrate agreement at the uncertainty level of less than 0.1%. This result has significant implications in radiation thermometry and in photometry as well as in radiometry.

  15. Photothermal method of determining calorific properties of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amer, Nabil M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Predetermined amounts of heat are generated within a coal sample (11) by directing pump light pulses (14) of predetermined energy content into a small surface region (16) of the sample (11). A beam (18) of probe light is directed along the sample surface (19) and deflection of the probe beam (18) from thermally induced changes of index of refraction in the fluid medium adjacent the heated region (16) are detected. Deflection amplitude and the phase lag of the deflection, relative to the initiating pump light pulse (14), are indicative of the calorific value and the porosity of the sample (11). The method provides rapid, accurate and non-destructive analysis of the heat producing capabilities of coal samples (11). In the preferred form, sequences of pump light pulses (14) of increasing durations are directed into the sample (11) at each of a series of minute regions (16) situated along a raster scan path (21) enabling detailed analysis of variations of thermal properties at different areas of the sample (11) and at different depths.

  16. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  17. A Planning Tool for Estimating Waste Generated by a Radiological Incident and Subsequent Decontamination Efforts - 13569

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Timothy; Lemieux, Paul; Schultheisz, Daniel; Peake, Tom; Hayes, Colin

    2013-07-01

    Management of debris and waste from a wide-area radiological incident would probably constitute a significant percentage of the total remediation cost and effort. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Waste Estimation Support Tool (WEST) is a unique planning tool for estimating the potential volume and radioactivity levels of waste generated by a radiological incident and subsequent decontamination efforts. The WEST was developed to support planners and decision makers by generating a first-order estimate of the quantity and characteristics of waste resulting from a radiological incident. The tool then allows the user to evaluate the impact of various decontamination/demolition strategies on the waste types and volumes generated. WEST consists of a suite of standalone applications and Esri{sup R} ArcGIS{sup R} scripts for rapidly estimating waste inventories and levels of radioactivity generated from a radiological contamination incident as a function of user-defined decontamination and demolition approaches. WEST accepts Geographic Information System (GIS) shape-files defining contaminated areas and extent of contamination. Building stock information, including square footage, building counts, and building composition estimates are then generated using the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA's) Hazus{sup R}-MH software. WEST then identifies outdoor surfaces based on the application of pattern recognition to overhead aerial imagery. The results from the GIS calculations are then fed into a Microsoft Excel{sup R} 2007 spreadsheet with a custom graphical user interface where the user can examine the impact of various decontamination/demolition scenarios on the quantity, characteristics, and residual radioactivity of the resulting waste streams. (authors)

  18. Geographic Information System Tools for Management of US DOE Sites - 13489

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Cliff; Pilz, Elaine; Pawel, Steve

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management (LM) uses a variety of GIS tools to support long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at DOE closure sites. These geo-spatial applications provide access to data both for external public viewing and for internal analysis and decision making. LM uses a custom geo-spatial application called geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) that draws validated information from a database of 4.6 million analytical results and 232,000 water level measurements for 58 LTS and M sites. These data were collected from transferred sites over a period of 40 years. The database is used to capture and store historical environmental information such as analytical chemistry data, groundwater depths and elevations, well logs, well construction data, geo-referenced boundaries, site physical features, and sampling locations from LTS and M sites. Stakeholders, regulators, and project personnel can use this Web-based application and data to display information in several forms, such as a tabular report, a graph, and a geo-spatial display, or the data can be labeled or highlighted in a map view. Institutional controls, with their LTS and M requirements and documentation, have recently been incorporated into a prototype GEMS Web page for the Weldon Spring, Missouri, Site. LM uses multiple internal GIS viewers to help ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. For example, at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site, LM uses a GIS application to display real property interests on authoritative maps. Another project is used to facilitate discussions at stakeholder meetings for the Rocky Flats site's Original Landfill. The Uranium Leasing Program uses multiple interactive maps that assist in ongoing monitoring and the oversight of lease-holders' activities. (authors)

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SimTable helps firefighters model and predict fire direction April 3, 2012 SimTable projects maps onto sand as part of an interactive 3-D model In the past, firefighters modeled their response to a wildfire by moving matchbox cars and pieces of yarn on a tabletop filled with sand, using the sand to represent the landscape. Today, SimTable, an innovative company and technology housed at the Santa Fe Complex, is revolutionizing firefighter training. With SimTable, Google Earth and GIS data are

  20. MAp GENeralization COntroller

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-02-24

    MAGENCO is a geographic information systems (GIS) tool for managing geospatial data. It assists in choosing an appropriate level of cartographic simplification (removal of vertices while preserving line character). While an effective algorithm for this task exists (Douglas-Peucker, published in 1973), the tolerance parameter depends on the fractal dimension or the natural or manmade feature, the scale of mapping, and the uses to which the data will be put. It is thus necessary to iterativelymore » test different parameters until an acceptable one is found.« less

  1. A test of an expert-based bird-habitat relationship model in South Carolina.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilgo, John, C.; Gartner, David, L.; Chapman, Brian, R.; Dunning, John, B., Jr.; Franzreb, Kathleen, E.; Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Miller, Karl, V.; Pearson, Scott, F.

    2002-01-01

    Wildlife-habitat relationships models are used widely by land managers to provide information on which species are likely to occur in an area of interest and may be impacted by a proposed management activity. Few such models have been tested. Recent Avian census data from the Savannah River Site, South Carolina was used to validate BIRDHAB, a geographic information system (GIS) model developed by United States Forest Service resource managers to predict relative habitat quality for birds at the stand level on national forests in the southeastern United States. BIRDHAB is based on the species-habitat matrices presented by Hamel (1992).

  2. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this response time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.

  3. Improving landscape-level environmental impact evaluations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, L.J.; LaGory, K.E.; Vinikour, W.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.L.; Cantwell, B.

    2012-04-01

    New spatial data and advancements in GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses of the large datasets required when making programmatic evaluations of the ecological effects of proposed activities that cover a large area or region. Understanding the environmental impacts of proposed human developments is critical to making appropriate siting decisions and designing mitigation strategies to reduce impacts on important resources. Impact analyses conducted under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) in Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) or Environmental Assessments (EAs) are intended to determine the resource-specific impacts of proposed activities of federal agencies and their alternatives using the best available information. Impacts to ecological resources are often a primary focus of these analyses. Information used in NEPA analyses include some measure of the known or probable presence of plants and wildlife in the project area, with special emphasis placed on threatened, endangered, and other special-status species. Site-specific information pertaining to ecological resources is usually easier to obtain for small-scale activities such as a local facility, road, or transmission upgrade project, where the ability to conduct fieldwork is more often feasible. However, site-specific data is more difficult-and sometimes impossible-to obtain for proposed activities that could affect a large area or region. These types of analyses often are considered in programmatic NEPA documents, in which a federal agency evaluates the implementation of a broad program or plan. Under these programmatic evaluations, the exact location and size of developments are often not known. Because obtaining quantitative information for ecological resources at such large spatial scales is difficult, programmatic impact evaluations typically rely on sketchy or partial information such as recorded species occurrences, species ranges, and general habitat descriptions. However, new spatial data and improved GIS tools allow much more comprehensive and quantitative analyses using large, readily available datasets. The availability of large-scale regional data such as GAP land-cover models or species habitat suitability models, combined with more robust spatial analysis procedures available through ArcGIS for Desktop software, allowed the analysis of multiple datasets at large spatial scales. This enabled researchers to surpass previous qualitative evaluations by developing a more accurate and quantitative approach for determining the environmental impacts of human activities at larger spatial scales. These approaches, combined with the utility of ModelBuilder and operability of Python scripts in ArcGIS, allow a more timely and cost-effective synthesis of available spatial data for programmatic evaluations and add a quantitative basis to environmental decision making.

