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Sample records for rare kaon decays

  1. Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory of rare Kaon and Pion decays I discuss recent theoretical progress in rare (leptonic) decay...

  2. Rare Kaon Decays, KEK experiment E391 and E14 at the Japan Physics and Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wah, Yau Wai

    2012-12-06

    The goal of the J-PARC neutral kaon experiment (E14/KOTO) is to discover and measure the rate of the kaon rare decay to pi-zero and two neutrinos. This flavor changing neutral current decay proceeds through second-order weak interactions. Other, as yet undiscovered particles, which can mediate the decay could provide an enhancement (or depletion) to the branching ratio which in the Standard Model is accurately predicted within a few percent to be 2.8x10-11. The experiment is designed to observe more than 100 events at the Standard Model branching. It is a follow-up of the KEK E391a experiment and has stage-2 approval by J-PARC PAC in 2007. E14/KOTO has collaborators from Japan (Kyoto, Osaka, Yamagata, Saga), US (Arizona State, Chicago, Michigan Ann Arbor), Taiwan (National Taiwan), Korea, and Russia (Dubna). The experiment exploits the 300kW 30-50 GeV proton delivery of the J-PARC accelerator with a hermetic high acceptance detector with a fine grained Cesium Iodide (CsI) crystal calorimeter, and state of the art electronic front end and data acquisition system. With the recovery of the tsunami disaster on March 11th 2011, E14 is scheduled to start collecting data in December 2012. During the detector construction phase, Chicago focuses on the front end electronics readout of the entire detector system, particularly the CsI calorimeter. The CsI crystals together with its photomultipliers were previously used at the Fermilab KTeV experiment (E832/E799), and were loaned to E14 via this Chicago DOE support. The new readout electronics includes an innovative 10-pole pulse-shaping technique coupled with high speed digitization (14-bit 125MHz and 12-bit 500MHz). This new instrument enables us to measure both energy and timing, particularly with timing resolution better than 100 psec. Besides the cost saving by elimination of the standard time to digital converters, it is now possible to measure the momenta of the final state photons for additional background suppression

  3. Physics Results from KTeV (E799-II and E832): The Search for Direct CP Violation in 2 PI Decays and Rare Decays of the Neutral Kaon

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    KTeV includes the study of fundamental symmetries, rare decay processes, weak interactions, and polarization phenomena. A striking asymmetry of our world is the fact that the universe appears to be composed entirely of matter and no astronomical object made of anti-matter has ever been detected. In fact, the only anti-matter we find anywhere is minute quantities produced in high energy particle interactions like those studied at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). At the time of this experiment, only one other place where an asymmetry of this kind, formally called "CP violation," has been observed. This is a tiny effect (about 1 part in 500) in certain decays of a particular elementary particle called the neutral Kaon. KTeV seeks to determine whether or not this effect can be fully understood in the context of the present picture of matter (the "Standard Model"). To do this, high-precision measurements on decays which are known to manifest CP violation are performed in order to study a variety of extremely rare decay processes.[copied with editing from http://ktev.fnal.gov/public/plain_english.html] This website provides access to numeric data and data plots from published papers. Drs Makoto Kobayashi, Toshihide Maskawa, and Yoichiro Nambu share a 2008 Nobel Prize in Physics for their work in this experiment.

  4. Measurements of the kaon content in tau decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronan, M.T. )

    1992-02-01

    Results on measurements of the kaon content in one-prong and three-prong [tau] decays are presented for data taken by the TPC/2[gamma] detector at PEP. Using a self-consistent procedure to measure exclusive and inclusive decays, the one-prong analysis extends previous work to kaon decay modes. Three-prong results [ital K][pi][pi], [ital K][pi] and [ital KKK] decay modes provide improved branching ratios and a first look at strange axial-vector couplings in [tau] decays.

  5. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  6. Rare B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrington, Sinead M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-10-01

    The confidence level limits of the CDF search for the B{sub s}{sup 0} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} rare decays and the branching ratio measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +} D{sub s}{sup -} are presented.

  7. Measurements of CP Violation and Neutral Kaon Charge Radius using K(L) --> pi+pi-e+e- Decays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golossanov, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    CP violation and K{sup 0} charge radius were measured using K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}e{sup +}e{sup -} decays. Specifically, a unique CP-violating decay-plane asymmetry was measured along with the parameters of individual contributions to the decay invariant amplitude: (1) CP-conserving magnetic dipole direct emission form factor, (2) CP-conserving K{sup 0} charge radius transition amplitude and (3) an upper limit for the CP-violating electric dipole direct emission amplitude. The measurements were obtained from the data sample accumulated by KTeV experiment at Fermilab. KTeV had two major goals: the measurement of direct CP violation parameter Re({var_epsilon}{prime}/{var_epsilon}) and the study of rare kaon decays. The state of the art detector was constructed, commissioned, operated and maintained by an international collaboration of scientists from fourteen institutions. The K{sub L} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} e{sup +}e{sup -} data was accumulated over the 1997 and 1999 running periods. During that time hundreds of billions K{sub L} decays took place in the KTeV fiducial decay region.

  8. Rare top quark decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2006-09-25

    Flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decays t {yields} H0 + c, t {yields} Z + c, and H0 {yields} t + c-bar are discussed in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions where FCNC decays may take place at tree-level and are only suppressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks, which is poorly constraint by current experimental values. The non-manifest case is also briefly discussed.

  9. Physics and Outlook for Rare, All-neutral Eta Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, David J.

    2014-06-01

    The $\\eta$ meson provides a laboratory to study isospin violation and search for new flavor-conserving sources of C and CP violation with a sensitivity approaching $10^{-6}$ of the isospin-conserving strong amplitude. Some of the most interesting rare $\\eta$ decays are the neutral modes, yet the effective loss of photons from the relatively common decay $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\pi^0 \\rightarrow 6\\gamma$ (33$\\%$) has largely limited the sensitivity for decays producing 3-5$\\gamma$'s. Particularly important relevant branches include the highly suppressed $\\eta \\rightarrow \\pi^0 2\\gamma \\rightarrow 4\\gamma$, which provides a rare window on testing models of $O(p^6)$ contributions in ChPTh, and $\\eta \\rightarrow 3\\gamma$ and $\\eta \\rightarrow 2\\pi^0 \\gamma \\rightarrow 5\\gamma$ which provide direct constraints on C violation in flavor-conserving processes. The substitution of lead tungstate in the forward calorimeter of the GluEx setup in Jefferson Lab's new Hall D would allow dramatically improved measurements. The main niche of this facility, which we call the JLab Eta Factory (JEF), would be $\\eta$ decay neutral modes. However, this could likely be expanded to rare $\\eta'(958)$ decays for low energy QCD studies as well as $\\eta$ decays involving muons for new physics searches.

  10. Rare {Lambda}{sub b} decays in a quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mott, L.; Roberts, W.

    2010-08-05

    Hadronic form factors for the rare weak transitions {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)} are calculated using a nonrelativistic quark model. The form factors obtained in this way are found to satisfy the relationships expecetd from the heavy quark effective theory. Differential decay rates and branching ratios are calculated for the dileptonic decays {Lambda}{sub b{yields}{Lambda}}{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, for both ground state and excited daughter baryons. Inclusion of the long distance contributions from charmonium resonances significantly enhances the decay rates. Future work is outlined.

  11. Kaon physics in the 1990's: Rare decays and CP violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atiya, M.; Blackmore, E.; Bock, G.; Bryman, D.; Cooper, M.; Gordon, H.; Littenberg, L.; Louis, W.; Lubatti, H.; McFarlane, K

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this group was to assess the opportunities for experiments on the K system over the next few years. This necessitated evaluating the impact of recent experimental and theoretical activity on the motivation for this work, adducing the technical lessons of the experiments, projecting the experimental techniques toward future efforts, and reviewing the facilities at which future experiments might be carried out. By and large we tried to indicate the general directions in which we feel future efforts will be most productive. More detailed attention is given to certain cases which seem to us particularly promising. 26 refs.

  12. Rare Decays And Exotic States With BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, S.H.; /McGill U.

    2006-08-28

    Results from the BABAR experiment are presented for searches for several rare FCNC B and D meson decays, including the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B {yields} ({rho},{omega}){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} (K,{pi}){sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. Limits on lepton flavor violation in neutrino-less {tau} decays are also discussed. Finally, results of BABAR searches for the strange pentaquark states {Theta}{sup +}(1540), {Xi}{sup --}(1860) and {Xi}{sup 0}(1860) are summarized.

  13. Study of CP Violation in Dalitz-Plot Analyses of B-Meson Decays to Three Kaons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, Brian; /SLAC

    2012-02-15

    The Standard Model (SM) explains CP violation in terms of the CKM matrix. The BABAR experiment was designed mainly to test the CKM model in B decays. B decays that proceed through b {yields} s loop diagrams, of which B {yields} KKK decays are an example, are sensitive to new physics effects that could lead to deviations from the CKM predictions for CP violation. We present studies of CP violation in the decays B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}, and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}, using a Dalitz plot amplitude analysis. These studies are based on approximately 470 million B{bar B} decays collected by BABAR at the PEP-II collider at SLAC. We perform measurements of time-dependent CP violation in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}, including B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub S}{sup 0}. We measure a CP-violating phase {beta}{sub eff} ({phi}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = 0.36 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.04 rad., in agreement with the SM. This is the world's most precise measurement of this quantity. We also measure direct CP asymmetries in all three decay modes, including the direct CP asymmetry A{sub CP} ({phi}K{sup +}) = (12.8 {+-} 4.4 {+-} 1.3)%, which is 2.8 sigma away from zero. This measurement is in tension with the SM, which predicts an asymmetry of a few percent. We also study the resonant and nonresonant features in the B {yields} KKK Dalitz plots. We find that the hypothetical scalar f{sub X}(1500) resonance, introduced by prior analyses to explain an unknown peak in the m{sub KK} spectrum, cannot adequately describe the data. We conclude instead that the f{sub X}(1500) can be explained as the sum of the f{sub 0}(1500), f'{sub 2}(1525), and f{sub 0}(1710) resonances, removing the need for the hypothetical f{sub X}(1500). We also find that an exponential nonresonant model, used by previous analyses to describe the broad nonresonant feature seen in B {yields} KKK decays, cannot fully model

  14. Penguin and rare decays in BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akar, Simon

    2015-04-29

    We present recent results from the BABAR Collaboration on radiative decays. These include searches for new physics via measurements of several observables such as the time- dependent CP asymmetry in B0 ? K0S? ?+? exclusive decays, as well as direct CP asymmetries and branching fractions in B ? Xs? and B ? Xs?+? inclusive decays.

  15. kmahn_nbi06_kaon.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Sept 06 NBI K. Mahn 1 Constraining neutrinos from kaon decay in MiniBooNE Kendall Mahn Columbia University * Oscillation backgrounds * Kaon measurements in MiniBooNE - high energy ν µ events from K+ * Summary 5-9 Sept 06 NBI K. Mahn 2 MiniBooNE beamline Pop Quiz! Protons hit Be target, producing: - a) π+ (primary source of ν µ ) - b) K+ decay to ν µ , ν e - c) K 0 decay to ν µ , ν e - d) all of the above 5-9 Sept 06 NBI K. Mahn 3 Oscillation search * Signal (Δm 2 =1eV 2 , sin 2

  16. Lepton flavor violation in Higgs boson decays under the rare...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We show that a search for the LFV decays phisup 0yieldstausup +-musup +- (tausup +-esup +-) of neutral Higgs bosons (phisup 0h,H and A) at future ...

  17. Improved estimates of rare K decay matrix elements from K{sub l3} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mescia, Federico; Smith, Christopher

    2007-08-01

    The estimation of rare K decay matrix elements from K{sub l3} experimental data is extended beyond LO in chiral perturbation theory. Isospin-breaking effects at next-to-leading order (and partially next-to-next-to-leading order) in the chiral perturbation theory expansion, as well as QED radiative corrections, are now accounted for. The analysis relies mainly on the cleanness of two specific ratios of form factors, for which the theoretical control is excellent. As a result, the uncertainties on the K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{nu} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{nu} matrix elements are reduced by a factor of about 7 and 4, respectively, and similarly for the direct CP-violating contributions to K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup -} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. They could be reduced even further with better experimental data for the K{sub l3} slopes and the K{sub l3}{sup +} branching ratios. As a result, the nonparametric errors for B(K{yields}{pi}{nu}{nu}) and for the direct CP-violating contributions to B(K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}l{sup +}l{sup -}) are now completely dominated by those on the short-distance physics.

  18. Using NERSC Systems, Physicists Close In on a Rare-Particle Decay Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using NERSC Systems, Physcists Close in on a Rare-Particle Decay Process Using NERSC Systems, Physicists Close In on a Rare-Particle Decay Process Underground Experiment May Unlock the Mysteries of the Neutrino June 11, 2012 NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 exo-1.jpg Located at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico, EXO-200 is a 200-kg detector using liquid xenon, enriched in the isotope 136, to detect "neutrino-less double beta decay." With

  19. Report of the Working Group on CP Violation and Rare Decays

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Cronin, J. W.; Deshpande, N. G.; Kane, G. L.; Luth, V. C.; Odian, A. C.; Machacek, M. E.; Paige, F.; Schmidt, M. P.; Slaughter, J.; Trilling, G. H.

    1984-10-01

    It has been pointed out that, with its high energy and luminosity, the SSC may provide the best or only way in which CP violation in heavy meson decays or the rare decay modes of such mesons can be observed. The major problem in the exploitation of the high rates of heavy quark production is the identification of interesting decays in the midst of a large background of more conventional processes. There have been some optimistic reports on the feasibility of such experiments, but relatively little quantitative backup has been provided. In the present report, we concentrate exclusively on B-meson decays. As is the case for K mesons, but not for charm or top decays, the favored modes are suppressed by the smallness of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angles, and therefore rare modes are relatively more frequent and potentially easier to observe.

  20. Search for rare b-meson decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, Philipp; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-10-01

    We report on the search for B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, B{sup 0}{sub d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays and b{yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions in exclusive decays of B mesons using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using 2 fb{sup -1} of Run II data we find upper limits on the branching fractions {beta}(B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})<5.8 x 10{sup -8} and {beta}(B{sup 0}{sub d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})<1.8 x 10{sup -8} at 95% confidence level. The results for the branching fractions of the b{yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions using 924 pb{sup -1} of Run II data are {beta}(B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +})=(0.60{+-}0.15{+-}0.04) x 10{sup -6}, {beta}(B{sup 0}{sub d}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup *0})=(0.82{+-}0.31{+-}0.10) x 10{sup -6} and {beta}(B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi})/{beta}(B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi}) < 2.61 x 10{sup -3} at 95% confidence level.

  1. Search for rare nuclear decays with HPGe detectors at the STELLA facility of the LNGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belli, P.; Di Marco, A.; Bernabei, R.; D'Angelo, S.; Cappella, F.; D'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Cerulli, R.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Laubenstein, M.; Nisi, S.; Danevich, F. A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Poda, D. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kovtun, N. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Polischuk, O. G.; and others

    2013-12-30

    Results on the search for rare nuclear decays with the ultra low background facility STELLA at the LNGS using gamma ray spectrometry are presented. In particular, the best T{sub 1/2} limits were obtained for double beta processes in {sup 96}Ru and {sup 104}Ru. Several isotopes, which potentially decay through different 2? channels, including also possible resonant double electron captures, were investigated for the first time ({sup 156}Dy, {sup 158}Dy, {sup 184}Os, {sup 192}Os, {sup 190}Pt, {sup 198}Pt). Search for resonant absorption of solar {sup 7}Li axions in a LiF crystal gave the best limit for the mass of {sup 7}Li axions (< 8.6 keV). Rare alpha decay of {sup 190}Pt to the first excited level of {sup 186}Os(E{sub exc}?=?137.2keV) was observed for the first time.

  2. Top quark rare three-body decays in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Jinzhong; Li Bingzhong; Wang Xuelei

    2011-02-01

    In the littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT), the mirror quarks have flavor structures and will contribute to the top quark flavor changing neutral current. In this work, we perform an extensive investigation of the top quark rare three-body decays t{yields}cVV, (V={gamma}, Z, g) and t{yields}cff, (f=b, {tau}, {mu}, e) at one-loop level. Our results show that the branching ratios of t{yields}cgg and t{yields}cbb could reach O(10{sup -3}) in the favorite parameter space of the littlest Higgs model with T-parity, which implies that these decays may be detectable at the LHC or ILC, while for the other decays, their rates are too small to be observable at the present or future colliders.

  3. Search for Rare Multi-Pion Decays of the Tau Lepton Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ter-Antonyan, Ruben

    2007-09-18

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to rare multi-pion final states is performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The analysis uses 232 fb-1 of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. In the search for the {tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay, we observe 10 events with an expected background of 6.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.4} events. In the absence of a signal, we calculate the decay branching ratio upper limit {beta}({tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. This is more than a factor of 30 improvement over the previously established limit. In addition, we search for the exclusive decay mode {tau}- {yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} with the further decay of {omega} {yields} {pi}-{pi}+{pi}{sup 0}. We observe 1 event, expecting 0.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4} background events, and calculate the upper limit {beta}{tau}-{yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This is the first upper limit for this mode.

  4. Search for the Rare Decay $B_s^0 \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prewitt, Michelle Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Results of the search for the rare decay B0 s → μ+μ- using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are presented. This analysis covers the full Run II data set, corresponding to approximately 10.4 fb-1 of integrated luminosity in p¯p collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The analysis used new variables and a multivariate technique to improve the background reduction. After seeing fewer events than expected from background, a new Tevatron best observed limit was set on the branching fraction of the decay at B(B0 s→ μ+μ-) < 15 x 10-9 (12 x 10-9) at the 95% (90%) C.L.

  5. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  6. A Search for the Rare Decay $B\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-02

    We report the result of a search for the rare decay B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} in 426 fb{sup -1} of data, corresponding to 226 million B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs, collected on the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider using the BABAR detector. We use a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield and observe 21{sub -12}{sup +13} signal events with a statistical signficance of 1.9 {sigma}. This corresponds to a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) = (1.7 {+-} 1.1(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -7}. Based on this result, we set a 90% confidence level upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -7}.

  7. Large $N$ approach to kaon decays and mixing 28 years later: $\\Delta I = 1/2$ rule, $\\hat B_K$ and $\\Delta M_K$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Gérard, Jean -Marc; Bardeen, William A.

    2014-05-20

    We review and update our results for K → π π decays and K⁰- K¯⁰ mixing obtained by us in the 1980s within an approach based on the dual representation of QCD as a theory of weakly interacting mesons for large N colours. In our analytic approach the dynamics behind the enhancement of ReA0 and suppression of ReA2, the so-called ΔI = 1/2 rule for K → π π decays, has a simple structure: the usual octet enhancement through quark-gluon renormalization group evolution down to the scales O(1 GeV) is continued as a meson evolution down to zero momentum scales at which the factorization of hadronic matrix elements is at work. The inclusion of lowest-lying vector meson contributions in addition to the pseudoscalar ones and of Wilson coefficients in a momentum scheme improves significantly the matching between quark-gluon and meson evolutions. In particular, the anomalous dimension matrix governing the meson evolution exhibits the structure of the known anomalous dimension matrix in the quark-gluon evolution. The recent results on ReA2 and ReA0 from the RBC-UKQC collaboration give support for our approach. In particular, the signs of the two main contractions found numerically by these authors follow uniquely from our analytic approach. At NLO in 1/N we obtain R = ReA0/ReA2= 16.0±1.5 which amounts to an order of magnitude enhancement over the strict large N limit value √2. QCD penguins contribute at 15% level to this result. We also find B^K = 0.73± 0.02, with the smallness of 1/N corrections to the large N value B^K = 3/4 resulting within our approach from an approximate cancellation between pseudoscalar and vector meson one-loop contributions. We summarize the status of ΔMK in this approach.

  8. Large $N$ approach to kaon decays and mixing 28 years later: $$\\Delta I = 1/2$$ rule, $$\\hat B_K$$ and $$\\Delta M_K$$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Gérard, Jean -Marc; Bardeen, William A.

    2014-05-20

    We review and update our results for K → π π decays and K⁰- K¯⁰ mixing obtained by us in the 1980s within an approach based on the dual representation of QCD as a theory of weakly interacting mesons for large N colours. In our analytic approach the dynamics behind the enhancement of ReA0 and suppression of ReA2, the so-called ΔI = 1/2 rule for K → π π decays, has a simple structure: the usual octet enhancement through quark-gluon renormalization group evolution down to the scales O(1 GeV) is continued as a meson evolution down to zero momentum scalesmore » at which the factorization of hadronic matrix elements is at work. The inclusion of lowest-lying vector meson contributions in addition to the pseudoscalar ones and of Wilson coefficients in a momentum scheme improves significantly the matching between quark-gluon and meson evolutions. In particular, the anomalous dimension matrix governing the meson evolution exhibits the structure of the known anomalous dimension matrix in the quark-gluon evolution. The recent results on ReA2 and ReA0 from the RBC-UKQC collaboration give support for our approach. In particular, the signs of the two main contractions found numerically by these authors follow uniquely from our analytic approach. At NLO in 1/N we obtain R = ReA0/ReA2= 16.0±1.5 which amounts to an order of magnitude enhancement over the strict large N limit value √2. QCD penguins contribute at 15% level to this result. We also find B^K = 0.73± 0.02, with the smallness of 1/N corrections to the large N value B^K = 3/4 resulting within our approach from an approximate cancellation between pseudoscalar and vector meson one-loop contributions. We summarize the status of ΔMK in this approach.« less

  9. Kaon Monitoring in MiniBooNE: The LMC Detector E. D. Zimmerman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kaon Monitoring in MiniBooNE: The LMC Detector E. D. Zimmerman University of Colorado NBI 2003 KEK, Tsukuba November 10, 2003 Kaon Monitoring at MiniBooNE 1) K-decay ν e background at BooNE K production estimates 2) Decay kinematics 3) The "Little Muon Counter" (LMC) Concept/Placement Civil construction/infrastructure Collimator Fiber Tracker Temporary detector Status K-decay ν e background MiniBooNE will see ~200-400 ν e from K + and K 0 L decays each year -- comparable to the

  10. A measurement of rare all-charged decays of the D[sup 0] meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C.J.

    1993-01-01

    A measurement of five rare decay of the D[sup 0] meson have been made and are presented here. The data for these measurements was obtained in Fermilab experiment E687, a photoproduction experiment with mean photon energy of 220 GeV. For the two body states the author measured the Branching Ratio ([pi][pi])/(K[pi]) of 0.045 [+-] 0.007 [+-] 0.008 (The first error is statistical the second systematic), and a Branching Ratio (KK)/(K[pi]) of 0.104 [+-] 0.007 [+-] 0.0045. A derivative of this gives the Branching Ratio (KK)/([pi][pi]) of 2.28 [+-] 0.38. The fourbody state give the following results: Branching Ratio ([pi][pi][pi][pi])/(K[pi][pi][pi]) of 0.103 [+-] 0.011 [+-] 0.016; Branching Ratio (KK[pi][pi])/(K[pi][pi][pi]) of 0.034 [+-] 0.004 [+-] 0.004; and Branching Ratio (KKK[pi])/([pi][pi][pi]) of 0.0047 [+-] 0.0017 [+-] 0.0017. Comparisons to previous experiments and the world average are also given.

  11. Rare top quark decays in Alternative Left-Right Symmetric Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2007-06-19

    We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t {yields} H0 + c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t {yields} c + {gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  12. Using NERSC Systems, Physicists Close In on a Rare-Particle Decay...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory experiment (EXO-200) has placed the most stringent constraints yet on the nature of a process called neutrinoless double beta decay. In doing so, the physicists have...

  13. Search for Rare Quark-Annihilation Decays, Charged B Mesons Decaying to Charged D(S) Mesons And Phi Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunha, J. Adam M.

    2008-01-16

    The authors report on a search for the decay B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*){+-}} {phi} using 212.2 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2004. This sample of 234 x 10{sup 6} e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events yields no significant signal. They report the Bayesian upper limits {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} {phi}) x {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {+-}}) < 8.6 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup {+-}}{phi}) x {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {+-}}) < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% C.L. Using the latest measurement of {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {+-}}), they report: {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}}{phi}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup {+-}}{phi}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -5} at the 90% C.L.

  14. Rare top quark and Higgs boson decays in alternative left-right symmetric models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O.G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L.G.

    2005-08-01

    Top quark and Higgs boson decays induced by flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNC) are very much suppressed in the standard model. Their detection in colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, Next Linear Collider, or Tevatron would be a signal of new physics. We evaluate the FCNC decays t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, t{yields}Z+c, and H{sup 0}{yields}t+c in the context of alternative left-right symmetric models with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; in this case, FCNC decays occur at tree level, and they are suppressed only by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks, which is poorly constrained by current experimental values. This provides the possibility for future colliders either to detect new physics or to improve present bounds on the parameters of the model.

  15. β-decay of neutron-rich Z∼60 nuclei and the origin of rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Nishimura, S.; Lorusso, G.; Baba, H.; Doornenbal, P.; Isobe, T.; Söderström, P. A.; Sakurai, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Browne, F.; Daido, R.; Fang, Y. F.; Yagi, A.; Nishibata, H.; Odahara, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Ideguchi, E.; Aoi, N.; Tanaka, M.; Collaboration: EURICA Collaboration; and others

    2014-05-02

    A large fraction of the rare-earth elements observed in the solar system is produced in the astrophysical rapid neutron capture process (r-process). However, current stellar models cannot completely explain the relative abundance of these elements partially because of nuclear physics uncertainties. To address this problem, a β-decay spectroscopy experiment was performed at RI Beam Factory (RIBF) at RIKEN, aimed at studying a wide range of very neutron-rich nuclei with Z∼60 that are progenitors of the rare-earth elements with mass number A∼460. The experiment provides a test of nuclear models as well as experimental inputs for r-process calculations. This contribution presents the experimental setup and some preliminary results of the experiment.

  16. Searches for K+ ---> pi+ gamma gamma, K+ ---> pi+ gamma, and pi0 ---> nu anti-nu in K+ decay at rest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    E949 is a high rate K{sup +} decay at rest experiment with the primary goal of determining |V{sub td}| via a measurement of the branching ratio of the ultra-rare charged kaon decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. The author reports here related limits from the decays K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma}{gamma}, K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{gamma} and {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} from an analysis of the full E949 dataset.

  17. Search for the rare decay Bs0→μ+μ-

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; et al

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay B0susing 6.1 fb-1 of pp⁻ collisions at collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B0scandidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limit on the branching fraction is B (B0s → μ⁺μ⁻) < 5.1 x 10-8 at the 95% C.L. This limit is a factor of 2.4 better than that of the previous D0 analysis and the best limit to date.

  18. Search for the rare decay Bs0→μ+μ-

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; et al

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay B0susing 6.1 fb-1 of pp⁻ collisions at collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B0scandidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limit on the branching fraction is B (B0s → μ⁺μ⁻) -8 at the 95% C.L. This limit is a factor of 2.4 better than that of the previous D0 analysis and the best limit to date.

  19. Bayesian analysis for kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsainy, T. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have investigated contribution of the nucleon resonances in the kaon photoproduction process by using an established statistical decision making method, i.e. the Bayesian method. This method does not only evaluate the model over its entire parameter space, but also takes the prior information and experimental data into account. The result indicates that certain resonances have larger probabilities to contribute to the process.

  20. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  1. Study of Rare B Meson Decays Related to the CKM Angle Beta at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, Keith; /Amherst Coll.

