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1

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

2

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

3

Martinique: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martinique: Energy Resources Martinique: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":14.66667,"lon":-61,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Export.gov - Doing Business in Jamaica  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E-mail Page Caribbean Region Caribbean Region Home Bahamas Barbados Dominican Republic N-USA Networking with the USA Directory Haiti Jamaica Trinidad & Tobago Other Caribbean...

5

Intersection : public place in a new Jamaica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jamaica, a microcosm of the Caribbean and the developing world, is heir to an ambivalent legacy. While she benefits from a unique cultural tradition brought in part through colonialism, she suffers from the nihilistic ...

Young, Kevin Anthony

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Jamaica: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica: Energy Resources Jamaica: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":18.25,"lon":-77.5,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Jamaica-IAEA Energy Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-IAEA Energy Planning Jamaica-IAEA Energy Planning Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-IAEA Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization International Atomic Energy Agency Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http://www-tc.iaea.org/tcweb/p Program Start 2009 Country Jamaica Caribbean References IAEA Project database[1] IAEA is working with Jamaica to support human resource development and energy planning. References ↑ "IAEA Project database" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Jamaica-IAEA_Energy_Planning&oldid=328862" Category: Programs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142311530

8

Jamaica - Analysis - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

IHS Cera /Global Insight Jamaica Observor New York Times Oil and Gas Journal Oil Daily Offshore Petroleum Economist Petroleum Intelligence Weekly PFC Energy

9

Jamaica-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Jamaica-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni Program Start 2009 Program End 2015 Country Jamaica Caribbean References CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework[1]

10

JAMAICA BAY TASK FORCE MEETING Tuesday April 6, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Len Houston, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) 7:30 Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Update Dan Mundy Jr., Jamaica Bay EcoWatchers 7:50 Recent Nitrogen Agreement with NYC Brad Sewell, Natural Resources Defense

Columbia University

11

Jamaica-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network Jamaica-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Jamaica-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Name Jamaica-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Agency/Company /Organization Climate Technology Initiative (CTI), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership (REEEP) Partner International Centre for Environmental Technology Transfer Sector Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Biomass, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Health, - Macroeconomic, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -NAMA, -TNA

12

Skin Bleaching in Jamaica: A Colonial Legacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light skin color sits within a space of privilege. While this has global significance and relevance, it is particularly true in Jamaica, a former British colony. The majority of the population is of African descent, yet there is an elevation of Eurocentric values and a denigration of Afrocentric values in many facets of life, specifically in the promotion of light skin as an indicator of beauty and social status. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological and socio-cultural factors that influence the practice of skin bleaching in the postcolonial society of Jamaica. Additionally, the study outlined the nation's efforts to combat the skin-bleaching phenomenon. The naturalistic paradigm of inquiry was used to frame the study and to collect and analyze data. The sample consisted of fifteen participantstwelve participants (six males and six females) with a history of skin bleaching; a retailer of skin lightening products; a local dermatologist who has written and published in local newspapers on the practice; and a representative from the Ministry of Health who was integrally involved in the national educational efforts to ban the practice. Data came from three sources: in-depth interviews with respondents; observation of participant's skin-bleaching practices; and a review of local cultural artifacts from popular culture and the media. Data from the audio recorded and transcribed interviews were analyzed using a thematic analysis. Some of the findings reveal that there are multiple and inconsistent definitions of bleaching; skin bleaching enjoys mixed reviewsmuch attributed to economic and social class distinctions; bleachers demonstrate and boast of their expertise in managing the bleaching process suggesting, that because of this expertise, they are immune to any negative side-effects of the practice; the bleaching practice was found to be intermittent, time consuming and laborious, costly and addictive; there are several motivations for the skin-bleaching practice, and these are primarily connected to issues of fashion, beauty, popularity, self-image and acceptability; there is a certain level of defiance towards the governments efforts to ban bleaching yet an expressed sense of responsibility among bleachers. The overall findings show that there is a bias in Jamaica for light skin over dark skin and these values are taught in non-formal and informal ways from very early in life. The practice of skin bleaching is of social and public health concern, and this study has implications for national policy, practice and theory.

Robinson, Petra Alaine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Jamaica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

14

Port Royal, Jamaica, and the slave trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the eighteenth century, the British Empire rose to an eminent role in transatlantic slave trade. British ships are thought to have transported more individuals into bondage during this century than in any other period in the history of human existence. Arguably the wealthiest city in the British colonies of the New World, Port Royal, Jamaica, was an important center of the maritime slave trade. This thesis concerns the role of the slave trade in the maritime community of Port Royal during the later half of the seventeenth century and the early eighteenth century, a time when Port Royal was at its commercial peak and the British slave trade was undergoing its greatest development. Primary and secondary sources provide a basis for understanding the conduct of the slave trade in Port Royal. Primary documents, which include official records, personal accounts, correspondence, probate inventories, wills and records of deeds and grants, reveal information beyond census and volume of the trade. These documents afford the opportunity to study Port Royal's slave trade on an individual level. The documents record the various participants in the trade, such as slaves, traders and purchasers, agencies and agents, and investors, so that relationships and roles can be assessed and the nature and conduct of the trade can be interpreted. Underwater excavation of the ship Henrietta Marie has yielded a significant representative collection of the slave trade's material culture. Wrecked at the turn of the eighteenth century in the Florida Keys, Henrietta Marie had just quit Port Royal after off-loading her human cargo. The artifact collection of shackles, ship's equipment and trade goods represents the trappings of the maritime slave trade. Particularly, the shackles are a grim reminder of the trade's more brutal aspects. Comparative analysis of this collection with shackles recovered from other sites reveals the role of these devices in the slave trade.

Johnson, David A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Matching renewal energy sources to rural development needs : a prototype design for a rural community development center for Jamaica, W.I.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The opportunities for utilizing Jamaica/s rich supply of renewable energy resources as a base for stead, environmentally sound rural development is tremendous. This thesis explores as way of tapping this potential. Jamaica's ...

Jackson, Michael Onaje

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Jamaica-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Jamaica-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, World Watch Institute (WWI) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

17

Jamaica Beach, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica Beach, Texas: Energy Resources Jamaica Beach, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.189684°, -94.9796456° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.189684,"lon":-94.9796456,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Analysis of the hollowware pewter from Port Royal, Jamaica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past forty years an enormous collection of pewter artifacts has been recovered from the various archaeological excavations at Port Royal, Jamaica, both on land and underwater (Link 1960; Marx 1971; Priddy 1975; Hamilton 1984, 1985, 1987, 1988). Since pewter is rarely found in most archaeological excavations the recovery of, what has come to represent, the largest single collection of 17th-century pewter from a single site is of special significance. These pewter artifacts, most of them recovered in their primary archaeological context, preserved countless aspects of daily life in 17th-century Port Royal. Pewter, like ceramics, possesses distinctive diagnostic characteristics which provide information concerning the maker and/or owner of the pewter, the use of the pewter, and the date and place of manufacture. The focus of this study is the pewter hollowware recovered from the excavations conducted by Robert Marx (1967,1968,1971,1973) and the INA/TAMU excavations directed by Donny Hamilton (1984, 1985, 1987, 1988). Approximately 269 pewter artifacts were recovered from these excavations which included spoons, flatware, hollowware, and miscellaneous pewter. The inclusion of the Marx artifacts allows for a consistency in the analysis of the pewter and of the historical records. The main objective of this study is to compile a catalog of the hollowware which records the form and style of each piece, as well as any diagnostic characteristics. A secondary objective is to analyze 17th-century probate inventories from Port Royal for information concerning pewter ownership and usage. The third objective is to relate patterns of pewter usage to primary motivation for settlement at Port Royal. This is accomplished by comparing and contrasting the Port Royal probate data with data provided by 17th-century probate inventories from Boston, Massachusetts, and Mainland, Jamaica.

Winslow, Debra Lynn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Jamaica-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Jamaica-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Partner Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, National Energy Commission Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -Roadmap Website http://www.worldwatch.org/ener

20

Jamaica-Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Jamaica-Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Island States of the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Name Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Island States of the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Partner International Climate Initiative Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Solar, Wind Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -Roadmap, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.worldwatch.org/ener Program Start 2011 Program End 2013

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica  

SciTech Connect

Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan - Kingston Container Terminal, Port of Kingston, Jamaica was written for the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phase of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports system supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) located at the Kingston Container Terminal (KCT) of the Port of Kingston, Jamaica to the Government of Jamaica (GOJ). Activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports system can be operated effectively in real time by Jamaica Customs and KCT personnel to the satisfaction of the DOE/NNSA. These activities will also determine if the Megaports system, as installed and accepted, is performing according to the Megaports Program objectives such that the system is capable of executing the mission of the Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative. The OT&E phase of the project also provides an opportunity to consider potential improvements to the system and to take remedial action if performance deficiencies are identified during the course of evaluation. Changes to the system should be considered under an appropriate change-control process. DOE/NNSA will determine that OT&E is complete by examining whether the Megaports system is performing as intended and that the GOJ is fully capable of operating the system independently without continued onsite support from the U.S. team.

Deforest, Thomas J.; VanDyke, Damon S.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

RAS Gene Hot-Spot Mutations in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Point mutations in the cellular homologues HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS of the viral Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma virus oncogenes are commonly involved in the onset of malignancies in humans and other species such as dog, mouse, and rat. Most often, three particular hot-spot codons are affected, with one amino acid exchange being sufficient for the induction of tumor growth. While RAS genes have been shown to play an important role in canine tumors such as non-small lung cell carcinomas, data about RAS mutations in canine fibrosarcomas as well as KRAS2 mutations in canine melanomas is sparse. To increase the number of tumors examined, we recently screened 13 canine fibrosarcomas and 11 canine melanomas for point mutations, particularly within the mutational hot spots. The results were compared to the already existing data from other studies about these tumors in dogs. A family of genes often involved in human tumors are the well-characterized RAS genes, which comprise HRAS, KRAS2, and NRAS, coding for closely related, small, 189 amino acid, 21 kDa, membrane-bound, intracellular proteins. The human cellular HRAS and KRAS2 genes were identified to be homologues of the Harvey and Kirsten rat sarcoma

Canine Neoplasias; J. Bullerdiek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wrought iron hand tools from the underwater archaelogical excavations of colonial Port Royal, Jamaica, C. 1692  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The written history of Port Royal starts with the European discovery of Jamaica on Columbus' second voyage to the New World and has proven to be rich in shady characters and natural disasters. The English took possession of Jamaica from Spain in 1654 and the city of Port Royal was established soon after. Port Royal, located at the end of the Palisadoes sand spit, a natural barrier roughly six miles long, separates Kingston harbor and the Caribbean Sea. Originally functioning as a protective fortification of the harbor, it became an active harbor and the most economically important English colony in the New World from 1655-1692. Port Royal quickly earned the title of "Wickedest City on Earth" because of its reputation of officially sanctioned privateering and piratical expeditions, and the abundant supply of establishments of ill repute. On Wednesday June 7, 1692 a devastating earthquake struck Port Royal and destroyed a major portion of the city. A total of 33 acres, or 66% of the city, including buildings and people, at the very end of the sand spit, literally sank into the shallow harbor. It was not until the concentrated efforts of the Nautical Archaeology Program (under the direction of Dr. Donny L. Hamilton), The Institute of Nautical Archaeology, and the Jamaican government, started archaeological excavation from 1987-1993, that the real picture of this sunken city emerged. Through the excavation, mapping, and collection, conservation and analysis of artifacts the ghost image was brought back to life and interpreted. A large collection of iron hand tools from this site was preserved. These conserved and replicated artifacts are now available for analysis. This thesis is a continuation of the catalog of hand tools from the Port Royal excavations previously done by Ms. Marianne Franklin. It seeks to link the historical background of these artifacts to tool technology and the history of Port Royal and its tradesmen through the use of historical documents.

Custer, Katie Michelle

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Preliminary energy sector assessments of Jamaica. Volume III: renewable energy. Part I: solar energy - commercial and industrial  

SciTech Connect

This study concerns commercial and industrial solar applications, specifically solar water heating and solar air cooling. The study finds that solar domestic water heating and boiler make-up water preheating are technically feasible and, depending on the displaced energy source (electrical or various fuel types), economically justified; and that solar hot water installations could displace the equivalent of 189,842 barrels of fuel oil per year. However, solar cooling requires high performance collectors not currently manufactured in Jamaica, and feasibility studies indicate that solar cooling in the near term is not economically justified.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Future design mindful of the MoRAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As human-computer interaction (HCI) expands its scope, the proper context for the design of information technology (IT) is increasingly an interconnected mosaic of responsive adaptive systems (MoRAS) including people's heads, organizations, communities, ...

George W. Furnas

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

Barker, Alan M [ORNL; Hanson, Gregory R [ORNL; Sexton, Angela Kay [ORNL; Jones Jr, J P [ORNL; Freer, Eva B [ORNL; Sjoreen, Andrea L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

An Investigation into Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS) Features for Massively Parallel Processor Systems  

SciTech Connect

A study has been completed into the RAS features necessary for Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) systems. As part of this research, a use case model was built of how RAS features would be employed in an operational MPP system. Use cases are an effective way to specify requirements so that all involved parties can easily understand them. This technique is in contrast to laundry lists of requirements that are subject to misunderstanding as they are without context. As documented in the use case model, the study included a look at incorporating system software and end-user applications, as well as hardware, into the RAS system.

KELLY, SUZANNE M.; OGDEN, JEFFREY BRANDON

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Qatargas exporting LNG from Qatar`s new Ras Laffan Port  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the 135,000 cu m LNG carrier Al Zubarah departed Ras Laffan Port in December, Qatar entered a new era of commerce that will both boost the emirate`s economic development and influence energy trade around the world. The event capped more than a decade of planning, design, and construction of Ras Laffan Port--the world`s newest and largest LNG exporting facility. During the 1980s, the focus in Qatar was on exploration and development of North field, which holds the world`s largest reserves of nonassociated natural gas. In the 1990s, efforts concentrated on establishing a direct production and export link between North field, the new multi-billion-dollar Qatar Liquefied Gas Co. (Qatargas) gas liquefaction plant at Ras Laffan, and LNG export facilities at the 8.5 sq km Ras Laffan Port. Markets of the Far East will be first to be served by LNG from Ras Laffan Port. Two 25-year LNG supply contracts have been signed with buyers in Japan and South Korea, and negotiations are under way with potential customers from China, Taiwan, and Thailand. The paper describes the port, its operations, and export projects.

NONE

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rb pathway and chromatin remodeling genes that antagonize let-60 Ras signaling during C. elegans vulval development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synthetic multivulva (synMuv) class A and class B genes act redundantly to regulate Ras-mediated vulval cell fate specification in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The class B synMuv gene lin-35 encodes a protein ...

Ceol, Craig J. (Craig Joseph), 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The Caenorhabditis elegans Synthetic Multivulva Genes Prevent Ras Pathway Activation by Tightly Repressing Global Ectopic Expression of lin-3 EGF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Caenorhabditis elegans class A and B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes redundantly antagonize an EGF/Ras pathway to prevent ectopic vulval induction. We identify a class A synMuv mutation in the promoter of the lin-3 ...

Saffer, Adam M.

31

Low proliferation and high apoptosis of osteoblastic cells on hydrophobic surface are associated with defective Ras signaling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrophobic (HPB) nature of most polymeric biomaterials has been a major obstacle in using those materials in vivo due to low compatibility with cells. However, there is little knowledge of the molecular detail to explain how surface hydrophobicity affects cell responses. In this study, we compared the proliferation and apoptosis of human osteoblastic MG63 cells adhered to hydrophilic (HPL) and hydrophobic surfaces. On the hydrophobic surface, less formation of focal contacts and actin stress fibers, a delay in cell cycle progression, and an increase in apoptosis were observed. By using fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) as a model growth factor, we also investigated intracellular signaling pathways on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The activation of Ras, Akt, and ERK by FGF1 was impaired in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface. The overexpression of constitutively active form of Ras and Akt rescued those cells from apoptosis and recovered cell cycle progression. Furthermore, their overexpression also restored the actin cytoskeletal organization on the hydrophobic surface. Finally, the proliferative, antiapoptotic, and cytoskeletal effects of constitutively active Ras in MG63 cells on the hydrophobic surface were blocked by wortmannin and PD98059 that inhibit Akt and ERK activation, respectively. Therefore, our results suggest that the activation of Ras and its downstream molecules Akt and ERK to an appropriate level is one of crucial elements in the determination of osteoblast cell responses. The Ras pathway may represent a cell biological target that should be considered for successful surface modification of biomaterials to induce adequate cell responses in the bone tissue.

Chang, Eun-Ju [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong-Hee [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Jung-Eun [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-Ae [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Seung Ko, Jea [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Chong-Pyoung [Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Man [Laboratory for the Study of Molecular Biointerfaces, Department of CMF Cell and Developmental Biology, College of Dentistry and DRI, and Intellectual Biointerface Engineering Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hyunmkim@plaza.snu.ac.kr

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Effects of mutant human Ki-ras{sup G12C} gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 {mu}g/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras{sup G12C} expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models.

Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T. [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Kock, Nancy D. [Section on Comparative Medicine, Department of Pathology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Floyd, Heather S. [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, North Carolina State College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States); Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J. [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); D'Agostino, Ralph B. [Section on Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Pettenati, Mark J. [Department of Medical Genetics, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Miller, Mark Steven [Department of Cancer Biology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 27157 (United States)], E-mail: msmiller@wfubmc.edu

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Caribbean-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References NREL International Program [1] Abstract The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is partnering with Caribbean nations to build Low Carbon Communities in the Caribbean as part of the broader Low Carbon Communities of the Americas program.... The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is partnering with Caribbean nations to build Low Carbon Communities in the Caribbean as part of the broader Low Carbon Communities of the Americas program. References

34

Sustainable Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal ~30% ... Oahu waste-to-energy ~20% ... overall solar ~0.1% Hawaii residents pay among the nation Population 1 Sicily 5,029,683 2 Ireland 4,422,100 3 New Zealand 4,280,000 4 Puerto Rico 3,994,259 5 Jamaica 2,285 15 Martinique 401,000 16 Maui 117,644 17 New Zealand 4,280,000 18 Oahu 899,593 19 Puerto Rico 3

Prevedouros, Panos D.