  4. An Analysis Of The Impact Of Selected Carbon Capture And Storage Policy Scenarios On The US Fossil-Based Electric Power Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Mahasenan, N Maha

    2003-09-13

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is rapidly emerging as a potential key climate change mitigation option. However, as policymakers and industrial stakeholders begin the process of formulating new policy for implementing CCS technologies, participants require a tool to assess large-scale CCS deployment over a number of different possible future scenarios. This paper will analyze several scenarios using two state-of-the-art Battelle developed models, the MiniCAM and the CO2-GIS for examining CCS deployment. Outputs include the total amount of CO2 captured, total annual emissions, and fossil-based generating capacity.

  5. PRRC 03-08

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PRRC 03-08 NM WAIDS: A Produced Water Quality and Infrastructure GIS Database for New Mexico Oil Producers (First Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report) Report Start Date: October 1, 2002 Report End Date: March 1, 2003 Martha Cather, PI Robert Lee, Project Manager Ibrahim Gundiler, Co-PI Andrew Sung, Co-PI Contributors: Naomi Davidson Ajeet Kumar Reddy Mingzhen Wei April 1, 2003 DE-FC26-02NT15134 New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Socorro,

  6. Some aspects of computer aided decision making for the crisis management of unstable slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faure, R.M.; Pairault, T.; Pham, M.; Bernardeau-Moreau, A.; Fayolle, G.; Robinson, J.C.; Foucheyrand, G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present here the developments in their risk management research; software tools based on object oriented techniques, an image and graphics based man-machine interface, a new algorithm which allows the quick construction of a GIS, strong links with analysis software with the possibility of using fuzzy logic reasoning. The case of the threatening landslide at Sechilienne (Isere, France), studied using these tools, is briefly presented. The authors will show that is management is facilitated through the use of networks as in the WASSS project approach.

  7. User's Guide Virtual Hydropower Prospector Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall; Sera E. White; Julie A. Brizzee; Randy D. Lee

    2005-11-01

    The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a web-based geographic information system (GIS) application for displaying U.S. water energy resource sites on hydrologic region maps. The application assists the user in locating sites of interest and performing preliminary, development feasibility assessments. These assessments are facilitated by displaying contextual features in addition to the water energy resource sites such as hydrograpy, roads, power infrastructure, populated places, and land use and control. This guide provides instructions for operating the application to select what features are displayed and the extent of the map view. It also provides tools for selecting features of particular interest and displaying their attribute information.

  8. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn A. Baskin

    2004-03-31

    Work during the first six months of the project mainly concentrated on contracts execution and collection of data to characterize the region and input of that data into the geographical information system (GIS) system. Data was collected for source characterization, transportation options and terrestrial options. In addition, discussions were held to determine the extent of the geologic information that would be needed for the project. In addition, activities associated with the regulatory, permitting and safety issues were completed. Outreach activities are in the formative stages.

  9. Water Energy Resource Data from Idaho National Laboratory's Virtual Hydropower Prospector

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydropower Program is to conduct research and development (R&D) that will improve the technical, societal, and environmental benefits of hydropower and provide cost-competitive technologies that enable the development of new and incremental hydropower capacity, adding diversity to the nation's energy supply. The Virtual Hydropower Prospector is a GIS application to locate and evaluate natural stream water energy resources. In the interactive data map the U.S. is divided into 20 hydrologic regions. The Prospector tool applies an analytical process to determine the gross power potential of these regions and helps users to site potential hydropower projects.

  10. Radiological Assistance Program Flight Planning Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-12-19

    The Radiological Assitance Program (RAP) is the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) first responder to radiological emergencies. RAP's mission is to identify and minimize radiological hazards, as well as provide radiological emergency response and technical advice to decision makers. One tool commonly used is aerial radiation detection equipment. During a response getting this equipment in the right place quickly is critical. The RAP Flight Planning Tool (a ArcGIS 10 Desktop addin) helps minimize this responsemore » time and provides specific customizable flight path information to the flight staff including maps, coordinates, and azimuths.« less

  11. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  12. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  13. Modified Version of High Efficiency Dehumidification System (HEDS) ESTCP Presentation EW-201344

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Models & Tools for Evaluation of Project Options Tribal Energy Program Review 2015 Lars Lisell 5/7/2015 2 Energy Audits/Energy Evaluation * Envelope/Weatherization * Lighting * HVAC * Plug loads 3 * http://www.nrel.gov/gis/ RE Resource Maps 4 * Biopower Atlas * https://mapsbeta.nrel.gov/biopower-atlas/ RE Resource Maps 5 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 6 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 7 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 8 PV Watts http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ 9 PV Watts

  14. A Geographic Information System approach to modeling nutrient and sediment transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levine, D.A.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Beauchamp, J.J.; Timmins, S.P.

    1993-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a water quality model to quantify nonpoint-source (NPS) pollution that uses a geographic information system (GIS) to link statistical modeling of nutrient and sediment delivery with the spatial arrangement of the parameters that drive the model. The model predicts annual nutrient and sediment loading and was developed, calibrated, and tested on 12 watersheds within the Lake Ray Roberts drainage basin in north Texas. Three physiographic regions are represented by these watersheds, and model success, as measured by the accuracy of load estimates, was compared within and across these regions.

  15. Assessing the Potential for Renewable Energy on Public Lands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Potential For Renewable Energy On Public Lands February 2003 U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Download CD ZIP File (248 MB) Download CD-Lite ZIP File with no GIS Data or Acrobat Reader Installers (43 MB) CD-Lite Version Assessing The Potential For Renewable Energy On Public Lands U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. iTOUGH2 Universal Optimization Using the PEST Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.A.