    2007-06-06

    This study reports measurements of the branching fractions of B meson decays to {eta}{prime}K{sup +}, {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}, {omega}{pi}{sup +}, {omega}K{sup +}, and {omega}K{sup 0}. Charge asymmetries are measured for the charged modes and the time-dependent CP-violation parameters S and C are measured for the neutral modes. The results are based on a data sample of 347 fb{sup -1} containing 383 million B{bar B} pairs recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Statistically significant signals are observed for all channels with the following results: B(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = (70.0{+-}1.5{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}) = (66.6{+-}2.6{+-}2.8)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}) = (6.7{+-}0.5{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6}, B(B{sup +} {yields} {omega}K{sup +}) = (6.3{+-}0.5{+-}0.3)x10-6, and B(B{sup 0} {yields} ?K0) = (5.6{+-}0.8{+-}0.3)x10-6, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We measure A{sub ch}({eta}{prime}K{sup +}) = +0.010{+-}0.022{+-}0.006, A{sub ch}({omega}{pi}{sup +}) = -0.02{+-}0.08{+-}0.01, A{sub ch}({omega}K{sup +}) = -0.01{+-}0.07{+-}0.01, S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.56{+-}0.12{+-}0.02, C{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.24 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.03, S{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = 0.62+0.25 -0.29 {+-} 0.02, and C{sub {omega}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} = -0.39+0.25 -0.24 {+-} 0.03. The result in S{sub {eta}{prime}K{sup 0}{sub S}} contributes to the published measurement from BABAR, which differs from zero by 5.5 standard deviations and is the first observation of mixing-induced CP-violation in a charmless B decay.

  2. CC Kaon Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CC Kaon Data Release Page Measurement of Charged Current muon neutrino production of K+ Phys. Rev. D 94, 012002 and hep-ex/1604.03920 Data Ancillary data files for this result are available on arXiv at http://arxiv.org/src/1604.03920/anc Among the available data files are: Cross Sections with Uncertainties Flux Covariance Matrix Covariance Matrix of flux uncertainties Covariance Matrix of uncertainties OTHER than those coming from the flux Contact Information For information on use of this

  3. Observation of the Decay K{sup +} yields P{sup +} v...

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwan, M.V.

    1999-05-21

    We have observed 1 event consistent with the signature expected of the rare decay of a positive kaon to a positive pion and a neutrino anti-neutrino pair. In the examined momentum region of 211 to 230 MeV/c in the center of mass of the kaon we estimated the backgrounds to be about 0.08 0.03 events. From this observation we estimate the branching ratio to be 4.2+9.7-3.5 x 10-10. In this presentation I will explain the experiment, and the analysis techniques. I will also discuss the expected improvements in the near future from the analysis of new data sets.

  4. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  5. Induced polarization of Lambda(1116) in kaon electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabrielyan, M.; Raue, B.A.; Carman, D.S.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K.P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M.J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Baturin, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Cao, T.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; ElFassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Goetz, J.T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C.A.; Mestayer, M.D.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J.W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2014-09-01

    We have measured the induced polarization of the ?(1116) in the reaction ep?e?K+?, detecting the scattered e? and K+ in the final state along with the proton from the decay ??p??.The present study used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), which allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in invariant energy W (1.6?W?2.7 GeV) and covered the full range of the kaon production angle at an average momentum transfer Q2=1.90 GeV2.In this experiment a 5.50 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. We have mapped out the W and kaon production angle dependencies of the induced polarization and found striking differences from photoproduction data over most of the kinematic range studied. However, we also found that the induced polarization is essentially Q2 independent in our kinematic domain, suggesting that somewhere below the Q2 covered here there must be a strong Q2 dependence. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables, these data are needed for the development of models, such as effective field theories, and as input to coupled-channel analyses that can provide evidence of previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  6. Strangeonium spectroscopy at the J//psi/: A comparison with kaon hadroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1989-08-01

    An experimental program to study strangeonium mesons produced in the decays of the J//psi/ at a /tau/-charm factory is compared with experiments on similar final states in kaon hadroproduction. The sample sizes and experimental performance required are discussed. The complementarity of different production modes and the importance of a broad programmatic approach to this physics are stressed. 21 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syukurilla, L. Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We have revisited the effect of hadronic form factors in kaon photoproduction process by utilizing an isobaric model developed for kaon photoproduction off the proton. The model is able to reproduce the available experimental data nicely as well as to reveal the origin of the second peak in the total cross section, which was the main source of confusion for decades. Different from our previous study, in the present work we explore the possibility of using different hadronic form factors in each of the K?N vertices. The use of different hadronic form factors, e.g. dipole, Gaussian, and generalized dipole, has been found to produce a more flexible isobar model, which can provide a significant improvement in the model.

  8. Observation of the rare $$B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-13

    The standard model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles and their interactions via the strong, electromagnetic and weak forces. It provides precise predictions for measurable quantities that can be tested experimentally. We foudn that the probabilities, or branching fractions, of the strange B meson (B 02 ) and the B0 meson decaying into two oppositely charged muons (μ+ and μ-) are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to theories that extend the standard model. The standard model predicts that the B 02 → μ+ and μ- and (B 0 → μ+ and μ- decays are very rare, with aboutmore » four of the former occurring for every billion mesons produced, and one of the latter occurring for every ten billion B0 mesons1. A difference in the observed branching fractions with respect to the predictions of the standard model would provide a direction in which the standard model should be extended. Before the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN2 started operating, no evidence for either decay mode had been found. Upper limits on the branching fractions were an order of magnitude above the standard model predictions. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) collaborations have performed a joint analysis of the data from proton–proton collisions that they collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of seven teraelectronvolts and in 2012 at eight teraelectronvolts. Here we report the first observation of the μ+ and μ-decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement so far of its branching fraction. We then obtained evidence for the B 0 → μ+ and μ- decay with a statistical significance of three standard deviations. Both measurements are statistically compatible with standard model predictions and allow stringent constraints to be placed on theories beyond the standard model. The LHC experiments will resume taking data in 2015, recording proton

  9. Observation of the rare $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-13

    The standard model of particle physics describes the fundamental particles and their interactions via the strong, electromagnetic and weak forces. It provides precise predictions for measurable quantities that can be tested experimentally. We foudn that the probabilities, or branching fractions, of the strange B meson (B 02 ) and the B0 meson decaying into two oppositely charged muons (μ+ and μ-) are especially interesting because of their sensitivity to theories that extend the standard model. The standard model predicts that the B 02 → μ+ and μ- and (B 0 → μ+ and μ- decays are very rare, with about four of the former occurring for every billion mesons produced, and one of the latter occurring for every ten billion B0 mesons1. A difference in the observed branching fractions with respect to the predictions of the standard model would provide a direction in which the standard model should be extended. Before the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN2 started operating, no evidence for either decay mode had been found. Upper limits on the branching fractions were an order of magnitude above the standard model predictions. The CMS (Compact Muon Solenoid) and LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) collaborations have performed a joint analysis of the data from proton–proton collisions that they collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of seven teraelectronvolts and in 2012 at eight teraelectronvolts. Here we report the first observation of the μ+ and μ-decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement so far of its branching fraction. We then obtained evidence for the B 0 → μ+ and μ- decay with a statistical significance of three standard deviations. Both measurements are statistically compatible with

  10. Two-pseudoscalar-meson decay of {chi}{sub cJ} with twist-3 corrections...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    After including the effects from the transverse momentum of light meson valence-quark state and Sudakov factors, the decay widths of the chisub cJ into pions or kaons are ...

  11. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in the Decay of a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a Long-Lived Neutral Kaon at BaBar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry in the Decay of a Neutral B Meson to a JPsi and a Long-Li...

  12. Measurements of Direct CP Violation, CPT Symmetry, and Other Parameters in the Neutral Kaon System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worcester, Elizabeth Turner; /Chicago U.

    2007-12-01

    The authors present precision measurements of the direct CP violation parameter, Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}), the kaon parameters, {Delta}m and {tau}{sub S}, and the CPT tests, {phi}{sub {+-}} and {Delta}{phi}, in neutral kaon decays. These results are based on the full dataset collected by the KTeV experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory during 1996, 1997, and 1999. This dataset contains {approx} 15 million K {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} decays and {approx} 69 million K {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays. They describe significant improvements to the precision of these measurements relative to previous KTeV analyses. They find Re({epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon}) = [19.2 {+-} 1.1(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst)] x 10{sup -4}, {Delta}m = (5265 {+-} 10) x 10{sup 6} hs{sup -1}, and {tau}{sub S} = (89.62 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -12} s. They measure {phi}{sub {+-}} = (44.09 {+-} 1.00){sup o} and {Delta}{phi} = (0.29 {+-} 0.31){sup o}; these results are consistent with CPT symmetry.

  13. Triple product asymmetries in Λb and Ξ0b decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2015-07-28

    In this study, the LHCb experiment is capable of studying four-body decays of the b-flavored baryons Λb and Ξ0b to charmless final states consisting of charged pions, kaons, and baryons. We remark on the search in such modes for CP-violating triple product asymmetries and for CP rate asymmetries relative to decays involving charmed baryons.

  14. Observation of the rare $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-13

    A joint measurement is presented of the branching fractions $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in proton-proton collisions at the LHC by the CMS and LHCb experiments. The data samples were collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and in 2012 at 8 TeV. The combined analysis produces the first observation of the $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement of its branching fraction so far, and three standard deviation evidence for the $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay. The measurements are statistically compatible with SM predictions and impose stringent constraints on several theories beyond the SM.

  15. Search for the Rare Decays B^+ -> mu^+ mu^- K^+, B^0 -> mu^+ mu^- K^*0(892), and B^0_s -> mu^+ mu^- phi at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    The authors search for b {yields} s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions in B meson (B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, or B{sub s}{sup 0}) decays with 924 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They find excesses with significances of 4.5, 2.9, and 2.4 standard deviations in the B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} decay modes, respectively. Using B {yields} J/{psi}h (h - K{sup +}, K*(892){sup 0}, {phi}) decays as normalization channels, they report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays as normalization channels, they report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}) = (0.59 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.04) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}) = (0.81 {+-} 0.30 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. These measurements are consistent with the world average results, and are competitive with the best available measurements. They set an upper limit on the relative branching fraction {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi})/{Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi}) < 2.6(2.3) x 10{sup -3} at the 95(90)% confidence level, which is the most stringent to date.

  16. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton) distribution amplitude (PDA) by projecting its Poincar-covariant BetheSalpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ? = 2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 1216% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3)-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on themoredifference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/F?=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5) inferred in e+e- annihilation at s=17 GeV2.less

  17. Charged Kaon Mass Measurement using the Cherenkov Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, N.; Lebedev, A.; Abrams, R.J.; Akgun, U.; Aydin, G.; Baker, W.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Bergfeld, T.; Beverly, L.; Bujak, A.; Carey, D.; /Fermilab /Virginia U. /Iowa U.

    2009-09-01

    The two most recent and precise measurements of the charged kaon mass use X-rays from kaonic atoms and report uncertainties of 14 ppm and 22 ppm yet differ from each other by 122 ppm. We describe the possibility of an independent mass measurement using the measurement of Cherenkov light from a narrow-band beam of kaons, pions, and protons. This technique was demonstrated using data taken opportunistically by the Main Injector Particle Production experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory which recorded beams of protons, kaons, and pions ranging in momentum from +37 GeV/c to +63 GeV/c. The measured value is 491.3 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which is within 1.4{sigma} of the world average. An improvement of two orders of magnitude in precision would make this technique useful for resolving the ambiguity in the X-ray data and may be achievable in a dedicated experiment.

  18. Search for the rare decays KL→π⁰π⁰µ⁺µ⁻ and KL→π⁰π⁰X⁰→ π⁰π⁰µ⁺µ⁻

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abouzaid, E.; Arenton, M.; Barker, A. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G. J.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M. D.; Cox, B.; et al

    2011-11-09

    The KTeV E799 experiment has conducted a search for the rare decays KL→π0π0µ+µ- and KL→π0π0X0→ π0π0µ+µ-, where the X0 is a possible new neutral boson that was reported by the HyperCP experiment with a mass of (214.3 ± 0.5) MeV/c2. We find no evidence for either decay. We obtain upper limits of Br(KL→π0π0X0 →π0π0µ+µ-) < 1.0 x 10-10 and Br(KL→ π0π0µ+µ-) < 9.2 x 10-11 at the 90% confidence level. This result rules out the pseudoscalar X0 as an explanation of the HyperCP result under the scenario that the d¯sX0 coupling is completely real.

  19. Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    staggered fermions | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Kaon semileptonic vector form factor and determination of |Vus| using staggered fermions Authors: A. Bazavov, C. Bernard, C. M. Bouchard, C. DeTar, Daping Du, A. X. El-Khadra, J. Foley, E. D. Freeland6, E. Gámiz, Steven Gottlieb, U. M. Heller, Jongjeong Kim, A. S. Kronfeld, J. Laiho, L. Levkova, P. B. Mackenzie, E. T. Neil, M. B. Oktay, Si-Wei Qiu, J. N. Simone, R. Sugar, D. Toussaint, R. S. Van de Water, Ran Zhou Using staggered

  20. Collins and Sivers asymmetries in muonproduction of pions and kaons off transversely polarised protons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Measurements of the Collins and Sivers asymmetries for charged pions and charged and neutral kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of high energy muons off transversely polarised protons are presented. The results were obtained using all the available COMPASS proton data, which were taken in the years 2007 and 2010. The Collins asymmetries exhibit in the valence region a non-zero signal for pions and there are hints of non-zero signal also for kaons. The Sivers asymmetries are found to be positive for positive pions and kaons and compatible with zero otherwise.

  1. Tests of non-local interferences in kaon physics at asymmetric [phi]-factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1993-04-16

    Tests of non-local interference effects in the two-kaon system are proposed. The first kind of tests consists of measuring the amount of destructive interference between K[sub S] [yields] K[sub L] regeneration processes of two distant kaons. The second kind deals with constructive interference. These tests could be performed at an asymmetric [phi]-factory. Estimates are given of the number of events predicted by orthodox quantum mechanics and kaon regeneration theory in various suitable experimental conditions. The impact on local theories if the predictions of quantum mechanics hold is discussed.

  2. Tests of non-local interferences in kaon physics at asymmetric {phi}-factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberhard, P.H.

    1993-04-16

    Tests of non-local interference effects in the two-kaon system are proposed. The first kind of tests consists of measuring the amount of destructive interference between K{sub S} {yields} K{sub L} regeneration processes of two distant kaons. The second kind deals with constructive interference. These tests could be performed at an asymmetric {phi}-factory. Estimates are given of the number of events predicted by orthodox quantum mechanics and kaon regeneration theory in various suitable experimental conditions. The impact on local theories if the predictions of quantum mechanics hold is discussed.

  3. High intensity beam operation of the Brookhaven AGS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    operated at record proton intensities. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of several high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam ...

  4. Kaon and pion femtoscopy at the highest energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in a hydrokinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpenko, Iu. A.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2010-05-15

    The hydrokinetic approach that incorporates hydrodynamic expansion of the systems formed in A+A collisions and their dynamical decoupling is applied to restore the initial conditions and space-time picture of the matter evolution in central Au+Au collisions at the top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energy. The analysis is based on the detailed reproduction of the pion and kaon momentum spectra and femtoscopic data in whole interval of the transverse momenta studied by both the STAR and the PHENIX collaborations. The fitting procedure utilizes the two parameters: the maximal energy density at supposed thermalization time 1 fm/c and the strength of the prethermal flows developed to this time. The quark-gluon plasma and hadronic gas is supposed to be in complete local equilibrium above the chemical freeze-out temperature T{sub ch}=165 MeV with the equation of states (EoS) at high temperatures as in the lattice QCD. Below T{sub ch} the EoS in the expanding and gradually decoupling fluid depends on the composition of the hadron-resonance gas at each space-time point and accounts for decays of resonances into the nonequilibrated medium. A good description of the pion and kaon transverse momentum spectra and interferometry radii is reached at both used initial energy density profiles motivated by the Glauber and color glass condensate models, however, at different initial energy densities. The discussion as for the approximate pion and kaon m{sub T} scaling for the interferometry radii is based on a comparison of the emission functions for these particles.

  5. Double Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanal, Vandana [Dept. of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2011-11-23

    At present, neutrinoless double beta decay is perhaps the only experiment that can tell us whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle. Given the significance of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}, there is a widespread interest for these rare event studies employing a variety of novel techniques. This paper describes the current status of DBD experiments. The Indian effort for an underground NDBD experiment at the upcoming INO laboratory is also presented.

  6. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  7. Photoproduction and Decay of Light Mesons in CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaryan, Moskov Jamalovich

    2013-08-01

    We present preliminary experimental results on photoproduction and decay of light mesons measured with CLAS setup at JLAB . This include Dalitz decay of pseudoscalar and vector mesons, radiative decay of pseudoscalar mesons as well hadronic decays of pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The collected high statistics in some of decay channels exceeds the world data by an order of magnitude and some other decay modes are observed for the first time. It is shown how the CLAS data will improve the world data on transition form factors of light mesons, Dalitz plot analyses, branching ratios of rare decay modes and other fundamental properties potentially accessible through the light meson decays.

  8. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  9. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie; /Vrije U., Amsterdam

    2011-11-28

    measurement of this angle. However, the low expected branching fraction for the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay channels could severely impact the measurement. A prerequisite of the measurement of the CKM angle is the observation of the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay on which this thesis reports. The BABAR experiment consists of the BABAR detector and the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The design of the experiment has been optimized for the study of CP violation in the decays of neutral B mesons but is also highly suitable for the search for rare B decays such as the B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup (*)-} a{sub 0}{sup +} decay. The PEP-II collider operates at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance and is a clean source of B{bar B} meson pairs.

  10. Study of B Meson Decays with Excited eta and eta-prime Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /Energy Sci. Network /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-04-18

    Using 383 million B{bar B} pairs from the BABAR data sample, they report results for branching fractions of six charged B-meson decay modes, where a charged kaon recoils against a charmless resonance decaying to K{bar K}* or {eta}{pi}{pi} final states with mass in the range (1.2-1.8) GeV/c{sup 2}. They observe a significant enhancement at the low K{bar K}* invariant mass which is interpreted as B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1475)K{sup +}, find evidence for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1295)K{sup +}, and place upper limits on the decays B{sup +} {yields} {eta}(1405)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285)K{sup +}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 1}(1420)K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields} {phi}(1680)K{sup +}.

  11. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays BK(*)+-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-01

    In a sample of 471×106 BB¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)ℓ+-, where ℓ+- is either e+e- or μ+μ-. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  12. D meson hadronic decays at CLEO-c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; /Fermilab

    2011-01-01

    The recent CLEO-c results on hadronic decays of D and D{sub s} mesons are presented. First the absolute branching fractions for D and D{sub s} mesons using a double tag technique are discussed, then are the Cabibbo suppressed decays and doubly Cabibbo suppressed decays. Finally, I present the inclusive and rare decay modes and other measurements from CLEO-c. These decays illuminate a wide range of physics. A brief theoretical introduction is given before the corresponding discussion on measurement.

  13. Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the Σ+(1385)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keller, D.; Hicks, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the Σ*+(1385) from the reaction γp → K0 Σ*+(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and Σ* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 ± 56.9(stat)-41.2+34.3(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representationmore » yields predictions for the Σ*+(1385) → Σ+γ and Σ*0(1385) → Λγ partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.« less

  14. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore »dependence of the oscillations.« less

  15. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-mass dependence of the oscillations.

  16. Systematic study of charged-pion and kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adare, A.

    2015-09-23

    We present a systematic study of charged pion and kaon interferometry in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV. The kaon mean source radii are found to be larger than pion radii in the outward and longitudinal directions for the same transverse mass; this difference increases for more central collisions. The azimuthal-angle dependence of the radii was measured with respect to the second-order event plane and similar oscillations of the source radii were found for pions and kaons. Hydrodynamic models qualitatively describe the similar oscillations of the mean source radii for pions and kaons, but they do not fully describe the transverse-massmore » dependence of the oscillations.« less

  17. Baryon helicity in B decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2005-05-13

    We extend the perturbative argument of helicity amplitudes to the two-body baryonic decays of B decays.

  18. Study of the Rare Decay B Mesons Decaying to X Mesons Positive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    +- or Ksub s and up to two pions, with at most one pisup 0. They observe a signal of 40 +- 10(stat) +- 2(syst) events and extract a branching fraction Beta(B...

  19. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monorchio, Diego; /INFN, Naples /Naples U.

    2011-09-13

    The authors will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)} {nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be payed in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment where to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  20. Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baracchini, Elisabetta; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2011-11-10

    We will present the most recent results on leptonic B decays B{sup {+-}(0)} {yields} K*{sup {+-}(0)}{nu}{bar {nu}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}, based on the data collected by the BaBar detector at PEP-II, an asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the center of mass energy of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. Rare B decays have always been a standard probe for New Physics (NP) searches. The very low Standard Model (SM) rate of these decays often make them unaccessible with the present experimental datasets, unless NP effects enhance the rate up to the current experimental sensitivity. Moreover, as NP effects can modify the decay kinematic, particular attention must be paid in order to perform a model independent analysis. A B-Factory provides an unique environment to investigate these processes. The high number of B{bar B} pairs produced by a B-Factory often allows to approach the needed experimental sensitivity. Moreover, the clean environment and the closed kinematic of the initial state enable to obtaining a very pure sample where to look for these decays.

  1. Unquenched determination of the kaon parameter B{sub K} from improved staggered fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamiz, Elvira; Collins, Sara; Davies, Christine T.H.; Lepage, G. Peter; Shigemitsu, Junko; Wingate, Matthew

    2006-06-01

    The use of improved staggered actions (HYP, Asqtad) has been proved to reduce the scaling corrections that affected previous calculations of B{sub K} with unimproved (standard) staggered fermions in the quenched approximation. This improved behavior allows us to perform a reliable calculation of B{sub K} including quark vacuum polarization effects, using the MILC configurations with n{sub f}=2+1 flavors of sea fermions. We perform such a calculation for a single lattice spacing, a=0.125 fm, and with kaons made up of degenerate quarks with m{sub s}/2. The valence strange quark mass m{sub s} is fixed to its physical value and we use two different values of the light sea quark masses. After a chiral extrapolation of the results to the physical value of the sea quark masses, we find B-circumflex{sub K}=0.83{+-}0.18, where the error is dominated by the uncertainty in the lattice to continuum matching at O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 2}). The matching will need to be improved to get the precision needed to make full use of the experimental data on {epsilon}{sub K} to constrain the unitarity triangle.

  2. Proposed Fermilab fixed target experiment: Kaons at the Tevatron. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0898, evaluating the impacts associated with the proposed fixed target experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Femilab) in Batavia, Illinois, known as Kaons at the Tevatron (KTeV). The proposed KTeV project includes reconfiguration of an existing target station, enhancement of an existing beam transport system connected to existing utility facilities, and construction of a new experimental detector hall area. The study of the K meson, a type of subatomic particle, has been going on at Fermilab for 20 years. The proposed KTEV project advances the search for the origins of a violation of a fundamental symmetry of nature called charge parity (CP) violation. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  3. The Neutral kaon mixing parameter B(K) from unquenched mixed-action lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Aubin, Jack Laiho, Ruth S. Van de Water

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the neutral kaon mixing parameter B{sub K} in unquenched lattice QCD using asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks and domain-wall valence quarks. We use the '2+1' flavor gauge configurations generated by the MILC Collaboration, and simulate with multiple valence and sea quark masses at two lattice spacings of a {approx} 0.12 fm and a {approx} 0.09 fm. We match the lattice determination of B{sub K} to the continuum value using the nonperturbative method of Rome-Southampton, and extrapolate B{sub K} to the continuum and physical quark masses using mixed action chiral perturbation theory. The 'mixed-action' method enables us to control all sources of systematic uncertainty and therefore to precisely determine B{sub K}; we find a value of B{sub K}{sup {ovr MS},NDR} (2 GeV) = 0.527(6)(21), where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic.

  4. Recent BaBar Results on $B$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, P.J.; /Edinburgh U.

    2011-11-15

    Several recent key results from the BABAR experiment are presented, most using 383.6 fb{sup -1} of data. In particular, the search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, inclusive and exclusive measurements of |V{sub ub}|, measurements of b {yields} d{gamma} decays and new observations of rare charmless hadronic decays. The new results provide important experimental constraints on the Standard Model and new physics models. Keywords: B decays; flavor; leptonic; semi-leptonic, radiative, hadronic.

  5. Rare Earth Elements Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Elements Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal By-Products logo. Download the 2016 Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal By-Products Project Portfolio Rare Earth ...

  6. Facility for Rare Isotope Beams: The Journey Has Begun on DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... rare that they can't be found naturally on earth. Instead, they're created in extreme conditions such as the centers of exploding supernovae. These isotopes decay into the elements ...

  7. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and {nu}-Mass Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedretti, M. [Universita dell Insubria, Via Vallegio 11, 22100 Como (Italy)

    2005-10-12

    The search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay could improve our knowledge on neutrino properties. After a brief discussion on the implications of the observation of this rare process, I will introduce the experimental approaches and review the prospects of the search for this nuclear transition.

  8. A rare opportunity beckons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, K

    2011-02-01

    There is a great deal of uncertainty for the future of rare-earth production. Rare-earths are a collection of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, which include scandium and yttrium as well as the 15 lanthanides, such as dysprosium and ytterbium. China has a stranglehold on today's rare-earth market, which was worth about $3bn in 2010, with the country accounting for about 95% of worldwide production. Yet China's future actions can only be guessed at best. In September it halted shipments of rare-earth elements to Japan over a diplomatic spat concerning the detention of a Chinese trawler captain. Although the ban was later lifted, the episode raised concerns around the world about China's rare-earth monopoly and its use in diplomacy. China has already warned that it will not export any rare-earth material in the coming years as it expects its own consumption of rare-earth metals to increase. The country has introduced export taxes as well as production and export quotas, and also refused to grant any new rare-earth mining licences. Furthermore, because its reserves are limited and China's internal markets are growing so rapidly, the country has suggested it will no longer export products that require rare-earth elements, especially those that need heavy rare-earth elements, such as terbium and dysprosium. China's actions have led to huge rises in the cost of rare-earth materials and products. Dysprosium oxide, for example, has shot up from $36 per kilogram in 2005 to a massive $305 per kilogram by late last year. This could have a huge impact on much of today's electronics industry, given that rare-earth elements are ubiquitous in electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) and mobile phones. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, for example, are used as computer spindle drives. The question is: what can be done to ensure that China's dominance of the rare-earth industry does not affect the military and energy security of the US

  9. Rare earth gas laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-10-31

    A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

  10. Probing new gauge-boson couplings via three-body decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G. )

    1993-06-01

    We examine the possibility of using rare, three-body decays of a new neutral gauge boson [ital Z][sub 2] to probe its gauge couplings at hadron colliders. Specifically, we study the decays [ital Z][sub 2][r arrow][ital Wl][nu] and [ital Z][sub 2][r arrow][ital Z][nu][bar [nu

  11. -delayed ?-proton decay in ??Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Cceres, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Fujita, H.; Ganio?lu, E.; Gerbaux, M.; Kozer, H. C.; Kucuk, L.; Kurtukian-Nieto, T.; Popescu, L.; Rogers, A. M.; Susoy, G.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Thomas, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ? decay of the proton-rich Tz = 2 nucleus ??Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, ?-de-layed ?-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  12. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Y X; Wang, Y; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; et al

    2014-11-01

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

  13. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y X; Wang, Y; Allada, K; Aniol, K; Annand, J R; Averett, T; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Bradshaw, P C; Bosted, P; Camsonne, A; Canan, M; Cates, G D; Chen, C; Chen, J -P; Chen, W; Chirapatpimol, K; Chudakov, E; Cisbani, E; Cornejo, J C; Cusanno, F; Dalton, M M; Deconinck, W; de Jager, C W; De Leo, R; Deng, X; Deur, A; Ding, H; Dolph, P A; Dutta, C; Dutta, D; El Fassi, L; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Golge, S; Guo, L; Hamilton, D; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Huang, M; Ibrahim, H F; Iodice, M; Jiang, X; Jin, G; Jones, M K; Katich, J; Kelleher, A; Kim, W; Kolarkar, A; Korsch, W; LeRose, J J; Li, X; Li, Y; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Lu, H -J; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; McNulty, D; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Munoz Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Narayan, A; Nelyubin, V; Norum, B; Oh, Y; Osipenko, M; Parno, D; Peng, J -C; Phillips, S K; Posik, M; Puckett, A J; Qian, X; Qiang, Y; Rakhman, A; Ransome, R; Riordan, S; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Schulte, E; Shahinyan, A; Shabestari, M H; Sirca, S; Stepanyan, S; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Tang, L -G; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Vilardi, I; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Yan, X; Yao, H; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yuan, L; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L; Zhu, X; Zong, X

    2014-11-01

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1

  14. Dark matter searches for monoenergetic neutrinos arising from stopped meson decay in the Sun

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rott, Carsten; In, Seongjin; Kumar, Jason; Yaylali, David

    2015-11-24

    Dark matter can be gravitationally captured by the Sun after scattering off solar nuclei. Annihilations of the dark matter trapped and accumulated in the centre of the Sun could result in one of the most detectable and recognizable signals for dark matter. Searches for high-energy neutrinos produced in the decay of annihilation products have yielded extremely competitive constraints on the spin-dependent scattering cross sections of dark matter with nuclei. Recently, the low energy neutrino signal arising from dark-matter annihilation to quarks which then hadronize and shower has been suggested as a competitive and complementary search strategy. These high-multiplicity hadronic showers give rise to a large amount of pions which will come to rest in the Sun and decay, leading to a unique sub-GeV neutrino signal. We here improve on previous works by considering the monoenergetic neutrino signal arising from both pion and kaon decay. We consider searches at liquid scintillation, liquid argon, and water Cherenkov detectors and find very competitive sensitivities for few-GeV dark matter masses.