35

Vol. 53, No. 9APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Sept. 1987, p. 2231-2236 0099-2240/87/092231-06$02.OO/O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal ~30% ... Oahu waste-to-energy ~20% ... overall solar ~0.1% Hawaii residents pay among the nation Population 1 Sicily 5,029,683 2 Ireland 4,422,100 3 New Zealand 4,280,000 4 Puerto Rico 3,994,259 5 Jamaica 2,285 15 Martinique 401,000 16 Maui 117,644 17 New Zealand 4,280,000 18 Oahu 899,593 19 Puerto Rico 3

Hazen, Terry

36

The C. elegans class A synthetic multivulva genes inhibit ectopic RAS-mediated vulval development by tightly restricting expression of lin-3 EGF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The class A and B synthetic multivulva (synMuv) genes of C. elegans redundantly antagonize an EGF/Ras pathway to prevent ectopic vulval induction. The class B synMuv genes encode many proteins known to remodel chromatin ...

Saffer, Adam M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotypes Reveal Cell-Nonautonomous Functions of Oncogenic RAS and the p53 Tumor Suppressor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cell proliferation, essentially permanently, in response to oncogenic stimuli, including genotoxic stress. We modified the use of antibody arrays to provide a quantitative assessment of factors secreted by senescent cells. We show that human cells induced to senesce by genotoxic stress secrete myriad factors associated with inflammation and malignancy. This senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) developed slowly over several days and only after DNA damage of sufficient magnitude to induce senescence. Remarkably similar SASPs developed in normal fibroblasts, normal epithelial cells, and epithelial tumor cells after genotoxic stress in culture, and in epithelial tumor cells in vivo after treatment of prostate cancer patients with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. In cultured premalignant epithelial cells, SASPs induced an epithelial-mesenchyme transition and invasiveness, hallmarks of malignancy, by a paracrine mechanism that depended largely on the SASP factors interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Strikingly, two manipulations markedly amplified, and accelerated development of, the SASPs: oncogenic RAS expression, which causes genotoxic stress and senescence in normal cells, and functional loss of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Both loss of p53 and gain of oncogenic RAS also exacerbated the promalignant paracrine activities of the SASPs. Our findings define a central feature of genotoxic stress-induced senescence. Moreover, they suggest a cell-nonautonomous mechanism by which p53 can restrain, and oncogenic RAS can promote, the development of age-related cancer by altering the tissue microenvironment.

Copp, Jean-Philippe; Patil, Christopher; Rodier, Francis; Sun, Yu; Munoz, Denise; Goldstein, Joshua; Nelson, Peter; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed ArakawaSchubert Scheme (McRAS). Part II: Implementation and Performance in GEOS II GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prognostic cloud scheme named the Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed ArakawaSchubert Scheme (McRAS) and the Simple Biosphere Model have been implemented in a version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) II GCM at a 4 latitude 5...

Y. C. Sud; G. K. Walker

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Motor Gasoline Blending Components Imports from Jamaica  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

40

Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program Name Caribbean-GTZ Renewable Energy Program Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Partner German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) Sector Energy Topics Background analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.gtz.de/en/praxis/95 Country Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Jamaica, Martinique, Puerto Rico, Saint Barthelemy, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos Islands, United States

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Genetic evidence that Ras-like GTPases, Gtr1p, and Gtr2p, are involved in epigenetic control of gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gtr1p and Gtr2p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are members of the Ras-like GTP binding family and interact genetically with Prp20p (yeast RCC1), which is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Gsp1p (yeast homolog of Ran, involved in nuclear export). Recently, Gtr1p and Gtr2p were suggested to be molecular switches in the rapamycin-sensitive TOR signaling pathway. Here, we show that Gtr1p and Gtr2p genetically interact with the chromatin remodeling factor Ino80p. Gtr2p interacted physically with both Rvb1p and Rvb2p. Consistent with these results, Gtr2p localized to chromatin and could activate transcription. Gtr1p and Gtr2p were found to be involved in chromatin silencing in the vicinity of telomeres. Gtr1p and Gtr2p were required to repress nitrogen catabolite-repressed genes, which are repressed by the TOR signaling pathway. We propose that Gtr1p and Gtr2p are involved in epigenetic control of gene expression in the TOR signaling pathway.

Sekiguchi, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Nihonbashi, Tokyo 103-0027 (Japan)], E-mail: sekigu@molbiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Hayashi, Naoyuki [Department of Molecular Pathology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-0934 (Japan); Wang, Yonggang [Department of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kobayashi, Hideki [Department of Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency, Nihonbashi, Tokyo 103-0027 (Japan)

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex contains a C-terminal Ras-like domain that promotes association of Paf1 complex with chromatin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conserved Paf1 complex localizes to the coding regions of genes and facilitates multiple processes during transcription elongation, including the regulation of histone modifications. However, the mechanisms that govern Paf1 complex recruitment to active genes are undefined. Here we describe a previously unrecognized domain within the Cdc73 subunit of the Paf1 complex, the Cdc73 C-domain, and demonstrate its importance for Paf1 complex occupancy on transcribed chromatin. Deletion of the C-domain causes phenotypes associated with elongation defects without an apparent loss of complex integrity. Simultaneous mutation of the C-domain and another subunit of the Paf1 complex, Rtf1, causes enhanced mutant phenotypes and loss of histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation. The crystal structure of the C-domain reveals unexpected similarity to the Ras family of small GTPases. Instead of a deep nucleotide-binding pocket, the C-domain contains a large but comparatively flat surface of highly conserved residues, devoid of ligand. Deletion of the C-domain results in reduced chromatin association for multiple Paf1 complex subunits. We conclude that the Cdc73 C-domain probably constitutes a protein interaction surface that functions with Rtf1 in coupling the Paf1 complex to the RNA polymerase II elongation machinery.

Amrich C. G.; Heroux A.; Davis, C. P.; Rogal, W. P.; Shirra, M. K.; Gardner, R. G.; Arndt, K. M.; VanDemark, A. P.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Jamaica-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sustainable energy initiativespolicies, financial and institutional capacity, and electricity generationtransmissiondistribution systems in CARICOM Member States. A...

44

Jamaica - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... What is shale gas and why is it important? ... OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet; World Oil Transit Chokepoints;

45

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAIS User's Group RAIS User's Group The connection is no longer here Fill out the following section for addition to the RAIS User's List: CONTACT DETAILS First name: * Required Last name: * Required Company: Street: City: State: Country: Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Aruba Bahamas Barbados Belize Bermuda Virgin Islands, British Canada Cayman Islands Costa Rica Cuba Dominica Dominican Republic El Salvador Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Haiti Honduras Jamaica Martinique Mexico Montserrat Netherlands Antilles Nicaragua Panama Puerto Rico Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and The Grenadines Trinidad and Tobago Turks and Caicos Islands United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Virgin Islands, U.S. Argentina Bolivia

46

UNIVERSIT DES ANTILLES ET DE LA GUYANE FACULT DE DROIT ET D'CONOMIE DE LA MARTINIQUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opportunities -MDF- Market Opportunities -MDF- The first MDF plant started up four years ago and now there are 3 the substrate of choice for exotic wood veneer layup. Pressing veneer on MDF will give the most defect

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

The Midsummer Dry Spells Impact on Vegetation in Jamaica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual rainfall pattern of the intra-Americas sea reveals a bimodal feature with a minimum during the midsummer known as the midsummer dry spell (MSD). A first attempt is made to examine the impact of the MSD on vegetation through a ...

Theodore L. Allen; Scott Curtis; Douglas W. Gamble

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Religion, Archaeology, and Social Relations: A Study of the Practice of Quakerism and Caribbean Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century British Virgin Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report on Excavations at Montpelier and Roehampton. JamaicaJournal 8:40-45. 1998 Montpelier, Jamaica: A PlantationSuch pots were common on Montpelier plantation in Jamaica,

Chenoweth, John Martin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Final Report: Retrofit Aeration System (RAS) for Francis Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Osage Plant and Bagnell Dam impounds the Osage River forming the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri. Since it is nearly 100 feet deep, the lake stratifies during the summer months causing low DO water to be discharged into the Osage river below the dam. To supplement DO, the turbines are vented during the low DO season. AmerenUE is continually researching new methods of DO enhancement. New turbines, manufactured by American Hydro Corporation, were installed in Units 3 & 5 during the spring of 2002. Additional vent capacity and new nosecones were included in the new turbine design. The retrofit aeration system is an attempt to further enhance the DO in the tailrace by installation of additional venting capability on Unit 6 (not upgraded with new turbine) and refining design on special nosecones which will be mounted on both Unit 3 (upgraded turbine) and Unit 6. Baseline DO testing for Units 3 & 6 was conducted mid August, 2002. This data wascompared to further tests planned for the summer of 2003 and 2004 after installation of the retrofit aeration system.

Alan Sullivan; DOE Project Officer Keith Bennett

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

In her RAS Presidential Address for 2005, Kathryn A Whaler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by a thermal perturbation of more recent origin, perhaps related to the ~183 Ma Karoo magmatic event. #12;SOUTH perturbation resulting from Karoo magmatism at ~183 Ma (Duncan et al., 1997). Further work will be required magmatic events associated with 183 Ma Karoo volcanism. Acknowledgments The existence of the Kaapvaal

51

Energy needed to produce aluminum - Today in Energy - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... solar, wind, geothermal, ... is usually imported from Jamaica and South America.

52

The role of the artist in a developing neighbourhood garden : the case of Dungarven Rd. lot in the community of Jamaica Plain, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An exploration of the role of the artist in a developing neighbourhood garden through the examination of the following topics: wilderness, landscape, gardens, community gardens and various artists' work in the land. Leading ...

Smith, David Brian

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Energy Department Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Government...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Government Site in Jamaica, N.Y. Energy Department Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Government Site in Jamaica, N.Y. October 27,...

54

Tech Beat May 25, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The network has been rapidly expanding, and now includes time standards in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Jamaica, Panama ...

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

NIST Quality Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SIM CIPM MRA signatories comprise the NMIs in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama ...

56

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albania, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Republic of Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico,...

57

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

58

RAS-NANO: a reliability-aware synthesis framework for reconfigurable nanofabrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Entering the nanometer era, a major challenge to current design methodologies and tools is to effectively address the high defect densities projected for nanotechnologies. To this end, we proposed a reconfiguration-based defect-avoidance methodology ...

Chen He; Margarida F. Jacome

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Ras-association domain family 1C protein promotes breast cancer cell migration and attenuates apoptosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

we chose to use a doxycycline (dox)-inducible Murineted with up to 1 10 -6 M doxycycline (dox) for 48 hr. HA-cells were treated with doxycycline, DMSO, etoposide at 45

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

of Washington WINTER QUARTER 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the North American Virginia Rail Rallus limicola, with `Martinique' crossed out by Verreaux and `Nle Zelande al. Figure 5. A phylogram of one of two most parsimonious trees found using a branch-and-bound search

Queitsch, Christine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

University of Idaho Student Union Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the North American Virginia Rail Rallus limicola, with `Martinique' crossed out by Verreaux and `Nle Zelande al. Figure 5. A phylogram of one of two most parsimonious trees found using a branch-and-bound search

O'Laughlin, Jay

62

Register as a New User  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ireland Northern, Ireland Republic of, Israel, Italy, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kirbati, Korea North, Korea South, Kosrae, Kuwait...

63

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bangladesh Brazil Chile Colombia Greece Indonesia Iran Jamaica Malaysia Mexico Pakistan Peru Philippines Portugal Romania Slovenia South Africa South Korea Thailand Turkey Uruguay...

64

SIMnet Launch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For the record, I'd like to name all the countries that are participating in SIMnet: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Jamaica ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

About TMS Membership: e-Memberships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indonesia Iran, Islamic Rep. Iraq Jamaica Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Dem Rep. Kyrgyz Republic Lao PDR Lesotho Liberia. Macedonia, FYR

66

Export.gov - Trade Leads  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea...

67

Export.gov - Trade Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea...

68

Total Energy - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, North Korea, South Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia...

69

Ask a Scientist!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, South Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon...

70

U.S. Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway...

71

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

launch an intense marketing push - Within 5 months, Quadlogic signed a multimillion-dollar deal with a private utility company in Jamaica * Today ... - New line has a dozen...

72

PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SOLAR COOLING SYSTEM IN UAE RAS AL KHAIMAH BY BOTH EXPERIMENT AND SIMULATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In United Arab Emirates (UAE), a huge proportion of electrical energy consumed in buildings is used to run air conditioning equipments. This is because (more)

Ssembatya, Martin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Surfing the Waves of Globalization: Asia and Financial Globalization in the Context of the Trilemma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7% pt. Jordan Jamaica Venezuela, RB Chile Peru ArgentinaTrinidad and Tobago Venezuela, RB 1992-96 (red-x) vs. 2002-is at 0 Peru (2.14) Venezuela Mexico 2 Investment volatility

Aizenman, Joshua; Chen, Menzie; Ito, Hiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

NAME City State Zip Aaron, Jeremy Tyler Winston Salem NC 27104  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Petersham, Massachusetts 01366 (L.S., C.M.S.); and The Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Jamaica Plain AND METHODS Plant Material From June 2002 to August 2002 at Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts (429548

Almor, Amit

75

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jamaica Bay water nor cooling tower "agothy Fm, Elevation ofJFK. Investment Cost of Cooling Tower Case. Table 3. Annualthe JFK Aquifer System. I. Cooling Tower Case Winter Cooling

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Uganda Manafwa River early flood warning system development hydrologic watershed modeling using HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, ArcGIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Manafwa River basin spans several districts in Eastern Uganda. Over the years, frequent floods have constantly posed a great threat to the local communities in these districts. The Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) intends ...

Ma, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Dietary, lifestyle and clinicopathological factors associated with BRAF and K-ras mutations arising in distinct subsets of colorectal cancers in the EPIC Norfolk study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was defined as fish where fat is dis- tributed throughout the flesh, such as herring and mackerel. Shellfish were not included in either fish cate- gory. Fruit consumption was defined as intake of fruits in all forms, including fruit included in composite...

Naguib, Adam; Mitrou, Panagiota N; Gay, Laura J; Cooke, James C; Luben, Robert; Ball, Richard Y; McTaggart, Alison; Arends, Mark J; Rodwell, Sheila A

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

Scientometric analysis of publications in the area of nanoenergy based on the materials of the peer-reviewed journal of VINITI RAS Physics of Nanoobjects and Nanotechnology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the analysis of a range of key publications in the area of nanoenergy, which, among other journals, were reflected in the Physics of Nanoobjects and Nanotechnology issue of the peer-reviewed journal that was published by the All-Russia ... Keywords: nanoenergy, nanomaterials, nanoobjects, nanophysics, scientometrics, solar cells

N. M. Builova; A. I. Osipov

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Tissue-specific interactions between oncogenic K-ras and the p19A?r?f?_p53 pathway determine susceptibility to transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tumor development is a multi-step process driven by the collective action of gain-of-function mutations in oncogenes and loss-of-function alterations in tumor suppressor genes. The particular spectrum of mutations in a ...

Young, Nathan Price

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Energy Department Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Government Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Government Site in Jamaica, N.Y. Energy Department Sends First Energy Saving Team to Federal Government Site in Jamaica, N.Y. October 27, 2005 - 12:32pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the first Federal Energy Saving team has been deployed to a General Services Administration (GSA) facility in Jamaica, N.Y., as part of the comprehensive national energy efficiency effort being undertaken by the Bush administration. The team, made up of energy savings experts, will assess the facility's energy usage with the goal of not only improving efficiency, but also reducing energy costs. "President Bush has called on all Americans to be more energy efficient. As the largest user of energy in the United States, the federal government

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Case Study of a Ross Ice Shelf Airstream Event: A New Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study illustrating cloud processes and other features associated with the Ross Ice Shelf airstream (RAS), in Antarctica, is presented. The RAS is a semipermanent low-level wind regime primarily over the western Ross Ice Shelf, linked to ...

Daniel F. Steinhoff; Saptarshi Chaudhuri; David H. Bromwich

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Brief communication: Global warming and coral reefs: Modelling the effect of temperature on Acropora palmata colony growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on colony growth of the branching coral Acropora palmata from fringing reefs off Discovery Bay on the north coast of Jamaica have been obtained over the period 2002-2007 using underwater photography and image analysis by both SCUBA and remotely ... Keywords: Climate change, Coral growth, Hadley, Image analysis, ROV, SST, Submersible

M. James C. Crabbe

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

DPI403 NORRIS FALL 2009 8/13/2009 12:31 PM DEMOCRATIC GOVERNANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SALVADOR HONDURAS NICARAGUA COSTA RICA PANAMÁ COLOMBIA VENEZUELA ECUADOR PER? BRASIL BOLIVIA PARAGUAY CHILE NICARAGUA VENEZUELA BRASIL BOLIVIA URUGUAY ARGENTINA JAMAICA HAITÍ REP. DOMINICANA TRINIDAD Y TOBAGO (incluyendoa Venezuela)seconcentrael25%dela biodiversidaddelplaneta. EnlosAndes estánpresentes84delas114zonasde

Milchberg, Howard

84

Byggmeister Test Home: Cold Climate Multifamily Masonry Building Condition Assessment and Retrofit Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a retrofit project undertaken by Building Science Corporation and partner Byggmeister on a multifamily brick row house located in Jamaica Plain, MA. This project studied the row house to determine the right combination of energy efficiency measures that are feasible, affordable, and suitable for this type of construction and acceptable to homeowners.