    2010-07-01

    iTOUGH2 (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/iTOUGH2) is a computer program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis [Finsterle, 2007a, b, c]. iTOUGH2 contains a number of local and global minimization algorithms for automatic calibration of a model against measured data, or for the solution of other, more general optimization problems (see, for example, Finsterle [2005]). A detailed residual and estimation uncertainty analysis is conducted to assess the inversion results. Moreover, iTOUGH2 can be used to perform a formal sensitivity analysis, or to conduct Monte Carlo simulations for the examination for prediction uncertainties. iTOUGH2's capabilities are continually enhanced. As the name implies, iTOUGH2 is developed for use in conjunction with the TOUGH2 forward simulator for nonisothermal multiphase flow in porous and fractured media [Pruess, 1991]. However, iTOUGH2 provides FORTRAN interfaces for the estimation of user-specified parameters (see subroutine USERPAR) based on user-specified observations (see subroutine USEROBS). These user interfaces can be invoked to add new parameter or observation types to the standard set provided in iTOUGH2. They can also be linked to non-TOUGH2 models, i.e., iTOUGH2 can be used as a universal optimization code, similar to other model-independent, nonlinear parameter estimation packages such as PEST [Doherty, 2008] or UCODE [Poeter and Hill, 1998]. However, to make iTOUGH2's optimization capabilities available for use with an external code, the user is required to write some FORTRAN code that provides the link between the iTOUGH2 parameter vector and the input parameters of the external code, and between the output variables of the external code and the iTOUGH2 observation vector. While allowing for maximum flexibility, the coding requirement of this approach limits its applicability to those users with FORTRAN coding knowledge. To make iTOUGH2 capabilities accessible to many application models, the PEST protocol [Doherty, 2007] has been implemented into iTOUGH2. This protocol enables communication between the application (which can be a single 'black-box' executable or a script or batch file that calls multiple codes) and iTOUGH2. The concept requires that for the application model: (1) Input is provided on one or more ASCII text input files; (2) Output is returned to one or more ASCII text output files; (3) The model is run using a system command (executable or script/batch file); and (4) The model runs to completion without any user intervention. For each forward run invoked by iTOUGH2, select parameters cited within the application model input files are then overwritten with values provided by iTOUGH2, and select variables cited within the output files are extracted and returned to iTOUGH2. It should be noted that the core of iTOUGH2, i.e., its optimization routines and related analysis tools, remains unchanged; it is only the communication format between input parameters, the application model, and output variables that are borrowed from PEST. The interface routines have been provided by Doherty [2007]. The iTOUGH2-PEST architecture is shown in Figure 1. This manual contains installation instructions for the iTOUGH2-PEST module, and describes the PEST protocol as well as the input formats needed in iTOUGH2. Examples are provided that demonstrate the use of model-independent optimization and analysis using iTOUGH2.

  17. CA_OPPUSST - Cantera OPUS Steady State

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-01

    The Cantera Opus Steady State (ca-opusst) applications solves steady reacting flow problems in opposed-flow geometries. It is a 1-0 application that represents axisymmetnc 3-0 physical systems that can be reduced via a similarity transformation to a 1-0 mathematical representation. The code contain solutions of the general dynamic equations for the particle distribution functions using a sectional model to describe the particle distribution function. Operators for particle nucleation, coagulation, condensation (i.e., growth/etching via reactions with themore » gas ambient), internal particle reactions. particle transport due to convection and due to molecular transport, are included in the particle general dynamics equation. Heat transport due to radiation exchange of the environment with particles in local thermal equilibrium to the surrounding gas will be included in the enthalpy conservation equation that is solved for the coupled gas! particle system in an upcoming version of the code due in June 2005. The codes use Cantera , a C++ Cal Tech code, for determination of gas phase species transport, reaction, and thermodynamics physical properties and source terms. The Codes use the Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator (CADS) package, a general library for aerosol modeling, to calculate properties and source terms for the aerosol general dynamics equation, including particle formation from gas phase reactions, particle surface chemistry (growth and oxidation), bulk particle chemistry, particle transport by Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, and diffusiophoresis, and thermal radiative transport involving particles. Also included are post-processing programs, cajost and cajrof, to extract ascii data from binary output files to produce plots.« less

  18. Underground Coal Gasification Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    CAVSIM is a three-dimensional, axisymmetric model for resource recovery and cavity growth during underground coal gasification (UCG). CAVSIM is capable of following the evolution of the cavity from near startup to exhaustion, and couples explicitly wall and roof surface growth to material and energy balances in the underlying rubble zones. Growth mechanisms are allowed to change smoothly as the system evolves from a small, relatively empty cavity low in the coal seam to a large,more » almost completely rubble-filled cavity extending high into the overburden rock. The model is applicable to nonswelling coals of arbitrary seam thickness and can handle a variety of gas injection flow schedules or compositions. Water influx from the coal aquifer is calculated by a gravity drainage-permeation submodel which is integrated into the general solution. The cavity is considered to consist of up to three distinct rubble zones and a void space at the top. Resistance to gas flow injected from a stationary source at the cavity floor is assumed to be concentrated in the ash pile, which builds up around the source, and also the overburden rubble which accumulates on top of this ash once overburden rock is exposed at the cavity top. Char rubble zones at the cavity side and edges are assumed to be highly permeable. Flow of injected gas through the ash to char rubble piles and the void space is coupled by material and energy balances to cavity growth at the rubble/coal, void/coal and void/rock interfaces. One preprocessor and two postprocessor programs are included - SPALL calculates one-dimensional mean spalling rates of coal or rock surfaces exposed to high temperatures and generates CAVSIM input: TAB reads CAVSIM binary output files and generates ASCII tables of selected data for display; and PLOT produces dot matrix printer or HP printer plots from TAB output.« less

  19. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fission yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.

  20. Designs for Risk Evaluation and Management

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-12-01

    The Designs for Risk Evaluation and Management (DREAM) tool was developed as part of the effort to quantify the risk of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP). DREAM is an optimization tool created to identify optimal monitoring schemes that minimize the time to first detection of CO2 leakage from a subsurface storage formation. DREAM acts as a post-processer on user-provided output from subsurface leakagemore » simulations. While DREAM was developed for CO2 leakage scenarios, it is applicable to any subsurface leakage simulation of the same output format. The DREAM tool is comprised of three main components: (1) a Java wizard used to configure and execute the simulations, (2) a visualization tool to view the domain space and optimization results, and (3) a plotting tool used to analyze the results. A secondary Java application is provided to aid users in converting common American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) output data to the standard DREAM hierarchical data format (HDF5). DREAM employs a simulated annealing approach that searches the solution space by iteratively mutating potential monitoring schemes built of various configurations of monitoring locations and leak detection parameters. This approach has proven to be orders of magnitude faster than an exhaustive search of the entire solution space. The user’s manual illustrates the program graphical user interface (GUI), describes the tool inputs, and includes an example application.« less

  1. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fissionmore » yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.« less

  2. Applications of Geographic Information Systems technology for environmental planning and management in North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Z.; Wiele-Evans, C. Van Der )

    1993-01-01

    The State of North Carolina is developing a multipurpose geographic information systems (GIS) database for widespread use. The database currently consists of more than fifty categories of information state wide. In addition to basic planimetric information, the data include many categories of environmental significance. Much of the database has proven useful to planners, managers, and consultants involved with environmental policy-making and protection. The database is being used to augment activities in regulatory programs, research programs and in a variety of siting applications. The North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCCGIA) has operated the State's GIS since 1977 and is the lead coordinating agency for geographic information in the state. NCCGIA is able to develop and maintain the corporate database through partnerships with other state, federal, regional, and local government agencies and private organizations. Users access the database at NCCGIA for the production of maps and statistics, to spontaneously generate displays of a project area, to acquire data, and to conduct special studies. This paper describes some of the activities associated with environmental planning and management applications at the North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. Specifically, it illustrates the following: the conceptual framework for development and maintenance of the corporate database; the contents of the database; several environmental planning documents and applications developed at NCCGIA; and methods of data access.