  15. Measurements of CP asymmetries and branching fractions of two-body charmless decays of B^0 and B^0_s mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morello, Michael Joseph; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2007-12-01

    The thesis is organized as follows: Chapter 1 describes the theoretical framework of non-leptonic B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} H{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays, with a simple overview of the CP violation mechanism within the Standard Model and of the most used phenomenological approaches in the evaluation of strong interaction contributions. The chapter contains also a review of the theoretical expectations and the current experimental measurements along with a discussion about the importance of studying such decays. Chapter 2 contains a general description of the Tevatron collider and of the CDF II detector. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the data sample used for the measurement and the method used in extracting the signal from the background. Particular attention is dedicated to the on-line trigger selection, which is crucial to collect a sample enriched in B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} decays. Chapter 4 shows how the information from kinematics and particle identification was used to achieve a statistical discrimination amongst modes to extract individual measurements. The available resolutions in mass or in particle identification are separately insufficient for an event-by-event separation of B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} modes. The choice of observables and the technique used to combine them is an important and innovative aspect of the analysis described in this thesis. Chapter 5 is devoted to the accurate determination of the invariant mass lineshape. This is a crucial ingredient for resolving overlapping mass peaks. This chapter details all resolution effects with particular attention at the tails due to the emission of low-energy photons from charged kaons and pions in the final state (FSR). For the first time the effect of FSR has been accurately accounted for in a CDF analysis. Chapter 6 describes how kinematic and PID information, discussed in chap. 4 and chap. 5 were combined in a maximum Likelihood fit

  16. B Decays Involving Light Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschrich, Ivo Gough; /UC, Irvine

    2007-01-09

    Recent BABAR results for decays of B-mesons to combinations of non-charm mesons are presented. This includes B decays to two vector mesons, B {yields} {eta}{prime}({pi}, K, {rho}) modes, and a comprehensive Dalitz Plot analysis of B {yields} KKK decays.

  17. {phi} meson radiative decays to {eta} and {eta}'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosino, F.

    2006-02-11

    We present recent results from KLOE on the dynamics of {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi} decays, as well as searches for rare {eta} decays, including a new determination of the {eta} {yields} {pi}0{gamma}{gamma} Branching Ratio. We also present a preliminary result on the ratio BR({phi} {yields} {eta}'{gamma})/BR({phi} {yields} {eta}{gamma}), a quantity related to the {eta} - {eta}' mixing and the gluonium content of the {eta}'. All results are obtained from the analysis of 450 pb-1 integrated luminosity from 2001-2002 runs.

  18. Hyperon radiative decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaxiras, Efthimios; Moniz, Ernest J.; Soyeur, Madeleine

    1985-08-01

    The radiative decay widths of the low-lying strange baryons are calculated both within the relativistic quark bag model and the nonrelativistic potential model. These widths are found to depend sensitively upon the quark-model dynamics through multiplet mixing and q4q-bar admixtures. The comparison between our calculated results and the very limited experimental data is discussed.

  19. Radioactive decay data tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  20. 2016 Rare Earth Elements Workshop Accelerating Rare Earth Element...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Elements Workshop Accelerating Rare Earth Element Recovery from U.S. Domestic Sources of Coal and Coal By-Products August 8-9, 2016 Hosted by: Dr. Cynthia Powell Acting ...

  1. ß-delayed γ-proton decay in ⁵⁶Zn: Analysis of the charged-particle spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orrigo, S. E.A.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Blank, B.; Gelletly, W.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Ascher, P.; Bilgier, B.; Cáceres, L.; et al

    2015-01-01

    A study of the β decay of the proton-rich Tz = –2 nucleus ⁵⁶Zn has been reported in a recent publication. A rare and exotic decay mode, β-de-layed γ-proton decay, has been observed there for the first time in the fp shell. Here, we expand on some of the details of the data analysis, focusing on the charged particle spectrum.

  2. Does the photino decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, L.J.

    1986-08-29

    The stability of the lightest superpartner is a crucial aspect of many experimental searches for supersymmetry and of supersymmetric dark matter candidates. It is shown that R parity may occur in operators of dimension four or less as an accidental consequence of an exact Z/sub N/ symmetry. In this case the lightest superpartner can decay via higher dimension operators. The lifetime depends on the scale of the new physics responsible for the non-renormalizable operators; it could be anywhere in the region 10/sup -20/ seconds to 10/sup +20/ seconds. Explicit examples are given. 12 refs.

  3. Observation of the Rare Decay B+ \\to K+pi0pi0 and Measurement of the Quasi-two Body Contributions B+ \\to K*(892)+pi0, B+ \\to f0(980)K+ and B+ \\to chic0K+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-12-13

    We report an analysis of charmless hadronic decays of charged B mesons to the final state K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, using a data sample of (470.9 {+-} 2.8) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected with the BABAR detector at the {Gamma}(4S) resonance. We observe an excess of signal events, with a significance above 10 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties, and measure the branching fraction and CP asymmetry to be {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = (16.2 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 1.5) x 10{sup -6} and A{sub CP}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = -0.06 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. Additionally, we study the contributions of the B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}(892){sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup +} {yields} f{sub 0}(980)K{sup +}, and B{sup +} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}K{sup +} quasi-two-body decays. We report the world's best measurements of the branching fraction and CP asymmetry of the B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} and B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}(892){sup +}{pi}{sup 0} channels.

  4. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  5. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  6. Rare Earth Metals & Alloys | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Metals & Alloys Quantities of high-purity rare earth metals and alloys in ... storage, cutting and cleaning and SDS information for the rare earth elements (metals).

  7. Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thron, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    The Soudan 2 nucleon decay experiment consists of a 1.1 Kton fine grained iron tracking calorimeter. It has a very isotropic detection structure which along with its flexible trigger will allow detection of multiparticle and neutrino proton decay modes. The detector has now entered its construction stage.

  8. Experiments with the High Resolution Kaon Spectrometer at Jlab Hall C and the New Spectroscopy of ^12_Lambda B Hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Liguang; Chen, Chunhua; Gogami, Toshiyuki; Kawama, Daisuke; Han, Yuncheng; Yuan, Lulin; Matsumura, Akihiko; Okayasu, Yuichi; Seva, Tomislav; Rodriguez, Victor; Baturin, Pavlo; Acha Quimper, Armando; Achenbach, Carsten; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Androic, Darko; Asaturyan, Arshak; Asaturyan, Razmik; Ates, Ozgur; Badui, Rafael; Baker, Oliver; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Boeglin, Werner; Bono, Jason; Bosted, Peter; Brash, Edward; Carter, Philip; Carlini, Roger; Chiba, Atsushi; Christy, Michael; Cole, Leon; Dalton, Mark; Danagoulian, Samuel; Daniel, Aji; De Leo, Raffaele; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Doi, Daisuke; Egiyan, Kim; Elaasar, Mostafa; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Fujii, Yu; Furic, Miroslav; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gasparian, Ashot; Gibson, Edward; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Honda, D.; Horn, Tanja; Hu, Bitao; Hungerford, Ed; Jayalath, Chandana; Jones, Mark; Johnston, Kathleen; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kanda, Hiroki; Kaneta, M.; Kato, F.; Kato, Seigo; Kawai, Masaharu; Keppel, Cynthia; Khanal, Hari; Kohl, M.; Kramer, Laird; Lan, Kejian; Li, Ya; Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha; Luo, Wei; Mack, David; Maeda, Kazushige; Malace, Simona; Margaryan, Amur; Marikyan, Gagik; Markowitz, Pete; Maruta, Tomofumi; Maruyama, Nayuta; Maxwell, Victor; Millener, David; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Mkrtchyan, Arthur; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Motoba, Toshio; Nagao, Sho; Nakamura, Satoshi; Narayan, Amrendra; Neville, Casey; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria; Nunez, Angel; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Nomura, Hiroshi; Nonaka, Kenichi; Ohtani, Atsushi; Oyamada, Masamichi; Perez, Naipy; Petkovic, Tomislav; Pochodzalla, J.; Qiu, Xiyu; Randeniya, Kapugodage; Raue, Brian; Reinhold, Joerg; Rivera, R.; Roche, Julie; Samanta, Chhanda; Sato, Yoshinori; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segbefia, Edwin; Schott, Diane; Shichijo, Ayako; Simicevic, Neven; Smith, Gregory; Song, Yushou; Sumihama, Mizuki; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Taniya, Naotaka; Tsukada, Kyo; Tvaskis, Vladas; Veilleux, Micah; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Yamamoto, Taku; Yan, Chen; Ye, Z.; Yokota, Kosuke; Zhamkochyan, Simon; Zhu, Lingyan

    2014-09-01

    Since the pioneering experiment, E89-009 studying hypernuclear spectroscopy using the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction was completed, two additional experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, were performed at Jefferson Lab. These later experiments used a modified experimental design, the "Tilt Method", to dramatically suppress the large electromagnetic background, and allowed for a substantial increase in luminosity. Additionally, a new kaon spectrometer, HKS (E01-011), a new electron spectrometer, HES, and a new splitting magnet were added to produce precision, high-resolution hypernuclear spectroscopy. These two experiments, E01-011 and E05-115, resulted in two new data sets, producing sub-MeV energy resolution in the spectra of ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{28}_{\\Lambda} \\text{Al}$ and ${}^{7}_{\\Lambda}\\text{He}$, ${}^{10}_{\\Lambda}\\text{Be}$, ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ and ${}^{52}_{\\Lambda}\\text{V}$. All three experiments obtained a ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$, spectrum, which is the most characteristic $p$-shell hypernucleus and is commonly used for calibration. Independent analyses of these different experiments demonstrate excellent consistency and provide the clearest level structure to date of this hypernucleus as produced by the $(e,e^{\\prime}K^+)$ reaction. This paper presents details of these experiments, and the extraction and analysis of the observed ${}^{12}_{\\Lambda}\\text{B}$ spectrum.

  9. Direct CP Violation, Branching Ratios and Form Factors B --> pi, B --> K in B decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. Leitner; X.-H. Guo; A.W. Thomas

    2004-11-01

    The B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K transitions involved in hadronic B decays are investigated in a phenomenological way through the framework of QCD factorization. By comparing our results with experimental branching ratios from the BELLE, BABAR and CLEO collaborations for all the B decays including either a pion or a kaon, we propose boundaries for the transition form factors B {yields} {pi} and B {yields} K depending on the CKM matrix element parameters {rho} and {eta}. From this analysis, the form factors required to reproduce the experimental data for branching ratios are F{sup B {yields} {pi}} = 0.31 {+-} 0.12 and F{sup B {yields} K} = 0.37 {+-} 0.13. We calculate the direct CP violating asymmetry parameter, a{sub CP}, for B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi} and B {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} K decays, in the case where {rho} - {omega} mixing effects are taken into account. Based on these results, we find that the direct CP asymmetry for B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, B{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {bar K}{sup 0}, reaches its maximum when the invariant mass {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} is in the vicinity of the {omega} meson mass. The inclusion of {rho} - {omega} mixing provides an opportunity to erase, without ambiguity, the phase uncertainty mod{pi} in the determination of th CKM angles {alpha} in case of b {yields} u and {gamma} in case of b {yields} s.

  10. DOSIMETRY; RADIOISOTOPES; DECAY; ACCURACY; DATA COMPILATION;...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radioactive decay data tables Kocher, D.C. 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; RADIOISOTOPES; DECAY; ACCURACY; DATA COMPILATION; DOSIMETRY; M CODES; COMPUTER CODES; DATA;...

  11. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  12. The decay of hot nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-11-01

    The formation of hot compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions is discussed. The statistical decay of such compound nuclei is responsible for the abundant emission of complex fragments and high energy gamma rays. 43 refs., 23 figs.

  13. Study of the Rare Decay B Mesons Decaying to X Mesons Positive And Negative Leptons at BABAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koptchev, Ventzislav B.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2005-08-30

    Flavor-changing neutral current transitions are forbidden at tree level in the Standard Model and can only occur via higher order diagrams. Since the amplitudes for such loops are dominated by the heaviest known particles, and non-SM effects are expected to contribute at the same order as the SM, such processes are an ideal place to look for new physics. We present a measurement of the inclusive branching fraction for the flavor-changing neutral current process B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} with a sample of 81.9 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The final state is reconstructed from e{sup +}e{sup -} or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} pairs and a hadronic system consisting of one K{sup {+-}} or K{sub s} and up to two pions, with at most one {pi}{sup 0}. They observe a signal of 40 {+-} 10(stat) {+-} 2(syst) events and extract a branching fraction {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}) = (5.6 {+-} 1.5(stat) {+-} 0.6(exp. syst) {+-} 1.1(model syst)) x 10{sup -6} for m{sub ll} > 0.2 GeV.

  14. Measurement of CP Violation in B Anti-B Mixing on the Recoil of Partially Reconstructed Anti-B0 to D* L- Anti-Nu/L Using Kaon Tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaz, Alessandro

    2011-11-16

    of reach of current experiments, but several New Physics models contain new particles and couplings which can enhance it up to detectable levels. In this thesis we search for CP-violation in Bd - $\\bar{B}$d mixing at the BABAR experiment. We reconstruct one of the two B mesons produced at the PEP-II electromagnetic collider using the partial reconstruction technique, while the flavor of the other B is inferred by the charge of a kaon identified among its decay products. Given the smallness of the physical asymmetry we want to measure, a crucial aspect of this analysis is the control of spurious charge asymmetries arising from the interaction of particles with the detector material. We accomplish this by using a control sample of charged kaons on the same data we use in our analysis. After a brief introduction of the theoretical framework and the phenomenology of the decays of B mesons at a B-factory (chapters 1 and 2), we will review in chapter 3 the current experimental results on this topic. We will then describe the characteristics of the collider and the experimental apparatus (chapter 4) used to perform our measurement. The available dataset and the event pre-selection techniques are treated in chapter 5, while the analysis method is discussed in detail in the following one. In chapters 7 and 8 the definitions of the probability density functions used to model each component of our sample are given and then they are tested in samples of simulated data. Toy and reweighted Monte Carlo data are used in chapter 9 to test the sensitivity of our fitting procedure to the physical parameters related to CP violation; chapter 10 discusses the possibility of modeling some of the components of our sample directly on the data. Finally the fit on the real data sample is described in chapter 11 and the treatment of systematic uncertainties is done in chapter 12, while the final result is given in chapter 13.

  15. Search for CP Violation in B0 - B¯0 Mixing Using Partial Reconstruction of B0D*-X+ν and a Kaon Tag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present results of a search for CP violation in B0-B¯0 mixing with the BABAR detector. We select a sample of B0→D*-Xℓ+ν decays with a partial reconstruction method and use kaon tagging to assess the flavor of the other B meson in the event. We determine the CP violating asymmetry ACP≡[N(B0B0)-N(B¯00)]/[N(B0B0)+N(B¯00)]=(0.06±0.17+0.38-0.32)%, corresponding to ΔCP=1-|q/p|=(0.29±0.84+1.88-1.61)×10-3.

  16. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, III, F. T.; Barabash, A.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, Mark D.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Williams, T.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta (ββ (0ν)) decay of the isotope 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. TheDemonstrator is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the SanfordUnderground Research Facility in Lead, SouthDakota. The array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the Demonstrator and the details of its design.

  17. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Combs, Dustin C.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Goett, J.; Green, M.; Gruszko, J.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusev, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Hegai, A.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Martin, R. D.; Mertens, S.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Pushkin, K.; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shanks, B.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Snyder, N.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Suriano, Anne-Marie; Thompson, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vasilyev, Sergey; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; White, Brandon R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Williams, T.; Xu, W.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-06-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR will search for the neutrinoless double-beta (ββ(0ν)) decay of the isotope 76Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The DEMONSTRATOR is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the DEMONSTRATOR and the details of its design.

  18. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abgrall, N.; Aguayo, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Barabash, A. S.; Bertrand, F. E.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, M.; Caldwell, A. S.; Chan, Y. -D.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Tmore » he M ajorana D emonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta ( β β 0 ν ) decay of the isotope Ge with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors.he observation of this rare decay would indicate that the neutrino is its own antiparticle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass scale of the neutrino.he D emonstrator is being assembled at the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota.he array will be situated in a low-background environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. Here we describe the science goals of the D emonstrator and the details of its design. « less

  19. Precision Measurement of Charged Pion and Kaon Differential Cross Sections in e⁺e⁻ Annihilation at √s=10.52 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leitgab, M.; Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Vossen, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; et al

    2013-08-06

    Measurements of inclusive differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production in e⁺e⁻ annihilation have been carried out at a center-of-mass energy of √s=10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider using a data sample containing 113×106 e⁺e⁻→qq¯ events, where q={u,d,s,c}. We present charge-integrated differential cross sections dσh±/dz for h±={π±,K±} as a function of the relative hadron energy z=2Eh/√s from 0.2 to 0.98. The combined statistical and systematic uncertainties for π± (K±) are 4% (4%) at z~0.6 and 15% (24%) at z~0.9. The cross sections are the first measurements of the zmore » dependence of pion and kaon production for z>0.7 as well as the first precision cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy far below the Z⁰ resonance used by the experiments at LEP and SLC.« less

  20. Precision Measurement of Charged Pion and Kaon Differential Cross Sections in e?e? Annihilation at ?s=10.52 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitgab, M.; Seidl, R.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Vossen, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Drsal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Gillard, R.; Giordano, F.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Jacobs, W. W.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kody, P.; Kouzes, R. T.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, A.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Rhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, J.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.

    2013-08-06

    Measurements of inclusive differential cross sections for charged pion and kaon production in e?e? annihilation have been carried out at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=10.52 GeV. The measurements were performed with the Belle detector at the KEKB e?e? collider using a data sample containing 113106 e?e??qq events, where q={u,d,s,c}. We present charge-integrated differential cross sections d?h/dz for h={?,K} as a function of the relative hadron energy z=2Eh/?s from 0.2 to 0.98. The combined statistical and systematic uncertainties for ? (K) are 4% (4%) at z~0.6 and 15% (24%) at z~0.9. The cross sections are the first measurements of the z dependence of pion and kaon production for z>0.7 as well as the first precision cross section measurements at a center-of-mass energy far below the Z? resonance used by the experiments at LEP and SLC.

  1. Low Radioactivity Crystals for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dafinei, Ioan [Sezione INFN di Roma, P-le Aldo Moro 2, Roma I-00185 (Italy)

    2011-04-27

    The production of crystals needed for rare events physics represent a relatively new, exciting challenge in the field of materials science and engineering. Extremely low concentration of radioactive impurities and very high crystal perfection is required for the crystals to be used in experiments in which the main concerns are the reduction of the background and the use of high sensitivity detectors. A further complication is the fact that for an experiment with a significant discovery potential, relatively large quantities of crystals are needed. The present work makes a review of the general problems related to the production of crystals for rare events physics and gives details related to the production of the TeO{sub 2} crystals needed for the major experiment in this field using bolometric technique, namely the CUORE experiment. The potential use of crystals for future double beta decay experiments is also discussed.

  2. Alpha Backgrounds for HPGe Detectors in Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. A. [University of Washington, Seattle; Burritt, T. H. [University of Washington, Seattle; Elliott, S. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gehman, V. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Guiseppe, V.E. [University of South Dakota; Wilkerson, J. F. [UNC/Triangle Univ. Nucl. Lab, Durham, NC/ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The Majorana Experiment will use arrays of enriched HPGe detectors to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge. Such a decay, if found, would show lepton-number violation and confirm the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Searches for such rare events are hindered by obscuring backgrounds which must be understood and mitigated as much as possible. A potentially important background contribution to this and other double-beta decay experiments could come from decays of alpha-emitting isotopes in the 232Th and 238U decay chains on or near the surfaces of the detectors. An alpha particle emitted external to an HPGe crystal can lose energy before entering the active region of the detector, either in some external-bulk material or within the dead region of the crystal. The measured energy of the event will only correspond to a partial amount of the total kinetic energy of the alpha and might obscure the signal from neutrinoless double-beta decay. A test stand was built and measurements were performed to quantitatively assess this background. We present results from these measurements and compare them to simulations using Geant4. These results are then used to measure the alpha backgrounds in an underground detector in situ. We also make estimates of surface contamination tolerances for double-beta decay experiments using solid-state detectors.

  3. Are Earths Rare? Perhaps Not

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Are Earths Rare? Perhaps Not Are Earths Rare? Perhaps Not Developed at NERSC, a Pipeline for Finding Earth-like Planets in the Milky Way January 13, 2014 Contact: Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov habitablezones450.jpg Artist's representation of the "habitable zone," the range of orbits where liquid water is permitted on the surface of a planet. The authors find that 22% of Sun-like stars harbor a planet between one and two times the size of Earth in the habitable zone One out of

  4. Neutron Beta Decay Studies with Nab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baessler, S.; Alarcon, R.; Alonzi, L. P.; Balascuta, S.; Barron-Palos, L.; Bowman, James David; Bychkov, M. A.; Byrne, J.; Calarco, J; Chupp, T.; Cianciolo, T. V.; Crawford, C.; Frlez, E.; Gericke, M. T.; Glück, F.; Greene, G. L.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Gudkov, V.; Harrison, D.; Hersman, F. W.; Ito, T.; Makela, M.; Martin, J.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGovern, S.; Page, S.; Penttila, Seppo I; Pocanic, Dinko; Salas-Bacci, A.; Tompkins, Z.; Wagner, D.; Wilburn, W. S.; Young, A. R.

    2013-01-01

    Precision measurements in neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay and allow for several stringent tests of the standard model. This paper discusses the design and the expected performance of the Nab spectrometer.

  5. Rare events: a state of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uppuluri, V.R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The study of rare events has become increasingly important in the context of nuclear safety. Some philosophical considerations, such as the framework for the definition of a rare event, rare events and science, rare events and trans-science, and rare events and public perception, are discussed. The technical work of the Task Force on problems of Rare Events in the Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Plants (1976-1978), sponsored by OECD, is reviewed. Some recent technical considerations are discussed, and conclusions are drawn. The appendix contains an essay written by Anne E. Beachey, under the title: A Study of Rare Events - Problems and Promises.

  6. Search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with the CUORE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorla, P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso-INFN, S.S. 17 bis, km 18-910 67010 Assergi (Italy)

    2009-12-17

    CUORE is a next generation experiment aimed at the detection of neutrinoless Double Beta Decay of the nuclide {sup 130}Te. The experiment, which will take place in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (Italy), will look for this rare decay using the macrobolometric technique with a prospected array of 988 detectors. Each bolometer will be constituted by a 5x5x5 cm{sup 3} TeO{sub 2} crystal, for a total mass of about 200 kg of {sup 130}Te, and will be maintained at a temperature of 10 mK. CUORE will probe the effective mass of the neutrino with a sensitivity of a few tens of meV. If an excess of counts are observed above background at the 2.5 MeV corresponding to the Q-value of the decay, CUORE will answer several questions that are still open in the field of neutrino physics, such as the determination of the particle's Majorana nature and of the absolute mass scale. A prototype for CUORE in Gran Sasso, named CUORICINO, has just closed after five years proving its importance as a stand-alone experiment.

  7. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the $B \\to K^{(*)} \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ Decay and First Observation of the $B^0_s \\to \\phi \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-01-01

    We reconstruct the rare decays B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} K*(892){sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}(1020){mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb{sup -1} collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using 120 {+-} 16 B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and 101 {+-} 12 B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the measurement of the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decay modes, and the K*{sup 0} longitudinal polarization in the B{sup 0} decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the theoretical prediction from the standard model, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy. We also report the first observation of the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decay and measure its branching ratio {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = [1.44 {+-} 0.33 {+-} 0.46] x 10{sup -6} using 27 {+-} 6 signal events. This is currently the most rare B{sub s}{sup 0} decay observed.

  8. Investigations of 2? decay measured by low background HPGe spectrometer OBELIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2013-12-30

    A low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer OBELIX was installed at the Modane Underground Laboratory (LSM, France, 4800 m w.e.). The detector was designed to measure a contamination of enriched isotopes and radio-impurities in construction materials, to investigate rare nuclear processes such as resonance neutrinoless double electron capture and two-neutrino double beta decay to excited states of daughter nuclei. Spectrometer sensitivity, contamination of NEMO-3 sources and results of 2?2?{sup ?} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the 0{sup +} (1130 keV) and 2{sup +} (540 keV) excited states as well as future plans for OBELIX detector are given.

  9. Charm Mixing, CP Violation and Rare D**0 Decays at BaBar (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nucl.Phys.A827:463c-465c,2009; Conference: Prepared for 18th International Conference on Particles and Nuclei (PANIC 08), Eilat, Israel, 9-14 Nov ...

  10. Rare B Decays at B Factories (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15518 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: PoS ICHEP2010:566,2010; Conference: Prepared for...

  11. Rare B Decays at B Factories (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Journal Name: PoS ICHEP2010:566,2010; Conference: Prepared for 35th International Conference on ...

  12. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; et al

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K– production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K– favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. Whilemore » the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K– results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.« less

  13. Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22

    B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X

  14. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the B→K(*)μ⁺μ⁻Decay and First Observation of the Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻ Decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-04-18

    We reconstruct the rare decays B⁺→K⁺μ⁺μ⁻, B⁰→K*(892)⁰μ⁺μ⁻, and Bs0→Φ(1020)μ⁺μ⁻ in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb⁻¹ collected in pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. Using 121±16 B⁺→K⁺μ⁺μ⁻ and 101±12 B⁰→K*⁰μ⁺μ⁻ decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B⁺ and B⁰ decay modes, and the K*⁰ longitudinal polarization fraction in the B⁰ decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the predictions, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy.more » We also report the first observation of the Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻ decay and measure its branching ratio BR(Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻)=[1.44±0.33±0.46]×10⁻⁶ using 27±6 signal events. This is currently the most rare Bs0 decay observed.« less

  15. Gravitational effects on inflaton decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ema, Yohei; Jinno, Ryusuke; Mukaida, Kyohei; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2015-05-22

    We point out that the inflaton inevitably couples to all non-conformally coupled matters gravitationally through an oscillation in the Hubble parameter or the cosmic scale factor. It leads to particle production during the inflaton oscillation regime, which is most efficient just after inflation. Moreover, the analysis is extended to the model with non-minimal inflaton couplings to gravity, in which the Hubble parameter oscillates more violently. We apply our results to the graviton production by the inflaton: gravitons are also produced just after inflation, but the non-minimal coupling does not induce inflaton decay into the graviton pair.

  16. Dark decay of the top quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  17. Dark Decay of the Top Quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye-Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. The top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6sigma deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t-->bW+Z's. This is the same as the dominant top quark decay (t-->bW) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.

  18. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  19. Experimental Survey of Strange Particle Decays

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Steinberger, J.

    1964-06-01

    It is the aim of these three lectures to summarize the present experimental knowledge concerning the decays of the strange particles.

  20. Radiative Decays Involving Light Scalar Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deirdre Black; Masayasu Harada; Joseph Schechter

    2002-09-01

    We present a vector dominance model to describe radiative decays involving the light scalar mesons. Assuming that the light scalar mesons form a nonet this model gives relations among various decay amplitudes of the form S--> gamma gamma, V-->Sgamma and S--> Vgamma, where S and V denote scalar and vector mesons. By comparing with experimental radiative decay rates, including those recently measured for phi--> PP'gamma, we obtain various predictions. We discuss briefly ongoing extensions of the present work in an attempt to describe the radiative phi decay measurements in detail.