Wytrykowska, H.; Ueno, K.; Van Straaten, R.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries. Volume I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contents of this book are: Introduction, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Bourkina (Upper Volta), Brazil, Burma, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, French Guiana, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields, Appendix II, Phytomass Files, and References.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Qatar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qatar Qatar U.S. Energy Secretary Visits Qatar November 15, 2005 - 2:42pm Addthis Includes tour of Ras Laffan Industrial City and Port, opening of GE corporate office building, a visit to Education City, and time spent thanking U.S. troops DOHA, QATAR - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today concluded a two-day visit to Qatar by participating in the announcement of Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas Company III (RasGas III), visiting Qatar's Education City, and eating lunch with U.S. troops stationed at Camp Al Sayliyah. On November 14, Secretary Bodman and his delegation toured the Ras Laffan Industrial City and Port in Qatar. Ras Laffan Port is the world's largest liquefied natural gas (LNG) exporting port. The visit to Industrial City preceded today's official opening of Ras

87

Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Breaking a Pocket of Resistance in the Fight Against Cancer Print Thursday, 12 December 2013 11:55 ras protein The new class of inhibitors interacts with a specific mutation (Glycine to Cysteine) associated with a number of types of lung cancer. Mutations in the protein K-RAS are a very common cause for certain types of human cancers and are generally associated with a poor response to standard therapies. RAS, an abbreviation of Rat Sarcoma, is a nucleotide binding protein that responds to chemical signals (nucleotides). When in the "on" state, RAS activates other proteins, resulting in a cascade of biochemical processes; in the "off" state, RAS remains inactive. Mutations in the RAS

88

Terms of Reference First Joint Mission GOVERNMENT OF GRENADA TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR First Joint Mission of INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK and the WORLD BANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Martinique is located at 11 582 North latitude and 61 202 west longitude and lies between Trinidad and Tobago to the south and St. Vincent and the Grenadines to the north. It is the southernmost of the Windward Islands. Grenada is a Small Island Developing State (SIDS) comprising three islands with the largest being Grenada which is 34 km (21 miles) long and 18km (12 miles) wide and the three islands taken together have a land area of 345 sq. km (133 sq. miles). The country is characterized by humid tropical climate, with relatively constant temperatures throughout the year averaging 26 degrees centigrade. The mean maximum temperature is 31.4 degrees centigrade while the mean minimum is 24.0 degrees centigrade. The dry season typically runs from January to May and the rainy season from June to December. Carriacou and Petit Martinique generally receive lower levels of rainfall and during the dry season can experience severe drought conditions. 2. Economy The economy of Grenada has been hit hard by the global crisis. The economic downturn had stronger impact than was predicted in 2008 which is reflected in declining tourism receipts, Foreign

Pilot Project; On Climate Resilience

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

IP3 Review Begins Page 3 January 13, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, W. J. 1977, A&AS, 54, 301 Williams, P. J. S., Kenderdine, S., & Baldwin, J. E. 1966, MmRAS, 70, 53

Saskatchewan, University of

90

Supporting Information Boghaert et al. 10.1073/pnas.1118872109  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O-kRas transgene expression, the mice were fed doxycycline (Bio-Serv) at a concen- tration of 200 mg/kg. After 2 d

Nelson, Celeste M.

91

Structural Studies of Calcium/Calmodulin Depenedent Protein Kinase II Activation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activation. For example, NF-kB and Ras have been shown toet al. , 2005), and the NF-kB pathway (Dolmetsch et al. ,

Chao, Luke H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Inter-Rater Reliability of Historical Data Collected by Non-Medical Research Assistants and Physicians in Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collected by Non- Medical Research Assistants and PhysiciansWe hypothesized that non-medical research assistants (RAs)45%]). Conclusion: Non-medical research assistants who focus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resilience (PPCR) Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cambodia, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Tajikistan, Tonga, Yemen, Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea

94

Achieving N-2 Contingency from a Virtual Power Plant (VPP): A Consolidated Edison Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consolidated Edison commissioned EPRI to analyze the feasibility of a Virtual Power Plant (VPP) to enhance delivery reliability in the Jamaica service area. Currently, service can be maintained at peak demand without overloads under the loss of a single transformer (N-1). Consolidated Edison foresees benefits from increasing reliability to a higher level, N-2 reliability, but the cost of adding another transformer is high, perhaps in excess of $250 million. EPRI constructed several VPP configurations us...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

95

Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb. 11, 2008 Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing 1/47 RAS RAS Advanced Fault Tolerance Solutions for High Performance Computing Christian Engelmann Oak Ridge National Solutions for High Performance Computing 2/47 · Nation's largest energy laboratory · Nation's largest

Engelmann, Christian

96

Blood proteolytic activity elevation and plasma protein degradation in spontaneously hypertensive rat models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G-protein alpha s, H-Ras, NF-kB, pard6, PI3K cat class IA,G-protein alpha-s, H-Ras, NF-kB, Pi3k cat class IA, PKA-cat,Beta-catenin, MDM2, MMP-2, NF-kb, PIAS2, SUMO- 1, XPA, p21

Chow, Jason C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Microsoft PowerPoint - opening survey  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

General survey of JIHT RAS team General survey of JIHT RAS team approach and results Genri Genri Norman Norman Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science Prague, August 30 - September 4, 2009 My arguments *Elite young perspective staff *Multidisciplinary science *Very active style of life *Sustained funding STAFF Director of the JIHT RAS Academician Vladimir V. Fortov Founder of the JIHT RAS Academician Alexander E. Sheindlin (celebrated 90 years on September 4, 2007) My Department www.ihed.ras.ru/norman our site exists from our site exists from 2003 2003 Heads of laboratories I.V.Morozov born 1978, Ph.D. 2004 V.V.Stegailov born 1981, Ph.D. 2005 I.Yu.Skobelev, born 1952 PhD, Dr.Sc.

98

Posters | MMSNF 2013 Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Privacy and Security Notice Privacy and Security Notice Posters Available Posters from the Materials Modeling and Simulation of Nuclear Fuels (MMSNF) 2013 workshop. Presented on Poster Title Author(s) ID Session Oct. 14, 2013 Atomistic simulation of radiation damage of metallic and oxide fuels by swift heavy ion irradiation Starikov, Sergey (JIHT RAS, Russia), Pisarev, Vasily (JIHT RAS, Russia), Kuksin, Alexey (JIHT RAS, Russia), Stegailov, Vladimir (JIHT RAS, Russia) PA4 A Oct. 14, 2013 Density functional theory for fission products transport in UO2 [2.5MB, posted: Oct. 28, 2013 ] Ducher, Roland (IRSN, France), Dubourg, Roland (IRSN, France) PA5 A Oct. 14, 2013 Kinetic Monte Carlo study of oxygen defect migration in urania fuel Hoffman III, Richard T. (GA Tech, USA), Bahera, Rakesh (GA Tech, USA), Deo, Chaitanya S. (GA Tech, USA) PA7 A

99

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-Grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations Sub-Grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations Using ARM-CART SCM Datasets Sud, Y.C., Walker, G.K., and Tao, W.-K., Climate and Radiation Branch, Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Influence of Sub-grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS: Evaluation using ARM-CART SCM Datasets. Y. C. Sud, G. K. Walker and W.-K. Tao In GCM-physics evaluations with the currently available ARM-CART SCM datasets, McRAS produced very similar character of near surface errors of simulated temperature and humidity containing typically warm and moist biases near the surface and cold and dry biases aloft. We argued it must have a common cause presumably rooted in the model physics. Lack of vertical adjustment

100

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet1 BP Stats Review Prices CRUDE OIL PRICES 1861 - 1999 US dollars per barrel 1861-1944 US Average 1945-1985 Arabian Light posted at Ras Tanura

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2011.00078 Mice lacking Ras-GRF1 show contextual fear conditioning but not spatial memory impairments: convergent evidence from two independently generated mouse mutant lines

Steven J. Clapcote; Vootele Voikar; David P. Wolfer; Karl Peter Giese; Stefania Fasano; Stefania Fasano; Division Of; Steven J. Clapcote

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Wave Packet Molecular Dynamics," Scientific-Coordination Session on "Non-ideal Plasma Research", Moscow, Russia, November 23-24, 2011, http:www.ihed.ras.runpp2011(oral...

103

FREE ELECTRON LASER FOR SIBERIAN CENTRE FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL RESEARCH: THE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FREE ELECTRON LASER FOR SIBERIAN CENTRE FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL RESEARCH: THE CONTROL SYSTEM of the Siberian Branch of RAS. Abstract. A control system for the magnetic system of the free electron laser (FEL

Kozak, Victor R.

104

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies Program Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies Program Agency/Company /Organization United States Agency for International Development, United States Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Energy, United States Department of Agriculture, United States Department of State Sector Energy, Land Topics Low emission development planning, -LEDS Program Start 2010 Program End 2014 Country Albania, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Gabon, Georgia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Republic of Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Moldova, Peru, Philippines, Serbia, South Africa, Thailand, Ukraine, Vietnam, Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies Program[1]

105

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports" U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1619502,1246181,2153814,2865683,3065683,-6.5 " Canada*",797861,599752,841061,1397613,1280803,9.1 " Dominican Republic",51698,160672,124720,212370,312741,-32.1 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",717687,407422,1116653,1125109,1331754,-15.5 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

106

Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni Program Start 2009 Program End 2015 Country Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts and Nevis, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago

107

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports" U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",3122664,2010882,3565711,5133546,5327583,-3.6 " Canada*",1773644,943061,2101534,2716705,3176066,-14.5 " Dominican Republic",51792,211736,124720,263528,312741,-15.7 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",1244972,777750,1268077,2022722,1698391,19.1 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

108

A novel random access scan flip-flop design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Serial scan design causes unnecessary switching activity during testing causing enormous power dissipation. The test time increases enormously with the increase in number of flip-flops. An alternate to serial scan architecture is Random Access Scan (RAS). Here every flip-flop is uniquely addressed using an address decoder. Although it may seem to have solved most of the current problems associated with testing integrated circuits, yet one may impulsively conclude that the routing and area overhead associated with RAS is prohibitive. We present a design of the RAS flip-flop which uses a unique toggle mechanism, possible only in RAS. We minimize the number of gates (transistors) and eliminate the need for two globally routed (scan in and test control) signals present in earlier designs. Our design is built keeping in focus the address decoder complexity to a bare minimum. Our multistage scan-out system enables the addressed flip-flop to be observed without compromising performance due to a slow output bus. We have estimated the additional gates required to implement RAS over serial scan (SS). The design obtained equal fault coverage, 60 % test vector reduction and 99 % lesser power dissipation as compared to SS. 1.

S. Mudlapur; Vishwani D. Agrawal; Adit D. Singh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

In situ control of As dimer orientation on Ge(100) surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the preparation of single domain Ge(100):As surfaces in a metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy reactor. In situ reflection anisotropy spectra (RAS) of vicinal substrates change when arsenic is supplied either by tertiarybutylarsine or by background As{sub 4} during annealing. Low energy electron diffraction shows mutually perpendicular orientations of dimers, scanning tunneling microscopy reveals distinct differences in the step structure, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms differences in the As coverage of the Ge(100):As samples. Their RAS signals consist of contributions related to As dimer orientation and to step structure, enabling precise in situ control over preparation of single domain Ge(100):As surfaces.

Brueckner, Sebastian; Doescher, Henning [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, Institut fuer Physik, Postfach 10 05 65, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); Supplie, Oliver; Luczak, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Barrigon, Enrique; Rey-Stolle, Ignacio [Instituto de Energia Solar, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Avda. Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kleinschmidt, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); CiS Forschungsinstitut fuer Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany); Hannappel, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Technische Universitaet Ilmenau, Institut fuer Physik, Postfach 10 05 65, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany); CiS Forschungsinstitut fuer Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 14, 99099 Erfurt (Germany)

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from CDKN-CARICOM-Trinidad and Tobago-A Regional Implementation (Redirected from CDKN-CARICOM-Trinidad and Tobago-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework) Jump to: navigation, search Name Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni Program Start 2009 Program End 2015 Country Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts and Nevis, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago

111

CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name CDKN-CARICOM-A Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Website http://cdkn.org/project/planni Program Start 2010 Country Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Lucia, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago

112

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",78.29,77.25,102.62,77.88,105.14,-25.9 " Canada*",81.61,80.7,110.67,81.3,112.16,-27.5 " Dominican Republic",78.54,75.09,73.89,75.77,76.61,-1.1 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",73.45,75.81,94.36,74.35,100.95,-26.3 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

113

Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles Jump to: navigation, search Name Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Partner Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, National Energy Commission Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas Topics Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -Roadmap Website http://www.worldwatch.org/ener Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean References Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles[1] Overview "Launched in spring 2010, Worldwatch's Caribbean project is partnering

114

Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Agency/Company /Organization Inter-American Development Bank, World Watch Institute (WWI) Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Program Start 2012 Program End 2012 Country Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Kitts and Nevis, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago

115

Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy-Economic Information System (SIEE) Database Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.olade.org/sieeEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

116

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",65.1,63.67,73.81,64.48,78.9,-18.3 " Canada*",59.34,55.22,63.02,57.57,73.63,-21.8 " Dominican Republic",78.47,74.41,73.89,75.4,76.61,-1.6 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",69.42,73.33,82.64,70.83,86.44,-18.1 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

117

OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OLADE-Latin American and Caribbean Energy Efficiency Seminar Agency/Company /Organization: Latin America Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Implementation, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Presentation, Webinar, Workshop, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.olade.org/eficiencia/indexEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

118

Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Island  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Island Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Island States of the Caribbean Jump to: navigation, search Name Designing and Communicating Low Carbon Energy Roadmaps for Small Island States of the Caribbean Agency/Company /Organization World Watch Institute Partner International Climate Initiative Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, People and Policy, Solar, Wind Topics Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Finance, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -Roadmap, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.worldwatch.org/ener Program Start 2011 Program End 2013 Country Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica

119

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Vincent and the Grenadines UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan

120

Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Albania Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Midway Islands Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Zealand Nicaragua Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore Slovakia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\ICR\My%20Documents\Coal\Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 (Thousand Short Tons) Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alabama 3,977 - 3,977 Argentina 225 - 225 Belgium 437 - 437 Brazil 1,468 - 1,468 Bulgaria 75 - 75 Egypt 363 - 363 Germany 71 - 71 Italy 61 - 61 Netherlands 219 - 219 Spain 415 - 415 Turkey 362 - 362 United Kingdom 282 - 282 Kentucky 1,404 - 1,404 Canada 433 - 433 Italy 227 - 227 Netherlands 468 - 468 United Kingdom 276 - 276 Pennsylvania 391 10,295 10,867 Belgium - 251 251 Brazil 187 - 189 Canada 50 8,548 8,766 France - 307 307 Germany 153 195 348 Ireland - 383 383 Jamaica - 87 87 Morocco - 134 134 Netherlands - 269 269 Norway - - 5 Peru - - 6 Portugal - 121 121 Utah - 917 917 Japan - 917 917 Virginia 2,787 - 2,787 Belgium 288 - 288 Brazil 792 - 792 Bulgaria 70 - 70 Canada 138 - 138

122

Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099 Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099 Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean Sector Energy, Land, Climate Topics GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.eclac.org/publicaci Country Aruba, Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guyana, Jamaica, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Saint Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean References Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099[1]

123

OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE Sustainable Energy Planning Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics: Implementation, Background analysis Website: www.olade.org/proyectoPlanificacionEnergetica.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

124

Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Legal Energy Information System (SIEL) Database Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.olade.org/sielEn.html Country: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, Venezuela, Barbados, Cuba, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago, Dominican Republic Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, Central America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, South America, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean, Caribbean

125

Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Papau New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Papau New Guinea UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa

126

file://G:\mydocs\Coal\Distribution\2003\distable2.HTML  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 (Thousand Short Tons) Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alabama 5,156 - 5,156 Argentina 345 - 345 Belgium 387 - 387 Brazil 1,825 - 1,825 Bulgaria 363 - 363 Egypt 477 - 477 Germany 167 - 167 Italy 87 - 87 Netherlands 399 - 399 Spain 198 - 198 Turkey 551 - 551 United Kingdom 359 - 359 Kentucky 1,449 - 1,449 Canada 566 - 566 France 104 - 104 Iceland 53 - 53 Italy 139 - 139 Netherlands 268 - 268 Norway 14 - 14 United Kingdom 304 - 304 Pennsylvania 476 8,251 8,820 Australia - 81 81 Belgium - 188 188 Brazil 85 - 87 Canada 203 6,622 6,893 Costa Rica - 40 40 Denmark - 184 184 Dominican Republic - 19 20 France - 193 193 Germany 89 - 89 Ireland - 148 148 Jamaica - 36 36 Morocco - 172 172 Netherlands 99 248 355 Peru - - 12 Portugal - 321 321 Venezuela - - 2 Virginia 4,786

127

The optimal size of a globular protein domain: A simple sphere-packing model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Biochemistry 24 (1985) 1501. [18] A. Donev, F.H. Stillinger, P.M. Chaikin, S. Torquato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92.M. Visscher, M. Bolsterl, Nature 239 (1972) 504. [21] A. Donev, I. Cisse, D. Sachs, E. Variano, F/BiochemMols/RasFrames/PSTABLE.HTM. [25] A. Bairoch, B. Boeckmann, S. Ferro, E. Gasteiger, Brief Bioin- form. 5 (2004) 39. [26] A. Donev

Eddy, Sean

128

ITERATIVE MULTI-USER DECODING FOR MIMO-OFDM SYSTEMS OVER TIME-FREQUENCY VARIANT WIRELESS CHANNELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

users with one single TA and one base station with N RAs). The transmission is frame oriented: the bit are mapped into symbols via QPSK modulation, i.e. Lx = L/2 symbols per frame. The frame is divided that pilot QPSK symbols are distributed in the frame according to a hexagonal grid in which Mp sub- carriers

129

Floodplain modeling for Paddy's Run at the DOE Fernald Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The restoration work for an intermittent stream, Paddy's Run, in the boundaries of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, managed by Fluor Fernald, involved floodplain expansion and the installation of grade control structures. Floodplain ... Keywords: Fernald, HEC-RAS, RiverCAD, floodplain, surface water

Marek H. Zaluski; Mark A. Ewanic; Steve D. Dunstan

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, Nizhny Novgorod 603950, Russia I. Y. Dodin and N. J particles could not travel faster than light. Hence, the final energy is estimated from Eq. 52 as a -1 Research through Grant No. 08-02-01209-a and the NNSA under the SSAA Program through DOE Research un- der

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

131

Prescriber-consumer social network analysis for risk level re-estimation based on an asymmetrical rating exchange model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a novel approach to re-estimate the risk level of prescribers and consumers (doctors and patients) that were previously evaluated by various independent Risk Analysis Systems (RAS). This is achieved by taking into consideration ... Keywords: fraud detection, risk level estimation, social network analysis

Yingsong Hu, D. Wayne Murray, Yin Shan, Alison Sutinen, B. Sumudu U. Mendis, MingJian Tang

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY, AND SERVICEABILITY FOR PETASCALE HIGH-END COMPUTING AND BEYOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our project is a multi-institutional research effort that adopts interplay of RELIABILITY, AVAILABILITY, and SERVICEABILITY (RAS) aspects for solving resilience issues in highend scientific computing in the next generation of supercomputers. results lie in the following tracks: Failure prediction in a large scale HPC; Investigate reliability issues and mitigation techniques including in GPGPU-based HPC system; HPC resilience runtime & tools.