  3. Application of geographic information systems to waste minimization efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyttle, T.W.; Smith, D.M.; Burns, M.; Weinrach, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), facility waste streams tend to be small but highly diverse. Initial characterization of such waste streams is often difficult in part due to a lack of tools to assist the generators themselves in completing such assessments. A methodology has been developed at LANL to allow process knowledgeable field personnel to develop baseline waste generation assessments and to evaluate potential waste minimization technology. This Process Waste Assessment (PWA) system is an application constructed within the Process Modeling System and currently being integrated with the InFoCAD Geographic Information System (GIS) . The Process Modeling System (PMS) is an object-oriented, mass balance-based, discrete-event simulation framework written using the Common Lisp Object System (CLOS) . Analytical capabilities supported within the PWA system include: complete mass balance specifications, historical characterization of selected waste streams and generation of facility profiles for materials consumption, resource utilization and worker exposure. Development activities include integration with the LANL facilities management Geographic Information System (GIS) and provisions for a Best Available Technologies (BAT) database. The environments used to develop these assessment tools will be discussed in addition to a review of initial implementation results.

  4. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 1, User`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is a consolidated set of automated resources that effectively manage the data gathered during environmental monitoring and restoration of the Hanford Site. HEIS includes an integrated database that provides consistent and current data to all users and promotes sharing of data by the entire user community. HEIS is an information system with an inclusive database. Although the database is the nucleus of the system, HEIS also provides user access software: query-by-form data entry, extraction, and browsing facilities; menu-driven reporting facilities; an ad hoc query facility; and a geographic information system (GIS). These features, with the exception of the GIS, are described in this manual set. Because HEIS contains data from the entire Hanford Site, many varieties of data are included and have.been divided into subject areas. Related subject areas comprise several volumes of the manual set. The manual set includes a data dictionary that lists all of the fields in the HEIS database, with their definitions and a cross reference of their locations in the database; definitions of data qualifiers for analytical results; and a mapping between the HEIS software functions and the keyboard keys for each of the supported terminals or terminal emulators.

  5. Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01

    This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

  6. The global coastal hazards data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); White, T.W. )

    1989-01-01

    A rise of sea level between 0.5 and 1.5 m, caused by predicted climate warming in the next century, could jeopardize low-lying radioactive waste disposal sites near the coast, due to permanent and episodic inundation, increased shoreline retreat, and changes in the water table. The effects of global sea level rise on the shoreline will not be spatially uniform. Therefore, site selection will depend on assessment of these differential vulnerabilities, in order to avoid high-risk coasts. The coastal hazards data base described here could provide an appropriate framework. The coastal hazards data base integrates relevant topographic, geologic, geomorphologic, erosional and subsidence information in a Geographic Information System (GIS), to identify high-risk shorelines characterized by low coastal relief, an erodible substrate, present and past evidence of subsidence, extensive shoreline retreat, and high wave/tide energies. Data for seven variables relating to inundation and erosion hazards are incorporated into the ORNL ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS). Data compilation has been completed for the US and is being extended to North America, and ultimately the world. A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) has been designed to flag high risk coastal segments. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Geospatial Optimization of Siting Large-Scale Solar Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Quinby, T.; Caulfield, E.; Gerritsen, M.; Diffendorfer, J.; Haines, S.

    2014-03-01

    Recent policy and economic conditions have encouraged a renewed interest in developing large-scale solar projects in the U.S. Southwest. However, siting large-scale solar projects is complex. In addition to the quality of the solar resource, solar developers must take into consideration many environmental, social, and economic factors when evaluating a potential site. This report describes a proof-of-concept, Web-based Geographical Information Systems (GIS) tool that evaluates multiple user-defined criteria in an optimization algorithm to inform discussions and decisions regarding the locations of utility-scale solar projects. Existing siting recommendations for large-scale solar projects from governmental and non-governmental organizations are not consistent with each other, are often not transparent in methods, and do not take into consideration the differing priorities of stakeholders. The siting assistance GIS tool we have developed improves upon the existing siting guidelines by being user-driven, transparent, interactive, capable of incorporating multiple criteria, and flexible. This work provides the foundation for a dynamic siting assistance tool that can greatly facilitate siting decisions among multiple stakeholders.

  8. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-04-01

    Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

  9. Simulation of landscape disturbances and the effect of climatic change. Final report, July 15, 1990--January 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, W.L.

    1993-04-01

    Altering the natural disturbance regime of a landscape produces changes in the structure of that landscape as the landscape adjusts to the new disturbance regime. A computer simulation model was designed to enable analyses of the longterm changes to be expected in landscapes as their disturbance regime changes. The model, DISPATCH, is the first dynamic spatial simulation model built around a geographical information system (GIS). The model also includes a new set of programs, the r.le programs, that is the first set of programs designed for calculating landscape structure measures within a GIS. The DISPATCH model was used, to analyze the effects of human alterations of disturbance regimes and global change on landscape structure. Landscapes do not adjust quickly to these alterations based on available data. Landscapes subjected to warming or to longterm fire suppression experience a decline in patch richness, Shannon diversity, the amount of edge and contrast, but an increase in distance between patches, angular second moment (texture measure) and patch size. In contrast, landscapes subjected to cooling, the short-term effects of fire suppression, fragmentation, or traditional prescribed burning tend to respond with increasing richness, Shannon diversity, edge, and contrast, but declining distance, angular second moment, and size. The pattern of response is different at different scales, with important implications for species.

  10. Petrophysical Analysis and Geographic Information System for San Juan Basin Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Robert Balch; Tom Engler; Roger Ruan; Shaojie Ma

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the availability and ease of access to critical data on the Mesaverde and Dakota tight gas reservoirs of the San Juan Basin. Secondary goals include tuning well log interpretations through integration of core, water chemistry and production analysis data to help identify bypassed pay zones; increased knowledge of permeability ratios and how they affect well drainage and thus infill drilling plans; improved time-depth correlations through regional mapping of sonic logs; and improved understanding of the variability of formation waters within the basin through spatial analysis of water chemistry data. The project will collect, integrate, and analyze a variety of petrophysical and well data concerning the Mesaverde and Dakota reservoirs of the San Juan Basin, with particular emphasis on data available in the areas defined as tight gas areas for purpose of FERC. A relational, geo-referenced database (a geographic information system, or GIS) will be created to archive this data. The information will be analyzed using neural networks, kriging, and other statistical interpolation/extrapolation techniques to fine-tune regional well log interpretations, improve pay zone recognition from old logs or cased-hole logs, determine permeability ratios, and also to analyze water chemistries and compatibilities within the study area. This single-phase project will be accomplished through four major tasks: Data Collection, Data Integration, Data Analysis, and User Interface Design. Data will be extracted from existing databases as well as paper records, then cleaned and integrated into a single GIS database. Once the data warehouse is built, several methods of data analysis will be used both to improve pay zone recognition in single wells, and to extrapolate a variety of petrophysical properties on a regional basis. A user interface will provide tools to make the data and results of the study accessible and useful. The final deliverable for this project will be a web-based GIS providing data, interpretations, and user tools that will be accessible to anyone with Internet access. During this project, the following work has been performed: (1) Assimilation of most special core analysis data into a GIS database; (2) Inventorying of additional data, such as log images or LAS files that may exist for this area; (3) Analysis of geographic distribution of that data to pinpoint regional gaps in coverage; (4) Assessment of the data within both public and proprietary data sets to begin tuning of regional well logging analyses and improve payzone recognition; (5) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort, including data from northwest New Mexico; (6) Acquisition and digitization of logs to create LAS files for a subset of the wells in the special core analysis data set; and (7) Petrophysical analysis of the final set of well logs.