  1. Novel Photoconductive Decay Measurement System - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Novel Photoconductive Decay Measurement System Colorado School of Mines Contact CSM About This Technology...

  2. Theoretical perspectives on strange physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, J.

    1983-04-01

    Kaons are heavy enough to have an interesting range of decay modes available to them, and light enough to be produced in sufficient numbers to explore rare modes with satisfying statistics. Kaons and their decays have provided at least two major breakthroughs in our knowledge of fundamental physics. They have revealed to us CP violation, and their lack of flavor-changing neutral interactions warned us to expect charm. In addition, K/sup 0/-anti K/sup 0/ mixing has provided us with one of our most elegant and sensitive laboratories for testing quantum mechanics. There is every reason to expect that future generations of kaon experiments with intense sources would add further to our knowledge of fundamental physics. This talk attempts to set future kaon experiments in a general theoretical context, and indicate how they may bear upon fundamental theoretical issues. A survey of different experiments which would be done with an Intense Medium Energy Source of Strangeness, including rare K decays, probes of the nature of CP isolation, ..mu.. decays, hyperon decays and neutrino physics is given. (WHK)

  3. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  4. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William; Ellis, Timothy W.; Dennis, Kevin W.; Hofer, Robert J.; Branagan, Daniel J.

    1997-11-25

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  5. B, D and K Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; Asner, D.M.; Ball, P.; Baracchini, E.; Bell, G.; Beneke, M.; Berryhill, J.; Bevan, A.; Bigi, I.I.; Blanke, M.; Bobeth, Ch.; Bona, M.; Borzumati, F.; Browder, T.; Buanes, T.; Buchalla, G.; Buchmuller, O.; Buras, A.J.; Burdin, S.; Cassel, D.G.; Cavanaugh, R.; /Syracuse U. /Carleton U. /Durham U., IPPP /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Karlsruhe U. /RWTH Aachen U. /Fermilab /Queen Mary, U. of London /Notre Dame U. /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Dortmund U. /Annecy, LAPP /ICTP, Trieste /Taiwan, Natl. Central U. /Hawaii U. /Bergen U. /Munich U. /CERN /Liverpool U.

    2008-03-07

    The present report documents the results of Working Group 2: B, D and K decays, of the workshop on Flavor in the Era of the LHC, held at CERN from November 2005 through March 2007. With the advent of the LHC, we will be able to probe New Physics (NP) up to energy scales almost one order of magnitude larger than it has been possible with present accelerator facilities. While direct detection of new particles will be the main avenue to establish the presence of NP at the LHC, indirect searches will provide precious complementary information, since most probably it will not be possible to measure the full spectrum of new particles and their couplings through direct production. In particular, precision measurements and computations in the realm of flavor physics are expected to play a key role in constraining the unknown parameters of the Lagrangian of any NP model emerging from direct searches at the LHC. The aim of Working Group 2 was twofold: on one hand, to provide a coherent, up-to-date picture of the status of flavor physics before the start of the LHC; on the other hand, to initiate activities on the path towards integrating information on NP from high-p{sub T} and flavor data. This report is organized as follows. In Sec. 1, we give an overview of NP models, focusing on a few examples that have been discussed in some detail during the workshop, with a short description of the available computational tools for flavor observables in NP models. Sec. 2 contains a concise discussion of the main theoretical problem in flavor physics: the evaluation of the relevant hadronic matrix elements for weak decays. Sec. 3 contains a detailed discussion of NP effects in a set of flavor observables that we identified as 'benchmark channels' for NP searches. The experimental prospects for flavor physics at future facilities are discussed in Sec. 4. Finally, Sec. 5 contains some assessments on the work done at the workshop and the prospects for future developments.

  6. US-Japan rare elements meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    US-Japan rare elements meeting US-Japan rare elements meeting US-Japan rare earth elements meeting PDF icon US-Japan rare elements meeting More Documents & Publications Microsoft...

  7. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  8. Linear Transformation Method for Multinuclide Decay Calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding Yuan

    2010-12-29

    A linear transformation method for generic multinuclide decay calculations is presented together with its properties and implications. The method takes advantage of the linear form of the decay solution N(t) = F(t)N{sub 0}, where N(t) is a column vector that represents the numbers of atoms of the radioactive nuclides in the decay chain, N{sub 0} is the initial value vector of N(t), and F(t) is a lower triangular matrix whose time-dependent elements are independent of the initial values of the system.

  9. Neutrino signals from dark matter decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covi, Laura; Grefe, Michael; Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David E-mail: michael.grefe@desy.de E-mail: david.tran@ph.tum.de

    2010-04-01

    We investigate different neutrino signals from the decay of dark matter particles to determine the prospects for their detection, and more specifically if any spectral signature can be disentangled from the background in present and future neutrino observatories. If detected, such a signal could bring an independent confirmation of the dark matter interpretation of the dramatic rise in the positron fraction above 10 GeV recently observed by the PAMELA satellite experiment and offer the possibility of distinguishing between astrophysical sources and dark matter decay or annihilation. In combination with other signals, it may also be possible to distinguish among different dark matter decay channels.

  10. Search for Neutral D Meson Mixing using Semileptonic Decays ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Search for Neutral D Meson Mixing using Semileptonic Decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Neutral D Meson Mixing using Semileptonic Decays...

  11. SciTech Connect: "neutrinoless double beta decay"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutrinoless double beta decay" Find + Advanced Search Term Search Semantic Search Advanced Search All Fields: "neutrinoless double beta decay" Semantic Semantic Term Title:...

  12. Nuclear reaction and decay data evaluation capabilities at LANL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Nuclear reaction and decay data evaluation capabilities at LANL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear reaction and decay data evaluation capabilities at ...

  13. Nuclear reaction and decay data evaluation capabilities at LANL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear reaction and decay data evaluation capabilities at LANL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear reaction and decay data evaluation capabilities at LANL You ...

  14. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  15. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner JR., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  16. Probing the Planck Scale with Proton Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harnik, Roni; Larson, Daniel T.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-04-28

    We advocate the idea that proton decay may probe physics at the Planck scale instead of the GUT scale. This is possible because supersymmetric theories have dimension-5 operators that can induce proton decay at dangerous rates, even with R-parity conservation. These operators are expected to be suppressed by the same physics that explains the fermion masses and mixings. We present a thorough analysis of nucleon partial lifetimes in models with a string-inspired anomalous U(1)_X family symmetry which is responsible for the fermionic mass spectrum as well as forbidding R-parity violating interactions. Protons and neutrons can decay via R-parity conserving non-renormalizable superpotential terms that are suppressed by the Planck scale and powers of the Cabibbo angle. Many of the models naturally lead to nucleon decay near present limits without any reference to grand unification.

  17. Dark decay of the top quark

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Lee, Hye -Sung; Park, Myeonghun

    2014-04-01

    We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers. Top quark is the heaviest particle in the standard model whose decays are relatively poorly measured, allowing sufficient room for exotic decay modes from new physics. A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z') is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6 σ deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We present and study a possible scenario that top quark decays as t → b W + Z's. This is the same as the dominant topmore » quark decay (t → b W) accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers. The Z' can be easily boosted, and it can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. In addition, we discuss the implications for the Large Hadron Collider experiments including the analysis based on the lepton-jets.« less

  18. Study of the K0L →π⁰π⁰νν¯decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ogata, R.; Suzuki, S.; Ahn, J. K.; Akune, Y.; Baranov, V.; Chen, K. F.; Comfort, J.; Doroshenko, M.; Fujioka, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; et al

    2011-09-21

    The rare decay K0L→π⁰π⁰νν̄ was studied with the E391a detector at the KEK 12-GeV proton synchrotron. Based on 9.4×10⁹ K0L decays, an upper limit of 8.1×10⁻⁷ was obtained for the branching fraction at 90% confidence level. We also set a limit on the K0L→π⁰π⁰X (X→invisible particles) process; the limit on the branching fraction varied from 7.0×10⁻⁷ to 4.0×10⁻⁵ for the mass of X ranging from 50 MeV/c² to 200 MeV/c².

  19. CKM-suppressed top quark decays t{yields}s(d)+W in the standard model and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz-Cruz, J. L.; Gaitan-Lozano, R.; Castro, G. Lopez; Pagliarone, C. E.

    2008-05-01

    As it is well known, top quark decays are of particular interest as a means to test the standard model (SM) predictions, these include the dominant (t{yields}b+W), the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays (t{yields}cV, cVV, c{phi}{sup 0}, bWZ). As all of them are highly suppressed, they become an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. In this paper, we evaluate the corrections from new physics to the CKM-suppressed SM top quark decay t{yields}q+W(q=d,s), both within an effective model with right-handed currents and for the minimal SUSY extension of the SM. We also discuss the perspectives to probe those predictions at the International Linear Collider.

  20. Neutrino decay and neutrinoless double beta decay in a 3-3-1 model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Alex G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66.318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Doff, A. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Pamplona 145, 01405-900 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Pires, C.A. de S; Rodrigues da Silva, P.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970, Joao Pessoa-PB (Brazil)

    2005-08-01

    In this work we show that the implementation of spontaneous breaking of the lepton number in the 3-3-1 model with right-handed neutrinos gives rise to fast neutrino decay with Majoron emission and generates a bunch of new contributions to the neutrinoless double beta decay.

  1. Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 2-3. Citation: C. Dejoie, P. Sciau, W. Li, L. No, A. Mehta, K. Chen, H. Luo, M. Kunz, N. Tamura, and Z. Liu, "Learning from the past: Rare -Fe2O3 in the ancient...

  2. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Magnets

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCallum, Bill

    2012-08-29

    Senior Scientist, Bill McCallum, briefly discusses rare-earth magnets and their uses and how Ames Lab is research new ways to save money and energy using magnets.

  3. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Beaudry, Bernard J.

    1987-01-06

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  4. Neutrinoless double-beta decay search with CUORE and CUORE-0 experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moggi, N.; Artusa, D. R.; F. T. Avignone; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; et al

    2015-03-24

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an upcoming experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decays. Observation of the process would unambiguously establish that neutrinos are Majorana particles and provide information on their absolute mass scale hierarchy. CUORE is now under construction and will consist of an array of 988 TeO2 crystal bolometers operated at 10 mK, but the first tower (CUORE-0) is already taking data. The experimental techniques used will be presented as well as the preliminary CUORE-0 results. The current status of the full-mass experiment and its expected sensitivity will then be discussed.

  5. Neutrinoless double-beta decay search with CUORE and CUORE-0 experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moggi, N.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cai, X. Z.; Camacho, A.; Caminata, A.; Canonica, L.; Cao, X. G.; Capelli, S.; Cappelli, L.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Copello, S.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Cushman, J. S.; Dafinei, I.; Dally, A.; Datskov, V.; Delloro, S.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Drobizhev, A.; Ejzak, L.; Fang, D. Q.; Farach, H. A.; Faverzani, M.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Heeger, K. M.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hickerson, K. P.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Keppel, G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Li, Y. L.; Ligi, C.; Lim, K. E.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Morganti, S.; Napolitano, T.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; ODonnell, T.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pagliarone, C. E.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sala, E.; Sangiorgio, S.; Santone, D.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tian, W. D.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Wielgus, L.; Wilson, J.; Winslow, L. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zarra, C.; Zhang, G. Q.; Zhu, B. X.; Zucchelli, S.; Fabbri, F.; Giacomelli, P.

    2015-03-24

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an upcoming experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless double-beta decays. Observation of the process would unambiguously establish that neutrinos are Majorana particles and provide information on their absolute mass scale hierarchy. CUORE is now under construction and will consist of an array of 988 TeO2 crystal bolometers operated at 10 mK, but the first tower (CUORE-0) is already taking data. The experimental techniques used will be presented as well as the preliminary CUORE-0 results. The current status of the full-mass experiment and its expected sensitivity will then be discussed.

  6. Inclusive radiative {psi}(2S) decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B.; Adams, G. S.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J.; Ecklund, K. M.; He, Q.; Insler, J.; Muramatsu, H.; Park, C. S.; Thorndike, E. H.

    2009-10-01

    Using e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct photon spectrum in the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}gg. We determine the ratio of the inclusive direct photon decay rate to that of the dominant three-gluon decay rate {psi}(2S){yields}ggg (R{sub {gamma}}{identical_to}{gamma}({gamma}gg)/{gamma}(ggg)) to be R{sub {gamma}}(z{sub {gamma}}>0.4)=0.070{+-}0.002{+-}0.019{+-}0.011, with z{sub {gamma}} defined as the scaled photon energy relative to the beam energy. The errors shown are statistical, systematic, and that due to the uncertainty in the input branching fractions used to extract the ratio, respectively.

  7. Correlations and the neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, and IFT, UAM-CSIC, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049-Madrid (Spain); Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F. [IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 67037-Strasbourg (France)

    2009-11-09

    We explore the influence of the deformation on the nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double beta decay (NME), concluding that the difference in deformation -or more generally on the amount of quadrupole correlations- between parent and grand daughter nuclei quenchs strongly the decay. We discuss how varies the nuclear matrix element of {sup 76}Ge decay when the wave functions of the two nuclei involved in the transition are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies. In the Interacting Shell Model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%, thus, the discrepancies between both approaches diminish.

  8. Measurement of branching fraction ratios and CP asymmetries in B →D0 CPK decays with the BABAR detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchiori, Giovanni; /Pisa U.

    2010-05-05

    The primary goals of the BABAR experiment are the detection of CP violation (CPV) in the B meson system, the precise measurement of some of the elements of the CKM matrix and the measurement of the rates of rare B meson decays. At present, BABAR has achieved major successes: (1) the discovery, in neutral B decays, of direct and mixing-induced CP violation; (2) accurate measurements of the magnitudes of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}|; (3) a precise measurement of the CKM parameter {beta} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}/V{sub td}V*{sub tb}]; (4) a first measurement of the CKM parameters {alpha} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub td}V*{sub tb}/V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}], {gamma} {triple_bond} arg[- V{sub ud}V*{sub ub}/V{sub cd}V*{sub cb}]; and (5) the observation of several rare B decays and the discovery of new particles (in the charmed and charmonium mesons spectroscopy). However, the physics program of BABAR is not yet complete. Two of the key elements of this program that still need to be achieved are: (1) the observation of direct CP violation in charged B decays, which would constitute the first evidence of direct CPV in a charged meson decay; and (2) the precise measurement of {alpha} and {gamma}, which are necessary ingredients for a stringent test of the Standard Model predictions in the quark electroweak sector. A possibility for the discovery of direct CP violation in charged B decays would be the observation of a non-vanishing rate asymmetry in the Cabibbo-suppressed decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} K{sup -}, with the D{sup 0} decaying to either a CP-even or a CP-odd eigenstate. This class of decays can also provide theoretically-clean information on {gamma}.

  9. Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-07-27

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular, we will discuss the relation between 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore, we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0{nu}{beta}{beta} from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope, i.e., within one experiment.

  10. The double-beta decay: Theoretical challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2012-11-20

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a unique process that could reveal physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics namely, if observed, it would prove that neutrinos are Majorana particles. In addition, it could provide information regarding the neutrino masses and their hierarchy, provided that reliable nuclear matrix elements can be obtained. The two neutrino double beta decay is an associate process that is allowed by the Standard Model, and it was observed for about ten nuclei. The present contribution gives a brief review of the theoretical challenges associated with these two process, emphasizing the reliable calculation of the associated nuclear matrix elements.

  11. On the neutrinoless double ?{sup +}/EC decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    The neutrinoless double positron-emission/electron-capture (0??{sup +}/EC) decays are studied for the magnitudes of the involved nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Decays to the ground state, 0{sub gs}{sup +}, and excited 0{sup +} states are discussed. The participant many-body wave functions are evaluated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. The channels ?{sup +}?{sup +}, ?{sup +}EC, and the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0?ECEC) are discussed.

  12. Rare Earth Metals for Science | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Metals for Science The Ames Laboratory has been actively involved in the ... More information on the rare-earth elements Quantities of high-purity rare earth metals ...

  13. Measurement of single spin asymmetry and fifth structure function for the proton(electron vec, electron Kaon+)Lambda reaction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahksha Nasseripour

    2005-08-31

    The single spin asymmetry, A{sub LT} ?, and the polarized structure function, ?{sub LT}?, for the p(e,e?K{sup +})? reaction in the resonance region have been measured and extracted using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. Data were taken at an electron beam energy of 2.567 GeV. The large acceptance of CLAS allows for full azimuthal angle coverage over a large range of center-of-mass scattering angles. Results were obtained that span a range in Q{sup 2} from 0.5 to 1.3 GeV{sup 2} and W from threshold up to 2.1 GeV and were compared to existing theoretical calculations. The polarized structure function is sensitive to the interferences between various resonant amplitudes, as well as to resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. This measurement is essential for understanding the structure of nucleons and searching for previously undetected nucleon excited states (resonances) predicted by quark models. The W dependence of the ?{sub LT} ? in the kinematic regions dominated by s and u channel exchange (cos q{sup cm} k = ?0.50, ?0.167, 0.167) indicated possible resonance structures not predicted by theoretical calculations. The ?{sub LT} ? behavior around W = 1.875 GeV could be the signature of a resonance predicted by the quark models and possibly seen in photoproduction. In the very forward angles where the reaction is dominated by the t-channel, the average ?{sub LT} ? was zero. There was no indication of the interference between resonances or resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. This might be indicating the dominance of a single t-channel exchange. Study of the sensitivity of the fifth structure function data to the resonance around 1900 MeV showed that these data were highly sensitive to the various assumptions of the models for the quantum number of this resonance. This project was part of a larger CLAS program to measure cross sections and polarization observables for kaon electroproduction in the nucleon resonance region.

  14. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.

    1986-09-16

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  15. ORNL Licenses Rare Earth Magnet Recycling Process to Momentum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ORNL Licenses Rare Earth Magnet Recycling Process to Momentum Technologies ORNL Licenses ... Dallas-based Momentum Technologies is focused on extraction of rare earth elements and ...

  16. Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths from Coal and By...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths from Coal and By-Products Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths ...

  17. Researchers use light to create rare uranium molecule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare uranium molecule Researchers use light to create rare uranium molecule Uranium nitride materials show promise as advanced nuclear fuels due to their high density, high ...

  18. Neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simkovic, Fedor [BLTP, JINR Dubna, 141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-11-23

    The fundamental importance of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) is widely recognized. Observation of the decay would tell us that the total lepton number is not conserved and that, consequently, neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. The 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay is discussed in context of neutrino oscillation data. The perspectives of the experimental 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay searches are analyzed. The importance of reliable determination of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is pointed out.

  19. Exotic decays of heavy B quarks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fox, Patrick J.; Tucker-Smith, David

    2016-01-08

    Heavy vector-like quarks of charge –1/3, B, have been searched for at the LHC through the decays B → bZ, bh, tW. In models where the B quark also carries charge under a new gauge group, new decay channels may dominate. We focus on the case where the B is charged under a U(1)' and describe simple models where the dominant decay mode is B → bZ' → b(bb¯¯). With the inclusion of dark matter such models can explain the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic center. We develop a search strategy for this decay chain and estimate thatmore » with integrated luminosity of 300 fb–1 the LHC will have the potential to discover both the B and the Z' for B quarks with mass below ~ 1.6 TeV, for a broad range of Z' masses. Furthermore, a high-luminosity run can extend this reach to 2 TeV.« less

  20. Stabilizing oscillating universes against quantum decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mithani, Audrey T.; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2015-07-07

    We investigate the effect of vacuum corrections, due to the trace anomaly and Casimir effect, on the stability of an oscillating universe with respect to decay by tunneling to the singularity. We find that these corrections do not generally stabilize an oscillating universe. However, stability may be achieved for some specially fine-tuned non-vacuum states.

  1. Scalar Mesons in B-decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkowski, Peter; Ochs, Wolfgang

    2006-02-11

    We summarize some persistent problems in scalar spectroscopy and discuss what could be learned here from charmless B-decays. Recent experimental results are discussed in comparison with theoretical expectations: a simple model based on penguin dominance leads to various symmetry relations in good agreement with recent data; a factorisation approach yields absolute predictions of rates.

  2. Experimental particle physics at the University of Pittsburgh. Progress report, November 1, 1995--October 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreau, J.F.; Engels, E. Jr.; Shepard, P.F.; Thompson, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the progress on two different tasks, Task A and Task B. Task A focuses on rare and semi-rare decays of {phi} and of the short-lived kaon with emphasis on those aspects needed in preparation for the proposed {Phi}-Factory measurements of CPT violation and {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} from the CP-violating decays of the K{sub L}K{sub S} final state. The second aspect of the kaon decay work is participation in the so-called rare kaon decay experiments, E865, at BNL. The major goals of Task B, Fermilab program, are as follows: (1) participation in the analysis of the E706 data taken during the 1990--1991 fixed target run at Fermilab and (2) the continuation of the work with the CDF collaboration particularly the SVX II upgrade. The E706 part of the program involves the completion of publications reporting the results of the 1990--91 data run. The analysis of these data is now mature and physics results are emerging. The CDF program involves a dedicated effort to the design of a silicon vertex detector upgrade, SVX II, to be accomplished by the time Fermilab run II collider run (1999). In addition they are participating in the 1993--1995 collide run Ib and actively analyzing the data from both runs Ia and Ib.

  3. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Robert A.; Maple, T. Grant; Sklensky, Alden F.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  4. Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

    2011-04-01

    The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained

  5. PyDecay/GraphPhys: A Unified Language and Storage System for Particle Decay Process Descriptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunietz, Jesse N.; /MIT /SLAC

    2011-06-22

    To ease the tasks of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and event reconstruction (i.e. inferring particle-decay events from experimental data) for long-term BaBar data preservation and analysis, the following software components have been designed: a language ('GraphPhys') for specifying decay processes, common to both simulation and data analysis, allowing arbitrary parameters on particles, decays, and entire processes; an automated visualization tool to show graphically what decays have been specified; and a searchable database storage mechanism for decay specifications. Unlike HepML, a proposed XML standard for HEP metadata, the specification language is designed not for data interchange between computer systems, but rather for direct manipulation by human beings as well as computers. The components are interoperable: the information parsed from files in the specification language can easily be rendered as an image by the visualization package, and conversion between decay representations was implemented. Several proof-of-concept command-line tools were built based on this framework. Applications include building easier and more efficient interfaces to existing analysis tools for current projects (e.g. BaBar/BESII), providing a framework for analyses in future experimental settings (e.g. LHC/SuperB), and outreach programs that involve giving students access to BaBar data and analysis tools to give them a hands-on feel for scientific analysis.

  6. Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay In this paper, we study the...

  7. Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay You are accessing a...

  8. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  9. Radioactive decay data tables (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radioactive decay data tables Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radioactive decay data tables You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech ...

  10. Crystalline rare-earth activated oxyorthosilicate phosphor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClellan, Kenneth J.; Cooke, D. Wayne

    2004-02-10

    Crystalline, transparent, rare-earth activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate phosphor. The phosphor consists essentially of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Gd.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Gd(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor may be optically coupled to a photodetector to provide a radiation detector.

  11. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of130Te with CUORE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-beta (0???) decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of neutrino mass. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an upcoming experiment designed to search for 0???decay of130Te using an array of 988 TeO2crystal bolometers operated at 10?mK. The detector will contain 206?kg of130Te and have an average energy resolution of 5?keV; the projected 0???decay half-life sensitivity after five years of livetime is 1.6??1026?y at 1?(9.5??1025?y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana massmorein the range 40100?meV (50130?meV). In this paper, we review the experimental techniques used in CUORE as well as its current status and anticipated physics reach.less

  12. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of 130 Te with CUORE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; et al

    2015-01-01

    Neumore » trinoless double-beta (0 ν β β ) decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of neutrino mass. The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an upcoming experiment designed to search for 0 ν β β decay of 130 Te using an array of 988 TeO 2 crystal bolometers operated at 10 mK. The detector will contain 206 kg of 130 Te and have an average energy resolution of 5 keV; the projected 0 ν β β decay half-life sensitivity after five years of livetime is 1.6 × 10 26  y at 1 σ (9.5 × 10 25  y at the 90% confidence level), which corresponds to an upper limit on the effective Majorana mass in the range 40–100 meV (50–130 meV). In this paper, we review the experimental techniques used in CUORE as well as its current status and anticipated physics reach.« less

  13. {tau} decays and chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, G.; Finkemeier, M.; Urech, R.

    1996-10-01

    In a small window of phase space, chiral perturbation theory can be used to make standard model predictions for {tau} decays into two and three pions. For {tau}{r_arrow}2{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, we give the analytical result for the relevant form factor {ital F}{sub {ital V}} up to two loops, then calculate the differential spectrum and compare with available data. For {tau}{r_arrow}3{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, we have calculated the hadronic matrix element to one loop. We discuss the decomposition of the three pion states into partition states and we give detailed predictions for the decay in terms of structure functions. We also compare with low energy predictions of meson dominance models. Overall, we find good agreement, but also some interesting discrepancies, which might have consequences beyond the limit of validity of chiral perturbation theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  14. Cold Positrons from Decaying Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Dodelson, Scott; Vives, Oscar

    2012-11-01

    Many models of dark matter contain more than one new particle beyond those in the Standard Model. Often heavier particles decay into the lightest dark matter particle as the Universe evolves. Here we explore the possibilities that arise if one of the products in a (Heavy Particle) $\\rightarrow$ (Dark Matter) decay is a positron, and the lifetime is shorter than the age of the Universe. The positrons cool down by scattering off the cosmic microwave background and eventually annihilate when they fall into Galactic potential wells. The resulting 511 keV flux not only places constraints on this class of models but might even be consistent with that observed by the INTEGRAL satellite.

  15. {beta} decay of {sup 26}Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, L.; Lisetskiy, A.F.; Arndt, O.; Dillmann, I.; Hallmann, O.; Kratz, K.L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Bergmann, U.; Cederkall, J.; Fraile, L.; Koester, U.; Franchoo, S.; Gaudefroy, L.; Sorlin, O.; Tabor, S.

    2004-11-01

    A pure neutron-rich {sup 26}Ne beam was obtained at the ISOLDE facility using isobaric selectivity. This was achieved by a combination of a plasma ion source with a cooled transfer line and subsequent mass separation. The high quality of the beam and good statistics allowed us to obtain new experimental information on the {sup 26}Ne {beta}-decay properties and resolve a contradiction between earlier experimental data and prediction of shell-model calculations.

  16. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  17. Single spin asymmetries in charged kaon production from semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He3 target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y. X.; Wang, Y.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. -P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z. -E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J. -C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L. -G.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.

    2014-11-03

    We report the first measurement of target single spin asymmetries of charged kaons produced in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off a transversely polarized 3He target. Both the Collins and Sivers moments, which are related to the nucleon transversity and Sivers distributions, respectively, are extracted over the kinematic range of 0.1 < xbj<0.4 for K+ and K production. While the Collins and Sivers moments for K+ are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties, both moments for K favor negative values. The Sivers moments are compared to the theoretical prediction from a phenomenological fit to the world data. While the K+ Sivers moments are consistent with the prediction, the K results differ from the prediction at the 2-sigma level.

  18. The nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2007-10-12

    The status of calculation of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) nuclear matrix elements (NME's) is reviewed. The spread of published values of NME's is discussed. The main attention is paid to the recent progress achieved in the evaluation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). The obtained results are compared with those of the nuclear shell model. The problem of reliable determination of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's is addressed. The uncertainty in NME's are analyzed and further progress in calculation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's is outlined.

  19. Rare earths for life: an 85th birthday visit with Mr. Rare Earth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth While scientists often talk about their life's work, few lives have been fuller than that of Ames Laboratory's Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. who's being honored for over...