Chokchai "Box" Leangsuksun

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Atmos. Chem. Phys., 12, 1067910692, 2012 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/12/10679/2012/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and mixed-phase clouds to the ice nuclei spectra in McRAS-AC: single column model simulations R. Morales ­ Published: 16 November 2012 Abstract. The salient features of mixed-phase and ice clouds in a GCM cloud scheme are examined using the ice nucle- ation parameterizations of Liu and Penner (LP) and Barahona

Meskhidze, Nicholas

134

Noise-Limited Frequency Signal Transmission in Gene Circuits Cheemeng Tan,* Faisal Reza,*y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clocks (2), Ca21 signaling pathways (3,4), p53 DNA repair pathways (5), NF-kB pathways (6), and cell of ;0.008/s significantly increased the activity of Ras proteins (22). Similarly, the frequency of NF-kB

You, Lingchong

135

Call for Papers and Participants Annual "SUSTAINABLE ENTERPRISES of the FUTURE"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for High Energy Densities of RAS, Moscow Kholshevnikov K.V St.Petersburg State University Shor V;3 Accommodation Participants of the conference will be accommodated in the hotels of St. Petersburg. We recommend you to visit sites: http://www.saint-petersburg-hotels.com/, http://www.hotelruss.spb.ru/ and http

Sibille, Etienne

136

Pennsylvania Act 38/Nutrient Management Program/Technical Manual January 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;[10]. Wu L, Mashego MR, van Dam JC, Proell AM, Vinke JL, Ras C, van Winden WA, van Gulik WM, Heijnen JJ profiling for analysis of yeast stress response during very high gravity ethanol fermentations. Biotechnol]. de Koning W, van Dam K. A method for the determination of changes of glycolytic metabolites in yeast

Guiltinan, Mark

137

Cyber-Physical Aspects of Energy Systems for the 21st  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and physical worlds of distributed utilities. The combination of distributed control and automation of smart microgrids. islanding RAS distributed network overlay hierarchical control via leader election to become a "smart grid". A microgrid is a tiny power system with a cluster of loads and DGs based on micro

Mueller, Frank

138

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrieval of Mean Cosine of Aerosol Phase Function from Extinction and Sky Retrieval of Mean Cosine of Aerosol Phase Function from Extinction and Sky Brightness Measurements Zhuravleva, T.B.(a), Sviridenkov, M.A.(b), and Anikin, P.P.(b), Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS, Tomsk, Russia (a), A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS, Moscow, Russia (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Asymmetry of the aerosol phase function together with optical thickness drive the magnitude of the aerosol radiative forcing. Two approaches are usually used to obtain the mean cosine of the phase function retrieval of the single scattering phase function from sky brightness measurements or calculations for the given aerosol size distribution and refractive index. We studied the possibility to determine the mean cosine directly from

139

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Some Results of the Comparison of the Solar Almucantar Sky Brightness Some Results of the Comparison of the Solar Almucantar Sky Brightness Observed Under the Cirri Conditions and the Calculated One Petrushin, A.G.(b), Shukurov, A.K.(a), Shukurov, K.A.(a), and Golitsyn, G.S.(a), A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS (a), Institute of Experimental Meteorology, NPO "Typhoon" (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The selected measurements of the solar almucantar sky brightness were carried out at the Zvenigorod Research Facility of the A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAPh) RAS using the scanning photometer [1] developed in IAPh. These measurements were took place at the cloudy sky and the clear one and at various optical depth t that was controlled with

140

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Amount of Midlatitude Continental Cloud Amount of Midlatitude Continental Clouds in Tomsk Region: Preliminary Results T.B. Zhuravleva, T.M. Rasskazchikova, and T.K. Sklyadneva Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia S.V. Smirnov Institute of Monitoring of Climatic and Ecological Systems SB RAS Tomsk, Russia The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program provides concentrated measurements of surface radiative budget as well as measurements of the atmospheric constituents including clouds, aerosols, water vapor, etc. at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), the Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. The data obtained allow studying a wide, but not the full range of climatologically relevant possibilities, and thus additional investigations are needed to provide the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C H O D S T E P H E N S , V. P H I L I P RAS M U S S E N , R. D O U G R A M S E Y a n d R A L P H E . WH I T E S I D E S C H O D S T E P H E N S , V. P H I L I P RAS M U S S E N , R. D O U G R A M S E Y a n d R A L P H E . WH I T E S I D E S Monitor Sequestered Carbon using remote sensing to Preliminary results show SOC can be estimated by using reflectance within the SWIR band. Since models based on visible bands tend to be confused with varying moisture content and low levels of SOC, it is anticipated that this model will be more robust within

142

Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

Mariella, Jr., Raymond P. (Danville, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Microsoft Word - ICEM05_Np_Sorption_paper.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 SORPTION OF LONG-LIVED RADIONUCLIDES FROM GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY UNDERGROUND WATERS BY URANIUM OXIDES T.V.Kazakovskaya RFNC-VNIIEF,Russia, V.I. Shapovalov, RFNC-VNIIEF, Russia E.V. Zakharova IPC RAS, Russia S.N.Kalmykov, IPC RAS, Russia M.J.Haire, ORNL, USA 2 Copyright © 2005 by AS ABSTRACT Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) from unburned nuclear fuel is present in large quantities in spent nuclear fuel geologic repositories. Furthermore, depleted uranium dioxide (DUO 2 ) can be used as a component of the geologic repository waste package as an absorbent for migrating radionuclides.. A potentially important use of DU oxides is to provide an additional engineered chemical barrier in the Yucca Mountain repository. If the DU oxides can be shown to substantially inhibit transport of important actinide elements and fission

144

Review: Wireless sensors in agriculture and food industry-Recent development and future perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview on recent development of wireless sensor technologies and standards for wireless communications as applied to wireless sensors. Examples of wireless sensors and sensor networks applied in agriculture and food production ... Keywords: Bluetooth, CAN, CDMA, GPRS, GSM, HVAC, IEEE, IT, IrDA, LAN, M2M, MEMS, NCAP, NIST, PDA, RAS, RFID, SPWAS, STIM, TEDS, TII, USDA, WINA, WLAN, WPAN, WPS, WPSRD, WiFi, ZigBee

Ning Wang; Naiqian Zhang; Maohua Wang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Middle East: Output expansions boost drilling  

SciTech Connect

Iraqi exports may return to the market in limited fashion, but none of the region`s producers seems particularly concerned. They believe that global oil demand is rising fast enough to justify their additions to productive capacity. The paper discusses exploration, drilling and development, and production in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, Oman, Iran, Iraq, Yemen, Qatar, Syria, Turkey, and Sharjah. The paper also briefly mentions activities in Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, and Ras al Khaimah.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Somebody better find some rigs  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the outlook for the gas and oil industries of the Middle East. Field development projects abound, as the larger exporting nations pursue ambitious policies of production expansion. However, their plans may be hampered by the growing worldwide shortage of rigs. Separate evaluations are given for Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Neutral Zone, Abu Dhabi, Iran, Iraq, Qatar, Yemen, Syria, Dubai, Turkey, Sharjah, and briefly for Bahrain, Israel, Jordan, UAE-Ajman, and UAE-Ras al-Khaimah.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Intercollegiate Faculty of Agribusiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It {lways m{kes me smile! :) - Hernandez Thanks to those RAs/ RCAs who completed the st{ff confidenti{l (s in the world! MC N O V E M B E R 2 0 1 1 P A G E 1 0 To: L{keside St{ff From: Dustin Rollins Message: Great job appreciate you more than you know. Go Gators! To: Zachary Wortzel From: Dustin Message: I continue

148

Assessing the Potential of Using Hydrate Technology to Capture, Store and Transport Gas for the Caribbean Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monetizing gas has now become a high priority issue for many countries. Natural gas is a much cleaner fuel than oil and coal especially for electricity generation. Approximately 40 percent of the world's natural gas reserves remain unusable because of lack of economic technology. Gas produced with oil poses a challenge of being transported and is typically flared or re-injected into the reservoir. These are gas transportation issues we now face. Gas hydrate may be a viable means of capturing, storing and transporting stranded and associated gas. For example, stranded gas in Trinidad could be converted to gas hydrates and transported to the islands of the Caribbean. This study will seek to address some of the limitations from previous studies on transporting natural gas as a hydrate while focusing on small scale transportation of natural gas to the Caribbean Islands. This work proposes a workflow for capturing, storing and transporting gas in the hydrate form, particularly for Caribbean situations where there are infrastructural constraints such as lack of pipelines. The study shows the gas hydrate value chain for transportation of 5 MMscf/d of natural gas from Trinidad to Jamaica. The analysis evaluated the water required for hydrate formation, effect of composition on hydrate formation, the energy balance of the process, the time required for formation, transportation and dissociation and preliminary economics. The overall energy requirement of the process which involves heating, cooling and expansion is about 15-20 percent of the energy of the gas transported in hydrate form. The time estimated for the overall process is 2030 hrs. The estimated capital cost to capture and transport 5 MMscf/d from Trinidad to Jamaica is about US$ 30 million. The composition of the gas sample can affect the conditions of formation, heating value and the expansion process. In summary, there is great potential for transporting natural gas by gas hydrate on a small scale based on the proposed hydrate work flow. This study did not prove commerciality at this time, however, some of the limitations require further evaluations and these include detailed modeling of the formation time, dissociation time and heat transfer capabilities.

Rajnauth, Jerome Joel

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

HP-GPC characterization of asphalt and modified asphalts from gulf countries and their relation to performance based properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Asphalt producing refineries in the Gulf countries include Ras Tanura and Riyadh (Saudi Arabia), Al-Ahmadi (Kuwait), and BAPCO (Bahrain). Riyadh and Ras Tanura refineries are located in the central and eastern Saudi Arabia respectively. Arabian light crude oil is used to produce 2000 to 3000 tons of asphalt per day using vacuum distillation, air blowing and grade blending techniques to produce 60/70 penetration grade asphalts in each of these two Saudi refineries. All of the asphalt cement used in Saudi Arabia, Qatar and parts of the United Arab Emirates is supplied by Riyadh and Ras Tanura refineries. Al-Ahmadi refinery supplies all of the asphalt cement needed for construction in the state of Kuwait. Ratwi-Burgan crude off mix is used to produce 750 to 1000 tons of asphalt per day using vacuum distillation and air blowing processes. This study was initiated to evaluate different locally available polymers in order to identify potential polymers to modify asphalts to satisfy the performance requirements in the Gulf countries environmental conditions.

Wahhab, H.I.A.; Ali, M.F.; Asi, I.M.; Dubabe, I.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 30, Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park natural areas and reference areas--Oak Ridge Reservation environmentally sensitive sites containing special plants, animals, and communities  

SciTech Connect

Areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) that contain rare plant or animal species or are special habitats are protected through National Environmental Research Park Natural Area (NA) or Reference Area (RA) designations. The US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park program is responsible for identifying species of vascular plants that are endangered, threatened, or rare and, as much as possible, for conserving those areas in which such species grow. This report includes a listing of Research Park NAs and RAs with general habitat descriptions and a computer-generated map with the areas identified. These are the locations of rare plant or animal species or special habitats that are known at this time. As the Reservation continues to be surveyed, it is expected that additional sites will be designated as Research Park NAs or RAs. This document is a component of a larger effort to identify environmentally sensitive areas on ORR. This report identifies the currently known locations of rare plant species, rare animal species, and special biological communities. Floodplains, wetlands (except those in RAs or NAs), and cultural resources are not included in this report.

Pounds, L.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US); Parr, P.D.; Ryon, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Yemen UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

152

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Samoa UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

153

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

154

Table 10. Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 10. Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 65.10 63.67 73.81 64.48 78.90 -18.3 Canada* 59.34 55.22 63.02 57.57 73.63 -21.8 Dominican Republic 78.47 74.41 73.89 75.40 76.61 -1.6 Honduras - 54.58 54.43 54.58 54.43 0.3 Jamaica 480.00 54.43 - 54.72 55.42 -1.3 Mexico 69.42 73.33 82.64 70.83 86.44 -18.1 Other** 80.33 389.30 70.37 82.45 76.10 8.3 South America Total 79.44 77.85 70.55

155

Table 9. U.S. Steam Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports U.S. Steam Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 9. U.S. Steam Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 1,619,502 1,246,181 2,153,814 2,865,683 3,065,683 -6.5 Canada* 797,861 599,752 841,061 1,397,613 1,280,803 9.1 Dominican Republic 51,698 160,672 124,720 212,370 312,741 -32.1 Honduras - 41,664 34,161 41,664 68,124 -38.8 Jamaica 25 36,311 - 36,336 33,585 8.2 Mexico 717,687 407,422 1,116,653 1,125,109 1,331,754 -15.5 Other** 52,231 360 37,219 52,591 38,676 36.0 South America Total 853,693 806,347

156

Table 7. U.S. Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports U.S. Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 7. U.S. Coal Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 3,122,664 2,010,882 3,565,711 5,133,546 5,327,583 -3.6 Canada* 1,773,644 943,061 2,101,534 2,716,705 3,176,066 -14.5 Dominican Republic 51,792 211,736 124,720 263,528 312,741 -15.7 Honduras - 41,664 34,161 41,664 68,124 -38.8 Jamaica 25 36,311 - 36,336 33,585 8.2 Mexico 1,244,972 777,750 1,268,077 2,022,722 1,698,391 19.1 Other** 52,231 360 37,219 52,591 38,676 36.0 South America Total 2,945,181 3,368,119

157

Table 8. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 8. Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 78.29 77.25 102.62 77.88 105.14 -25.9 Canada* 81.61 80.70 110.67 81.30 112.16 -27.5 Dominican Republic 78.54 75.09 73.89 75.77 76.61 -1.1 Honduras - 54.58 54.43 54.58 54.43 0.3 Jamaica 480.00 54.43 - 54.72 55.42 -1.3 Mexico 73.45 75.81 94.36 74.35 100.95 -26.3 Other** 80.33 389.30 70.37 82.45 76.10 8.3 South America Total 107.72 108.02 149.99 107.88

158

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

159

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

160

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Haiti UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Lucia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

162

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Grenada UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

163

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Mozambique UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

164

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Dominica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

165

Annotated bibliography of coal in the Caribbean region. [Lignite  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of preparing this annotated bibliography was to compile information on coal localities for the Caribbean region used for preparation of a coal map of the region. Also, it serves as a brief reference list of publications for future coal studies in the Caribbean region. It is in no way an exhaustive study or complete listing of coal literature for the Caribbean. All the material was gathered from published literature with the exception of information from Cuba which was supplied from a study by Gordon Wood of the US Geological Survey, Branch of Coal Resources. Following the classification system of the US Geological Survey (Wood and others, 1983), the term coal resources has been used in this report for reference to general estimates of coal quantities even though authors of the material being annotated may have used the term coal reserves in a similar denotation. The literature ranges from 1857 to 1981. The countries listed include Colombia, Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the countries of Central America.