  11. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin sections, leading to an interpretation of the sequence of diagenetic events and development of porosity in the reservoir. Nearly 1000 stable isotope geochemistry samples have been collected from cores in four of the five states in the study area. More than 400 of these samples will be analyzed for fluid inclusion and/or strontium isotope analyses, as well. Gas samples have been collected from 21 wells in four states and analyzed for chemical content and isotope analyses of carbon and hydrogen. Because natural gases vary in chemical and isotope composition as a function of their formation and migration history, crossplots of these values can be very revealing. Gas from the Homer field in Kentucky indicates compartmentalization and at least two different sources. Gas from the York field in Ohio also came from at least two discrete compartments. Gas from the Cottontree field in West Virginia is very dry, probably generated from post-mature source rocks. Isotope reversals may be indicative of cracking of residual oil. Gas from Glodes Corners Road field in New York also is post-mature, dry gas, and again isotope reversals may indicate cracking of residual oil in the reservoir. Noble gases are predominantly of crustal origin, but a minor helium component was derived from the mantle. The project web server continues to evolve as the project progresses. The user/password authenticated website has 18 industry partner users and 20 research team users. Software has been installed to track website use. Two meetings of the research team were held to review the status of the project and prepare reports to be given to the full consortium. A meeting of the full consortium--industry partners and researchers--was very successful. However, the ultimate product of the research could be improved if industry members were more forthcoming with proprietary data.

  12. JBlulce Data Acquisition Software for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-06-01

    JBlulce (Java Beam Line Universal Integrated Configuration Environment is a data acquisition software for macromolecular crystallography conforming user interface of the SSRL Blulce that has become a de-factor standard in the field. Besides this interface conformity, JBlulce is a unique system in terms of architecture, speec, capability and osftware implementation. It features only two software layers, the JBlulce clients and the EPICS servers, as compared to three layers present in Blulc and most of similarmore » systems. This layers reduction provides a faster communication with hardware and an easier access to advanced hardware capabilities like on-the-fly scanning. Then JBlulc clients are designed to operate in parallel with the other beamline controls which streamlines the tasks performed by staff such as beamline preparation, maitenance, audting and user assistance. Another distinction is the deployment of multiple plugins that can be written in any programming languag thus involving more staff into the development. further on, JBlulce makes use of unified motion controls allowing for easy scanning and optimizing of any beamline component. Finally, the graphic interface is implemented in Java making full use of rich Java libraries and Jave IDE for debugging. to compare, Blulce user interface is implemented with aging Tcl/tk language providing very restricted capabilities. JBlulce makes full use of the industrial power and wide drivers selection of EPICS in controlling hardware; all hardware commuication is routed via multiple EPICS servers residing on local area network. JBlulce also includes several EPICS State Notation servers aimed at making hardware communication more robust. Besides using EPICS for controlling hardware, JBlulce extensively uses EPICS databases for efficien communications between multiple instances of JBlulce clients and JBlulce pplugins that can run in parallel on different computers. All of the above makes JBlulce one of the biggest and most sophisticated EPICS client projects to date. JBlulce configuraion is stored in my SQL database which provides flexibility in tuning the system. The database is also accessible by the plugins. From the users perspective JBlulce provides all standard features of data acquisition software for macromolecular crystallography plus such unique capabilities as:one click beamline energy change that may involve switching undulator harmonics, mirrors lanes and beam realignment, automated diffraction rtastering for finding small crystals and swwet spots on poorly diffracting crystals with automated scoring of raster cells by the number of reflections; data collection along a vector; automated on-the-fly fluorescent tastering, a faster and lower-irradiation compliment to the diffraction raster; fully automated fluorescence measurements for MAD that include signal optimization, fast on the fly energy scanning and automated adapting of scan range to chemical shifts; fly-scan mimibeam realighment; automated loop and crystal centering, controls for sample automounter, automated screening, data collectin audting, remoate access and a lot more.« less

  13. Characterization of piesoelectric ZnO thin films and the fabrication of piezoelectric micro-cantilevers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Raegan Lynn

    2005-08-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), a microcantilever is raster scanned across the surface of a sample in order to obtain a topographical image of the sample's surface. In a traditional, optical AFM, the sample rests on a bulk piezoelectric tube and a control loop is used to control the tip-sample separation by actuating the piezo-tube. This method has several disadvantages--the most noticeable one being that response time of the piezo-tube is rather long which leads to slow imaging speeds. One possible solution aimed at improving the speed of imaging is to incorporate a thin piezoelectric film on top of the cantilever beam. This design not only improves the speed of imaging because the piezoelectric film replaces the piezo-tube as an actuator, but the film can also act as a sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric film can excite the cantilever beam near its resonance frequency. This project aims to fabricate piezoelectric microcantilevers for use in the AFM. Prior to fabricating the cantilevers and also part of this project, a systematic study was performed to examine the effects of deposition conditions on the quality of piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited by RF sputtering. These results will be presented. The deposition parameters that produced the highest quality ZnO film were used in the fabrication of the piezoelectric cantilevers. Unfortunately, the fabricated cantilevers warped due to the intrinsic stress of the ZnO film and were therefore not usable in the AFM. The complete fabrication process will be detailed, the results will be discussed and reasons for the warping will be examined.

  14. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yankelevich, Diego R.; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 ; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements of low quantum efficiency sub-nanosecond fluorophores.

  15. A fast and reliable readout method for quantitative analysis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoprobes on chip surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Hyejin; Jeong, Sinyoung; Ko, Eunbyeol; Jeong, Dae Hong E-mail: debobkr@gmail.com; Kang, Homan; Lee, Yoon-Sik E-mail: debobkr@gmail.com; Lee, Ho-Young E-mail: debobkr@gmail.com

    2015-05-15

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering techniques have been widely used for bioanalysis due to its high sensitivity and multiplex capacity. However, the point-scanning method using a micro-Raman system, which is the most common method in the literature, has a disadvantage of extremely long measurement time for on-chip immunoassay adopting a large chip area of approximately 1-mm scale and confocal beam point of ca. 1-μm size. Alternative methods such as sampled spot scan with high confocality and large-area scan method with enlarged field of view and low confocality have been utilized in order to minimize the measurement time practically. In this study, we analyzed the two methods in respect of signal-to-noise ratio and sampling-led signal fluctuations to obtain insights into a fast and reliable readout strategy. On this basis, we proposed a methodology for fast and reliable quantitative measurement of the whole chip area. The proposed method adopted a raster scan covering a full area of 100 μm × 100 μm region as a proof-of-concept experiment while accumulating signals in the CCD detector for single spectrum per frame. One single scan with 10 s over 100 μm × 100 μm area yielded much higher sensitivity compared to sampled spot scanning measurements and no signal fluctuations attributed to sampled spot scan. This readout method is able to serve as one of key technologies that will bring quantitative multiplexed detection and analysis into practice.