  20. Thermal effects and sudden decay approximation in the curvaton scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitajima, Naoya; Takesako, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Langlois, David; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: langlois@apc.univ-paris7.fr E-mail: takesako@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    We study the impact of a temperature-dependent curvaton decay rate on the primordial curvature perturbation generated in the curvaton scenario. Using the familiar sudden decay approximation, we obtain an analytical expression for the curvature perturbation after the decay of the curvaton. We then investigate numerically the evolution of the background and of the perturbations during the decay. We first show that the instantaneous transfer coefficient, related to the curvaton energy fraction at the decay, can be extended into a more general parameter, which depends on the net transfer of the curvaton energy into radiation energy or, equivalently, on the total entropy ratio after the complete curvaton decay. We then compute the curvature perturbation and compare this result with the sudden decay approximation prediction.

  1. Calculated secondary yields for proton broadband using DECAY TURTLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sondgeroth, A.

    1995-02-01

    The calculations for the yields were done by Al Sondgeroth and Anthony Malensek. The authors used the DECAY deck called PBSEC{_}E.DAT from the CMS DECKS library. After obtaining the run modes and calibration modes from the liaison physicist, they made individual decay runs, using DECAY TURTLE from the CMS libraries and a production spectrum subroutine which was modified by Anthony, for each particle and decay mode for all particle types coming out of the target box. Results were weighted according to branching ratios for particles with more than one decay mode. The production spectra were produced assuming beryllium as the target. The optional deuterium target available to broadband will produce slightly higher yields. It should be noted that they did not include pion yields from klong decays because they could not simulate three body decays. Pions from klongs would add a very small fraction to the total yield.

  2. SEPARATION OF RARE EARTHS BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peppard, D.F.; Mason, G.W.

    1960-10-11

    A process is given for separating lanthanide rare earths from each other from an aqueous mineral acid solution, e.g., hydrochloric or nitric acid of a concentration of above 3 M, preferably 12 to 16 M, by extraction with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate, such as tributyl phosphate or a mixture of mono-, di- and tributyl phosphate, and fractional back-extraction with mineral acid whereby the lanthanides are taken up by the acid in the order of increasing atomic number.

  3. Concerning the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Symons, James

    2013-05-29

    James Symons, Nuclear Science Division Director at Lawrence Berkeley Lab, and Daniela Leitner, head of operations at Berkeley Lab's 88-Inch Cyclotron, discuss major contributions to the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University, including ion source, which will based on the VENUS source built for the 88-Inch Cyclotron, and the GRETA gamma-ray detector now under construction there.

  4. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D.

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  5. Search for the Higgs Boson and Rare Standard Model Processes in the ET+B-Jets Signature at the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potamianos, Karolos Jozef

    2011-12-01

    We study rare processes of the standard model of particle physics (SM) in events with missing transverse energy ET, no leptons, and two or three jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a $b$-quark (ET+b-jets signature). We present a search for the SM Higgs boson produced in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson when the Higgs decays into \\bbbar. We consider the scenario where $Z \\to \

  6. Antideuterons from decaying gravitino dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delahaye, Timur; Grefe, Michael

    2015-07-08

    We study the possibility of improving the constraints on the lifetime of gravitino dark matter in scenarios with bilinear R-parity violation by estimating the amount of cosmic-ray antideuterons that can be produced in gravitino decays. Taking into account all different sources of theoretical uncertainties, we find that the margin of improvement beyond the limits already set by cosmic-ray antiproton data are quite narrow and unachievable for the next generation of experiments. However, we also identify more promising energy ranges for future experiments.

  7. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  8. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Timothy W.; Schmidt, Frederick A.

    1995-08-01

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  9. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is ...

  10. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

  11. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  12. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

  13. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

  14. What would we do without rare earths? | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an Energy Innovation Hub created by the U.S. Department of Energy, has a big problem to solve -- what would we do without rare earths? Rare earths are a big part of our modern...

  15. DOE-Led Research Team Makes Significant Rare Earth Discovery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-Led Research Team Makes Significant Rare Earth Discovery DOE-Led Research Team Makes ... Energy (DOE) has found that rare earth elements (REEs) can be removed from two U.S. ...

  16. Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials Theoretical modeling has led to a ... Rare-earth elements are unique in that their cores hold strongly localized electrons that ...

  17. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

  18. Aljazeera story on rare earths features Alex King | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aljazeera story on rare earths features Alex King Aljazeera America recently did a story on the demand and scarcity of rare-earth metals and spoke to Ames Laboratory scientist and...

  19. Inclusive radiative J/{psi} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G.; Ecklund, K. M.; Love, W.

    2008-08-01

    Using data taken with the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated the direct-photon momentum spectrum in the decay J/{psi}(1S){yields}{gamma}gg, via the ''tagged'' process: e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S); {psi}(2S){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}+X. Including contributions from two-body radiative decay processes, we find the ratio of the inclusive direct-photon branching fraction to that of the dominant three-gluon branching fraction [R{sub {gamma}}=B(gg{gamma})/B(ggg)] to be R{sub {gamma}}=0.137{+-}0.001{+-}0.016{+-}0.004, where the errors shown are statistical, systematic, and the model-dependent uncertainty related to the extrapolation to zero photon energy. The shape of the scaled photon energy spectrum in J/{psi}{yields}gg{gamma} is observed to be very similar to that of {upsilon}{yields}gg{gamma}. The R{sub {gamma}} value obtained is roughly consistent with that expected by a simple quark-charge scaling [R{sub {gamma}}{approx}(q{sub c}/q{sub b}){sup 2}] of the value determined at the {upsilon}(1S), but somewhat higher than the value expected from the running of the strong coupling constant.

  20. Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials Theoretical modeling has led to a key development in our understanding of the deeply complex magnetic properties in a series of rare-earth intermetallic materials. Rare-earth elements are unique in that their cores hold strongly localized electrons that underpin their novel magnetic properties. When combined with transition metals, rare earths become technologically-useful intermetallic materials. Here gadolinium-an element

  1. Caterpillar and Cummins Gain Edge Through Argonnne's Rare Computer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caterpillar and Cummins Gain Edge Through Argonnne's Rare Computer Modeling and Analysis Resources PDF icon catcumminscomputingsuccessstorydec2015...

  2. No-neutrino double beta decay: more than one neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Interference effects between light and heavy Majorana neutrinos in the amplitude for no-neutrino double beta decay are discussed. The effects include an upper bound on the heavy neutrino mass, and an A dependence for the effective mass extracted from double beta decay. Thus the search for the no-neutrino decay mode should be pursued in several nuclei, and particularly in Ca/sup 48/, where the effective mass may be quite large.

  3. Neutrinoless double beta decay search with the NEMO 3 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasteva, Irina [Particle Physics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-23

    The NEMO 3 experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay and makes precision measurements of two-neutrino double beta decay in seven isotopes. The latest two-neutrino half-life results are presented, together with the limits on neutrinoless half-lives and the corresponding effective Majorana neutrino masses. Also given are the limits obtained on neutrinoless double beta decay mediated by R{sub p}-violating SUSY, right-hand currents and different Majoron emission modes.

  4. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike todays large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldors motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  5. Annihilation diagrams in two-body nonleptonic decays of charmed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CHARMED MESONS; WEAK HADRONIC DECAY; ANNIHILATION; FEYNMAN DIAGRAM; TWO-BODY PROBLEM; AXIAL VECTOR MESONS; KOBAYASHI-MASKAWA ...

  6. Searches for Leptonic B Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Silke; /SLAC

    2012-04-25

    Measurements of the branching fractions of purely leptonic decays of B-mesons translate into constraints in the plane of the charged Higgs mass versus tan {beta} which are relatively insensitive to the particular theoretical model. Using the full BABAR dataset of 450 million B-decays we search for these decays. No significant signal is found in the decays into electrons or muons and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of the order of a 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. We measure the branching fraction of B {yields} {tau}{mu} to be (1.7 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}.

  7. Radiative J/psi decays and the pseudoscalar puzzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wermes, N.

    1985-07-01

    Recent results on radiative decays of the J/PSI, obtained by the SPEAR detectors Mark III and Crystal Ball and the DCI detector DM2 at Orsay, are presented. The status of the glueball candidates theta(1690), iota(1460), and xi(220), and the decays J/PHI ..-->.. ..gamma.. Vector Vector are reviewed. A coupled channel analysis of iota(1460) decays to K anti K..pi.., rho rho, ..omega omega.., and ..gamma..rho is presented which may help to understand the pseudoscalar sector in radiative J/PHI decays. 42 refs., 16 figs.

  8. Neutron Beta Decay as a Probe of Weak Interactions (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron Beta Decay as a Probe of Weak Interactions Authors: Saunders, Alexander 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National ...

  9. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment Dolinski, M J 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS;...

  10. Search for massive WH resonances decaying into the $$\\ell \

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-28

    In this study, a search for a massive resonancemore » $${\\mathrm{W}^{\\prime }}$$ decaying into a W and a Higgs boson in the $$\\ell \

  11. What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments? Citation Details ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 72 nucleus, semileptonic ...

  12. Autocorrelation Function Statistics and Implication to Decay Ratio Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March-Leuba, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    This document summarizes the results of a series of computer simulations to attempt to identify the statistics of the autocorrelation function, and implications for decay ratio estimation.

  13. Exploring the Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in the Inverted...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature of neutrinos. In this ...

  14. Spectroscopy and Decay of $B$ Hadrons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulini, Manfred

    2007-02-01

    The authors review recent results on heavy quark physics focusing on Run II measurements of B hadron spectroscopy and decay at the Tevatron. A wealth of new B physics measurements from CDF and D0 has been available. These include the spectroscopy of excited B states (B**, B**{sub s}) and the observation of the {Sigma}{sub b} baryon. The discussion of the decays of B hadrons and measurements of branching fractions focuses on charmless two-body decays of B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -}. They report several new B{sub s}{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay channels.

  15. A nuclear physics program at the Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator Facility in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Chang-Bum

    2014-04-15

    This paper outlines the new physics possibilities that fall within the field of nuclear structure and astrophysics based on experiments with radioactive ion beams at the future Rare Isotope Beams Accelerator facility in Korea. This ambitious multi-beam facility has both an Isotope Separation On Line (ISOL) and fragmentation capability to produce rare isotopes beams (RIBs) and will be capable of producing and accelerating beams of wide range mass of nuclides with energies of a few to hundreds MeV per nucleon. The large dynamic range of reaccelerated RIBs will allow the optimization in each nuclear reaction case with respect to cross section and channel opening. The low energy RIBs around Coulomb barrier offer nuclear reactions such as elastic resonance scatterings, one or two particle transfers, Coulomb multiple-excitations, fusion-evaporations, and direct capture reactions for the study of the very neutron-rich and proton-rich nuclides. In contrast, the high energy RIBs produced by in-flight fragmentation with reaccelerated ions from the ISOL enable to explore the study of neutron drip lines in intermediate mass regions. The proposed studies aim at investigating the exotic nuclei near and beyond the nucleon drip lines, and to explore how nuclear many-body systems change in such extreme regions by addressing the following topics: the evolution of shell structure in areas of extreme proton to neutron imbalance; the study of the weak interaction in exotic decay schemes such as beta-delayed two-neutron or two-proton emission; the change of isospin symmetry in isobaric mirror nuclei at the drip lines; two protons or two neutrons radioactivity beyond the drip lines; the role of the continuum states including resonant states above the particle-decay threshold in exotic nuclei; and the effects of nuclear reaction rates triggered by the unbound proton-rich nuclei on nuclear astrophysical processes.

  16. Leptonic Decays of the Charged B Meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, Luke A.; /Ohio State U.; ,

    2010-06-11

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} ({ell} = {tau}, {mu}, or e) in (458.9 {+-} 5.1) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. The analysis strategy and the statistical procedure is set up for branching fraction extraction or upper limit determination. They determine from the dataset a preliminary measurement of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -4}, which excludes zero at 2.4{sigma}, and f{sub B} = 255 {+-} 58 MeV. Combination with the hadronically tagged measurement yields {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.8 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -4}. They also set preliminary limits on the branching fractions at {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}) < 11 x 10{sup -6} (90% C.L.), and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -4} (90% C.L.).

  17. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imashuku, Susumu Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun

    2013-12-15

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  18. The search for Majorana neutrinos with neutrinoless double beta decays: From CUORICINO to LUCIFER experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy) and INFN - Sezione di Roma, Roma I-00185 (Italy)

    2012-11-20

    The study of neutrino properties is one of the fundamental challenges in particle physics nowadays. Fifty years of investigations established that neutrinos are massive but the absolute mass scale has not yet been measured. Moreover its true nature is still unknown. Is the neutrino its own antiparticle (thus violating the lepton number) as proposed by Majorana in 1937? The only way to probe the neutrino nature is through the observation of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}), a very rare spontaneous nuclear transition which emits two electrons and no neutrinos. In this paper, after a brief introduction to the theoretical framework of Majorana's neutrino, a presentation of experimental challenges posed by 0{nu}{beta}{beta} search will be given as well as an overview of present status and future perpectives of experiments.

  19. CP Violation in Tau to K* Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgkinson, Mark; /Manchester U.

    2006-03-10

    A sample of {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sup {+-}} decays with K*{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, using 123.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is used to search for a direct CP violation effect in the charged Higgs sector. No evidence of CP violation is found and the imaginary part of the charged Higgs coupling, {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}), in the Multi-Higgs-Doublet-Model is found to be at -0.284 < {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}) < 0.200 at 90% Confidence Level. In addition the installation of the kk2f Monte Carlo generator into the BaBar software framework is described.

  20. Constraining mass spectra with sterile neutrinos from neutrinoless double beta decay, tritium beta decay, and cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Srubabati [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Chhatnag Road, Jhunsi, Allahabad 211 019 (India); Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-06-01

    We analyze the constraints on neutrino mass spectra with extra sterile neutrinos as implied by the LSND experiment. The various mass related observables in neutrinoless double beta decay, tritium beta decay and cosmology are discussed. Both neutrino oscillation results as well as recent cosmological neutrino mass bounds are taken into account. We find that some of the allowed mass patterns are severely restricted by the current constraints, in particular, by the cosmological constraints on the total sum of neutrino masses and by the nonmaximality of the solar neutrino mixing angle. Furthermore, we estimate the form of the four neutrino mass matrices and also comment on the situation in scenarios with two additional sterile neutrinos.

  1. Rare Earth-Bearing Murataite Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Stefanovsky, Olga; Yudintsev, Sergey; Nikonov, Boris

    2007-07-01

    Phase composition of the murataite-based ceramics containing 10 wt.% lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, yttrium, zirconium oxides was studied. The ceramics were prepared by melting of oxide mixtures in 20 mL glass-carbon crucibles in air at {approx}1500 deg. C. They are composed of predominant murataite-type phases and minor extra phases: rutile, crichtonite, perovskite, ilmenite/pyrophanite, and zirconolite (in the Zr-bearing sample only). Three murataite-related phases with five- (5C), eight- (8C), and three-fold (3C) elementary fluorite unit cell are normally present in all the ceramics. These phases form core, intermediate zone, and rim of the murataite grains, respectively. They are predominant host phases for the rare earth elements whose concentrations are reduced in a row: 5C>8C>3C. Appreciate fraction of La and Ce may enter the perovskite phase. (authors)

  2. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  3. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, April D.; Modine, Frank A.; Lauf, Robert J.; Alim, Mohammad A.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Bartkowiak, Miroslaw

    1998-01-01

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  4. Scaling factor inconsistencies in neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, S. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    The modern theory of neutrinoless double beta decay includes a scaling factor that has often been treated inconsistently in the literature. The nuclear contribution to the decay half-life can be suppressed by 15%-20% when scaling factors are mismatched. Correspondingly, is overestimated.

  5. Neutrinoless double-{beta} decay: Status and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilenky, S. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bilenky@he.sissa.it

    2006-12-15

    A brief summary of the status of neutrino masses, mixing, and oscillations is presented. Neutrinoless double {beta} decay is considered. Predictions for the effective Majorana mass are reviewed. A possible test of the calculations of nuclear matrix elements of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay is proposed.

  6. Imperfect World of beta beta-decay Nuclear Data Sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pritychenko, B.

    2015-01-03

    The precision of double-beta ββ-decay experimental half lives and their uncertainties is reanalyzed. The method of Benford's distributions has been applied to nuclear reaction, structure and decay data sets. First-digit distribution trend for ββ-decay T2v1/2 is consistent with large nuclear reaction and structure data sets and provides validation of experimental half-lives. A complementary analysis of the decay uncertainties indicates deficiencies due to small size of statistical samples, and incomplete collection of experimental information. Further experimental and theoretical efforts would lead toward more precise values of-decay half-lives and nuclear matrix elements.

  7. Prompt proton decay in the vicinity of {sup 56}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L-L.; Fahlander, C.; Rietz, R. du; Torres, D. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; Sarantites, D. G.; Sobotka, L. G.; Ekman, J.

    2007-11-30

    A new decay mode, the so called prompt proton decay, was discovered in 1998. It has since proven to be an important decay mechanism for several neutron deficient nuclei in the A{approx}60 region. To measure with high accuracy the energies and angular distributions of these protons, a state-of-the-art charged particle detector--LuWuSiA--was developed. It was first utilized during a fusion-evaporation reaction experiment performed at Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.A. In this contribution, the characteristics of the prompt proton decay are discussed along with the special features of LuWuSiA as well as a revisit to the prompt proton decay in {sup 58}Cu.

  8. Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Id Betan, R.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

  9. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the B→K(*)μ⁺μ⁻Decay and First Observation of the Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻ Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-04-18

    We reconstruct the rare decays B⁺→K⁺μ⁺μ⁻, B⁰→K*(892)⁰μ⁺μ⁻, and Bs0→Φ(1020)μ⁺μ⁻ in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb⁻¹ collected in pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. Using 121±16 B⁺→K⁺μ⁺μ⁻ and 101±12 B⁰→K*⁰μ⁺μ⁻ decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B⁺ and B⁰ decay modes, and the K*⁰ longitudinal polarization fraction in the B⁰ decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the predictions, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy. We also report the first observation of the Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻ decay and measure its branching ratio BR(Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻)=[1.44±0.33±0.46]×10⁻⁶ using 27±6 signal events. This is currently the most rare Bs0 decay observed.

  10. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at $$$\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =\\; $$$ s N N = 5.02 $$$\\,\\text {TeV}$$$ TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2014-06-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt(sNN) = 5.02 TeV. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range pt approximately 0.1-1.7 GeV and laboratory rapidity abs(y) < 1 are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average pt increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average pt with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that EPOS LHC, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is ablemore » to reproduce most of the data features, unlike HIJING and AMPT. The pt spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.« less

  11. Study of the production of charged pions, kaons, and protons in pPb collisions at $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =\\; $$ s N N = 5.02 $$\\,\\text {TeV}$$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Van der Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Dildick, S.; Garcia, G.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Selvaggi, M.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Martins Junior, M. Correa; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; De Souza, S. Fonseca; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Manganote, E. J. Tonelli; Pereira, A. Vilela; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Lagana, C.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Sierra, L. F. Chaparro; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Tikvica, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Heine, K.; Höing, R. S.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lange, J.; Marchesini, I.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F. -P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Stiliaris, E.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Swain, S. K.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. 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S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Galanti, M.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Kanishchev, F. K.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Dell’Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Mazza, G.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Grigelionis, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; de La Cruz, I. Heredia; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Linares, E. Casimiro; Pineda, A. Morelos; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; Da Cruz E Silva, C. Beirão; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Nguyen, F.; Antunes, J. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Korotkikh, V.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Vardanyan, I.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Maestre, J. Alcaraz; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Llatas, M. Chamizo; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Peris, A. Delgado; Vázquez, D. Domínguez; Bedoya, C. Fernandez; Ramos, J. P. Fernández; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Lopez, O. Gonzalez; Lopez, S. Goy; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; De Martino, E. Navarro; Pelayo, J. Puerta; Olmeda, A. Quintario; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Menendez, J. Fernandez; Folgueras, S.; Caballero, I. Gonzalez; Iglesias, L. Lloret; Gomez, J. Piedra; Cifuentes, J. A. Brochero; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Campderros, J. Duarte; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Sanchez, J. Gonzalez; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Virto, A. Lopez; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Rivero, C. Martinez; Matorras, F.; Sanchez, F. J. Munoz; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Cortabitarte, R. Vilar; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bendavid, J.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Bondu, O.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Perez, J. A. Coarasa; Colafranceschi, S.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; David, A.; De Roeck, A.; De Visscher, S.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eugster, J.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Hammer, J.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y. -J.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Cortezon, E. Palencia; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Plagge, M.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Stoye, M.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; del Arbol, P. Martinez Ruiz; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Taroni, S.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R. -S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Karapinar, G.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Bahtiyar, H.; Barlas, E.; Cankocak, K.; Günaydin, Y. O.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Yücel, M.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Burton, D.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Negra, M. Della; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Bryer, A. Guneratne; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Kenzie, M.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Kasmi, A.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; De La Barca Sanchez, M. Calderon; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Takasugi, E.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Jandir, P.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Campagnari, C.; D’Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magana Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Kcira, D.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Lopez, E. Luiggi; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Kaufman, G. Nicolas; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Outschoorn, V. I. Martinez; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Lacroix, F.; Moon, D. H.; O’Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Haupt, J.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Wan, Z.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Antonelli, L.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Vuosalo, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Belknap, D. A.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2014-06-01

    Spectra of identified charged hadrons are measured in pPb collisions with the CMS detector at the LHC at sqrt(sNN) = 5.02 TeV. Charged pions, kaons, and protons in the transverse-momentum range pt approximately 0.1-1.7 GeV and laboratory rapidity abs(y) < 1 are identified via their energy loss in the silicon tracker. The average pt increases with particle mass and the charged multiplicity of the event. The increase of the average pt with charged multiplicity is greater for heavier hadrons. Comparisons to Monte Carlo event generators reveal that EPOS LHC, which incorporates additional hydrodynamic evolution of the created system, is able to reproduce most of the data features, unlike HIJING and AMPT. The pt spectra and integrated yields are also compared to those measured in pp and PbPb collisions at various energies. The average transverse momentum and particle ratio measurements indicate that particle production at LHC energies is strongly correlated with event particle multiplicity.

  12. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Judith L.; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2009-06-16

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  13. SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowan, G.A.

    1959-08-25

    The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

  14. What are the Rare Earths? | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What are the Rare Earths? Rare-earth metals or elements typically include scandium (Sc-21), yttrium (Y-39) and the lanthanides: lanthanum (La-57), cerium (Ce-58), praseodymium (Pr-59), neodymium (Nd-60), promethium (Pm-61), samarium (Sm-62), europium (Eu-63), gadolinium (Gd-64), terbium (Tb-65), dysprosium (Dy-66), holmium (Ho-67), erbium (Er-68), thulium (Tm-69), ytterbium (Yb-70), and lutetium (Lu-71). When alloyed with other metals, the rare-earths can provide enhanced magnetic, strength and

  15. Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths April 20, 2011 - 6:17pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) What does this mean for me? Rare earth elements -- dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium -- are essential to a wide range of green energy technologies ranging from windmills to electric vehicles One of their primary uses is in permanent magnets, which amount to over a $4 billion global industry Ames Laboratory

  16. Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Twinkles in Rare Color Jefferson Lab Laser Twinkles in Rare Color NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Dec. 21 - December is a time for twinkling lights, and scientists at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are delivering. They've just produced a long-sought, rare color of laser light 100 times brighter than that generated anywhere else. The light was produced by Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser facility. The laser delivered vacuum ultraviolet light in the form of 10

  17. COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Challenges | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 4, 2015, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technical Challenges Dr. Georg Bollen Michigan State University - The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams Wednesday Colloquium, February 4, 2015, "Facility for Rare Isotope Beams - Scientific Opportunities and Technial Chanllenges", Dr. Georg Bollen Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics

  18. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hiplito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a ?(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  19. Two-photon decay of pseudoscalar quarkonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pham, T. N.

    2008-08-29

    We report on our recent evaluation of the two-photon width of the pseudoscalar quarkonia, {eta}{sub c}(nS) and {eta}{sub b}(nS) in an approach based on Heavy-Quark Spin Symmetry (HQSS). To what concerns the 1S state {eta}{sub c}, our parameter-free computation agrees with experiments, as well as most of other theoretical works. On the other hand, our computation for the 2S-state looks 2S like a confirmation that there may exist an anomaly related to the decay of {eta}{sub c}{sup '}, especially in the light of the new preliminary result of the Belle collaboration. We also point out that the essentially model-independent ratio of {eta}{sub b} two-photon width to the {upsilon} leptonic width and the {eta}{sub b} two-photon width could be used to extract the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}.

  20. Pionic contribution to neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vergados, J. D. [Physics Department, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, GR 451 10 (Greece); Theory Division, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Faessler, Amand [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Toki, H. [RCNP, Osaka University, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan)

    2010-02-01

    It is well known that neutrinoless double decay is going to play a crucial role in settling the neutrino properties, which cannot be extracted from the neutrino oscillation data. It is, in particular, expected to settle the absolute scale of neutrino mass and determine whether the neutrinos are Majorana particles, i.e. they coincide with their own antiparticles. In order to extract the average neutrino mass from the data, one must be able to estimate the contribution of all possible high mass intermediate particles. The latter, which occur in practically all extensions of the standard model, can, in principle, be differentiated from the usual mass term, if data from various targets are available. One, however, must first be able to reliably calculate the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. Such calculations are extremely difficult since the effective transition operators are very short ranged. For such operators processes like pionic contributions, which are usually negligible, turn out to be dominant. We study such an effect in a nonrelativistic quark model for the pion and the nucleon.

  1. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtained for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.

  2. Shock wave perturbation decay in granular materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogler, Tracy J.

    2015-11-05

    A technique in which the evolution of a perturbation in a shock wave front is monitored as it travels through a sample is applied to granular materials. Although the approach was originally conceived as a way to measure the viscosity of the sample, here it is utilized as a means to probe the deviatoric strength of the material. Initial results for a tungsten carbide powder are presented that demonstrate the approach is viable. Simulations of the experiments using continuum and mesoscale modeling approaches are used to better understand the experiments. The best agreement with the limited experimental data is obtainedmore » for the mesoscale model, which has previously been shown to give good agreement with planar impact results. The continuum simulations indicate that the decay of the perturbation is controlled by material strength but is insensitive to the compaction response. Other sensitivities are assessed using the two modeling approaches. The simulations indicate that the configuration used in the preliminary experiments suffers from certain artifacts and should be modified to remove them. As a result, the limitations of the current instrumentation are discussed, and possible approaches to improve it are suggested.« less

  3. Two surface plasmon decay of plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluge, T. Metzkes, J.; Zeil, K.; Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E.

    2015-06-15

    The interaction of ultra-intense lasers with solid foils can be used to accelerate ions to high energies well exceeding 60 MeV [Gaillard et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056710 (2011)]. The non-linear relativistic motion of electrons in the intense laser radiation leads to their acceleration and later to the acceleration of ions. Ions can be accelerated from the front surface, the foil interior region, and the foil rear surface (target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA), most widely used), or the foil may be accelerated as a whole if sufficiently thin (radiation pressure acceleration). Here, we focus on the most widely used mechanism for laser ion-acceleration of TNSA. Starting from perfectly flat foils, we show by simulations how electron filamentation at or inside the solid leads to spatial modulations in the ions. The exact dynamics depend very sensitively on the chosen initial parameters which has a tremendous effect on electron dynamics. In the case of step-like density gradients, we find evidence that suggests a two-surface-plasmon decay of plasma oscillations triggering a Raileigh-Taylor-like instability.

  4. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kogler, Laura

    2011-11-03

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2{nu}{beta}{beta}). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO{sub 2} crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of #24;10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with {sup 130}Te and 2 with {sup 128}Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of #24;350 g {sup 130}Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life was measured to be T{sup 2{nu}}{sub 1/2} = [9.81{+-} #6;0.96(stat){+-} 0.49(syst)]#2;x10{sup 20} y.