Orndorff, R.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

East Coast (PADD 1) Imports from All Countries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Import Area: East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Country: All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Argentina Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Denmark Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibralter Greece Guatemala Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Kazakhstan Korea, South Kyrgyzstan Latvia Liberia Lithuania Malaysia Malta Mauritania Mexico Morocco Namibia Netherlands Netherlands Antilles Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia Senegal Singapore South Africa Spain Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Thailand Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Vietnam Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen

167

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Tajikistan UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

168

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bolivia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

169

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Niger UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

170

State of the Art of the Development and Application of Anti-Seismic Systems in Europe and Other Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are already approximately 5,000 structures in the world, located in over 30 countries, that have been protected by seismic isolation (SI), energy dissipation (ED) and other modern seismic vibration passive control (SVPC) systems. The number of such applications is increasing everywhere more and more. It has been confirmed that, in each country, the extension of the use of the SVPC systems is conclusively influenced by earthquake experience, the availability of specific design rules and the features of those adopted. With regard to application, Japan has consolidated its worldwide leadership, with over 3,000 seismically isolated buildings, many others protected by ED systems and several isolated bridges and viaducts. Second is now the P. R. China, with 610 isolated buildings and 45 with dampers, in addition to numerous isolated bridges and viaducts. The Russian Federation is third for the number of isolated buildings, which are approximately 600. In the USA, due to the very penalizing design code in force for SI of buildings, there are at present only a few new applications of this kind (an overall number of approximately 200 was reported), although the US isolated buildings are mostly quite important, half being retrofits; on the contrary, the use of SI for bridges and viaducts and that of ED for buildings are more popular in the USA. At present (April 2008), Italy (which remains the worldwide leader as regards the application of the SVPC systems to cultural heritage and keeps a key role also as to the number and importance of bridges and viaducts protected by such systems) is at the fifth place, at least for the number of isolated buildings already open to activity: they are 51, besides others protected by other SVPC systems. There, thanks to the new national seismic code (enforced in May 2003), there has been a significant recent increase of building application and design of the SVPC systems. With regard to the use of such systems in other countries, Italy is now followed by Taiwan, France (including its Martinique island), New Zealand and Armenia. In addition, significant applications also concern: Canada in North America; Mexico in Central America; Chile and Venezuela in South America; Turkey, South Korea and Indonesia in Asia; and Greece, Cyprus, Portugal and Macedonia in Europe. More recently, the installation of the aforesaid systems also began in further countries, such as Argentina, Israel, India and Iran. Devices manufactured in Italy have been frequently used even abroad. Finally, to be stressed are the somewhat increasing use of SI in nuclear and high risk chemical plants (e.g. the liquefied natural gas tanks) and the already significant application of the SVPC systems to cultural heritage, in particular in Italy.

Martelli, Alessandro [Section on Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Risks - PROTPREV, Department of Environment, Global Changes and Sustainable Development - ACS, Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment - ENEA, GLIS - GLIS-Isolation and Other Anti-Seismic Design Strategies, European Territorial Section, ASSISi - Anti-Seismic Systems International Society, Via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Forni, Massimo [ENEA-ACS-PROTPREV, GLIS and ASSISi, c/o ENEA, Via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

ePSA- Standard Self Assessments (SSA), Version 3.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ePSA Standards Self Assessment (SSA) is a MicrosoftWindows-based program for recording self-assessment data for industry standards on Probabilistic Risk Assessment. ePSA Standards Self Assessment (SSA) is a Microsoft Windows-based program for recording self-assessment data for industry standards on PRA. ePSA SSA helps you manage the job of maintaining your PRA and documenting its compliance with industry standards. This version of ePSA includes templates for the following standards: ASME RA-S-2002 Standa...

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microsoft PowerPoint - International Projects1.pptm.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Program International Program Modeling Activities Boris Faybishenko Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA DOE-EM Project Managers- Kurt Gerdes and Skip Chamberlain Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange April 13-14, 2010, Richland, WA Outline * Review of projects formerly supported by DOE-EM * Potential International Projects and Analogue Case Studies for ASCEM - Chernobyl Cooling Pond, Ukraine - Nonclassical transport modeling-project with the Nuclear Safety Institute of RAS, Russia - Uranium Mine and Mills Tailing's Covers * Central Asia--Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan - Cementitious Materials for Long-Term Storage and Disposal * Conclusions and Recommendations Overall Objectives of DOE-EM International Program Modeling Activities

173

Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Maria L. Ghirardi (Primary Contact), Paul W. King, Kathleen Ratcliff and David Mulder National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 384-6312 Email: maria.ghirardi@nrel.gov DOE Manager Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Dr. Sergey Kosourov, Institute of Basic Biological Problems, RAS, Pushchino, Russia * Dr. Eric Johnson, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Project Start Date: October 1, 2000 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Primary Objectives

174

RussiaSNL2-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Extending Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Extending Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation Methods Principal Investigators: John Aidun (SNL) and Genri Norman (JIHT) Project Description Novel nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation methods are being extended and applied in four areas of mutual interest to Sandia and Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences (JIHT RAS). NEMD is being applied to (1) understanding relaxation and equilibration in non-ideal, nondegenerate plasmas; (2) characterizing melting or cavitation of condensed matter systems that are super-heated or under hydrostatic tension; (3) devising classical interaction potentials that can represent changing bonding character as a system evolves; and (4) investigating the mechanisms of

175

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Current Projects with the Russian Federation Project Title: Development of Models of Energy Transfer in Nanostructured Materials. Russian Institute: Institute for Problems in Mechanical Engineering, Russian Academy of Sciences (IPME RAS), St. Petersburg. Brief Description: To develop modeling approaches and simulations to examine energy transport and transfer in materials with structural features at the nanoscale. Tasks include developing such a model for thin crystal structures subjected to short duration laser excitation, and using atomic-scale simulations to evaluate microscopic expressions for stress and heat flux in crystals containing defects such as vacancies, dislocations and bi-material interfaces.

176

The trypanosome transcriptome is remodelled during differentiation but displays limited responsiveness within life stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-likeISG75 SNAREs 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 Qa Qb Qc R Secretory pepidases 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 Aspartic/cysteine Serine Metallo Ras-like small GTPases In te ns ity /a rb itr ar y un its Open reading frame accession A B C D BMC Genomics... SNAREs in BSF, with evidence for limited PCF regulation of the secretory pathway. On average, Qc and R SNAREs are more highly expressed than Qa and Qb SNAREs (Fig- ure 3). The T. brucei N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF, Tb927.1.1560), an ATPase...

Koumandou, V Lila; Natesan, Senthil Kumar A; Sergeenko, Tatiana; Field, Mark C

2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

178

Harbour Island: The Comparative Archaeology of a Maritime Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeological research at Harbour Island, Bahamas, was designed to help explore and develop the concept of maritimity, or identity grounded in perceived (or imagined) shared traits deriving from a communitys relationship with the maritime environment. Maritimity can best be identified by using three broad and overlapping categories of Landscape, Maritime Resources and Maritime Material Culture. Historical documents and maritime cultural landscape elements establish the maritimity of Harbour Island in the context of these categories. Artifacts, procured through archaeological survey of nine properties inhabited since at least the eighteenth century, are analyzed to investigate whether there any notable differences in the archaeological assemblages of maritime communities that indicate maritimity. Analysis relies on Stanley South's artifact classification system and his Carolina Artifact pattern. The nine properties are compared among themselves as well as with four other sites from the western British Atlantic region. Comparisons between the Harbour Island sites reveal a strong homogeneity of ceramic types at all households and a low representation of personal and clothing artifacts that indicate the relative poverty of the community. Maritime activities are not strongly represented in the archaeological record. When compared to four other sites from Jamaica, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Delaware, the assemblage from the Harbour Island community is relatively comparable to other sites influenced by British colonial culture. Although the domestic artifacts contain little maritime material culture, the development of the island's built environment demonstrates maritimity in both the categories of Landscape and Maritime Material Culture. Faunal remains from Harbour Island, consisting primarily of fish and shellfish, provide archaeological evidence of the importance of the Maritime Resources category. Only when the evidence from all three categories of maritimity is considered together can Harbour Island be identified archaeologically as a community that strongly identified with both the maritime environment and the dominant British Colonial Atlantic culture.

Hatch, Heather E

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

180

Activation of the MAP Kinase Cascade by Exogenous Calcium-Sensing Receptor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Rat-1 fibroblasts and ovarian surface epithelial cells, extracellular calcium induces a proliferative response which appears to be mediated by the G-protein coupled Calcium-sensing Receptor (CaR), as expression of the non-functional CaR-R795W mutant inhibits both thymidine incorporation and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) in response to calcium. In this report we utilized CaR-transfected HEK293 cells to demonstrate that functional CaR is necessary and sufficient for calcium-induced ERK activation. CaR-dependent ERK activation was blocked by co-expression of the Ras dominant-negative mutant, Ras N17, and by exposure to the phosphatidyl inositol 3' kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. In contrast to Rat-1 fibroblasts, CaR-mediated in vitro kinase activity of ERK2 was unaffected by tyrosine kinase inhibitor herbimycin in CaR-transfected HEK293 cells. These results suggest that usage of distinct pathways downstream of the CaR varies in a cell-type specific manner, suggesting a potential mechanism by which activation of the CaR could couple to distinct calcium-dependent responses.

Hobson, Susan A.; Wright, Jay W.; Lee, Fred; Mcneil, Scott; Bilderback, Tim R.; Rodland, Karin D.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial Action Selection Report, Appendix B of Attachment 2: Geology report, Final  

SciTech Connect

The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), 42 USC {section} 7901 et seq. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which describes the proposed remedial action for the Naturita site. An extensive amount of data and supporting information has been generated and evaluated for this remedial action. These data and supporting information are not incorporated into this single document but are included or referenced in the supporting documents. The RAP consists of this RAS and four supporting documents or attachments. This Attachment 2, Geology Report describes the details of geologic, geomorphic, and seismic conditions at the Dry Flats disposal site.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Intrarenal renin-angiotensin system modulates glomerular angiotensin receptors in the rat  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) modulates glomerular angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors. In one protocol ANG II receptors were measured 7 days after unilateral denervation of the left kidney in rats. There were 50% more receptors in the glomeruli from denervated compared with innervated kidneys, which was associated with a 63% reduction in left renal vein renin. The differences in ANG II receptors between the left and right kidneys were not longer present when angiotensin-converting enzyme was inhibited with enalapril or when pharmacological amounts of ANG II were infused. In a second protocol, renal cortical renin content was raised in the left kidney by placing a 0.20-mm clip on the left renal artery. At 7 days, glomerular ANG II receptors were reduced by 72.3% in the clipped compared with the contralateral kidneys. The differences in ANG II receptors were no longer present after enalapril treatment. Pharmacological maneuvers that either blocked ANG II formation or increased circulating ANG II resulted in an equal number of ANG II receptors in the right and left kidneys. The data indicate that the intrarenal RAS modulates the density of glomerular ANG II receptors and is a more important receptor modulation than plasma ANG II.

Wilkes, B.M.; Pion, I.; Sollott, S.; Michaels, S.; Kiesel, G. (North Shore Univ. Hospital and Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (USA))

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Crystallization of sodium nitrate from radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

From the 1940s to the 1980s, the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IPC/RAS) conducted research and development on processes to separate acetate and nitrate salts and acetic acid from radioactive wastes by crystallization. The research objective was to decrease waste volumes and produce the separated decontaminated materials for recycle. This report presents an account of the IPC/RAS experience in this field. Details on operating conditions, waste and product compositions, decontamination factors, and process equipment are described. The research and development was generally related to the management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The waste solutions resulted from recovery and processing of uranium, plutonium, and other products from irradiated nuclear fuel, neutralization of nuclear process solutions after extractant recovery, regeneration of process nitric acid, equipment decontamination, and other radiochemical processes. Waste components include nitric acid, metal nitrate and acetate salts, organic impurities, and surfactants. Waste management operations generally consist of two stages: volume reduction and processing of the concentrates for storage, solidification, and disposal. Filtration, coprecipitation, coagulation, evaporation, and sorption were used to reduce waste volume. 28 figs., 40 tabs.

Krapukhin, V.B.; Krasavina, E.P. Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Soil Management Plan applies to all activities conducted under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that involve soil disturbance and potential management of waste soil. The plan was prepared under the direction of the Y-12 Environmental Compliance Department of the Environment, Safety, and Health Division. Soil disturbances related to maintenance activities, utility and building construction projects, or demolition projects fall within the purview of the plan. This Soil Management Plan represents an integrated, visually oriented, planning and information resource tool for decision making involving excavation or disturbance of soil at Y-12. This Soil Management Plan addresses three primary elements. (1) Regulatory and programmatic requirements for management of soil based on the location of a soil disturbance project and/or the regulatory classification of any contaminants that may be present (Chap. 2). Five general regulatory or programmatic classifications of soil are recognized to be potentially present at Y-12; soil may fall under one or more these classifications: (a) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) pursuant to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facilities Agreement; (b) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); (c) RCRA 3004(u) solid waste managements units pursuant to the RCRA Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments Act of 1984 permit for the ORR; (d) Toxic Substances and Control Act-regulated soil containing polychlorinated biphenyls; and (e) Radiologically contaminated soil regulated under the Atomic Energy Act review process. (2) Information for project planners on current and future planned remedial actions (RAs), as prescribed by CERCLA decision documents (including the scope of the actions and remedial goals), land use controls implemented to support or maintain RAs, RCRA post-closure regulatory requirements for former waste management units, legacy contamination source areas and distribution of contamination in soils, and environmental infrastructure (e.g., caps, monitoring systems, etc.) that is in place or planned in association with RAs. (3) Regulatory considerations and processes for management and disposition of waste soil upon generation, including regulatory drivers, best management practices (BMPs), waste determination protocols, waste acceptance criteria, and existing waste management procedures and BMPs for Y-12. This Soil Management Plan provides information to project planners to better coordinate their activities with other organizations and programs with a vested interest in soil disturbance activities at Y-12. The information allows project managers and maintenance personnel to evaluate and anticipate potential contaminant levels that may be present at a proposed soil disturbance site prior to commencement of activities and allows a more accurate assessment of potential waste management requirements.

None

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Angular Distribution of Intensity in a Flux of Radiation Scattered by a Angular Distribution of Intensity in a Flux of Radiation Scattered by a Cloud Dvoryashin, S.V., Shukurov, K.A., Shukurov, A.K., and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A study of the angular distribution of intensity in a flux of solar radiation scattered by a cloud was carried out in conditions of translucent clouds (the disk of the Sun is visible). Using the digital video camera KODAK DC200, mounted on the sun tracker, the sky images with the angle of view 38 0) have been obtained in cloudy and cloudless conditions. During measurements the disk of the Sun was closed with a blend. Using the specially developed program the photometry of the received images was

186

DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Startup or Restart Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5.1D 5.1D VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START UP OR RESTART NUCLEAR FACILITIES DOE O 425.1D Familiar Level June 2011 1 DOE O 425.1D VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START UP OR RESTART NUCLEAR FACILITIES FAMILIAR LEVEL _________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. What is the purpose of DOE O 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Startup or Restart Nuclear Facilities? 2. What are the requirements for determining the level of readiness review [operational readiness reviews (ORRs) and readiness assessments (RAs)]? 3. What are the requirements for determining the startup authorization authority? 4. What are the requirements for startup notification reports?

187

6th US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

US-Russian Pu Science Workshop US-Russian Pu Science Workshop Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory University of California, Livermore, California July 14 and 15, 2006 Local Chairs: Michael Fluss, James Tobin, Adam Schwartz LLNL, Livermore, USA Alexander V. Petrovtsev, RFNC * VNIITF, Snezhinsk, Russia Boris A. Nadykto, RFNC * VNIIEF, Sarov, Russia Lidia F. Timofeeva, VNIINM, Moscow, Russia Siegfried S. Hecker, (Luis Morales POC) LANL, Los Alamos, USA Valentin E. Arkhipov, IMP, Ural Branch of RAS, Yekaterinburg, Russia This is a satellite meeting of the "Pu Futures-The Science 2006 International Conference", 9-13 July 2006, Asilomar Conference, Grounds, Pacific Grove Ca. The workshop is hosted by LLNL, under the aegis of the United States/Russian Federation Scientific and Technical Collaboration pursuant

188

Microsoft PowerPoint - Prague-2009_Korolev IK_Preliminary version3  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Engineering Engineering Russian Academy of Science FEM simulation of fatigue damage, crack nucleation and growth in a pre- damaged material August 31 - September 3, 2009 Igor K. Korolev 1 , Sergei V. Petinov 1,2 , Alexander B. Freidin 1 1 Institute of Problems in Mechanical Engineering, RAS 2 St.-Petersburg State Polytechnic University Joint U.S.-Russia Conference on Advances in Material Science Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering Russian Academy of Science The ways for modeling the crack growth using finite element approach: A model with an operative reorganization of a finite element grid during the crack extension A model with a fixed finite element grid during the crack extension Institute of Problems of Mechanical Engineering Russian Academy of Science A model with a fixed finite element grid during the crack

189

Praga 2009 Belyaev  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Theoretical Model for the Hydrogen- Theoretical Model for the Hydrogen- Material Interaction as a Basis for Prediction of the Material Mechanical Properties Institute Problems of Machinery RAS St.-Petersburg D.A. Indeitsev,* V.A. Polyanskiy,† A.K. Belyaev,* A.A. Sukhanov, † * Institute of Problems in Mechanical Engineering of Russian Academy of Sciences, Bolshoy pr. V.O. 61, St.-Petersburg, 199178, Russia † St.-Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytekhnicheskaya, 29, St.-Petersburg, 195294, Russia A. K. Belyaev ind@director.ipme.ru Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science 2 Acknowledgements The financial support of the Sandia Corporation, contract 891092, and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grants 08-08-00737 and 08-01-12017, is acknowledged. Joint U.S. Russia Conference on

190

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimation of Temperature Effect of Fires Near Moscow in Summer-Fall 2002 Estimation of Temperature Effect of Fires Near Moscow in Summer-Fall 2002 Mokhov, I.I. and Gorchakova, I.A., Obukhov Institute of Atmosphere Physics RAS, Russia Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Local effect of cooling ΔT due to peatbog and forest fires near Moscow in summer-fall 2002 is estimated. These estimates are based on coordinated measurements at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station (55°42'N, 36°46'E) of our Institute. Continuous measurements of radiation balance components at the surface together with meteorological and aerological observations and determination of the aerosol optical depth τ were used to calculate the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) at the surface ARF(0), at the top of the atmosphere ARF(∞), and for the whole atmosphere ARF (∞)- ARF(0).