  16. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; et al

    2015-11-03

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassettemore » or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. As a result, crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.« less

  17. Improvements in 500-kHz Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe Designs for Evaluation of Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-02-01

    PNNL has been studying and performing confirmatory research on the inspection of piping welds in coarse-grained steels for over 30 years. More recent efforts have been the application of low frequency phased array technology to this difficult to inspect material. The evolution of 500 kHz PA probes and the associated electronics and scanning protocol are documented in this report. The basis for the probe comparisons are responses from one mechanical fatigue crack and two thermal fatigue cracks in large-bore cast mockup specimens on loan from the Electric Power Research Institution. One of the most significant improvements was seen in the use of piezo-composite elements in the later two probes instead of the piezo-ceramic material used in the prototype array. This allowed a reduction in system gain of 30 dB and greatly reduced electronic noise. The latest probe had as much as a 5 dB increase in signal to noise, adding to its flaw discrimination capability. The system electronics for the latest probe were fully optimized for a 500 kHz center frequency, however significant improvements were not observed in the center frequency of the flaw responses. With improved scanner capabilities, smaller step sizes were used, allowing both line and raster data improvements to be made with the latest probe. The small step sizes produce high resolution images that improve flaw discrimination and, along with the increased signal-to-noise ratio inherent in the latest probe design, enhanced detection of the upper regions of the flaw make depth sizing more plausible. Finally, the physical sizes of the probes were progressively decreased allowing better access to the area of interest on specimens with weld crowns, and the latest probe was designed with non-integral wedges providing flexibility in focusing on different specimen geometries.

  18. THE 2014 MARCH 29 X-FLARE: SUBARCSECOND RESOLUTION OBSERVATIONS OF Fe XXI ?1354.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Peter R.; Tian, Hui; Jaeggli, Sarah

    2015-02-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) is the first solar instrument to observe ?10 MK plasma at subarcsecond spatial resolution through imaging spectroscopy of the Fe XXI ?1354.1 forbidden line. IRIS observations of the X1 class flare that occurred on 2014 March 29 at 17:48 UT reveal Fe XXI emission from both the flare ribbons and the post-flare loop arcade. Fe XXI appears at all of the chromospheric ribbon sites, although typically with a delay of one raster (75s) and sometimes offset by up to 1''. 100-200 km s{sup 1} blue-shifts are found at the brightest ribbons, suggesting hot plasma upflow into the corona. The Fe XXI ribbon emission is compact with a spatial extent of <2'', and can extend beyond the chromospheric ribbon locations. Examples are found of both decreasing and increasing blue-shift in the direction away from the ribbon locations, and blue-shifts were present for at least sixminutes after the flare peak. The post-flare loop arcade, seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131 filtergram images that are dominated by Fe XXI, exhibited bright loop-tops with an asymmetric intensity distribution. The sizes of the loop-tops are resolved by IRIS at ?1'', and line widths in the loop-tops are not broader than in the loop-legs suggesting the loop-tops are not sites of enhanced turbulence. Line-of-sight speeds in the loop arcade are typically <10 km s{sup 1}, and mean non-thermal motions fall from 43 km s{sup 1} at the flare peak to 26 km s{sup 1} six minutes later. If the average velocity in the loop arcade is assumed to be at rest, then it implies a new reference wavelength for the Fe XXI line of 1354.106 0.023 .

  19. AN INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH FIRST VIEW ON SOLAR SPICULES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, T. M. D.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V.; Tarbell, T. D.; Lemen, J.; Title, A.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Wülser, J. P.; Martínez-Sykora, J.; Kleint, L.; Golub, L.; McKillop, S.; Reeves, K. K.; Saar, S.; Testa, P.; Tian, H.; Jaeggli, S.; Kankelborg, C.

    2014-09-01

    Solar spicules have eluded modelers and observers for decades. Since the discovery of the more energetic type II, spicules have become a heated topic but their contribution to the energy balance of the low solar atmosphere remains unknown. Here we give a first glimpse of what quiet-Sun spicules look like when observed with NASA's recently launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Using IRIS spectra and filtergrams that sample the chromosphere and transition region, we compare the properties and evolution of spicules as observed in a coordinated campaign with Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. Our IRIS observations allow us to follow the thermal evolution of type II spicules and finally confirm that the fading of Ca II H spicules appears to be caused by rapid heating to higher temperatures. The IRIS spicules do not fade but continue evolving, reaching higher and falling back down after 500-800 s. Ca II H type II spicules are thus the initial stages of violent and hotter events that mostly remain invisible in Ca II H filtergrams. These events have very different properties from type I spicules, which show lower velocities and no fading from chromospheric passbands. The IRIS spectra of spicules show the same signature as their proposed disk counterparts, reinforcing earlier work. Spectroheliograms from spectral rasters also confirm that quiet-Sun spicules originate in bushes from the magnetic network. Our results suggest that type II spicules are indeed the site of vigorous heating (to at least transition region temperatures) along extensive parts of the upward moving spicular plasma.

  20. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F.; Fraser, James S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Larsson, Karl M.; Lemke, Heinrik T.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E.; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S.; Soltis, S. M.; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I.; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-01-01

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. Crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  1. High-density grids for efficient data collection from multiple crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Aguila, Laura; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Barnes, Christopher O.; Bonagura, Christopher A.; Brehmer, Winnie; Brunger, Axel T.; Calero, Guillermo; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Degrado, William F.; Fraser, James S.; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Kern, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Kruse, Andrew C.; Larsson, Karl M.; Lemke, Heinrik T.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Manglik, Aashish; McPhillips, Scott E.; Norgren, Erik; Pang, Siew S.; Soltis, S. M.; Song, Jinhu; Thomaston, Jessica; Tsai, Yingssu; Weis, William I.; Woldeyes, Rahel A.; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Zouni, Athina; Cohen, Aina E.

    2015-11-03

    Higher throughput methods to mount and collect data from multiple small and radiation-sensitive crystals are important to support challenging structural investigations using microfocus synchrotron beamlines. Furthermore, efficient sample-delivery methods are essential to carry out productive femtosecond crystallography experiments at X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). To address these needs, a high-density sample grid useful as a scaffold for both crystal growth and diffraction data collection has been developed and utilized for efficient goniometer-based sample delivery at synchrotron and XFEL sources. A single grid contains 75 mounting ports and fits inside an SSRL cassette or uni-puck storage container. The use of grids with an SSRL cassette expands the cassette capacity up to 7200 samples. Grids may also be covered with a polymer film or sleeve for efficient room-temperature data collection from multiple samples. New automated routines have been incorporated into theBlu-Ice/DCSSexperimental control system to support grids, including semi-automated grid alignment, fully automated positioning of grid ports, rastering and automated data collection. Specialized tools have been developed to support crystallization experiments on grids, including a universal adaptor, which allows grids to be filled by commercial liquid-handling robots, as well as incubation chambers, which support vapor-diffusion and lipidic cubic phase crystallization experiments. Experiments in which crystals were loaded into grids or grown on grids using liquid-handling robots and incubation chambers are described. As a result, crystals were screened at LCLS-XPP and SSRL BL12-2 at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  2. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girolamo, D. Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-03-31

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies.

  3. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline material in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a first laser of a first wavelength for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a second laser of a second relatively shorter wavelength for illuminating a relatively narrower spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate raster mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A reflectance measurement of the piece of material is obtained by adding together the signals from the optical detection devices. In the case where the piece of material includes a photovoltaic device, the current induced in the device by the illuminating light can be measured with a current sensing amplifier after the light integrating sphere is moved away from the device.

  4. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.