  5. The Majorana Demonstrator: Progress towards showing the feasibility of a 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnerty, P.; Aguayo, Estanislao; Amman, M.; Avignone, Frank T.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Barton, P. J.; Beene, Jim; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, P. J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Fraenkle, Florian; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M.; Guiseppe, Vincente; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; LaFerriere, Brian D.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; Looker, Q.; Luke, P.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Phillips, David; Poon, Alan; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, Werner; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Yaver, Harold; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir

    2014-03-24

    The Majorana Demonstrator will search for the neutrinoless double-beta decay (0*) of the 76Ge isotope with a mixed array of enriched and natural germanium detectors. The observation of this rare decay would indicate the neutrino is its own anti-particle, demonstrate that lepton number is not conserved, and provide information on the absolute mass-scale of the neutrino. The Demonstrator is being assembled at the 4850 foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, South Dakota. The array will be contained in a lowbackground environment and surrounded by passive and active shielding. The goals for the Demonstrator are: demonstrating a background rate less than 3 counts tonne -1 year-1 in the 4 keV region of interest (ROI) surrounding the 2039 keV 76Ge endpoint energy; establishing the technology required to build a tonne-scale germanium based double-beta decay experiment; testing the recent claim of observation of 0; and performing a direct search for lightWIMPs (3-10 GeV/c2).

  6. Trace rare earth element analysis in briny groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Smith, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    A rare-earth element (REE) group separation scheme has been developed. REE data for two briny groundwaters representing Granite Wash and Wolfcamp Carbonate formations are reported. (DLC)

  7. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water ... in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas ...

  8. DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. The request is specifically focused on rare earth metals (e.g., lanthanum, cerium and neodymium) and several other metals including lithium and cobalt, but respondents are welcome to identify other materials of interest. These

  9. Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths from Coal and By...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Characterization and Recovery of Rare Earths from Coal and By-Products ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  10. At 85, Mr. Rare Earth is Retiring | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    At 85, Mr. Rare Earth is Retiring At 85, Mr. Rare Earth is Retiring February 19, 2016 - 11:00am Addthis We first talked to Dr. Gschneider back in 2013 for one of our <a href="/node/609731">"10 Questions with a Scientist"</a> blogs. Today he looks back at over 60 years of studying rare earth metals. We first talked to Dr. Gschneider back in 2013 for one of our "10 Questions with a Scientist" blogs. Today he looks back at over 60 years of studying rare

  11. PROCESS FOR PREPARING RARE EARTH CHROMITE BASED CERAMIC MATERIALS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: PROCESS FOR PREPARING RARE EARTH CHROMITE BASED CERAMIC MATERIALS AND THE MATERIALS OBTAINED. (in French) Authors: Elston, J. ; Roux, M. Publication Date: 1971-01-01 OSTI ...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR NET-SHAPE CASTABLE RARE EARTH MODIFIED ALUMINUM ALLOYS FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE APPLICATION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CHARACTERIZATION OF NEAR ...

  13. Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

  14. Dynamics of excimer formation and decay in supercritical krypton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holroyd, Richard A.; Cook, Andrew R.; Preses, Jack M.

    2009-12-14

    New infrared absorbing species are identified in the pulse radiolysis of supercritical Kr at high pressures. The species are believed to be excimers. Their formation and decay rates have been time resolved using the Laser Electron Accelerator Facility. An initial species, formed in less than 1 ns, absorbs at several wavelengths between 790 and 1300 nm; The decay of this species is initially fast, followed by a slower component; the decay rate increases with pressure. As this initial species decays a second excimer is formed absorbing at 830, 890, and 990 nm. The growth and decay rates of this excimer are also pressure dependent. A third excimer, absorbing between 1000 and 1200 nm grows at a rate similar to that of the decay of the second species. The decay rate of the third species is also pressure dependent; the lifetime increases from 9.4 ns at 109 bar to 49 ns at 15 bar. A kinetic mechanism is proposed that satisfactorily reproduces the experimental results. The first species is identified as a higher energy gerade triplet state excimer and the second as the singlet gerade state.

  15. Gamma-ray burst spectrum with decaying magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xiaohong; Bai, Jinming [Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China); Li, Zhuo [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Xuewen; Zhang, Bin-bin; Mszros, Peter, E-mail: zhaoxh@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In the internal shock model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the synchrotron spectrum from the fast cooling electrons in a homogeneous downstream magnetic field (MF) is too soft to produce the low-energy slope of GRB spectra. However, the MF may decay downstream with distance from the shock front. Here we show that the synchrotron spectrum becomes harder if electrons undergo synchrotron and inverse-Compton cooling in a decaying MF. To reconcile this with the typical GRB spectrum with low-energy slope ?F {sub ?}??, the postshock MF decay time must be comparable to the cooling time of the bulk electrons (corresponding to a MF decaying length typically of ?10{sup 5} skin depths); that the inverse-Compton cooling should dominate synchrotron cooling after the MF decay time; and/or that the MF decays with comoving time roughly as B?t {sup 1.5}. An internal shock synchrotron model with a decaying MF can account for the majority of GRBs with low-energy slopes not harder than ?{sup 4/3}.

  16. Multiple particle emission after {sup 11}Li beta-decay: exploring new decay channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madurga, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Prezado, Y.; Tengblad, O.; Jonson, B.; Nyman, G.; Riisager, K.

    2007-11-30

    We present here a study of the three-body, n{alpha}{sup 6}He particle break-up of {sup 11}Be(10.6) following {sup 11}Li {beta}-decay. The emitted charged particles were detected in coincidence using a cubic set-up of highly segmented silicon detectors, allowing us to measure simultaneously energy and trajectory. The three body break-up of {sup 11}Be(10.5) through the intermediate state {sup 10}Be(9.6) was modeled using the multiple-level single-channel R-Matrix formalism.

  17. Study of Scalar Mesons and Related Radiative Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deirdre Black; Masayasu Harada; Joseph Schechter

    2002-06-01

    After a brief review of the puzzling light scalar meson sector of QCD, a brief summary will be given of a paper concerning radiative decays involving the light scalars. There, a simple vector meson dominance model is constructed in an initial attempt to relate a large number of the radiative decays involving a putative scalar nonet to each other. As an application it is illustrated why a{sub 0}(980)-f{sub 0}(980) mixing is not expected to greatly alter the f{sub 0}/a{sub 0} production ratio for radiative {phi} decays.

  18. Cold fusion: externally induced beta decay of the deuteron?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, R.B.

    1995-04-01

    Plasma frequencies {nu}{sub e} of interstitial electrons in palladium crystals charged with deuterium by electrolysis can reach resonance with the beats of de Broglie group frequencies of deuterons. This frequency can occur during acoustic compressions of lattices due to (1) bubble formation at the Pd cathode, (2) particles from cosmic ray showers, and (3) beta decays of deuterons. Resonance perturbs the orbits of deuterons nucleon constituents with a finite probability of causing dissociation and beta decay -- that is the basic conjecture. The exponential tendency resulting from cause (3) of lattice compression is limited by melting of the lattice, whose integrity is essential for {nu}{sub e}, which drives the decays.

  19. Searches for New Physics in Top Decays at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pleier, Marc-Andre; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-01

    The Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab with its centre of mass energy of 1.96 TeV allows for pair production of top quarks and the study of top quark decay properties. This report reflects the current status of measurements of the W boson helicity in top quark decays and the ratio of top quark branching fractions as well as searches for neutral current top quark decays and pair production of fourth generation t' quarks, performed by the D0 Collaboration utilising datasets of up to 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  20. Decays Ξ b → Λ b π and diquark correlations in hyperons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decays b b and diquark correlations in hyperons Prev Next Title: Decays b b and diquark correlations in hyperons Authors: Li, Xin ; Voloshin, M. B. ...

  1. Decays Ξ b → Λ b π and diquark correlations in hyperons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decays b b and diquark correlations in hyperons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Decays b b and diquark correlations in hyperons Authors: Li, ...

  2. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L.; Jacobs, Ralph R.; Krupke, William F.; Weber, Marvin J.

    1980-01-01

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  3. CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

    1958-11-01

    A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

  4. CMI Webinar: Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Materials Institute Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach The CMI Webinar series includes a presentation CMI Webinar: Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach by David Reed, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), on April 23, 2015. The recording of the webinar runs nearly 39 minutes (38:52

  5. Hierarchy of scales in B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-08-31

    We show that the naive factorization approach can accommodate the existence of the observed hierarchy of branching ratios for the B{yields}PS decays (P stands for pseudoscalar and S for scalar mesons respectively.

  6. Nuclear Decay Data Evaluations at IFIN-HH, Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luca, A.

    2014-06-15

    An IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Updated Decay Data Library for Actinides was implemented during the period 2005-2012. The author participated in the CRP, as a representative of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory. Decay data for five actinide nuclides were evaluated by the author, according to the procedures and rules of the international cooperation Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP): {sup 236}U, {sup 234}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 211}Bi and {sup 211}Po. The most important results, conclusions and some recommendations of the evaluator are presented. The IFIN-HH involvement in several new international and national research projects in the field is briefly mentioned; new evaluations and experimental determination of some nuclear decay data (photon absolute emission probability, half-life) for nuclear medicine applications are foreseen.

  7. Observation of the Decay B??Ds(*)+K?l????l

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; et al

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??l based on 342fb? of data collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D+s decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B??Ds(*)+K?l??l with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B??Ds(*)+K?l??l)=[6.13+1.04-1.03(stat)0.43(syst)0.51(B(Ds))]10??, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the Ds branching fractions.

  8. OSTIblog Articles in the neutrinos Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Topic Mining for Gold, Neutrinos and the Neutrinoless ... The site of the former Homestake Mine was once one of the largest and deepest gold mines ...

  9. Complementarity of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodelson, Scott; Lykken, Joseph

    2014-03-20

    Neutrinoless double beta decay experiments constrain one combination of neutrino parameters, while cosmic surveys constrain another. This complementarity opens up an exciting range of possibilities. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, and the neutrino masses follow an inverted hierarchy, then the upcoming sets of both experiments will detect signals. The combined constraints will pin down not only the neutrino masses but also constrain one of the Majorana phases. If the hierarchy is normal, then a beta decay detection with the upcoming generation of experiments is unlikely, but cosmic surveys could constrain the sum of the masses to be relatively heavy, thereby producing a lower bound for the neutrinoless double beta decay rate, and therefore an argument for a next generation beta decay experiment. In this case as well, a combination of the phases will be constrained.

  10. Phenomenology of semileptonic B -meson decays with form factors...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of semileptonic B -meson decays with form factors from lattice QCD Authors: Du, Daping ; El-Khadra, A. X. ; Gottlieb, Steven ; Kronfeld, A. S. ; Laiho, J. ; Lunghi, E. ; Van de...

  11. Precision On-Line Decay Facility - Facilities - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beta decay provide the most precise information available on the unitarity of the CKM matrix, a key test for the possible existence of physics beyond the Standard Model. Extremely...

  12. DOE Science Showcase - Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinos are created as a result of certain types of radioactive decay, or nuclear reactions such as those that take place in the Sun, in nuclear reactors, or when cosmic rays hit ...

  13. Decay of helical Kelvin waves on a quantum vortex filament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-07-15

    We study the dynamics of helical Kelvin waves moving along a quantum vortex filament driven by a normal fluid flow. We employ the vector form of the quantum local induction approximation (LIA) due to Schwarz. For an isolated filament, this is an adequate approximation to the full Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov dynamics. The motion of such Kelvin waves is both translational (along the quantum vortex filament) and rotational (in the plane orthogonal to the reference axis). We first present an exact closed form solution for the motion of these Kelvin waves in the case of a constant amplitude helix. Such solutions exist for a critical wave number and correspond exactly to the Donnelly-Glaberson instability, so perturbations of such solutions either decay to line filaments or blow-up. This leads us to consider helical Kelvin waves which decay to line filaments. Unlike in the case of constant amplitude helical solutions, the dynamics are much more complicated for the decaying helical waves, owing to the fact that the rate of decay of the helical perturbations along the vortex filament is not constant in time. We give an analytical and numerical description of the motion of decaying helical Kelvin waves, from which we are able to ascertain the influence of the physical parameters on the decay, translational motion along the filament, and rotational motion, of these waves (all of which depend nonlinearly on time). One interesting finding is that the helical Kelvin waves do not decay uniformly. Rather, such waves decay slowly for small time scales, and more rapidly for large time scales. The rotational and translational velocity of the Kelvin waves depend strongly on this rate of decay, and we find that the speed of propagation of a helical Kelvin wave along a quantum filament is large for small time while the wave asymptotically slows as it decays. The rotational velocity of such Kelvin waves along the filament will increase over time, asymptotically reaching a finite

  14. PROCESS FOR SEPARATING AMERICIUM AND CURIUM FROM RARE EARTH ELEMENTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baybarz, R.D.; Lloyd, M.H.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to methods of separating americium and curium values from rare earth values. In accordance with the invention americium, curium, and rare earth values are sorbed on an anion exchange resin. A major portion of the rare earth values are selectively stripped from the resin with a concentrated aqueous solution of lithium chloride, and americium, curium, and a minor portion of rare earth values are then stripped from the resin with a dilute aqueous solution of lithium chloride. The americium and curium values are further purified by increasing the concentration of lithium chloride in the solution to at least 8 molar and selectively extracting rare earth values from the resulting solution with a monoalkylphosphoric acid. (AEC)

  15. Higgs boson decays in the littlest Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Sprinberg, G.A.; Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis

    2005-02-01

    We calculate the two body Higgs boson decays in the framework of the littlest Higgs model. The decay H{yields}{gamma}Z is computed at one-loop-level and, using previous results, we evaluate the branching fractions in the framework of the littlest Higgs model. A wide range of the space parameter of the model is considered and possible deviations from the standard model are explored.

  16. Effect of nuclear deformation on double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodin, Vadim [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-11-09

    The existing ways of accounting for deformation in recent calculations of neutrinoless double beta decay matrix elements are discussed. From an analysis of relevant experimental data it is argued that only {sup 150}Nd reveals convincing evidences of strong static deformation, which should eventually be taken into account in QRPA calculations. A proposal which allows in principle to measure the neutrino less double beta decay Fermi matrix element is briefly described.

  17. Decay instability of a whistler in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, D.P.; Sharma, R.R.

    1981-08-01

    The parametric instabilities of a high power whistler in a high-density plasma possess large growth rates when the scattered sideband is an electrostatic lower hybrid mode. The efficient channels of decay include oscillating two stream instability, nonlinear Landau damping, and resonant decay involving ion acoustic and ion cyclotron modes. The processes of nonlinear scattering i.e., the ones possessing whistler sidebands are relatively less significant.

  18. Reheating dynamics affects non-perturbative decay of spectator fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enqvist, Kari; Lerner, Rose N.; Rusak, Stanislav E-mail: rose.lerner@helsinki.fi

    2013-11-01

    The behaviour of oscillating scalar spectator fields after inflation depends on the thermal background produced by inflaton decay. Resonant decay of the spectator is often blocked by large induced thermal masses. We account for the finite decay width of the inflaton and the protracted build-up of the thermal bath to determine the early evolution of a homogeneous spectator field ? coupled to the Higgs Boson ? through the term g{sup 2}?{sup 2}?{sup 2}, the only renormalisable coupling of a new scalar to the Standard Model. We find that for very large higgs-spectator coupling g?>10{sup ?3}, the resonance is not always blocked as was previously suggested. As a consequence, the oscillating spectator can decay quickly. For other parameter values, we find that although qualitative features of the thermal blocking still hold, the dynamics are altered compared to the instant decay case. These findings are important for curvaton models, where the oscillating field must be relatively long lived in order to produce the curvature perturbation. They are also relevant for other spectator fields, which must decay sufficiently early to avoid spoiling the predictions of baryogenesis and nucleosynthesis.

  19. Study of the D0 ---> pi- pi+ pi- pi+ decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /CINVESTAV, IPN /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment at Fermilab, they present new measurements for the Cabbibo-suppressed decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. They measure the branching ratio {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0914 {+-} 0.0018 {+-} 0.0022. An amplitude analysis has been performed, a first for this channel, in order to determine the resonant substructure of this decay mode. The dominant component is the decay D{sup 0} {yields} a{sub 1}(1260){sup +}{pi}{sup -}, accounting for 60% of the decay rate. The second most dominant contribution comes from the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, with a fraction of 25%. They also study the a{sub 1}(1260) line shape and resonant substructure. Using the helicity formalism for the angular distribution of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} {rho}(770){sup 0}{rho}(770){sup 0}, they measure a longitudinal polarization of P{sub L} = (71 {+-} 4 {+-} 2)%.

  20. Hadronic decays of the D/sub s/ meson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserbaech, S.R.

    1989-06-01

    The D/sub s//sup +/ is the lowest-lying pseudoscalar meson containing charm and anti-strange quarks. Evidence for this state was first reported in 1977, although more recent observations disagree with some of the early results. Since 1983 the weakly decaying D/sub s//sup +/ has been observed in many experiments. Relative branching fractions have been measured for many non-leptonic decay modes, including D/sub s//sup +/ /yields/ /phi//pi//sup +/, /phi//pi//sup +//pi//sup +//pi//sup /minus//, /bar K/*/sup 0/K/sup +/, and f/sub 0/(975)/pi//sup +/. The absolute branching fractions are estimated in high energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilation from the observed numbers of reconstructed D/sub s//sup +/ decays and the expected D/sub s//sup +/ production cross section. The lowest-lying vector c/bar s/ meson, the D/sub s/*/sup +/, has also been seen in its decay to /gamma/D/sub s//sup +/. Weak decays of the heavy quark and lepton flavors are relevant to the development of the Standard Model of both the electroweak and the strong interactions. Measurements of charmed particle weak decay are useful for determining the parameter of the Standard Model and for testing phenomenological models which include strong effects. 83 refs., 56 figs., 12 tabs.

  1. Short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance, tritium beta decay, and neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giunti, Carlo; Laveder, Marco [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica G. Galilei, Universita di Padova, and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2010-09-01

    We consider the interpretation of the MiniBooNE low-energy anomaly and the gallium radioactive source experiments anomaly in terms of short-baseline electron neutrino disappearance in the framework of 3+1 four-neutrino mixing schemes. The separate fits of MiniBooNE and gallium data are highly compatible, with close best-fit values of the effective oscillation parameters {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}2{theta}. The combined fit gives {Delta}m{sup 2}(greater-or-similar sign)0.1 eV{sup 2} and 0.11(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.48 at 2{sigma}. We consider also the data of the Bugey and Chooz reactor antineutrino oscillation experiments and the limits on the effective electron antineutrino mass in {beta} decay obtained in the Mainz and Troitsk tritium experiments. The fit of the data of these experiments limits the value of sin{sup 2}2{theta} below 0.10 at 2{sigma}. Considering the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data as a statistical fluctuation, we perform a combined fit which gives {Delta}m{sup 2}{approx_equal}2 eV and 0.01(less-or-similar sign)sin{sup 2}2{theta}(less-or-similar sign)0.13 at 2{sigma}. Assuming a hierarchy of masses m{sub 1}, m{sub 2}, m{sub 3}<decay and neutrinoless double-{beta} decay are, respectively, between about 0.06 and 0.49 and between about 0.003 and 0.07 eV at 2{sigma}. We also consider the possibility of reconciling the tension between the neutrino MiniBooNE and gallium data and the antineutrino reactor and tritium data with different mixings in the neutrino and antineutrino sectors. We find a 2.6{sigma} indication of a mixing angle asymmetry.

  2. Rare-earth-free magnet made from cheap materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare-earth-free magnet Rare-earth-free magnet made from cheap materials Researchers create a powerful permanent magnet out of iron and nitrogen as part of a program to cut the need for rare-earth metals May 17, 2016 Mars (a) 2 × 1016/cm2 fluence, embedded dots can be observed (rich N region), with a diameter of 20 nm, separated by 140 to 200 nm; (b) 8 × 1016/cm2 fluence, besides embedded dots, obvious cracks appeared; (c) 1 × 1017/cm2 fluence, an obvious microstructure is generated, with

  3. What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments? (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: What can we learn from neutrinoless double beta decay experiments? We assess how well next generation neutrinoless double beta decay and normal neutrino beta decay experiments can answer four fundamental questions. 1) If neutrinoless double beta decay searches do not detect a signal, and if the spectrum is known to be inverted hierarchy, can we conclude

  4. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity andmore » equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.« less

  5. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excessmore » of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.« less

  6. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ → 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two γ-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via β-decay, the Jπ = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keVmore » in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.« less

  7. 137 Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchn, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0+ ? 0+ transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two ?-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard 137Cs source populating, via ?-decay, the J? = 11/2- isomeric state at 662 keV in 137Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.

  8. DOE Science Showcase - Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy - LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells Science.gov - H.R.4866 - Rare Earths Supply-Chain Technology and Resources Transformation Act ...

  9. METHOD OF SEPARATING RARE EARTHS BY ION EXCHANGE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spedding, F.H.; Powell, J.E.

    1960-10-18

    A process is given for separating yttrium and rare earth values having atomic numbers of from 57 through 60 and 68 through 71 from an aqueous solution whose pH value can range from 1 to 9. All rare earths and yttrium are first adsorbed on a cation exchange resin, and they are then eluted with a solution of N-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) in the order of decreasing atomic number, yttrium behaving like element 61; the effluents are collected in fractions. The HEDTA is recovered by elution with ammonia solution and the resin is regenerated with sulfuric acid. Rare earths are precipitated from the various effluents with oxalic acid, and each supernatant is passed over cation exchange resin for adsorption of HEDTA and nonprecipitated rare earths: the oxalic acid is not retained by the resin.

  10. Rare-earth nanoparticles for catalysis | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing new materials based on these two elements is expected to impact favorably the supply chain of the more scarce rare earths. The SULI student in this program will work...

  11. Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion on "rare earth ...

  12. ORNL Licenses Rare Earth Magnet Recycling Process to Momentum Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Momentum Technologies have signed a non-exclusive licensing agreement for an ORNL process designed to recover rare earth magnets from used computer hard drives.

  13. Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For an up-to-date review of the rare earth elements, which is more technical, see the 2012 articles by Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. and Vitalij K. Pecharsky in the Encyclopedia ...

  14. The Ames Process for Rare Earth Metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Ames Process for Rare Earth Metals The Ames Process for the preparation of high purity ... If we rearrange the order of elements from increasing atomic weight to increasing boiling ...

  15. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to...

  16. Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus; Yanagihara, Naohisa; Dyke, James T.; Vemulapalli, Krishna

    1991-09-03

    The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

  17. DOE Science Showcase - Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Citations Database - Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals DOE Green Energy - LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells ...

  18. Extraordinary Responsive Rare Earth Magnetic Materials | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Extraordinary Responsive Rare Earth Magnetic Materials Research Personnel Updates Publications https://www.ameslab.gov/dmse/highlight/real-estate-atoms-it-all-about-location-location-location Read More Rare Earth Alloys - Why Purity Matters Read More A Mystery at Cryogenic Temperatures Read More Previous Pause Next Synthesis Responsive systems, where a small change of an extrinsic thermodynamic variable, such as temperature, pressure, or magnetic field, triggers an intrinsic phase

  19. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF SECOND RARE EARTH SERIES METALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, R.D.; Hayward, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    >This invention relates to a process for alloying the second rare earth series metals with Mo, Nb, or Zr. A halide of the rare earth metal is mixed with about 1 to 20 at.% of an oxide of Mo, Nb, or Zr. Iodine and an alkali or alkaline earth metal are added, and the resulting mixture is heated in an inert atmosphere to 350 deg C. (AEC)

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Rare Metals Refinery Inc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - NY 38 Rare Metals Refinery Inc - NY 38 Site ID (CSD Index Number): NY.38 Site Name: International Rare Metals Refinery, Inc. Site Summary: Site Link: External Site Link: Alternate Name(s): Canadian Radium and Uranium Corporation Alternate Name Documents: NY.38-1 Location: 69 Kisco Avenue, Mt. Kisco, New York Location Documents: NY.38-1 NY.38-3 Historical Operations (describe contaminants): Manufactured and distributed radium and polonium products. Historical Operations Documents: NY.38-5

  1. Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Magnetic coupling at rare earth ferromagnet/transition metal ferromagnet interfaces: A comprehensive study of Gd/Ni Thin film magnetic heterostructures with competing interfacial coupling and Zeeman energy provide a fertile ground to study phase transition

  2. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Ian M.; /Victoria U.

    2010-03-16

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (8.83 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.13)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.273 {+-} 0.002 {+-} 0.009)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.1346 {+-} 0.0010 {+-} 0.0036)%, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.58 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -5} are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.42 {+-} 0.55 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -5}, a measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.28) x 10{sup -5} and an upper limit on {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}[ex.{phi}]) {le} 2.5 x 10{sup -6} {at} 905 CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is measured to be (6.531 {+-} 0.056 {+-} 0.093) x 10{sup -2} from which |V{sub us}| is determined to be 0.2255 {+-} 0.0023. The branching ratio {Beta}/({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu

  3. Evidence for the decay X(3872) -> J/\\psi\\omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a study of the decays B{sup 0,+} --> J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup 0,+}, using 467x10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. We present evidence for the decay mode X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}, with product branching fractions B(B{sup +} --> X(3872)K{sup +}) x B(X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.2(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}, and B(B{sup 0} --> X(3872)K{sup 0}) x B(X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}. A detailed study of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} mass distribution from X(3872) decay favors a negative-parity assignment.

  4. Double beta decay, Majorana neutrinos, and neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avignone, Frank T. III; Elliott, Steven R.; Engel, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the nonobservation of neutrinoless double beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

  5. Chiral Two-body Currents and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menendez, Javier [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2011-12-16

    The nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) of neutrinoless double-beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay are studied using weak currents derived in the framework of chiral effective field theory. Apart from the standard one-body (1b) currents, it is shown that two-body (2b) currents contribute to weak processes. The normal-ordered 1b part of 2b currents modifies the Gamow-Teller (GT){sigma}{tau}{sup -} part of the 1b current, contributing to the well-known quenching of GT single-{beta} decays. The momentum-transfer dependence of the quenching due to 2b currents is also predicted. Therefore, including 2b currents allows to address, microscopically, the problem of the axial weak coupling (g{sub A}) value, which is the biggest uncertainty in the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay NME calculations for all available methods.

  6. Results of the double beta decay experiment NEMO-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tretyak, V. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 6 Joliot Curie, Dubna (Russian Federation); Collaboration: NEMO-3 Collaboration

    2013-12-30

    The double beta decay experiment NEMO-3 has taken data from February 2003 to January 2011. The two-neutrino decay half lives were measured for seven different isotopes ({sup 100}Mo, {sup 82}Se, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 150}Nd, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 48}Ca and {sup 130}Te). No evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is observed. The 0??? half-life limits are found to be T{sub 1/2}{sup 0?}({sup 100}Mo)>1.010{sup 24}yr(90%C.L.) and T{sub 1/2}{sup 0?}({sup 82}Se)>3.210{sup 23}yr(90%C.L.)

  7. {alpha} decay of {sup 180,181}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-11-15

    A detailed {alpha}-decay study of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 181}Pb has been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt). In comparison with the literature, more precise data have been deduced for the I{sup {pi}}=(9/2{sup -}) ground state in this nucleus, which is presumably based on the neutron {nu}h{sub 9/2} spherical orbital. Improved {alpha}-decay data were also measured for {sup 180}Pb.

  8. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.; /Oregon U. /SLAC; ,

    2008-09-24

    Using approximately 350 million {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}{ell}{ell}) in the range (4-8) x 10{sup -8}.

  9. Selected spectroscopic results on element 115 decay chains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rudolph, D.; Forsberg, U.; Golubev, P.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Yakushev, A.; Andersson, L. -L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; et al

    2014-08-24

    We observed thirty correlated α-decay chains in an experiment studying the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung. The decay characteristics of the majority of these 30 chains are consistent with previous observations and interpretations of such chains to originate from isotopes of element Z = 115. High-resolution α-photon coincidence spectroscopy in conjunction with comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations allow to propose excitation schemes of atomic nuclei of the heaviest elements, thereby probing nuclear structure models near the 'Island of Stability' with unprecedented experimental precision.