191

Microsoft Word - CX-2013ElectronicEquipmentUpgrades_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 12, 2013 April 12, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Cleareance Memorandum Molly Kovaka Bob Trismen Contractor - TEP-CSB-2 Electrical Engineer - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Electronic Equipment Upgrades and Emergency Generator Replacements PP&A Project No: 2571 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.7 Electronic Equipment; B1.3 Routine maintenance activities Location: Multiple locations within Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) service area. Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to upgrade electronic equipment required for operation of its transmission grid and replace emergency generators. Several types of actions involving communications, meters, relays, and Remedial Action Scheme (RAS) and Supervisory

192

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-008208: Categorical Exclusion Determination Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program - Andreola Farms, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: B5.18 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): Nevada Offices(s): Golden Field Office March 26, 2012 CX-008164: Categorical Exclusion Determination Captain Jack-Olinda RAS LLL/LT Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.31 Date: 03/26/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration March 26, 2012 CX-008207: Categorical Exclusion Determination Field Evaluation and Validation of Remote Wind Sensing Technologies - Shore-Based and Buoy Mounted Light LIDAR Systems CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1, B3.16 Date: 03/26/2012 Location(s): New Jersey Offices(s): Golden Field Office March 26, 2012 CX-008206: Categorical Exclusion Determination

193

Aerosol Radiative Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions.in Winter ZCAREX-2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions Forcing Under Cloudless Conditions in Winter ZCAREX-2001 G. S. Golitsyn, I. A. Gorchakova, and I. I. Mokhov Institute of Atmospheric Physic Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) is estimated for winter clear-sky conditions from measurements during ZCAREX-2001-Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment in February-March, 2001 at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station (ZSS) of the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS. ARF in the shortwave range is determined by the difference between the net fluxes of the solar radiation, calculated with and without the aerosol component of the atmosphere. The estimates of ARF are made for conditions with high surface albedo. Data Used The following data of atmospheric characteristics observed during winter are used for the

194

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Aerosol Optical Depth Determination from Zenith Measurements of On Aerosol Optical Depth Determination from Zenith Measurements of Scattered Light Polarization Degree Shukurov, A.Kh., Shukurov K.A., and Golitsyn G.S., A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS Investigations on relationships between variations of aerosol optical depth τaer and maximal polarization degree Pmax of scattered light (from part of a sky within 90 angular distance of Sun in its almucantar or vertical) are well known (see e.g. Coulson K.L. Izvestia Atmospheric Oceanic Physics. V.10, No.3, 1974). But these results show insufficient correlation coefficient R between Pmax and τaer. In the current work the results of measurements of variations P(h) dependence of polarization degree P on the Sun angular height () obtained from zenith measurements of scattered light

195

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Empirical Model of Aerosol Uplifting from the Arid Area Empirical Model of Aerosol Uplifting from the Arid Area Gorchakov, G.I., Shukurov, K.A., and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The model enables to make the estimates of the vertical fluxes of arid aerosol using measured data of the wind velocity. The model includes the following main elements: 1. The parameterization of the microstructure of the aerosol uplifted from the area. 2. Relationship between wind velocity and the submicron aerosol concentration. 3. The aerosol uplifting rates. It is found that there is the synchronism of the submicron and coarse aerosol fluctuation in convective conditions at the arid area. Vertical turbulent fluxes of the aerosol were determined regarding two regimes of aerosol

196

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winter Zvenigorod Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment Winter Zvenigorod Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment (ZCAREZ-99): Preliminary Results G. S. Golitsyn A. Kh. Shukurov, I. I. Mokhov, A. I. Alekseev, P. P. Anikin, G. N. Chlenova, A. V. Djola, S. V. Dvoryashin, A. S. Elokhov, A. S. Emilenko, E. M. Feigelson, Yu. V. Glushchenko, I. A. Gorchakova, E. I. Grechko, A. N. Gruzdev, A. A. Isakov, D. I. Olshansky, I. N. Plakhina, E. V. Romashova, L. M. Shukurova, V. N. Sidorov, M. A. Sviridenkov, T. A. Tarasova, A. V. Tikhonov, and V. G. Tolstobrov A. M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS Moscow, Russia A. G. Petrushin Institute of Experimental Meteorology Obninsk, Russia A. N. Rublev Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy Moscow, Russia Introduction The First Winter Zvenigorod Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment (ZCAREX-99) was conducted from

197

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 15710 of 31,917 results. 01 - 15710 of 31,917 results. Download DOE-STD-3006-95 Planning and Conduct of Operation Readiness Reviews Replaced by DOE-STD-3006-2000 DOE 0 425.1 specifies the conditions and circumstances when an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) or a Readiness Assessment (RA) is required as part of a new start or restart process. This standard provides guidance on the planning and conduct of the Operational Readiness Reviews. This standard also provides guidance for requesting exemptions. The requirements for ORRs and RAs apply both to responsible contractors and to DOE. This standard addresses the requirements and suggests methods and approaches for both. http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/doe-std-3006-95 Download 1 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/1-1 Download DOE-HDBK-1079-94

198

Microsoft Word - CaptainJack_Olinda_CX_2012.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2012 6, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Cynthia Rounds Project Manager- TPC Proposed Action: Captain Jack-Olinda RAS LLL/LT Replacement Project Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.31 Installation or relocation of machinery and equipment Location: Olinda Substation, Shasta County, CA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund upgrades to BPA equipment at the Transmission Agency of Northern California 500-kilovolt (kV) Olinda Substation (also known as Vic Fazio Substation), which is operated and maintained by Western Area Power Administration (Western). BPA would fund Western to relocate existing and install new

199

Technical Sessions J. C. Doran Pacific; Northwest Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. C. Doran J. C. Doran Pacific; Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 from one surface to another (with each slurface of order 10 km in length) but would show relatively minor variations over any particular surface. With such a site, we hoped to see a clear signature of the effElcts of surface inhomogeneities, test one or more par;~metric schemes relating turbulent fluxes to vertical gr;~dients of mean quantities, evaluate methods of measuring surface fluxes over inhomogeneous terrain, examine the variation of surface fluxes over a range of scales, and establish procedures for extrapolating flux values from smaller scales to larger ones. The site chosen for the experiment \\ras located near Boardman, in northeastern Oregon, and is shown schematically in Figure 1. A large, sagebrush steppe area

200

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCM Sensitivity to Microphysics, Radiation, SCM Sensitivity to Microphysics, Radiation, and Convection Algorithms S. F. Iacobellis, R. C. J. Somerville, and D. E. Lane Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California Introduction In this paper, we briefly describe several ongoing sensitivity studies using our single-column model (SCM) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) observations. These studies investigate the sensitivity of model results to 1) the parameterization of cumulus convection, 2) the parameterization of longwave radiation, and 3) the initial profiles of temperature and humidity. Our SCM results indicate: * SCM with the Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert (RAS) convection scheme produces a significantly more realistic vertical distribution of cloud amount compared to model results using the Community

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201

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical and Microphysical Characteristics of the Smoke Aerosol in the Optical and Microphysical Characteristics of the Smoke Aerosol in the Moscow Region During the Summer-Autumn of 2002 Gorchakov, G.I.(a), Golitsyn, G.S.(a), Anikin, P.P.(a), Emilenko, A.S.(a), Isakov, A.A. (a), Kopeikin, V.M.(a), Rublev, A.N.(b), Sviridenkov, M.A.(a), and Shukurov, K.A.(a), A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS (a), Russian Research Center "Kurchatov Institute" (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Observational results will be presented for the optical and microphysical characteristics of the smoke aerosol produced by wild fires at peatbogs in the Moscow region during the July-September of 2002. Characteristics in the visual range and mass concentration of the submicron aerosol had been

202

Current Projects | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Projects Current Projects In Situ Production of Radionuclide Technetium-99m Researchers at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have developed a new process for the production of Molybdenum 99 (Mo-99), a man made radionuclide which decays (T 1/2 = 66 hours) to Technetium-99m (Tc-99m). Tc-99 m is a radioactive tracer isotope, used in the nuclear medical field for diagnostic imaging, for 2/3 of all diagnostic medical isotope procedures In the United States. Tc-99m has a relatively short half life of 6 hours, which makes it ideal in medical diagnostic tests where the patient only retains a minimal amount of radiation from the examination. (See PPPL Digest) Plasma Treatment of Electrodes for Intelligent Materials Ras Labs, LLC, a woman-owned small business, committed to producing

203

zuev(2)-99.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact of Volcanic Aerosol on Mean Fluxes of Solar Impact of Volcanic Aerosol on Mean Fluxes of Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds V. V. Zuev and T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia Introduction One of the powerful means of detecting the volcanic effect on the earth's radiation budget and, hence, on the earth's climate is numerical modeling. However, the atmospheric processes, during and after the eruption, are too complex and frequently prohibit an adequate description of the non-unique effect of volcanic activity on the earth's energy balance and its individual components. This explains why different model results, obtained by many authors, not only disagree among themselves, but also with the data of field measurements (Kondratiev 1992). To improve the quality of radiation calculations, it is

204

CX-004462: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4462: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4462: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004462: Categorical Exclusion Determination Four Corners Intertie Separation Remedial Action Scheme Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/27/2010 Location(s): Farmington, New Mexico Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to replace the existing two transfer trip units that receive the Four Corners Intertie Separation signals from Dittmer and Munro with two GE N60 universal relays at Arizona Public Service Company?s (APS) Four Corners Substation. A third identical GE N60 unit would be used as maintenance spare. The upgrade is needed to the existing Northeast/Southeast Intertie Separation Remedial Action Scheme (RAS) equipment at APS?s Four Corners Substation to ensure system

205

zuev(3)-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Possible Forcing of the Greenhouse Phenomenon Under Stress of Plants and Soil Caused by Atmospheric Pollutants V. V. Zuev and Y. N. Ponomarev Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia Introduction Plant biosystems take an active part in planetary biochemical cycles and may affect chemical and physical characteristics of the earth's atmosphere. To estimate the long-term variation in concentration levels of CO 2 and other gases contributing to the greenhouse effect, the biospheric- atmospheric exchange specificity must be investigated under controllable stress actions, such as superconcentration of atmospheric pollutants in industrial regions, for example. The response of plant biosystems to natural and anthropogenic stressors can be manifested by activation of

206

Введение  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Page 1 Session 5: Materials: Constitutive Properties, Strength Page 1 Session 5: Materials: Constitutive Properties, Strength Deterministic Perturbations Developing on Steel Shells under Quasispherical Explosive Loading. Investigation Results using Laser Interferometry and Ultrasmall-Direction Gamma-Tomography E. A. Kozlov * , S. A. Brichikov * , N. S. Zhilyaeva * , L. P. Brezgina * , V. N. Povyshev * , A. V. Dobromyslov † , and N. I. Taluts † * Russian Federal Nuclear Center - Zababakhin All-Russia Research Institute of Technical Physics, P.O. Box 245, Snezhinsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456770, Russia † Institute of Metal Physics, RAS Ural Branch, Ekaterinburg Author Contact: e.a.kozlov@vniitf.ru Introduction The purpose of this project is to obtain systematic experimental data how the deterministic perturbations development

207

Praga 2009 Polyanskiy0109.ppt  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The Determination of the Small Hydrogen The Determination of the Small Hydrogen Traps as Nucleus of Fatigue and Destruction Institute Problems of Machinery RAS St.-Petersburg V. A. Polyanskiy *, A. M. Polyanskiy,† A. K. Belyaev,‡ Yu. A. Yakovlev,* * St.-Petersburg State Polytechnic University, Polytekhnicheskaya, 29, St.-Petersburg, 195251, Russia † RDC Electronbeamtech, St.-Petersburg, Bronevaya 6, 198188, Russia ‡ Institute of Problems in Mechanical Engineering of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Bolshoy pr. V.O. 61, St.-Petersburg, 199178, Russia V. A. Polyanskiy vapol@electronbeamtech.com Joint U.S. Russia Conference on Advances in Materials Science 2 Acknowledgements The financial support of the Sandia Corporation, contract 891092, and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, grants 08-08-00737 and 08-01-12017, is

208

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regularities of Angular Distribution of Near-Horizon Sky Regularities of Angular Distribution of Near-Horizon Sky Brightness in the Cloudless Atmosphere S.M. Sakerin, T.B. Zhuravleva, and I.M. Nasrtdinov Institute of Atomospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia Introduction The methods of sun-photometry of the atmosphere based, for example, on interpretation of the angular distribution of radiation in the solar almucantar are widely used for retrieval of the aerosol optical characteristics (Dubovik et al. 2000). Preliminary analysis has shown that the near-horizon region also can be interesting for solving some applied problems. As is known, investigations of the structure of the daytime cloudless sky brightness at observation from the ground were carried out principally at zenith angles less than 80° in visible wavelength range. For further development of the methods it is necessary

209

Order Module--DOE O 425.1D, VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START UP OR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE O 425.1D, VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START UP DOE O 425.1D, VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START UP OR RESTART NUCLEAR FACILITIES Order Module--DOE O 425.1D, VERIFICATION OF READINESS TO START UP OR RESTART NUCLEAR FACILITIES "The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. In the first section we will discuss the purpose of DOE O 425.1D and the requirements for 1) determining the level of readiness review (RR), 2) determining the startup authorization authority (SAA), and 3) the startup notification report. In the second section we will discuss 1) the requirements applicable to DOE ORRs and DOE RAs, and 2) the core requirements. In the third section we will discuss the 1) requirements for DOE field element and headquarters line management oversight of the startup or restart process, 2) requirements for the records management program, and

210

Filtering log data: finding the needles in the haystack  

SciTech Connect

Log data is an incredible asset for troubleshooting in large-scale systems. Nevertheless, due to the ever-growing system scale, the volume of such data becomes overwhelming, bringing enormous burdens on both data storage and data analysis. To address this problem, we present a 2-dimensional online filtering mechanism to remove redundant and noisy data via feature selection and instance selection. The objective of this work is two-fold: (i) to significantly reduce data volume without losing important information, and (ii) to effectively promote data analysis. We evaluate this new filtering mechanism by means of real environmental data from the production supercomputers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory. Our preliminary results demonstrate that our method can reduce more than 85% disk space, thereby significantly reducing analysis time. Moreover, it also facilitates better failure prediction and diagnosis by more than 20%, as compared to the conventional predictive approach relying on RAS (Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability) events alone.

Yu, Li [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zheng, Ziming [Illinois Institute of Technology; Lan, Zhiling [Illinois Institute of Technology; Jones, Terry R [ORNL; Brandt, Jim [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Gentile, Ann [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Profiling Signaling Polarity in Chemotactic Cells  

SciTech Connect

While directional movement requires morphological polarization characterized by formation of a leading pseudopodium at the front and a trailing rear at the back, little is known about how protein networks are spatially integrated to regulate this process. Here, we utilize a unique pseudopodial purification system and quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics to map the spatial relationship of 3509 proteins and 228 distinct sites of phosphorylation in polarized cells. Networks of signaling proteins, metabolic pathways, actin regulatory proteins, and kinase-substrate cascades were found to partition to different poles of the cell including components of the Ras/ERK pathway. Also, several novel proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated at the front or rear of polarized cells and to localize to distinct subcellular structures. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that control cell movement and provide a comprehensive profile of proteins and their sites of phosphorylation that control cell polarization.

Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Wei; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Moore, Ronald J.; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Survival of retinal pigment epithelium after exposure to prolonged oxidative injury: a detailed gene expression and cellular analysis. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 45  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PURPOSE. To detail, by DNA microarrays and cellular structure labeling, the in vitro responses of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells to a nonlethal dose of the oxidant agent hydroquinone (HQ). METHODS. The viability of growth-quiescent ARPE-19 cells after treatment with HQ was measured by XTT conversion, 3 H-leucine incorporation, trypan blue exclusion, and the presence of DNA laddering. The effect of a nonlethal dose of HQ on the localization of apoptosis-induced factor (AIF) and phosphorylation of stress-activated kinase-2/p38 (SAPK2/p38) was detected by immunocytochemistry. Actin structures were visualized by phalloidin staining. Cell membrane blebbing was detected using GFP-membranelabeled RPE cells (ARPE-GFP-crRas). Changes in gene expression patterns of RPE cells within 48 hours of prolonged treatment with a nonlethal dose of HQ

Nataly Strunnikova; Connie Zhang; Diane Teichberg; Scott W. Cousins; Judit Baffi; Kevin G. Becker; Karl G. Csaky

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nested methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction cancer detection method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molecular marker-based method for monitoring and detecting cancer in humans. Aberrant methylation of gene promoters is a marker for cancer risk in humans. A two-stage, or "nested" polymerase chain reaction method is disclosed for detecting methylated DNA sequences at sufficiently high levels of sensitivity to permit cancer screening in biological fluid samples, such as sputum, obtained non-invasively. The method is for detecting the aberrant methylation of the p16 gene, O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene, Death-associated protein kinase gene, RAS-associated family 1 gene, or other gene promoters. The method offers a potentially powerful approach to population-based screening for the detection of lung and other cancers.

Belinsky, Steven A. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmisano, William A. (Edgewood, NM)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

215

rab arl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperation of Rab and Arl GTPase Cooperation of Rab and Arl GTPase Family Members in Localization of the Golgin GCC185 Proteins are delivered to specific sites within cells in small membrane-enclosed carriers called transport vesicles. Transport vesicles are targeted to the correct acceptor membrane by a number of sequential steps that are regulated by small GTPases of the Rab and Arf families. Small GTP-binding proteins (GTPases) are a large group of proteins involved in the regulation of quite different cellular processes like cell proliferation, differentiation (Ras-, Rap- and Ral-family), nuclear transport (Ran), vesicular transport (Rab-family) and cytoskeleton organization (Rho- and Arf-family). Vesicles are transported along microtubule or actin tracks; target recognition is thought to involve a molecular "tethering" event at the target membrane that is mediated by coiled-coil and multi-subunit tethers, prior to membrane fusion.