    1996-12-03

    Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline material in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a first laser of a first wavelength for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a second laser of a second relatively shorter wavelength for illuminating a relatively narrower spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate raster mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A reflectance measurement of the piece of material is obtained by adding together the signals from the optical detection devices. In the case where the piece of material includes a photovoltaic device, the current induced in the device by the illuminating light can be measured with a current sensing amplifier after the light integrating sphere is moved away from the device. 22 figs.

  5. Facilitating Oil Industry Access to Federal Lands through Interagency Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Jehn; Ben Grunewald

    2007-05-31

    Much of the environmental and technical data useful to the oil and gas industry and regulatory agencies is now contained in disparate state and federal databases. Delays in coordinating permit approvals between federal and state agencies translate into increased operational costs and stresses for the oil and gas industry. Making federal lease stipulation and area restriction data available on state agency Web sites will streamline a potential lessors review of available leases, encourage more active bidding on unleased federal lands, and give third-party operators independent access to data who otherwise may not have access to lease restrictions and other environmental data. As a requirement of the Energy Policy Conservation Act (EPCA), the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is in the process of inventorying oil and natural gas resources beneath onshore federal lands and the extent and nature of any stipulation, restrictions, or impediments to the development of these resources. The EPCA Phase 1 Inventory resulted in a collection of GIS coverage files organized according to numerous lease stipulation reference codes. Meanwhile, state agencies also collect millions of data elements concerning oil and gas operations. Much of the oil and gas data nationwide is catalogued in the Ground Water Protection Council's (GWPC's) successfully completed Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS). The GWPC and the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Montana are implementing a pilot project where BLM lease stipulation data and RBDMS data will be displayed in a GIS format on the Internet. This increased access to data will increase bid activity, help expedite permitting, and encourage exploration on federal lands. Linking environmental, lease stipulation and resource inventory assessment data and making a GIS interface for the data available to industry and other agencies via the internet represents an important step in the GWPC strategy for all oil and gas regulatory e-commerce. The next step beyond mere data sharing for facilitating the permitting process is to make it possible for industry to file those permit applications electronically. This process will involve the use of common XML schemas.

  6. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01

    The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  7. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  8. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  9. Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    As with many professions, safety planners and first responders tend to be specialists in certain areas. To be truly useful, tools should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Thus, general software suites aimed at the professional geographic information system (GIS) community might not be the best solution for a first responder with little training in GIS terminology and techniques. On the other hand, commonly used web-based map viewers may not have the capability tomore » be customized for the planning, response, and recovery (PR&R) mission. Data formats should be open and foster easy information flow among local, state, and federal partners. Tools should be free or low-cost to address real-world budget constraints at the local level. They also need to work both with and without a network connection to be robust. The Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) can satisfy many of these needs while working in harmony with established systems at the local, state, and federal levels. The IMPACT software framework, termed the Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment (GIPSE), organizes tasks, tools, and resources for the end user. It uses the concept of software wizards to both customize and extend its functionality. On the Tasks panel are a number of buttons used to initiate various operations. Similar to macros, these task buttons launch scripts that utilize the full functionality of the underlying foundational components such as the SQL spatial database and ORNL-developed map editor. The user is presented with a series of instruction pages which are implemented with HTML for interactivity. On each page are links which initiate specific actions such as creating a map showing various features. Additional tasks may be quickly programmed and added to the panel. The end user can customize the graphical interface to faciltate its use during an emergency. One of the major components of IMPACT is the ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV). It is used to provide various map displays for the Tasks and Maps panels. Unlike typical maps however, the OGV display is highly interactive and can be customized, automated, and animated to meet the needs of the user. It is also a means to both import and export geospatial data from or to existing GIS systems. The built-in simulation capability can be used as the basis of table-top exercises.« less

  10. Towards Sustainable Watershed Dvelopment: A Geographic Information Systems based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L

    2006-01-01

    With an unprecedented projection of population and urban growth in the coming decades, assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is crucial for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with sustainable watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Most planners, government agencies, and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of watershed development. Before investing in complex analyses and customized data collection, it is often useful to utilize simple screening analyses using data that are already available. In this paper, we discuss such a technique for long-term hydrologic impact assessment (L-THIA) that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GIS by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is integrated with a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. An application of the L-THIA/NPS model on the Little Eagle Creek (LEC) watershed near Indianapolis, Indiana is illustrated in this paper. Three historical land use scenarios for 1973, 1984, and 1991 were analyzed to track land use change in the watershed and to assess the impacts of land use change on annual average runoff and NPS pollution from the watershed and its five sub-basins. Results highlight the effectiveness of the L-THIA approach in assessing the long-term hydrologic impact of urban sprawl. The L-THIA/NPS GIS model is a powerful tool for identifying environmentally sensitive areas in terms of NPS pollution potential and for evaluating alternative land use scenarios to enhance NPS pollution management. Access to the model via the INTERNET enhances the usability and effectiveness of the technique significantly. Recommendations can be made to community decision makers, based on this analysis, concerning how development can be controlled within the watershed to minimize the long-term impacts of increased stormwater runoff and NPS pollution for better management of water resources.

  11. Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Daniel B.

    2013-04-01

    As with many professions, safety planners and first responders tend to be specialists in certain areas. To be truly useful, tools should be tailored to meet their specific needs. Thus, general software suites aimed at the professional geographic information system (GIS) community might not be the best solution for a first responder with little training in GIS terminology and techniques. On the other hand, commonly used web-based map viewers may not have the capability to be customized for the planning, response, and recovery (PR&R) mission. Data formats should be open and foster easy information flow among local, state, and federal partners. Tools should be free or low-cost to address real-world budget constraints at the local level. They also need to work both with and without a network connection to be robust. The Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) can satisfy many of these needs while working in harmony with established systems at the local, state, and federal levels. The IMPACT software framework, termed the Geospatial Integrated Problem Solving Environment (GIPSE), organizes tasks, tools, and resources for the end user. It uses the concept of software wizards to both customize and extend its functionality. On the Tasks panel are a number of buttons used to initiate various operations. Similar to macros, these task buttons launch scripts that utilize the full functionality of the underlying foundational components such as the SQL spatial database and ORNL-developed map editor. The user is presented with a series of instruction pages which are implemented with HTML for interactivity. On each page are links which initiate specific actions such as creating a map showing various features. Additional tasks may be quickly programmed and added to the panel. The end user can customize the graphical interface to faciltate its use during an emergency. One of the major components of IMPACT is the ORNL Geospatial Viewer (OGV). It is used to provide various map displays for the Tasks and Maps panels. Unlike typical maps however, the OGV display is highly interactive and can be customized, automated, and animated to meet the needs of the user. It is also a means to both import and export geospatial data from or to existing GIS systems. The built-in simulation capability can be used as the basis of table-top exercises.