  10. Selected spectroscopic results on element 115 decay chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, D.; Forsberg, U.; Golubev, P.; Sarmiento, L. G.; Yakushev, A.; Andersson, L. -L.; Di Nitto, A.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Gates, J. M.; Gregorich, K. E.; Gross, C. J.; Herzberg, R. -D.; Heßberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kratz, J. V.; Rykaczewski, K.; Schädel, M.; Åberg, S.; Ackermann, D.; Block, M.; Brand, H.; Carlsson, B. G.; Cox, D.; Derkx, X.; Eberhardt, K.; Even, J.; Fahlander, C.; Gerl, J.; Jäger, E.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lommel, B.; Mistry, A.; Mokry, C.; Nitsche, H.; Omtvedt, J. P.; Papadakis, P.; Ragnarsson, I.; Runke, J.; Schaffner, H.; Schausten, B.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Torres, T.; Traut, T.; Trautmann, N.; Türler, A.; Ward, A.; Ward, D. E.; Wiehl, N.

    2014-08-24

    We observed thirty correlated α-decay chains in an experiment studying the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ca + 243Am at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung. The decay characteristics of the majority of these 30 chains are consistent with previous observations and interpretations of such chains to originate from isotopes of element Z = 115. High-resolution α-photon coincidence spectroscopy in conjunction with comprehensive Monte-Carlo simulations allow to propose excitation schemes of atomic nuclei of the heaviest elements, thereby probing nuclear structure models near the 'Island of Stability' with unprecedented experimental precision.

  11. The GERDA Neutrinoless Double Beta-Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majorovits, Bela A. [Max Planck Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)

    2007-10-12

    Neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta})-decay is the key process to gain understanding of the nature of neutrinos. The GErmanium Detector Array (GERDA) is designed to search for 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay of the isotope {sup 76}Ge. Germanium crystals enriched in {sup 76}Ge, acting as source and detector simultaneously, will be submerged directly into an ultra pure cooling medium that also serves as a radiation shield. This concept will allow for a reduction of the background by up to two orders of magnitudes with respect to earlier experiments.

  12. Double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Suhonen, J.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P. O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd was determined by using the JYFLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The measured mass difference between {sup 150}Nd and {sup 150}Sm is 3371.38(20) keV. This new value deviates by 3.7 keV from the previously adopted value of 3367.7(22) keV and is a factor of 10 more precise. Accurate knowledge of this Q value is important because {sup 150}Nd is a primary candidate to be used in the search for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay modes in several experiments.

  13. Consistency test of neutrinoless double beta decay with one isotope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duerr, Michael; Lindner, Manfred [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 10 39 80, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Zuber, Kai [Technical University Dresden, Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-01

    We discuss a consistency test which makes it possible to discriminate unknown nuclear background lines from neutrinoless double beta decay with only one isotope. By considering both the transition to the ground state and to the first excited 0{sup +} state, a sufficiently large detector can reveal if neutrinoless double beta decay or some other nuclear physics process is at work. Such a detector could therefore simultaneously provide a consistency test for a certain range of Majorana masses and be sensitive to lower values of the effective Majorana mass .

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  16. New Limit on Time-Reversal Violation in Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumm, H. P.; Chupp, T. E.; Cooper, R. L.; Coulter, K. P.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Garcia, A.; Jones, G. L.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Trull, C. A.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-09-02

    We report the results of an improved determination of the triple correlation DP{center_dot}(p{sub e}xp{sub v}) that can be used to limit possible time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons and constrain extensions to the standard model. Our result is D=[-0.96{+-}1.89(stat){+-}1.01(sys)]x10{sup -4}. The corresponding phase between g{sub A} and g{sub V} is {phi}{sub AV}=180.013 deg. {+-}0.028 deg. (68% confidence level). This result represents the most sensitive measurement of D in nuclear {beta} decay.

  17. The Half Life of {sup 193}Osbeta-decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.; Oliva, Jefferson W. M.; Zamboni, Cibele B.

    2010-05-21

    In this work, the half life of the beta{sup -} decay of {sup 193}Os was measured by following the activity of 25 5 mg {sup 192}Os-enriched samples for 20-60 h after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Three different transitions associated with this beta decay were analyzed, and the results were then processed using three different statistical methods; the resulting values were compatible with the tabulated value, with an uncertainty of the same order of magnitude.

  18. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D.; Zamfir, N.V.; Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H.; Wesselborg, C.

    1992-10-01

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J{sup {pi}},K)=(l{sup {minus}},0) and (J{sup {pi}},K)=(l{sup {minus}},1) octupole vibrational bands. It is shown that the decay branching ratios and the absolute transition strengths of these states can be reproduced rather well with an improved T(El)-operator in the sdf-Interacting Boson Model. Another class of octupole states has been investigated in the region of the semimagic nucleus {sup 142}Nd. Here a quintuplet of collective excitations around 3.5 MeV is expected due to the coupling of the 3{minus}-octupole vibration with the 2+-quadrupole vibration. We performed photon scattering experiments on the odd A neighboring nucleus {sup 141}Pr and found first evidence for the existence of 3{sup {minus}}{circle_times}2+{circle_times}particle-states.

  19. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 6-28-2016 page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...itasaku-gun, JAPAN) Rare earth bonded magnet Abstract A rare earth bonded magnet is provided which is produced such that a mixture which comprises: a rare earth magnet powder; a ...

  20. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 3-1-2016 page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table 3-1-2016 page 1 Disclaimer: This U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table contains a sample of the rare earth-magnet patents issued by the U.S. ...

  1. ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials, December 6, 2010 PDF...

  2. GraXe, graphene and xenon for neutrinoless double beta decay searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martn-Albo, J.; Monrabal, F.; Vidal, J. Muoz [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valencia, Calle Catedrtico Jos Beltrn, 2, 46980 Valencia (Spain); Guinea, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), CSIC, Calle Sor Juana Ins de la Cruz, 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fogler, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Katsnelson, M.I., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: paco.guinea@icmm.csic.es, E-mail: mfogler@ucsd.edu, E-mail: katsnel@sci.kun.nl, E-mail: justo.martin-albo@ific.uv.es, E-mail: francesc.monrabal@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heijendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new detector concept, GraXe (to be pronounced as grace), to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in {sup 136}XE. GraXe combines a popular detection medium in rare-event searches, liquid xenon, with a new, background-free material, graphene. In our baseline design of GraXe, a sphere made of graphene-coated titanium mesh and filled with liquid xenon (LXe) enriched in the {sup 136}XE isotope is immersed in a large volume of natural LXe instrumented with photodetectors. Liquid xenon is an excellent scintillator, reasonably transparent to its own light. Graphene is transparent over a large frequency range, and impermeable to the xenon. Event position could be deduced from the light pattern detected in the photosensors. External backgrounds would be shielded by the buffer of natural LXe, leaving the ultra-radiopure internal volume virtually free of background. Industrial graphene can be manufactured at a competitive cost to produce the sphere. Enriching xenon in the isotope {sup 136}XE is easy and relatively cheap, and there is already near one ton of enriched xenon available in the world (currently being used by the EXO, KamLAND-Zen and NEXT experiments). All the cryogenic know-how is readily available from the numerous experiments using liquid xenon. An experiment using the GraXe concept appears realistic and affordable in a short time scale, and its physics potential is enormous.

  3. Conversion of experimental half-life to effective electron neutrino mass in 0nubetabeta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smolnikov, Anatoly; Grabmayr, Peter [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia, and Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    The Germanium Detector Array (GERDA) collaboration will be searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. As a result it will measure the half-life T{sub 1/2} of this rare process; or at least a new value for the lower limit for T{sub 1/2} will be derived. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment on the effective electron neutrino mass depends on the theoretical value for the nuclear matrix element M and the kinematical phase space factor G.In this Brief Report we focus on existing difficulties in applying the dimensionless values of M calculated by various theoretical groups, which use different methods and parametrizations. The implicit radius dependencies in M and G are discussed. Resulting values of the neutrino mass are tabulated for various representative half-lives T{sub 1/2} representing the sensitivity of the various phases of the GERDA experiment.

  4. Consistent scenario for B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-12-01

    We consider B{yields}PS decays where P stands for pseudoscalar and S for a heavy (1500 MeV) scalar meson. We achieve agreement with available experimental data, which includes two orders of magnitude hierarchy, assuming the scalars mesons are two quark states. The contribution of the dipolar penguin operator O{sub 11} is quantified.

  5. The Majorana Double Beta Decay Experiment: Present Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Avignone, Frank T.; Back, Henning O.; Barabash, Alexander S.; Beene, Jim; Bergevin, M.; Bertrand, F.; Boswell, M.; Brudanin, V.; Busch, Matthew; Chan, Yuen-Dat; Christofferson, C. D.; Collar, J. I.; Combs, Dustin C.; Cooper, R. J.; Detwiler, Jason A.; Doe, Peter J.; Efremenko, Yuri; Egorov, Viatcheslav; Ejiri, H.; Elliott, S. R.; Esterline, James H.; Fast, James E.; Fields, N.; Finnerty, P.; Fraenkle, Florian; Gehman, Victor M.; Giovanetti, G. K.; Green, M. P.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Gusey, K.; Hallin, A. L.; Hazama, R.; Henning, Reyco; Hime, Andrew; Hoppe, Eric W.; Horton, Mark; Howard, Stanley; Howe, M. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Keeter, K.; Keller, C.; Kidd, M. F.; Knecht, A.; Kochetov, Oleg; Konovalov, S.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Laferriere, Brian D.; LaRoque, B. H.; Leon, Jonathan D.; Leviner, L.; Loach, J. C.; MacMullin, S.; Marino, Michael G.; Martin, R. D.; Mei, Dong-Ming; Merriman, Jason H.; Miller, M. L.; Mizouni, Leila; Nomachi, Masaharu; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Nicole R.; Phillips II, D. G.; Poon, Alan; Perumpilly, Gopakumar; Prior, Gersende; Radford, D. C.; Rielage, Keith; Robertson, R. G. H.; Ronquest, M. C.; Schubert, Alexis G.; Shima, T.; Shirchenko, M.; Snavely, Kyle J.; Steele, David; Strain, J.; Thomas, K.; Timkin, V.; Tornow, W.; Vanyushin, I.; Varner, R. L.; Vetter, Kai; Vorren, Kris R.; Wilkerson, J. F.; Yakushev, E.; Young, A.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Yumatov, Vladimir; Zhang, C.

    2013-06-01

    The Majorana collaboration is actively pursuing research and development aimed at a tonne-scale 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment, an R&D effort that will field approximately 40 kg of germanium detectors with mixed enrichment levels. This article provides a status update on the construction of the Demonstrator

  6. Decay heat fractions for DFA 8213 and 4192

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S.F., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-06

    Decay heat fractions for FFTF driver fuel assemblies 8213 and 4192 were calculated to allow the assembly nozzles to be cut. Cutting the nozzles is required to allow the assemblies to fit in the center location of a core component container in an Interim Storage Cask.

  7. Search for a strongly decaying neutral charmed pentaquark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat,J.P.; ,

    2005-06-01

    We present a search for a charmed pentaquark decaying strongly to D{sup (*)}-p. Finding no evidence for such a state, we set limits on the cross section times branching ratio relative to D*{sup -} and D{sup -} under particular assumptions about the production mechanism.

  8. Cosmic rays from leptophilic dark matter decay via kinetic mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David; Ringwald, Andreas; Weniger, Christoph E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de

    2009-08-01

    If interpreted in terms of decaying dark matter, the steep rise in the positron fraction of cosmic rays above 10 GeV, as observed by the PAMELA experiment, suggests an underlying production mechanism that favors leptonic channels. We consider a scenario where a portion of the dark matter is made of the gauginos of an unbroken hidden-sector U(1){sub X}, which interact with the visible sector only through a tiny kinetic mixing. The second component of the dark matter is made of neutralinos, and depending on the mass spectrum, either the lightest neutralino or the hidden gaugino becomes unstable and subject to decay. We analyze the cosmic rays, namely the contributions to the positron, the extragalactic gamma-ray and the antiproton flux, which potentially result from these decays and demonstrate that the production of antiprotons can be naturally suppressed. Furthermore, we briefly discuss the apparent double-peak structure of the ATIC data in light of cascade-decaying hidden gauginos, as well as possible signatures at Fermi.

  9. MAJORANA Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay DUSEL R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkerson, John F.

    2009-09-04

    The Majorana research and development is addressing key issues and risks related to the collaboration's goal of undertaking a search for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) in {sup 76}Ge using an array of hyper-pure Ge-diodes (HPGe). The observation of this decay would provide critical insight into our understanding of neutrinos, yielding definitive evidence that neutrinos are Majorana particles and providing information on the absolute mass of neutrinos. Achieving sensitivities to 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay half-lives on the order of 10{sup 26} years requires ultra-low backgrounds in the 2039 keV region where a 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay peak would be observed. The goal of our R&D program has been to demonstrate the feasibility of all components of Majorana and to provide an integrated evaluation framework, allowing for optimization of these components in terms of background, background suppression, and signal detection efficiency and acceptance. This report covers work carried out by Majorana collaboration members at the University of Washington as part of the overall Majorana collaboration activities. Specifically the Majorana group at the University of Washington was involved in moving forward on demonstrating technology for clean large-scale cryostats and mounting the HPGe crystals in low-mass holders. The UW activities included assistance in the procurement and assembly of an electroforming system for large size cryostats, and design and fabrication of prototype crystal mounting hardware.

  10. Majorana neutrino masses and the neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faessler, A. [University of Tuebingen, Institute of Theoretical Physics (Germany)], E-mail: amand.faessler@uni-tuebingen.de

    2006-12-15

    Neutrinoless double-beta decay is forbidden in the Standard Model of electroweak and strong interaction but allowed in most Grand Unified Theories (GUTs). Only if the neutrino is a Majorana particle (identical with its antiparticle) and if it has a mass is neutrinoless double-beta decay allowed. Apart from one claim that the neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge is measured, one has only upper limits for this transition probability. But even the upper limits allow one to give upper limits for the electron Majorana neutrino mass and upper limits for parameters of GUTs and the minimal R-parity-violating supersymmetric model. One further can give lower limits for the vector boson mediating mainly the right-handed weak interaction and the heavy mainly right-handed Majorana neutrino in left-right symmetric GUTs. For that, one has to assume that the specific mechanism is the leading one for neutrinoless double-beta decay and one has to be able to calculate reliably the corresponding nuclear matrix elements. In the present work, one discusses the accuracy of the present status of calculating of the nuclear matrix elements and the corresponding limits of GUTs and supersymmetric parameters.

  11. New Advances in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, Jose Barea [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. Unidad Asociada al Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-08-04

    We present the matrix elements necessary to evaluate the half-life of some neutrinoless double beta decay candidates in the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM). We compare our results with those from other models and extract some simple features of the calculations.

  12. Neutrinoless double beta decay in the microscopic interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iachello, F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States)

    2009-11-09

    The results of a calculation of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay in the closure approximation in several nuclei within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) are presented and compared with those calculated in the shell model (SM) and quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA)

  13. Conditions for detecting CP violation via neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joniec, A.; Zralek, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2006-02-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay data, together with information on the absolute neutrino masses obtained from the future KATRIN experiment and/or astrophysical measurements, provide a chance to find CP violation in the lepton sector with Majorana neutrinos. We derive and discuss necessary conditions which make discovery of such CP violation possible for the future neutrino oscillation and mass measurements data.

  14. Searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    The status of searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay is reviewed. The claim by an ITEP group that the electron antineutrino mass > 17eV has been disputed by all the subsequent experiments. Current measurements of the tritium beta spectrum limit m[sub [bar [nu

  15. TURBULENCE DECAY AND CLOUD CORE RELAXATION IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Law, Chung K.; Xu, Haitao

    2015-02-01

    The turbulent motion within molecular clouds is a key factor controlling star formation. Turbulence supports molecular cloud cores from evolving to gravitational collapse and hence sets a lower bound on the size of molecular cloud cores in which star formation can occur. On the other hand, without a continuous external energy source maintaining the turbulence, such as in molecular clouds, the turbulence decays with an energy dissipation time comparable to the dynamic timescale of clouds, which could change the size limits obtained from Jean's criterion by assuming constant turbulence intensities. Here we adopt scaling relations of physical variables in decaying turbulence to analyze its specific effects on the formation of stars. We find that the decay of turbulence provides an additional approach for Jeans' criterion to be achieved, after which gravitational infall governs the motion of the cloud core. This epoch of turbulence decay is defined as cloud core relaxation. The existence of cloud core relaxation provides a more complete understanding of the effect of the competition between turbulence and gravity on the dynamics of molecular cloud cores and star formation.

  16. Computer code for double beta decay QRPA based calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbero, C. A.; Mariano, A.; Krmpoti?, F.; Samana, A. R.; Ferreira, V. dos Santos; Bertulani, C. A.

    2014-11-11

    The computer code developed by our group some years ago for the evaluation of nuclear matrix elements, within the QRPA and PQRPA nuclear structure models, involved in neutrino-nucleus reactions, muon capture and ?{sup } processes, is extended to include also the nuclear double beta decay.

  17. One-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay in laboratory coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galeao, A. P.; Barbero, C.; De Conti, C.; Krmpotic, F.

    2013-05-06

    We present a formalism for the computation of one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic weak hypernuclear decay rates in laboratory coordinates, within an independent-particle shell model framework, with a view to its generalization to the case of two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  18. Observation of Doppler broadening in β -delayed proton- γ decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schwartz, S. B.; Wrede, C.; Bennett, M. B.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Bowe, A.; Chen, A. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Cooper, N.; Irvine, D.; et al

    2015-09-14

    Background: The Doppler broadening of gamma-ray peaks is due to nuclear recoil from beta-delayed nucleon emission can be used to measure the energies of the nucleons. This method has never been tested using beta-delayed proton emission or applied to a recoil heavier than A = 10. Purpose: To test and apply this Doppler broadening method using gamma-ray peaks from the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Methods: A fast beam of P-26 was implanted into a planar Ge detector, which was used as a P-26 beta-decay trigger. The SeGA array of high-purity Ge detectors was used to detect gamma rays frommore » the P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay sequence. Results: Radiative Doppler broadening in beta-delayed proton-gamma decay was observed for the first time. Moreover, the Doppler broadening analysis method was verified using the 1613-keV gamma-ray line for which the proton energies were previously known. The 1776-keV gamma ray de-exciting the 2720 keV Al-25 level was observed in P-26(beta p gamma)Al-25 decay for the first time and used to determine that the center-of-mass energy of the proton emission feeding the 2720-keV level is 5.1 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV, corresponding to a Si-26 excitation energy of 13.3 +/- 1.0 (stat.) +/- 0.6 (syst.) MeV for the proton-emitting level. Conclusions: Finally, the Doppler broadening method has been demonstrated to provide practical measurements of the energies for beta-delayed nucleon emissions populating excited states of nuclear recoils at least as heavy as A = 25.« less

  19. Beta-decay measurements of neutron-deficient cesium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parry, R.F.

    1983-03-01

    Beta decay endpoint energy measurements of the neutron deficient cesium isotopes were done using an energy spectrum shape fitting technique. This was a departure from the typical method of endpoint energy analysis, the Fermi-Kurie plot. A discussion of the shape fitting procedure and its improved features are discussed. These beta endpoint measurements have led to total decay energies (Q/sub EC/) of the neutron deficient /sup 119/ /sup 123/Cs isotopes. The total decay energies of /sup 122m/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.95 +- 0.25 MeV) and /sup 119/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 6.26 +- 0.29 MeV) were new measurements. The total decay energies of /sup 123/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 4.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 122g/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.05 +- 0.18 MeV), /sup 121/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 5.21 +- 0.22 MeV), and /sup 120/Cs (Q/sub EC/ = 7.38 +- 0.23 MeV) were measurements with significantly improved uncertainties as compared to the literature. Further, a combination of the energy levels derived from previous literature gamma-gamma coincident measurements and the experimental beta-coincident gamma decay energies has supported an improved level scheme for /sup 121/Xe and the proposal of three new energy levels in /sup 119/Xe. Comparison of the experimental cesium mass excesses (determined with our Q/sub EC/ values and known xenon mass excesses) with both the literature and theoretical predicted values showed general agreement except for /sup 120/Cs. Possible explanations for this deviation are discussed.

  20. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  1. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.

    1992-12-29

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  2. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold; Grantham, LeRoy F.; Specht, Eugene R.

    1992-01-01

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  3. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  4. Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schatz, Hendrick [Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States

    2010-01-08

    Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

  5. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  6. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  7. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P.; Johnson, Terry R.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  8. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Peterson, David T.; Wheelock, John T.; Jones, Lawrence L.; Lincoln, Lanny P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  9. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  10. Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment You are ...

  11. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136: Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136: Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Double Beta Decay in...

  12. A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into muons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into muons...

  13. A Study of $B \\to J/\\psi K^{(*)} 0 X$ decays (Thesis/Dissertation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: A Study of B to Jpsi K(*) 0 X decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Study of B to Jpsi K(*) 0 X decays You are accessing a ...

  14. Radiative Penguin Decays at the B Factories (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in radiative penguin decays from the B factories Belle and BABAR. Most notably, I will talk about the recent new observations in the decays B yields (rhoomega) gamma, a...

  15. Decay of the X ( 3872 ) into χ c J and the operator product...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decay of the X ( 3872 ) into c J and the operator product expansion in effective field theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Decay of the X ( 3872 ) into c J and ...

  16. Hadronic decays of the X(3872) to {chi}{sub cJ} in effective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hadronic decays of the X(3872) to chisub cJ in effective field theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hadronic decays of the X(3872) to chisub cJ in effective ...

  17. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors The safety ...

  18. The effect of hyperfine mixing in electromagnetic and semileptonic decays of doubly heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albertus, C.; Hernandez, E.; Nieves, J.

    2011-05-23

    We consider the role played by hyperfine mixing in electromagnetic and semileptonic decays of doubly heavy baryons, which give rise to large corrections to the decay widths in both cases. Our results qualitatively agree with other calculations.

  19. Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136Xe with EXO-200...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136Xe with EXO-200 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136Xe with EXO-200 Authors: Auger, M. ;...

  20. Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs boson...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs boson Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for lepton-flavour-violating decays of the Higgs...

  1. Remarks on decays of hb(2P) (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Remarks on decays of hb(2P) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Remarks on decays of hb(2P) Authors: Li, Xin ; Voloshin, M. B. Publication Date: 2012-11-06 OSTI Identifier: ...

  2. Z b ( 10610 ) and Z b ( 10650 ) decays to bottomonium plus pion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Z b ( 10610 ) and Z b ( 10650 ) decays to bottomonium plus pion Prev Next Title: Z b ( 10610 ) and Z b ( 10650 ) decays to bottomonium plus pion Authors: Li, Xin ; Voloshin, ...

  3. Remarks on decays of hb(2P) (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Remarks on decays of hb(2P) Prev Next Title: Remarks on decays of hb(2P) Authors: Li, Xin ; Voloshin, M. B. Publication Date: 2012-11-06 OSTI Identifier: 1101292 Type: ...

  4. Metastable vacuum decay in center-stabilized Yang-Mills theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metastable vacuum decay in center-stabilized Yang-Mills theory at large N Prev Next Title: Metastable vacuum decay in center-stabilized Yang-Mills theory at large N Authors: ...

  5. Z b ( 10610 ) and Z b ( 10650 ) decays to bottomonium plus pion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Z b ( 10610 ) and Z b ( 10650 ) decays to bottomonium plus pion Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Z b ( 10610 ) and Z b ( 10650 ) decays to bottomonium plus pion Authors: ...

  6. Neutrinos at IceCube from heavy decaying dark matter (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinos at IceCube from heavy decaying dark matter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutrinos at IceCube from heavy decaying dark matter Authors: Feldstein, Brian ; ...

  7. B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and Sides at the BABAR and BELLE B-Factories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: B Decay and CP Violation: CKM Angles and ...

  8. Decay of theX(3872)into?cJand the operator product expansion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Decay of theX(3872)intocJand the operator product expansion in effective field theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Decay of theX(3872)intocJand the operator...

  9. New precision measurements of free neutron beta decay with cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baeßler, Stefan; Bowman, James David; Penttilä, Seppo I.; Počanić, Dinko

    2014-10-14

    Precision measurements in free neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay, and offer several stringent tests of the standard model. This study describes the free neutron beta decay program planned for the Fundamental Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and finally puts it into the context of other recent and planned measurements of neutron beta decay observables.

  10. The Search for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with 130Te with CUORE-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Loren Ouellet

    2015-06-02

    This thesis describes the design, operation and results of an experimental search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0$\

  11. 2016 Rare Earth Elements Workshop Accelerating Rare Earth Element Recovery from U.S. Domestic Sources of Coal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare Earth Elements Workshop Accelerating Rare Earth Element Recovery from U.S. Domestic Sources of Coal and Coal By-Products August 8-9, 2016 Hosted by: Dr. Cynthia Powell Acting Deputy Director, Science & Technology National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy 541.207.7392 Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 301.903.2827 Location: National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26505 Time: 12:30 pm - 4:15 pm August 8, 2016 7:30

  12. A Combination of CDF and D0 limits on the branching ratio of B0(s)(d) ---> mu+ mu- decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhard, R.; Glenzinski, D.; Herndon, M.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Landsberg, G.; Lehner, F.; Lin, C.J.; Mrenna, S.; /Zurich U. /Fermilab /Wisconsin U., Madison /Texas A-M /Brown U.

    2005-08-01

    The authors combine the results of CDF and D0 searches for the rare decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The experiments use 364 pb{sup -1} and 300 pb{sup -1} of data respectively. The limits on the branching ratios are obtained by normalizing the estimated sensitivity to the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +} taking into account the fragmentation ratios f{sub u}/f{sub s(d)}. The combined results exclude branching ratios of BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 1.5 x 10{sup -7} and BR(B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) > 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 95% confidence level. These are the most stringent limits on these decays at the present time.

  13. Complex Electronic Structure of Rare Earth Activators in Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aberg, D.; Yu, S. W.; Zhou, F.

    2015-10-27

    To aid and further the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms behind the scintillator nonproportionality that leads to degradation of the attainable energy resolution, we have developed theoretical and experimental algorithms and procedures to determine the position of the 4f energy levels of rare earth dopants relative to the host band edge states.

  14. Potential synergy: the thorium fuel cycle and rare earths processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ault, T.; Wymer, R.; Croff, A.; Krahn, S.

    2013-07-01

    The use of thorium in nuclear power programs has been evaluated on a recurring basis. A concern often raised is the lack of 'thorium infrastructure'; however, for at least a part of a potential thorium fuel cycle, this may less of a problem than previously thought. Thorium is frequently encountered in association with rare earth elements and, since the U.S. last systematically evaluated the large-scale use of thorium (the 1970's,) the use of rare earth elements has increased ten-fold to approximately 200,000 metric tons per year. Integration of thorium extraction with rare earth processing has been previously described and top-level estimates have been done on thorium resource availability; however, since ores and mining operations differ markedly, what is needed is process flowsheet analysis to determine whether a specific mining operation can feasibly produce thorium as a by-product. Also, the collocation of thorium with rare earths means that, even if a thorium product stream is not developed, its presence in mining waste streams needs to be addressed and there are previous instances where this has caused issues. This study analyzes several operational mines, estimates the mines' ability to produce a thorium by-product stream, and discusses some waste management implications of recovering thorium. (authors)

  15. Rare Isotope Beams for the 21st Century

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Symons

    2010-01-08

    In a scientific keynote address on Friday, June 12 at Michigan State University (MSU) in East Lansing, James Symons, Director of Berkeley Labs Nuclear Science Division (NSD), discussed the exciting research prospects of the new Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) to be built at MSUs National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory.