216

kasyanov-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effect of Three-Dimensional Cloud Inhomogeneity on The Effect of Three-Dimensional Cloud Inhomogeneity on Shortwave Radiative Transfer E. I. Kasyanov* and Y. L. Kogan CIMMS, University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma *On leave from the Institute of Atmospheric Optics, RAS, Tomsk, Russia G. A. Titov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The effect of cloud inhomogeneity on radiative transfer in stratocumulus clouds, as well as retrieval of their optical properties, has been studied extensively during recent years. However, in many studies the clouds have been simulated by models that account only for horizontal inhomogeneity of liquid water path and, correspondingly, the optical depth (see Barker et al. 1996, Chambers et al. 1997, Davis et al. 1997, and Marshak et al. 1997). In this paper, we explore the effects of three-dimensional

217

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Content, Aerosol Black Carbon Content, Aerosol Optical and Microphysical Characteristics in Moscow and the Moscow Region M.A. Sviridenkov, A.S. Emilenko, A.A. Isakov, and V.M. Kopeikin A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Moscow, Russia Introduction Aerosol loading in the atmosphere is determined by particle generation, growth, transport, and deposition processes. Large cities (e.g., Moscow) are significant sources of aerosols because soot acts as the main light-absorbing constituent. The urban effect on the aerosol characteristics may be studied by comparing measurements from the center of a megacity and in rural region, free from powerful anthropogenic aerosol sources. Experiment Aerosol scattering characteristics and black carbon (BC) mass concentration were simultaneously

218

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Fluxes of Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds: Spectral Fluxes of Solar Radiation in Broken Clouds: Algorithms for Calculation T. B. Zhuravleva and K. M. Firsov Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS Tomsk, Russia Introduction The most Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) clear- and cloudy- sky radiation experi- ments have been performed with broadband fluxes. Because the fluxes are integrated over wavelength, it is difficult to understand the causes of unavoidable differences between calculated and observed broadband fluxes in those experiments. Therefore for better understanding of the mechanisms of cloud-radiation interaction, it is necessary to measure and calculate the spectral distribution of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The comparison of spectral measurements and

219

Early experience with red storm.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Red Storm is a massively parallel processor. The Red Storm design goals are: (1) Balanced system performance - CPU, memory, interconnect, and I/O; (2) Usability - functionality of hardware and software meets needs of users for Massively Parallel Computing; (3)S calability - system hardware and software scale, single cabinet system to {approx} 30,000 processor system; (4) reliability - machines tays up long enough between interrupts to make real progress on completing application run (at least 50 hours MTBI), requires full system RAS capability; (5) Upgradability - system can be upgraded with a processor swap and additional cabinets to 100T or greater; (6) red/black switching - capability to switch major portions of the machine between classified and unclassified computing environments; (7) space, power, cooling - high density, low power system; and (8) price/performance - excellent performance per dollar, use high volume commodity parts where feasible.

Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Ballance, Robert A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Losartan attenuates chronic cigarette smoke exposure-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats: Possible involvement of angiotensin-converting enzyme-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chronic cigarette smoking induces pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by largely unknown mechanisms. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is known to function in the development of PAH. Losartan, a specific angiotensin II receptor antagonist, is a well-known antihypertensive drug with a potential role in regulating angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2), a recently found regulator of RAS. To determine the effect of losartan on smoke-induced PAH and its possible mechanism, rats were daily exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 months in the absence and in the presence of losartan. Elevated right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), thickened wall of pulmonary arteries with apparent medial hypertrophy along with increased angiotensin II (Ang II) and decreased ACE2 levels were observed in smoke-exposed-only rats. Losartan administration ameliorated pulmonary vascular remodeling, inhibited the smoke-induced RVSP and Ang II elevation and partially reversed the ACE2 decrease in rat lungs. In cultured primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from 3- and 6-month smoke-exposed rats, ACE2 levels were significantly lower than in those from the control rats. Moreover, PASMCs from 6-month exposed rats proliferated more rapidly than those from 3-month exposed or control rats, and cells grew even more rapidly in the presence of DX600, an ACE2 inhibitor. Consistent with the in vivo study, in vitro losartan pretreatment also inhibited cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced cell proliferation and ACE2 reduction in rat PASMCs. The results suggest that losartan may be therapeutically useful in the chronic smoking-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH and ACE2 may be involved as part of its mechanism. Our study might provide insight into the development of new therapeutic interventions for PAH smokers.

Han Suxia; He Guangming; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Ning Yunye; Luo Feng; An Jin; Yang Ting; Dong Jiajia; Liao Zenglin; Xu Dan [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Wen Fuqiang, E-mail: wenfuqiang.scu@gmail.co [Division of Pulmonary Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy of China, and Department of Respiratory Medicine, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Cogeneration Partnerships -- A "Win-Win" Approach for All Parties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Historically, electric utilities in the US have tended to discourage the deployment of cogeneration installations in their own service territory because the resulting electricity sales reduction would be greater than normal load growth, and thus there would be a negative impact on earnings. For an island-based utility such as Jamaica Public Service Company (JPSCo) that is experiencing strong load growth, however, the situation is quite different. There is a need to provide new electrical resources on a continuing basis. There is a need to support the manufacturing sector, to help to grow the economy. There are no indigenous fuels; expensive imported fuel oil is virtually the only energy source available. Cogeneration is recognized as a proven technology that provides an economical, efficient, and environmental friendly way to increase electricity supply in appropriately sized increments. By facilitating, cogeneration installations and sharing in their ownership, the utility can protect-and under some circumstances even increase its overall revenue stream. The basic concept is as follows: a JPSCo-owned Cogeneration Plant will supply: (1) electricity to the JPSCo grid, and (2) ""energy products"" (such as chilled water, steam, or hot water, and perhaps compressed air) to manufacturing businesses operating within a specific geographic area. Some non-manufacturing facilities in the same area may also be served. The ""energy products"" would be supplied via a local District Energy piping network. The large manufacturing entities who are customers for one of more of the ""energy products"" would be billed for electricity supplied by JPSCo under an new Industrial Park Tariff that is about 10-15% lower than the standard tariff. Ideally, the price charged for each of the ""energy products"" would be competitive with each customer's total cost to produce the same product on-site, or as a minimum each customer's total annual cost for electricity and fuel would be lower. The results of a feasibility study of the concept using data for a specific Industrial Park will be presented in this paper. The rated net electrical capacity of the cogeneration plant is 15 MW (four 4 MW medium-speed diesel engines serve as prime movers.) A total of eight industrial plants are served with electricity, chilled water, and steam. "

Steigelmann, W.; Campbell, V.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, {beta}-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of {beta}-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but {beta}-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the need to take non-genomic effects and signalling cross-talk into consideration, when screening for environmental estrogens. Otherwise, chemicals devoid of ER affinity, such as {beta}-HCH, but with an effect profile otherwise similar to estrogens might be overlooked in safety testing.

Silva, Elisabete, E-mail: elisabete.silva@pharmacy.ac.u [Centre for Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom); Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas [Centre for Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX (United Kingdom)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - Data and Evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Under the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in 1992, all environmental restoration activities on the ORR are performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Since the 1990s, the environmental restoration activities have experienced a gradual shift from characterization to remediation. As this has occurred, it has been determined that the assessment of the individual and cumulative performance of all ORR CERCLA remedial actions (RAs) is most effectively tracked in a single document. The Remediation Effectiveness Report (RER) is an FFA document intended to collate all ORR CERCLA decision requirements, compare pre- and post-remediation conditions at CERCLA sites, and present the results of any required post-decision remediation effectiveness monitoring. First issued in 1997, the RER has been reissued annually to update the performance histories of completed actions and to add descriptions of new CERCLA actions. Monitoring information used in the 2010 RER to assess remedy performance was collected and/or compiled by DOE's Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP). Only data used to assess performance of completed actions are provided. In addition to collecting CERCLA performance assessment data, the WRRP also collects baseline data to be used to gauge the effectiveness of future actions once implemented. These baseline data are maintained in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System and will be reported in future RERs, as necessary, once the respective actions are completed. However, when insufficient data exist to assess the impact of the RAs, e.g., when the RA was only recently completed, a preliminary evaluation is made of early indicators of effectiveness at the watershed scale, such as contaminant trends at surface water integration points (IPs). Long-term stewardship (LTS) information used in this report is collected, compiled, and tracked by the WRRP in conjunction with the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) program, the BJC Radiation Protection Organization at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), and the ETTP Environmental Compliance Program. Additionally, documentation verifying the implementation of administrative land use controls (LUCs) [i.e., property record restrictions, property record notices, zoning notices, and excavation/penetration permit (EPP) program] is also obtained from many sources throughout the fiscal year (FY), including County Register of Deeds offices for property record restrictions and property record notices, City Planning Commission for zoning notices, and BJC project engineers for EPP program verification. Copies of this documentation are obtained by the WRRP and maintained with the project RER files.

Bechtel Jacobs

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

KISS1 and Its G Protein-Coupled Receptor (GPR54) in Cancer Progression and Metastasis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Activation of G-protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) signaling generated by kisspeptins (endogenous GPR54 ligands encoded by KISS1 gene) has been known to regulate puberty and to suppress cancer metastasis. However, an endogenous GPR54 signaling in cancer progression is still unclear. This study demonstrates that an autocrine GPR54 signaling regulates breast cancer progression and metastasis. When MMTV-PyMT mice were crossed with Gpr54 heterozygous mice, Gpr54 heterozygosity attenuated PyMT-inudced breast cancer progression, including tumorigenesis and metastasis. Likewise, Gpr54 heterozygosity retarded in vitro primary tumor cell proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth, and in vivo tumor growth in SCID mice. Furthermore, the anchorage-independent growth was linked to dosage-depdent Gpr54 regulation of RhoA. Human KISS1 and GPR54 were abundantly expressed in benign breast tissue. In MCF10A normal human breast epthelial cells, knockdown of GPR54 or inactivation of RhoA reduced Ras-induced anchorage-independent growth, while consistutively active RhoA recovered Ras-induced tumorigeneity in GPR54-silenced cells. Therefore, this study suggests that autocrine GPR54 signaling via RhoA is sufficient for breast tumorigenesis. The major population of human breast cancer is estrogen receptor-positive (ER?). This study further demonstrates that a loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling in non-metastatic ER? breast cancer cells induces estrogen-independent tumor growth and metastasis with a morphological change. In MCF7 non-metastatic ER? human breast cancer cells, loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling by knockdown of KISS1 or GPR54 caused a morphological change with an alteration of epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) gene expression. Accordingly, silencing of GPR54 signaling by knockdown with KISS1 shRNA or GPR54 shRNA reduced cell proliferation, but enhanced cell motility and anchorage-independent growth. In addition, loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling caused E?-insensitivity. In xenograft tumor growth assays, the lack of autocrine GPR54 signaling caused E?-indpendent tumor growth. In the experimental metastasis mouse model, loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling promoted pulmonary metastasis. Thus, those data indicate that loss of autocrine GPR54 signaling causes estrogen-independent tumor growth and metastasis by promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Altogether, this study demonstrates that the autocrine KISS1-GPR54 signaling is sufficient for breast tumorigenesis and for suppressing ER? breast cancer metastasis.

Cho, Sunggook Gook

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity  

SciTech Connect

The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

Guindon, Katherine A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Massey, Thomas E. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)], E-mail: masseyt@queensu.ca

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Final SEAB September 13 Meeting Minutes[2]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Page Page 1 o f 3 Summary M inutes o f t he U.S. D epartment o f E nergy ( DOE) Secretary o f E nergy A dvisory B oard Public M eeting Committee M embers: J ohn D eutch, C o---Chair; P ersis D rell, C o---Chair; B rent S cowcroft; R am S henoy; Cherry M urray; S hirley J ackson; D an R eicher; M artha S chlicher; R afael B ras; Albert C arnesale; S teve K oonin; D an Y ergin; C armichael R oberts; D eborah J in; Paul J oskow; R ichard M eserve Date a nd T ime: 8:00 A M--- 1 2:00 P M, S eptember 1 3, 2 013 Location: Department o f E nergy F orrestal B uilding, 1 000 I ndependence A venue, S W, Washington, D C 2 0585 Purpose: Meeting o f t he S ecretary o f E nergy A dvisory B oard ( SEAB) SEAB S taff: Amy B odette, D esignated F ederal O fficer; M ackenzie H uffman, D eputy Designated F ederal O fficer DOE S taff: Secretary E rnest

227

Meals, quarters for 8,200 needed at peak in LNG project  

SciTech Connect

It has everything a real town has except women, children, schools, bars, and old people. It is the huge camp built at Ras Laffan, Qatar, on the shores of the Persian Gulf to lodge and feed over 5,000 workers as they build the first plant in the emirate for liquefying millions of tons of natural gas yearly. Japan`s Chiyoda Corp. is the top contractor for the Qatar Liquefied Gas Co. (QatarGas) project, which is owned by a Qatari, French, American, and Japanese consortium. As part of the plant construction contract, Chiyoda built the camp, which Teyseer Services Co., the Qatar affiliate of the French company, Sodexho Alliance, now runs and maintains. Sodexho is the world`s largest catering/remote site management organization. It has had all its expertise in those fields put to the test for nearly 4 years supporting this world-scale LNG project which will be completed this summer. This project is described.

Aalund, L.R.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Roles of TNFα Signaling and NFκB in Thiol- and Low Dose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roles of TNFα Signaling and NFκB in Thiol- and Low Dose Radiation-Induced Roles of TNFα Signaling and NFκB in Thiol- and Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses Jeffrey S. Murley The University of Chicago Abstract To better investigate the roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) signaling processes and nuclear transcription factor κB (NFκB) activation on the induction of manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) mediated adaptive responses, we employed a two by two experimental matrix that includes the use of both wild type C57BL/6 and C57BL/6 tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 (TNFR1-R2-) knockout mice, and ras/c-myc transfected wild type and TNFR1-R2- knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF). MEF were immortalized in order to facilitate their use in our mouse models to test the role of normal or TNFR1-R2- stromal cells and tissues on their responses to thiol

229

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report; Attachment 3, Groundwater hydrology report; Attachment 4, Water resources protection strategy: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

Chernoff, A.R. [USDOE Albuquerque Field Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Lacker, D.K. [Texas State Dept. of Health, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Radiation Control

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Remedial Action Plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE's remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

Chernoff, A.R. (USDOE Albuquerque Field Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Lacker, D.K. (Texas State Dept. of Health, Austin, TX (United States). Bureau of Radiation Control)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Ionized gas velocity dispersion in nearby dwarf galaxies: looking at supersonic turbulent motions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of ionized gas turbulent motions study in several nearby dwarf galaxies using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer with the 6-m telescope of the SAO RAS. Combining the `intensity-velocity dispersion' diagrams (I-sigma) with two-dimensional maps of radial velocity dispersion we found a number of common patterns pointing to the relation between the value of chaotic ionized gas motions and processes of current star formation. In five out of the seven analysed galaxies we identified expanding shells of ionized gas with diameters of 80-350 pc and kinematic ages of 1-4 Myr. We also demonstrate that the I-sigma diagrams may be useful for the search of supernova remnants, other small expanding shells or unique stars in nearby galaxies. As an example, a candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) was found in UGC 8508. We propose some additions to the interpretation, previously used by Munoz-Tunon et al. to explain the I-sigma diagrams for giant star formation regions. In the case of dwarf galaxies,...

Moiseev, Alexei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Guide to ground water remediation at CERCLA response action and RCRA corrective action sites  

SciTech Connect

This Guide contains the regulatory and policy requirements governing remediation of ground water contaminated with hazardous waste [including radioactive mixed waste (RMW)], hazardous substances, or pollutants/contaminants that present (or may present) an imminent and substantial danger. It was prepared by the Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413), to assist Environmental Program Managers (ERPMs) who often encounter contaminated ground water during the performance of either response actions under CERCLA or corrective actions under Subtitle C of RCRA. The Guide begins with coverage of the regulatory and technical issues that are encountered by ERPM`s after a CERCLA Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation (PA/SI) or the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) have been completed and releases into the environment have been confirmed. It is based on the assumption that ground water contamination is present at the site, operable unit, solid waste management unit, or facility. The Guide`s scope concludes with completion of the final RAs/corrective measures and a determination by the appropriate regulatory agencies that no further response action is necessary.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Falls City, Texas. Remedial action selection report, attachment 2, geology report; attachment 3, groundwater hydrology report; and attachment 4, water resources protection strategy. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas, was one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be remediated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). The UMTRCA requires that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The RAP, which includes this summary remedial action selection report (RAS), serves a two-fold purpose. First, it describes the activities proposed by the DOE to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of the residual radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Falls City, Texas. Second, this document and the remainder of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the State of Texas, and the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement between the DOE and the State of Texas.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gaseous Radiochemical Method for Registration of Ionizing Radiation and Its Possible Applications in Science and Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a new possibility of registration of ionizing radiation by the flowing gaseous radiochemical method (FGRM). The specified method uses the property of some solid crystalline lattice materials for a free emission of radioactive isotopes of inert gas atoms formed as a result of nuclear reactions. Generated in an ampoule of the detector, the radioactive inert gases are transported by a gas-carrier into the proportional gas counter of the flowing type, where the decay rate of the radioactive gas species is measured. This quantity is unequivocally related to the flux of particles (neutrons, protons, light and heavy ions) at the location of the ampoule. The method was used to monitor the neutron flux of the pulsed neutron target "RADEX" driven by the linear proton accelerator of INR RAS. Further progress of the FGRM may give rise to possible applications in nuclear physics, astrophysics and medicine, in the nondestructive control of fissionable materials, diagnostics of thermonuclear plasma, monitoring of fluxes and measurement of spectra of bombarding particles.