  12. Topographic and Air-Photo Lineaments in Various Locations Related to Geothermal Exploration in Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard

    2012-02-01

    Title: Topographic and Air-Photo Lineaments in Various Locations Related to Geothermal Exploration in Colorado Tags: Colorado, lineaments, air-photo, geothermal Summary: These line shapefiles trace apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in various counties in Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids, as part of a DOE reconnaissance geothermal exploration program. Description: Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. This line shapefile is an attempt to use desktop GIS to delineate possible faults and fracture orientations and locations in highly prospective areas prior to an initial site visit. Geochemical sampling and geologic mapping could then be centered around these possible faults and fractures. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and utility right-of-ways. Still, it is unknown what actual features these lineaments, if they exist, represent. Although the shapefiles are arranged by county, not all areas within any county have been examined for lineaments. Work was focused on either satellite thermal infrared anomalies, known hot springs or wells, or other evidence of geothermal systems. Finally, lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Projection Information: UTM Zone 13 NAD 27 projection Credits: These lineament shapefile was created by Geothermal Development Associates, as part of a geothermal geologic reconnaissance performed by Flint Geothermal, LLC, of Denver Colorado. Funding was provided in part by DOE Grant DE-EEE0002828. Use Limitation These shapefiles was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and/or nature.

  13. Generalized Nuclear Data: A New Structure (with Supporting Infrastructure) for Handling Nuclear Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.R.; Patel, N.R.; Summers, N.C.; Hedstrom, G.W.; Brown, D.A.

    2012-12-15

    The Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format was designed in the 1960s to accommodate neutron reaction data to support nuclear engineering applications in power, national security and criticality safety. Over the years, the scope of the format has been extended to handle many other kinds of data including charged particle, decay, atomic, photo-nuclear and thermal neutron scattering. Although ENDF has wide acceptance and support for many data types, its limited support for correlated particle emission, limited numeric precision, and general lack of extensibility mean that the nuclear data community cannot take advantage of many emerging opportunities. More generally, the ENDF format provides an unfriendly environment that makes it difficult for new data evaluators and users to create and access nuclear data. The Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) has begun the design of a new Generalized Nuclear Data (or 'GND') structure, meant to replace older formats with a hierarchy that mirrors the underlying physics, and is aligned with modern coding and database practices. In support of this new structure, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has updated its nuclear data/reactions management package Fudge to handle GND structured nuclear data. Fudge provides tools for converting both the latest ENDF format (ENDF-6) and the LLNL Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (ENDL) format to and from GND, as well as for visualizing, modifying and processing (i.e., converting evaluated nuclear data into a form more suitable to transport codes) GND structured nuclear data. GND defines the structure needed for storing nuclear data evaluations and the type of data that needs to be stored. But unlike ENDF and ENDL, GND does not define how the data are to be stored in a file. Currently, Fudge writes the structured GND data to a file using the eXtensible Markup Language (XML), as it is ASCII based and can be viewed with any text editor. XML is a meta-language, meaning that it has a primitive set of definitions for representing hierarchical data/text in a file. Other meta-languages, like HDF5 which stores the data in binary form, can also be used to store GND in a file. In this paper, we will present an overview of the new GND data structures along with associated tools in Fudge.

  14. A Study of United States Hydroelectric Plant Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Douglas G.; Reeves, Kelly S.

    2006-06-01

    Ownership of United States hydroelectric plants is reviewed from several perspectives. Plant owners are grouped into six owner classes as defined by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The numbers of plants and the corresponding total capacity associated with each owner class are enumerated. The plant owner population is also evaluated based on the number of owners in each owner class, the number of plants owned by a single owner, and the size of plants based on capacity ranges associated with each owner class. Plant numbers and corresponding total capacity associated with owner classes in each state are evaluated. Ownership by federal agencies in terms of the number of plants owned by each agency and the corresponding total capacity is enumerated. A GIS application that is publicly available on the Internet that displays hydroelectric plants on maps and provides basic information about them is described.

  15. Bolivia renewable energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.

    1997-12-01

    The author summarizes changes which have occurred in Bolivia in the past year which have had an impact on renewable energy source development. Political changes have included the privatization of power generation and power distribution, and resulted in a new role for state level government and participation by the individual. A National Rural Electrification Plan was adopted in 1996, which stresses the use of GIS analysis and emphasizes factors such as off grid, economic index, population density, maintenance risk, and local organizational structure. The USAID program has chosen to stress economic development, environmental programs, and health over village power programs. The national renewables program has adopted a new development direction, with state projects, geothermal projects, and private sector involvement stressed.

  16. Concentrating Solar Deployment System (CSDS) -- A New Model for Estimating U.S. Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Market Potential: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Mehos, M.; Short, W.; Heimiller, D.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents the Concentrating Solar Deployment System Model (CSDS). CSDS is a multiregional, multitime-period, Geographic Information System (GIS), and linear programming model of capacity expansion in the electric sector of the United States. CSDS is designed to address the principal market and policy issues related to the penetration of concentrating solar power (CSP) electric-sector technologies. This paper discusses the current structure, capabilities, and assumptions of the model. Additionally, results are presented for the impact of continued research and development (R&D) spending, an extension to the investment tax credit (ITC), and use of a production tax credit (PTC). CSDS is an extension of the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). While WinDS examines issues related to wind, CSDS is an extension to analyze similar issues for CSP applications. Specifically, a detailed representation of parabolic trough systems with thermal storage has been developed within the existing structure.

  17. Decadal growth of black carbon emissions in India - article no. L02807

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, S.K.; Beig, G.; Sharma, C.

    2008-01-15

    A Geographical Information System (GIS) based methodology has been used to construct the black carbon (BC) emission inventory for the Indian geographical region. The distribution of emissions from a broader level to a spatial resolution of 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid has been carried out by considering micro level details and activity data of fossil fuels and bio-fuels. Our calculated total BC emissions were 1343.78 Gg and 835.50 Gg for the base years 2001 and 1991 respectively with a decadal growth of around 61%, which is highly significant. The district level analysis shows a diverse spatial distribution with the top 10% emitting districts contributing nearly 50% of total BC emission. Coal contributes more than 50% of total BC emission. All the metropolitan cities show high BC emissions due to high population density giving rise to high vehicular emissions and more demand of energy.

  18. Geothermal resource assessment of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.; Trexler, D.; Shevenell, L., Garside, L.

    1995-12-01

    An assessment of the geothermal resources within a fifty-mile radius of the Yucca Mountain Project area was conducted to determine the potential for commercial development. The assessment includes collection, evaluation, and quantification of existing geological, geochemical, hydrological, and geophysical data within the Yucca Mountain area as they pertain to geothermal phenomena. Selected geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data were reduced to a set of common-scale digital maps using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for systematic analysis and evaluation. Available data from the Yucca Mountain area were compared to similar data from developed and undeveloped geothermal areas in other parts of the Great Basin to assess the resource potential for future geothermal development at Yucca Mountain. This information will be used in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project to determine the potential suitability of the site as a permanent underground repository for high-level nuclear waste.

  19. Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Predmore

    2008-03-06

    The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.

  20. VIRTUAL HYDROPOWER PROSPECTING: A FOUNDATION FOR WATER ENERGY RESOURCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Lee; Sera White; Julie Brizzee; Shane Cherry; Douglas Hall

    2008-06-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the gross power potential of the natural stream water energy resources of the United States was performed using state-of-the-art digital elevation models (DEMs) and geographic information system (GIS) tools. Water energy resource sites (stream segments) assessed in the basic resource assessment were further evaluated to identify which can be developed using a set of feasibility criteria. The gross power potential of each site was refined to determine its developable hydropower potential using a set of development criteria corresponding to a damless low power (less than 1 MWa) or small hydro (between 1 and 30 MWa) project. The methodologies for performing the basic resource assessment and subsequent feasibility assessment are described and the summary results for the nation are presented.