S. G. Lebedev; V. E. Yants

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Physics of reactor safety. Quarterly report, April-June 1983. Volume II. [LMFBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This version of SAS4A/LEVITATE is now operating successfully for the most part and is being applied to analysis of the TREAT L6 and L7 experiments. Application of the RAS version of SAS4A/LEVITATE to an EOC-4 LOF case for the CRBR showed substantial axial fuel dispersal to occur within 100 ms after pin failure, with the dispersal becoming very large by 250 ms. Both fission gas and sodium vapor effects appeared to be important in this dispersal. Considerable improvements have been made in the development version of SAS4A/PLUTO2/LEVITATE relating to the way fission gas is handled. The BIFLO code for analysis of two-dimensional sodium boiling in a fuel assembly is being modified to implement a more implicit numerical formulation, an equation of state for pure vapor, and lateral heat conduction between sodium flow channels. In the area of single-phase code development work (COMMIX-1A; COMMIX-1B) the implementation of three turbulence models and two different schemes have been completed. In the area of two-phase works, COMMIX-2 computer code, the efforts are continued in developing both models, the two-fluid model and the homogeneous equilibrium model with slip.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2317&D2). Remedial actions performed in the Balance of Site (BOS) Laboratory Area of EU Z2-33 and two small areas in EU Z2-42 are described in Sects. 5 through 10 of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-33; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe RAs performed in the EU Z2-33 BOS Laboratory Area and two small areas in EU Z2-42. Approximately 18 acres in EU Z2-33 are addressed in this PCCR. Based on the results of the DVS evaluation and RAs performed, all 18 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. Three Federal Facility Agreement sites are addressed and recommended for no further action within this acreage, including: (1) K-1004-L Recirculating Cooling Water Lines Leak Sites; (2) K-1044 Heavy Equipment Repair Shop; and (3) K-1015-A Laundry Pit. Remedial actions for EU Z2-33 were developed in response to DVS characterization results described in the EU Z2-33 Technical Memorandum (Appendix A) and to support reindustrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park as a commercial industrial park. Remediation criteria were designed for the protection of a future industrial worker who normally would not have the potential for exposure to soil below 10ft bgs. Accordingly, the Zone 2 ROD required land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likel

Bechtel Jacobs

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium processing site at Naturita, Colorado. Remedial action selection report, Attachment 2, Geology report: Preliminary final  

SciTech Connect

The uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado, is one of 24 inactive uranium mill sites designated to be cleaned up by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604. Part of the UMTRCA requires that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concur with the DOE`s remedial action plan (RAP) and certify that the remedial action conducted at the site complies with the standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Included in the RAP is this Remedial Action Selection Report (RAS), which serves two purposes. First, it describes the activities that are proposed by the DOE to accomplish remediation and long-term stabilization and control of the radioactive materials at the inactive uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Second, this document and the rest of the RAP, upon concurrence and execution by the DOE, the state of Colorado, and the NRC, become Appendix B of the cooperative agreement between the DOE and the State of Colorado.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Mechanisms of radiation-induced gene responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the process of identifying genes differentially expressed in cells exposed ultraviolet radiation, we have identified a transcript having a 26-bp region that is highly conserved in a variety of species including Bacillus circulans, yeast, pumpkin, Drosophila, mouse, and man. When the 5` region (flanking region or UTR) of a gene, the sequence is predominantly in +/+ orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand; while in the coding region and the 3` region (UTR), the sequence is most frequently in the +/-orientation with respect to the coding DNA strand. In two genes, the element is split into two parts; however, in most cases, it is found only once but with a minimum of 11 consecutive nucleotides precisely depicting the original sequence. The element is found in a large number of different genes with diverse functions (from human ras p21 to B. circulans chitonase). Gel shift assays demonstrated the presence of a protein in HeLa cell extracts that binds to the sense and antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers, as well as to the double- stranded oligonucleotide. When double-stranded oligomer was used, the size shift demonstrated as additional protein-oligomer complex larger than the one bound to either sense or antisense single-stranded consensus oligomers alone. It is speculated either that this element binds to protein(s) important in maintaining DNA is a single-stranded orientation for transcription or, alternatively that this element is important in the transcription-coupled DNA repair process.

Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NF-kB activation by ultraviolet light not dependent on a nuclear signal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure of mammalian cells to radiation triggers the ultraviolet (UV) response, which includes activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB). This was postulated to occur by induction of a nuclear signaling cascade by damaged DNA. Recently, induction of AP-1 by UV was shown to be mediated by a pathway involving Src tyrosine kinases and the Ha-Ras small guanosine triphosphate-binding protein, proteins located at the plasma membrane. It is demonstrated here that the same pathway mediates induction of NF-kB by UV. Because inactive NF-kB is stored in the cytosol, analysis of its activation directly tests the involvement of a nuclear-initiated signaling cascade. Enucleated cells are fully responsive to UV both in NF-kB induction and in activation of another key signaling event. Therefore, the UV response does not require a signal generated in the nucleus and is likely to be initiated at or near the plasma membrane.

Devary, Y.; Rosette, C.; DiDonato, J.A.; Karin, M. (Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States))

1993-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

240

Molecular Profiling to Optimize Treatment in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Review of Potential Molecular Targets for Radiation Therapy by the Translational Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group  

SciTech Connect

Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been mainly based on disease stage, performance status, and co-morbidities, and rarely on histological or molecular classification. Rather than applying broad treatments to unselected patients that may result in survival increase of only weeks to months, research efforts should be, and are being, focused on identifying predictive markers for molecularly targeted therapy and determining genomic signatures that predict survival and response to specific therapies. The availability of such targeted biologics requires their use to be matched to tumors of corresponding molecular vulnerability for maximum efficacy. Molecular markers such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), K-ras, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) represent potential parameters guide treatment decisions. Ultimately, identifying patients who will respond to specific therapies will allow optimal efficacy with minimal toxicity, which will result in more judicious and effective application of expensive targeted therapy as the new paradigm of personalized medicine develops.

Ausborn, Natalie L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Le, Quynh Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Saha, Debabrata [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Simko, Jeff [Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Story, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Torossian, Artour [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Lu, Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ras jamaica martinique" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

2011 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - Data and Evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Under the requirements of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) established between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, (EPA) and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in 1992, all environmental restoration activities on the ORR are performed in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Since the 1990s, the environmental restoration activities have experienced a gradual shift from characterization to remediation. As this has occurred, it has been determined that the assessment of the individual and cumulative performance of all ORR CERCLA remedial actions (RAs) is most effectively tracked in a single document. The Remediation Effectiveness Report (RER) is an FFA document intended to collate all ORR CERCLA decision requirements, compare pre- and post-remediation conditions at CERCLA sites, and present the results of any required post-decision remediation effectiveness monitoring. First issued in 1997, the RER has been reissued annually to update the performance histories of completed actions and to add descriptions of new CERCLA actions. Monitoring information used in the 2011 RER to assess remedy performance was collected and/or compiled by DOE's Water Resources Restoration Program (WRRP). Only data used to assess performance of completed actions are provided. In addition to collecting CERCLA performance assessment data, the WRRP also collects baseline data to be used to gauge the effectiveness of future actions once implemented. These baseline data are maintained in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System and will be reported in future RERs, as necessary, once the respective actions are completed. However, when insufficient data exist to assess the impact of the RAs, e.g., when the RA was only recently completed, a preliminary evaluation is made of early indicators of effectiveness at the watershed scale, such as contaminant trends at surface water integration points (IFs). Long-term stewardship (LTS) information used in this report is collected, compiled, and tracked by the WRRP in conjunction with the Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) program, the BJC Radiation Protection Organization at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), ETTP Environmental Compliance Program, B&W Y-12 Liquid Waste Treatment Operations, and UT Battelle Facilities Management Division. Additionally, documentation verifying the implementation of administrative land use controls (LUCs) [i.e., property record restrictions, property record notices, zoning notices, and excavation/penetration permit (EPP) program] is also obtained from many sources throughout the fiscal year (FY), including County Register of Deeds offices for property record restrictions and property record notices, City Planning Commission for zoning notices, and BJC project engineers for EPP program verification. Copies of this documentation are obtained by the WRRP and maintained with the project RER files.

Bechtel Jacobs

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Role of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Regulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Activation and Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase integral in regulating cell growth, survival, and migration. EGFR signaling, which is dependent on localization of the receptor within lipid rafts, is often hijacked during colon tumorigenesis. Previous work has found that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is protective against colon cancer. This fatty acid is proposed to function in part by perturbing lipid rafts and thereby altering cell signaling. The overall objective of this work was to determine whether DHA alters EGFR function and signaling. We assessed EGFR localization and ligand-induced phosphorylation in YAMC cells treated with fatty acids. We found that DHA reduced the localization of EGFR to lipid rafts. Concomitant with altering receptor localization, DHA was found to increase EGFR phosphorylation. However, DHA paradoxically suppressed EGFR signal transduction. We found that DHA uniquely altered EGFR activity, and other long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid did not exert the same effect. We additionally observed similar effects on EGFR activation and signaling by feeding mice a diet enriched in fish oil (high in DHA), and this was attendant with reduced colon tumorigenesis. We next probed the mechanism by which DHA enhances EGFR phosphorylation. We found that DHA facilitates receptor dimerization to increase phosphorylation. We additionally identified Ras activation as the site of perturbation of signal transduction. DHA suppressed signal transduction by both changing the localization of EGFR within the plasma membrane and increasing receptor endocytosis and degradation. Lastly, we extended our observations into a wounding model. Although DHA uniquely altered ligand-stimulated EGFR activity, both DHA and EPA altered EGFR transactivation and signaling upon injury. This culminated in reduced wound healing in DHA and EPA treated cells. In an animal model, we found that diets enriched in either DHA or EPA altered EGFR signaling in the colonocytes of wounded animals. Overall, we found that DHA modifies EGFR signaling, which can be beneficial or detrimental for health depending on the disease state of an individual. These data help elucidate a mechanism by which DHA protects against colon cancer, as well as indicating a potential downside of n-3 PUFA therapy.

Turk, Harmony 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The RERTR Program : a status report.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners since its inception in 1978. A brief summary of the results that the program had attained by the end of 1997 is followed by a detailed review of the major events, findings, and activities that took place in 1998. The past year was characterized by exceptionally important accomplishments and events for the RERTR program. Four additional shipments of spent fuel from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. Altogether, 2,231 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors have been received by the U.S. under the acceptance policy. Fuel development activities began to yield solid results. Irradiations of the first two batches of microplates were completed. Preliminary postirradiation examinations of these microplates indicate excellent irradiation behavior of some of the fuel materials that were tested. These materials hold the promise of achieving the pro am goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium density in the 8-9 g /cm{sup 3} range. Progress was made in the Russian RERTR program, which aims to develop and demonstrate the technical means needed to convert Russian-supplied research reactors to LEU fuels. Feasibility studies for converting to LEU fuel four Russian-designed research reactors (IR-8 in Russia, Budapest research reactor in Hungary, MARIA in Poland, and WWR-SM in Uzbekistan) were completed. A new program activity began to study the feasibility of converting three Russian plutonium production reactors to the use of low-enriched U0{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, so that they can continue to produce heat and electricity without producing significant amounts of plutonium. The study of an alternative LEU core for the FRM-II design has been extended to address, with favorable results, the transient performance of the core under hypothetical accident conditions. A major milestone was accomplished in the development of a process to produce molybdenum-99 from fission targets utilizing LEU instead of HEU. Targets containing LEU metal foils were irradiated in the RAS-GAS reactor at BATAN, Indonesia, and molybdenum-99 was successfully extracted through the ensuing process. These are exciting times for the program and for all those involved in it, and last year's successes augur well for the future. However, as in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that have always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the maximum score possible. A highly ranked ANA or ARA is one that is large in size compared to other areas, includes a greater proportion of the watershed within Reservation boundaries, contains a number of status taxa at high densities, exhibits a high overall biodiversity, has very good or excellent habitat and water quality, is well protected and isolated from disturbances, and shows several other characteristics that contribute to natural area value. In this report, the term 'natural area' is loosely defined as a terrestrial or aquatic system that exhibits, or is thought to exhibit, high natural integrity and other significant natural values. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate and rank the currently recognized Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for their natural area value. A previous study (Baranski 2009) analyzed, evaluated, and ranked terrestrial areas (Natural Areas [NAs], Reference Areas [RAs], and Cooperative Management Areas [CMAs]) on the ORR for natural area value, and a precise methodology for natural area evaluation was developed. The present study is intended to be a complement and companion to the terrestrial area study and attempts to employ a similar methodology for aquatic areas so that aquatic and terrestrial areas can be compared on a similar scale. This study specifically develops criteria for assessing the ecological, biodiversity, and natural area importance and significance of aquatic systems on the Reservation in a relevant and consistent manner. The information can be integrated into the Tennessee Natural Heritage Program (http://tn.gov/environment/na/nhp.shtml) system and applied to potential new aquatic areas. Further, the information will be useful in planning, management, and protection efforts on the ORR.

Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Status and progress of the RERTR program in the year 2000.  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the progress achieved by the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program in collaboration with its many international partners during the year 2000 and discusses the main activities planned for the year 2001. The past year was characterized by important accomplishments and events for the RERTR program. Four additional shipments containing 503 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors were accepted by the U.S. Altogether, 3,740 spent fuel assemblies from foreign research reactors have been received by the U.S. under the acceptance policy. Postirradiation examinations of three batches of microplates have continued to reveal excellent irradiation behavior of U-MO dispersion fuels in a variety of compositions and irradiating conditions. h-radiation of two new batches of miniplates of greater sizes is in progress in the ATR to investigate me swelling behavior of these fuels under prototypic conditions. These materials hold the promise of achieving the program goal of developing LEU research reactor fuels with uranium densities in the 8-9 g /cm{sup 3} range. Qualification of the U-MO dispersion fuels is proceeding on schedule. Test fuel elements with 6 gU/cm{sup 3} are being fabricated by BWXT and are scheduled to begin undergoing irradiation in the HFR-Petten in the spring of 2001, with a goal of qualifying this fuel by the end of 2003. U-Mo with 8-9 gU/cm{sup 3} is planned to be qualified by the end of 2005. Joint LEU conversion feasibility studies were completed for HFR-Petten and for SAFARI-1. Significant improvements were made in the design of LEU metal-foil annular targets that would allow efficient production of fission {sup 99}Mo. Irradiations in the RAS-GAS reactor showed that these targets can formed from aluminum tubes, and that the yield and purity of their product from the acidic process were at least as good as those from the HEU Cintichem targets. Progress was made on irradiation testing of LEU UO{sub 2} dispersion fuel and on LEU conversion feasibility studies in the Russian RERTR program. Conversion of the BER-11reactor in Berlin, Germany, was completed and conversion of the La Reins reactor in Santiago, Chile, began. These are exciting times for the program. In the fuel development area, the RERTR program is aggressively pursuing qualification of high-density LEU U-Mo dispersion fuels, with the dual goal of enabling fi.uther conversions and of developing a substitute for LEU silicide fuels that can be more easily disposed of after expiration of the FRR SNF Acceptance Program. The {sup 99}Mo effort has reached the point where it appears feasible for all the {sup 99}Mo producers of the world to agree jointly to a common course of action leading to the elimination of HEU use in their processes. As in the past, the success of the RERTR program will depend on the international friendship and cooperation that has always been its trademark.

Travelli, A.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting for Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and WasteTreatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

The sixth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held November 15-17, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, and Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 55 Russian attendees from 16 different Russian organizations and four non-Russian attendees from the US. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C. The 16 different Russian design, industrial sites, and scientific organizations in attendance included staff from Rosatom/Minatom, Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (GOSATOMNADZOR, NIERA/GAN), All Russian Designing & Scientific Research Institute of Complex Power Technology (VNIPIET), Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), A. A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), All Russian & Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT), Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation Specialized State Designing Institute (GSPI), State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), Siberian Chemical Combine Tomsk (SCC), Mayak PO, Mining Chemical Combine (MCC K-26), Institute of Biophysics (IBPh), Sverdlosk Scientific Research Institute of Chemical Machine Building (SNIIChM), Kurchatov Institute (KI), Institute of Physical Chemistry Russian Academy of Science (IPCh RAS) and Radon PO-Moscow. The four non-Russian attendees included one representative from DOE NNSA, and LLNL, and two from Duratek, The meeting was organized into three major sessions: (1) Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal; (2) Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation; (3) Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. Twenty presentations were made on the topic of Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (Session II), ten presentations on Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session III), and four presentations on Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session IV). In addition, DOE/NNSA, Minatom/Rosatom and TVEL summarized the bases for the conference at the beginning of the meeting (Session I). Nine months had passed since the last LLNL contracts review meeting. During that time period, LLNL and TVEL have been able to sign six contracts for a total of $1,700,000 in the areas of: (1) Waste treatment, storage and disposal; and (2) Plutonium packaging, storage and transportation. The scope of several other work projects are now in various stages of development in these areas. It is anticipated that more contracts will be signed before the next meeting of this type. These events have allowed us to start work in our technical activities under new direction from TVEL, which is now the single Russian organization to coordinate and conclude contracts with LLNL. The meeting presentations and discussions have defined where we are and where we are going in the near term in regard to our joint interests in excess weapons plutonium disposition. Each topical section of this Proceedings is introduced by a summary of the presentations in that section.

Jardine, L J

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z