  16. Particle decay studies at or near closed shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toth, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    We summarize briefly two sets of investigations. In the first one ..cap alpha..-decay rates of neutron-deficient even-even Pb isotopes were studied by using the UNISOR separator on-line at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility. These data indicate that midway between N = 82 and N = 126, the Z = 82 shell gap may not exist. The second investigation, carried out at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron and SuperHILAC, has dealt with the delayed-proton decays of the N = 81 precursors /sup 147/Dy, /sup 149/Er, and /sup 151/Yb. All three proton spectra have sharp peaks and thus provide evidence for greatly reduced level densities in the N = 82 proton emitting nuclei /sup 147/Tb, /sup 149/Ho, and /sup 151/Tm. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Search for the proton decay mode with KamLAND

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asakura, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishio, S.; et al

    2015-09-23

    We present a search for the proton decay modemore » $$p \\rightarrow \\bar{v}K^+$$ based on an exposure of 8.97 kton-years in the KamLAND experiment. The liquid scintillator detector is sensitive to successive signals from $$p \\rightarrow \\bar{v}K^+$$ with unique kinematics, which allow us to achieve a detection efficiency of 44%, higher than previous searches in water Cherenkov detectors. We find no evidence of proton decays for this mode. The expected background, which is dominated by atmospheric neutrinos, is 0:9 ± 0.2 events. The nonbackground-subtracted limit on the partial proton lifetime is τΒ($$p \\rightarrow \\bar{v}K^+$$) > 5.4 x 1032 years at 90% C.L.« less

  18. Search for the proton decay mode with KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asakura, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Hachiya, T.; Hayashida, S.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishio, S.; Koga, M.; Matsuda, R.; Matsuda, S.; Mitsui, T.; Motoki, D.; Nakamura, K.; Obara, S.; Oki, Y.; Oura, T.; Shimizu, I.; Shirahata, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suzuki, A.; Tachibana, H.; Tamae, K.; Ueshima, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.  D.; Yamauchi, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Kozlov, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Fushimi, K.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.  I.; Berger, B.  E.; Freedman, S.  J.; Fujikawa, B.  K.; O’Donnell, T.; Learned, J.  G.; Maricic, J.; Sakai, M.; Dazeley, S.; Svoboda, R.; Winslow, L.  A.; Efremenko, Y.; Karwowski, H.  J.; Markoff, D.  M.; Tornow, W.; Detwiler, J.  A.; Enomoto, S.; Decowski, M.  P.

    2015-09-23

    We present a search for the proton decay mode $p \\rightarrow \\bar{v}K^+$ based on an exposure of 8.97 kton-years in the KamLAND experiment. The liquid scintillator detector is sensitive to successive signals from $p \\rightarrow \\bar{v}K^+$ with unique kinematics, which allow us to achieve a detection efficiency of 44%, higher than previous searches in water Cherenkov detectors. We find no evidence of proton decays for this mode. The expected background, which is dominated by atmospheric neutrinos, is 0:9 ± 0.2 events. The nonbackground-subtracted limit on the partial proton lifetime is τΒ($p \\rightarrow \\bar{v}K^+$) > 5.4 x 1032 years at 90% C.L.

  19. Search for Charged Lepton Violation in Narrow Upsilon Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Hawkes, C.M.; /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Columbus Supercond., Genova /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    Charged lepton flavor violating processes are unobservable in the standard model, but they are predicted to be enhanced in several extensions to the standard model, including supersymmetry and models with leptoquarks or compositeness. We present a search for such processes in a sample of 99 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(2S) decays and 117 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected with the BABAR detector. We place upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} e{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) and {Beta}({Upsilon}(nS) {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}) (n = 2, 3) at the 10{sup -6} level and use these results to place lower limits of order 1 TeV on the mass scale of charged lepton flavor violating effective operators.

  20. Exclusive B Decays into Final States with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chai, Xuedong; /Iowa U.

    2010-01-11

    This Thesis presents measurements of the decays B{sup -} {yields} {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0}{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Xi}{sub c}{sup +}{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}, B{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} K{sup -}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} K{sub s}{sup 0} based on 228 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory.

  1. Neutrinoless double {beta}-decay and neutrino mass hierarchies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilenky, S. M. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, I-34014 Trieste (Italy); Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Simkovic, Fedor [Institute fuer Theoretische Physik der Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    In the framework of the seesaw mechanism the normal hierarchy is favorable for the neutrino mass spectrum. For this spectrum we present a detailed calculation of the half-lives of neutrinoless double {beta}-decay for several nuclei of experimental interest. The half-lives are evaluated by considering the most comprehensive nuclear matrix elements, which were obtained within the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation by the Bratislava-Caltech-Tuebingen group. The dependence of the half-lives on sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub 13} and the lightest neutrino mass is studied. We present also the results of the calculations of the half-lives of neutrinoless double {beta}-decay in the case of the inverted hierarchy of neutrino masses.

  2. Extra dimensions and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Faessler, Amand [Theoretical Physics Department, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Institute fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-05-01

    The neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the few phenomena, belonging to the nonstandard physics, which is extensively being sought for in experiments. In the present paper the link between the half-life of the neutrinoless double beta decay and theories with large extra dimensions is explored. The use of the sensitivities of currently planned 0{nu}2{beta} experiments: DAMA, CANDLES, COBRA, DCBA, CAMEO, GENIUS, GEM, MAJORANA, MOON, CUORE, EXO, and XMASS, gives the possibility for a nondirect 'experimental' verification of various extra dimensional scenarios. We discuss also the results of the Heidelberg-Moscow Collaboration. The calculations are based on the Majorana neutrino mass generation mechanism in the Arkani-Hamed-Dimopoulos-Dvali model.

  3. Searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1992-10-01

    The status of searches for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay is reviewed. The claim by an ITEP group that the electron antineutrino mass > 17eV has been disputed by all the subsequent experiments. Current measurements of the tritium beta spectrum limit m{sub {bar {nu}}e} < 10 eV. The status of the 17 keV neutrino is reviewed. The strong null results from INS Tokyo and Argonne, and deficiencies in the experiments which reported positive effects, make it unreasonable to ascribe the spectral distortions seen by Simpson, Hime, and others to a 17keV neutrino. Several new ideas on how to search for massive neutrinos in nuclear beta decay are discussed.

  4. Non-adiabatic perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimdahl, W.; Fabris, J.C.; Borges, H.A.; Carneiro, S.; Hiplito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: humberto@ufba.br E-mail: fabris@pq.cnpq.br

    2011-04-01

    We investigate a spatially flat Friedmann-Lematre-Robertson-Walker cosmology in which a decaying vacuum term causes matter production at late times. Assuming a decay proportional to the Hubble rate, the ratio of the background energy densities of dark matter and dark energy changes with the cosmic scale factor as a{sup ?3/2}. The intrinsically non-adiabatic two-component perturbation dynamics of this model is reduced to a single second-order equation. Perturbations of the vacuum term are shown to be negligible on scales that are relevant for structure formation. On larger scales, dark-energy perturbations give a somewhat higher contribution but remain always smaller than the dark-matter perturbations.

  5. Measurement of the Michel rho parameter in direct muon decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piilonen, Leo; Haim, D.; Lee, F. S.; Zhang, Y.; Amann, J. F.; Bolton, R. D.; Cooper, M. D.; Foreman, W.; Harrison, R.; Hart, G.; Hogan, G. E.; Kozlowski, T.; Kroupa, M. A.; Mischke, R. E.; Pillai, C.; Schilling, S.; Whitehouse, D.; Chen, Y.; Dzemidzic, M.; Hungerford, E. V. III

    1997-05-20

    We report on the status of LAMPF experiment E-1240 to measure the Michel {rho} parameter in direct muon decay. This experiment ran in 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. The expected precision on the {rho} parameter is {+-}0.0008. This result will provide better constraints on new physics, particularly on the charged vector bosons' mixing angle {zeta} in the manifestly left-right symmetric extension of the Standard Model.

  6. CP Violation in B Meson Decays: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanceri, Livio; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2005-08-30

    CP violation is intimately connected with the puzzle of matter-antimatter asymmetry and baryogenesis. In the Standard Model of particle physics, the observed CP violation phenomena are accounted for by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism involving a phase in the quark mixing matrix. This paper is devoted to a review of the experimental status of CP violation in the decays of B mesons.

  7. Recent developments in the theory of double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iachello, F.; Kotila, J.; Barea, J.

    2013-12-30

    We report results of a novel calculation of phase space factors for 2??{sup +}?{sup +}, 2??{sup +}EC, 2?ECEC, 0??{sup +}?{sup +}, and 0??{sup +}EC using exact Dirac wave functions, and finite nuclear size and electron screening corrections. We present results of expected half-lives for 0??{sup +}?{sup +} and 0??{sup +}EC decays obtained by combining the calculation of phase space factors with IBM-2 nuclear matrix elements.

  8. Least Squ Fit of Lin Combination of Exponential Decay

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-07-06

    This program fits by least squares a function which is a linear combination of real exponential decay functions. The function is y(k) = summation over j of a(j) * exp(-lambda(j) * k). Values of the independent variable (k) and the dependent variable y(k) are specified as input data. Weights may be specified as input information or set by the program (w(k) = 1/y(k) ).

  9. B meson decays into charmless pseudoscalar scalar mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Ramirez, Carlos A.; Mendoza S, J. A.

    2007-06-19

    The nonleptonic weak decays of meson B into a scalar and pseudoscalar meson are studied. The scalar mesons under consideration are {sigma} (or f0(600)), f0(980), a0(980) and K{sub 0}{sup *}(1430). We calculate the Branching ratios in the Naive Factorization approximation. Scalars are assumed to be qq-bar bounded sates, but an estimation can be obtained in the case they are four bounded states.

  10. An Enquiry Concerning Charmless Semileptonic Decays of Bottom Mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaisanguanthum, Kris Somboon; /Harvard U. /SLAC

    2008-09-19

    The branching fractions for the decays B {yields} P{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}, where P are the pseudoscalar charmless mesons {pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{prime} and {ell} is an electron or muon, are measured with B{sup 0} and B{sup {+-}} mesons found in the recoil of a second B meson decaying as B {yields} D{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}} or B {yields} D*{ell}{nu}{sub {ell}}. The measurements are based on a data set of 348 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV recorded with the BABAR detector. Assuming isospin symmetry, measured pionic branching fractions are combined into {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (1.54 {+-} 0.17{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.09{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}. First evidence of the B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decay is seen; its branching fraction is measured to be {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) = (0.64 {+-} 0.20{sub (stat)} {+-} 0.03{sub (syst)}) x 10{sup -4}. It is determined that {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {eta}{prime}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) < 0.47 x 10{sup -4} to 90% confidence. Partial branching fractions for the pionic decays in ranges of the momentum transfer and various published calculations of the B {yields} {pi} hadronic form factor are used to obtain values of the magnitude of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V{sub ub} between 3.61 and 4.07 x 10{sup -3}.

  11. Numerical simulations of the decay of primordial magnetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahniashvili, Tina [McWilliams Center for Cosmology and Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, Laurentian University, Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, ON P3E 2C (Canada); Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, AlbaNova University Center, Roslagstullsbacken 23, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Tevzadze, Alexander G. [Abastumani Astrophysical Observatory, Ilia State University, 2A Kazbegi Ave, Tbilisi, GE-0160 (Georgia); Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Tbilisi State University, 1 Chavchavadze Avenue Tbilisi, GE-0128 (Georgia); Ratra, Bharat [Department of Physics, Kansas State University, 116 Cardwell Hall, Manhattan, Kansas 66506 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of forced and freely decaying 3D magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in order to model magnetic field evolution during cosmological phase transitions in the early Universe. Our approach assumes the existence of a magnetic field generated either by a process during inflation or shortly thereafter, or by bubble collisions during a phase transition. We show that the final configuration of the magnetic field depends on the initial conditions, while the velocity field is nearly independent of initial conditions.

  12. Inclusive. chi. (2 P ) production in. Upsilon. (3 S ) decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, R.; Schmidt, D.; Procario, M.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Cr

    1991-09-23

    Using the CsI calorimeter of the CLEO II detector, the spin triplet {chi}{sub {ital b}}(2{ital P}) states are observed in {Upsilon}(3{ital S}) radiative decays with much higher statistics than seen in previous experiments. The observed mass splittings are not described well by theoretical models, while the relative branching ratios agree with predictions that include relativistic corrections to the radiative transition rates.

  13. Decay of transverse correlations in quantum Heisenberg models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Björnberg, Jakob E. E-mail: daniel@ueltschi.org; Ueltschi, Daniel E-mail: daniel@ueltschi.org

    2015-04-15

    We study a class of quantum spin systems that include the S=1/2 Heisenberg and XY-models and prove that two-point correlations exhibit exponential decay in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The field is not necessarily constant, it may be random, and it points in the same direction. Our proof is entirely probabilistic and it relies on a random loop representations of the correlation functions, on stochastic domination and on first-passage percolation.

  14. Some Comments on the Decays of eta (550)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Veltman, M.; Yellin, J.

    1966-07-01

    Various decay modes of the {eta}(500) are discussed. The relations, through SU{sub 3} and the Gell-Mann, Sharp, Wagner model, between the {eta}-decay modes and the modes {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{gamma), {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} are investigated taking into account {eta}-{eta}{sup *} mixing. The present experimental values for the neutral branching ratios plus the shape of the {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot are shown to require a 25% {vert_bar}{Delta}{rvec I}{vert_bar} = 3 contribution to the {eta} {yields} 3{pi} amplitude. The connection between a possible charge asymmetry in {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and the branching ratio {Gamma}{sub {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}}/{Gamma}{sub {eta}}{sup all} is investigated in the framework of a model proposed earlier by several authors. It is shown that there is no conflict between the existing data and this model. The Dalitz plot distribution of {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} is discussed under various assumptions about the properties of the interaction responsible for the decay. (auth)

  15. Gamma-ray decay of levels in /sup 53/Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickens, J.K.; Larson, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    Gamma-ray decay of levels in the stable isotope /sup 53/Cr has been studied using /sup 53/Cr(n,n'..gamma..) reactions for incident neutron energies between threshold and 10 MeV. Of the 65 gamma rays or gamma-ray groups observed for neutron interactions with /sup 53/Cr, 50 have been placed or tentatively placed among 34 levels in /sup 53/Cr up to an excitation energy of 4.36 MeV. Deduced branching ratios are in reasonable agreement with previous measurements except for decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level. For the decay of the E/sub x/ = 1537-keV level we are unable to explain variations in the branching ratios of the transition gamma rays as a function of incident neutron energy within the framework of the presently known level structure of /sup 53/Cr and suggest the possibility of a second energy level at E/sub x/ = 1537 keV. 59 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. THE DECAYING LONG-PERIOD OSCILLATION OF A STELLAR MEGAFLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anfinogentov, S.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Mathioudakis, M.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Kowalski, A. F.

    2013-08-20

    We analyze and interpret the oscillatory signal in the decay phase of the U-band light curve of a stellar megaflare observed on 2009 January 16 on the dM4.5e star YZ CMi. The oscillation is well approximated by an exponentially decaying harmonic function. The period of the oscillation is found to be 32 minutes, the decay time about 46 minutes, and the relative amplitude 15%. As this observational signature is typical of the longitudinal oscillations observed in solar flares at extreme ultraviolet and radio wavelengths, associated with standing slow magnetoacoustic waves, we suggest that this megaflare may be of a similar nature. In this scenario, macroscopic variations of the plasma parameters in the oscillations modulate the ejection of non-thermal electrons. The phase speed of the longitudinal (slow magnetoacoustic) waves in the flaring loop or arcade, the tube speed, of about 230 km s{sup -1} would require a loop length of about 200 Mm. Other mechanisms, such as standing kink oscillations, are also considered.

  17. Search for T violation in charm meson decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-06-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment, they have searched for T violation in charm meson decays using the four-body decay channels D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The T violation asymmetry is obtained using triple-product correlations and assuming the validity of the CPT theorem. They find the asymmetry values to be A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup 0}) = 0.010 {+-} 0.057(stat.) {+-} 0.037(syst.), A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup +}) = 0.023 {+-} 0.062(stat.) {+-} 0.022(syst.), and A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sub s}{sup +}) = -0.036 {+-} 0.067(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.). Each measurement is consistent with no T violation. New measurements of the CP asymmetries for some of these decay modes are also presented.

  18. Charmless three-body decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2007-11-01

    An exploratory study of charmless 3-body decays of B mesons is presented using a simple model based on the framework of the factorization approach. The nonresonant contributions arising from B{yields}P{sub 1}P{sub 2} transitions are evaluated using heavy meson chiral perturbation theory (HMChPT). The momentum dependence of nonresonant amplitudes is assumed to be in the exponential form e{sup -{alpha}{sub N}{sub R}}{sup p{sub B}{center_dot}}{sup (p{sub i}+p{sub j})} so that the HMChPT results are recovered in the soft meson limit p{sub i},p{sub j}{yields}0. In addition, we have identified another large source of the nonresonant signal in the matrix elements of scalar densities, e.g. , which can be constrained from the decay B{sup 0}{yields}K{sub S}K{sub S}K{sub S} or B{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}K{sub S}K{sub S}. The intermediate vector-meson contributions to 3-body decays are identified through the vector current, while the scalar meson resonances are mainly associated with the scalar density. Their effects are described in terms of the Breit-Wigner formalism. Our main results are: (i) All KKK modes are dominated by the nonresonant background. The predicted branching ratios of K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S(L)}, K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup -} and K{sup -}K{sub S}K{sub S} modes are consistent with the data within errors. (ii) Although the penguin-dominated B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}K{sub S} decay is subject to a potentially significant tree pollution, its effective sin2{beta} is very similar to that of the K{sub S}K{sub S}K{sub S} mode. However, direct CP asymmetry of the former, being of order -4%, is more prominent than the latter. (iii) For B{yields}K{pi}{pi} decays, we found sizable nonresonant contributions in K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} modes, in agreement with the Belle measurements but larger than the BABAR result. (iv) Time-dependent CP asymmetries in K{sub S}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, a purely CP-even state, and K{sub S

  19. Study of Inclusive and Semi-Inclusive Production of eta{prime} in B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicheur, Adlene

    2001-09-24

    We report a measurement of the rate for B {yields} {eta}{prime} X{sub s} transitions where the {eta}{prime} meson has center-of-mass momentum in the range 2.0 to 2.7 GeV/c and X{sub s} represents a system comprising a kaon and up to four pions. Our study is based on 22.2 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We find {Beta}(B {yields} {eta}{prime}X{sub s}) = (6.8{sub -1.0}{sup +0.7}(stat) {+-} 1.0(syst){sub -0.5}{sup +0.0}(bkg)) x 10{sup -4} assuming that the signal is due to b {yields} sg* transitions.

  20. Process for separation of the rare earths by solvent extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, George W.; Lewey, Sonia

    1977-04-05

    Production rates for solvent extraction separation of the rare earths and yttrium from each other can be improved by the substitution of di(2-ethylhexyl) mono-thiophosphoric acid for di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid. The di(2-ethylhexyl) mono-thiophosphoric acid does not form an insoluble polymer at approximately 50% saturation as does the former extractant, permitting higher feed solution concentration and thus greater throughput.

  1. Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detecting rare, abnormally large grains by x-ray diffraction - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense

  2. Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm035_mcguire_2011_o.pdf (397.61 KB) More Documents & Publications Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials (Agreement ID:19201) Vehicle Technologies Office: 2011 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Applied ICME for New Propulsion Materials (Agreement ID:26391) Project ID:18865

  3. CMI Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths CMI at Mines offers webinars about critical materials at no charge. Registration is required to obtain a link to the webinar. September 21: Parans Paranthaman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, "Additive Manufacturing of NdFeB Magnets" Registration is open August 23: CMI Director Alex King, "CMI Director's Perspective." A recording of the webinar is available. July 20: Corby Anderson, Colorado School

  4. Public to have rare opportunity to tour Neutron Science Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rosenfest: celebrate Louis Rosen, tour LANSCE Public to have rare opportunity to tour Neutron Science Center Tour attendees can expect to see many facets of the LANSCE, including areas along the linear accelerator beam line, the control room area, and one or more experimental areas. May 10, 2011 Aerial View of Neutron Science Center Aerial View of Neutron Science Center Contact James Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203 Email LANL Rosenfest will celebrate life of LANSCE founder Louis

  5. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Rare-Earth Research | Department of Energy Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research June 15, 2011 - 7:07pm Addthis The plasma torch in the Retech plasma furnace is one tool used in Materials Preparation Center to create ultra-high purity metal alloy samples, particularly rare-earth metals, located at the Ames Lab. | Photo Courtesy of

  6. Measurement of W Boson Polarization in Top Quark Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickey, Trevor Neil

    2004-11-01

    A measurement of the polarization of the W boson from top quark decay is an excellent test of the V-A form of the charged-current weak interaction in the standard model. Since the longitudinal W boson is intimately related to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism, and the standard model gives a specific prediction for the fraction of longitudinal W bosons from top decays, it is of particular interest for study. This thesis presents a measurement of W boson polarization in top quark decays through an analysis of the cos{theta}* distribution in the lepton-plus-jets channel of t{bar t} candidate events from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This measurement uses an integrated luminosity of {approx} 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF Run II detector, resulting in 31 t{bar t} candidate events with at least one identified b jet. Using a binned likelihood fit to the cos{theta}* distribution from the t{bar t} candidate events found in this sample, the fraction of W bosons with longitudinal polarization is determined to be F{sub 0} = 0.99{sub -0.35}{sup +0.29}(stat.) {+-} 0.19(syst.), F{sub 0} > 0.33 {at} 95% CL. This result is consistent with the standard model prediction, given a top quark mass of 174.3 GeV/c{sup 2}, of F{sub 0} = 0.701 {+-} 0.012.

  7. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Stefan Meinel

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light-quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeV < m{sub {pi}} < 352 MeV, two lattice spacings, a = 0.085, 0.112 fm, and a volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3}. Our results for the axial couplings are g{sub 1} = 0.449(51), g{sub 2} = 0.84(20), and g{sub 3} = 0.71(13), where g{sub 1} governs the interaction between heavy-light mesons and pions and g{sub 2,3} are similar couplings between heavy-light baryons and pions. Using our lattice result for g{sub 3}, and constraining 1/m{sub Q} corrections in the strong decay widths with experimental data for {Sigma}{sub c}{sup (*)} decays, we obtain {Gamma}[{Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} {yields} {Lambda}{sub b} {pi}{sup {+-}}] = 4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *+}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *-} initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup prime(*)} baryons.

  8. Atomic nuclei decay modes by spontaneous emission of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Ivascu, M.; Sndulescu, A.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    The great majority of the known nuclides with Z>40, including the so-called stable nuclides, are metastable with respect to several modes of spontaneous superasymmetric splitting. A model extended from the fission theory of alpha decay allows one to estimate the lifetimes and the branching ratios relative to the alpha decay for these natural radioactivities. From a huge amount of systematic calculations it is concluded that the process should proceed with maximum intensity in the trans-lead nuclei, where the minimum lifetime is obtained from parent-emitted heavy ion combinations leading to a magic (/sup 208/Pb) or almost magic daughter nucleus. More than 140 nuclides with atomic number smaller than 25 are possible candidates to be emitted from heavy nuclei, with half-lives in the range of 10/sup 10/--10/sup 30/ s: /sup 5/He, /sup 8en-dash10/Be, /sup 11,12/B, /sup 12en-dash16/C, /sup 13en-dash17/N, /sup 15en-dash22/O, /sup 18en-dash23/F, /sup 20en-dash26/Ne, /sup 23en-dash28/Na, /sup 23en-dash30/Mg, /sup 27en-dash32/Al, /sup 28en-dash36/Si, /sup 31en-dash39/P, /sup 32en-dash42/S, /sup 35en-dash45/Cl, /sup 37en-dash47/Ar, /sup 40en-dash49/ K, . .Ca, /sup 44en-dash53/ Sc, /sup 46en-dash53/Ti, /sup 48en-dash54/V, and /sup 49en-dash55/ Cr. The shell structure and the pairing effects are clearly manifested in these new decay modes.

  9. Measurement of the Michel rho parameter in direct muon decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piilonen, Leo; Haim, D.; Zhang, Y.; Bolton, R.D.; Cooper, M.D.; Foreman, W.; Harrison, R.; Hart, G.; Hogan, G.E.; Kozlowski, T.; Kroupa, M.A.; Mischke, R.E.; Pillai, C.; Schilling, S.; Whitehouse, D.; Dzemidzic, M.; Hungerford, E.V.; Lan, K.; Mayes, B.W.; Pinsky, L.; von Witsch, W. Cooper, P.S.; Liu, F.; Tribble, R.E.; Tu, X.L.; Van Ausdeln, L.A.; Van Ausdeln, L.A. Jui, C.C.H.; Stantz, K.M.; Szymanski, J.J.; Manweiler, R.; Stanislaus, T.D.; Ziock, K.O.H. Wright, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the status of LAMPF experiment E-1240 to measure the Michel {rho} parameter in direct muon decay. This experiment ran in 1993, and the data are currently being analyzed. The expected precision on the {rho} parameter is {plus_minus}0.0008. This result will provide better constraints on new physics, particularly on the charged vector bosons{close_quote} mixing angle {zeta} in the manifestly left-right symmetric extension of the Standard Model. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. beta. -Decay in the Skyrme-Witten representation of QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyderman, N.J.

    1991-05-01

    The renormalized coupling strength of the {beta}-decay axial vector current is related to {pi}{plus minus} p cross sections through the Adler-Weisberger sum rule, that follows from chiral symmetry. We attempt to understand the Adler-Weisberger sum rule in the 1/N{sub c} expansion in QCD, and in the Skyrme-Witten model that realizes the 1/N{sub c} expansion in the low energy limit, using it to explicitly calculate both g{sub A} and the {pi}{plus minus} p cross sections. 32 refs.

  12. Reconstruction and identification of $\\tau$ lepton decays to hadrons and $\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-27

    This paper describes the algorithms used by the CMS experiment to reconstruct and identify τ→ hadrons + vt decays during Run 1 of the LHC. The performance of the algorithms is studied in proton-proton collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The algorithms achieve an identification efficiency of 50–60%, with misidentification rates for quark and gluon jets, electrons, and muons between per mille and per cent levels.

  13. Efficient double beta decay nuclear matrix elements computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neacsu, Andrei [Horia Hulubei Foundation (FHH) 407 Atomistilor, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) 30 Reactorului, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2012-11-20

    We have developed a shell model code for the accurate computation of the two-body matrix elements of the transition operators involved in the neutrinoless double beta decay. This code features coupled cluster method short-range correlations with Jastrow-like functions, finite nucleon size effect and higher order nucleon current corrections. We present the results obtained for {sup 48}Ca and {sup 82}Se, then we compare them with other results in the literature. In the case of {sup 48}Ca, we also study the contributions of the included effects and find good agreement with other published results.

  14. Determination of the b_s lifetime using hadronic decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deisher, A.J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2008-07-01

    The authors present a measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson lifetime using fully and partially reconstructed hadronic decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}(X) followed by D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample was recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb{sup -1} from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV.

  15. Reconstruction and identification of $$\\tau$$ lepton decays to hadrons and $$\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-29

    This paper describes the algorithms used by the CMS experiment to reconstruct and identify τ→ hadrons + vt decays during Run 1 of the LHC. The performance of the algorithms is studied in proton-proton collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The algorithms achieve an identification efficiency of 50–60%, with misidentification rates for quark and gluon jets, electrons, and muons between per mille and per cent levels.

  16. Compact high resolution isobar separator for study of exotic decays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compact high resolution isobar separator for study of exotic decays A. Piechaczek 1 , V. Shchepunov 1 , H. K. Carter 1 J. C. Batchelder 1 , E. F. Zganjar 2 1 UNIRIB, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 2 Department of Physics & Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 A compact isobar separator, based on the Multi-Pass-Time-of-Flight (MTOF) principle, is developed [1]. A mass resolving power (MRP) as spectrometer of 110,000 (FWHM) is achieved in

  17. Rare-earth tantalates and niobates suitable for use as nanophosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S& gt

    2013-11-19

    A family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  18. GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN EVALUATION OF DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL THEORY Citation Details In-Document Search Title: GROUND-STATE PROPERTIES OF RARE-EARTH METALS: AN ...

  19. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts ...

  20. Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  1. Search for a light Higgs boson decaying to two gluons or ss? in the radiative decays of ?(1S)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; et al

    2013-08-06

    We search for the decay ?(1S)??A?, A??gg or ss?, where A? is the pseudoscalar light Higgs boson predicted by the next-to-minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. We use a sample of (17.60.3)10? ?(1S) mesons produced in the BABAR experiment via e?e???(2S)??????(1S). We see no significant signal and set 90%-confidence-level upper limits on the product branching fraction B(?(1S)??A?)B(A??gg or ss?) ranging from 10?? to 10? for A? masses in the range 0.59.0 GeV/c.

  2. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lising, Laura J.

    1999-05-18

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation D{sigma}{sub n}{center_dot}p{sub e} x p{sub v} involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 {+-} 1.3(stat.) {+-} 0.7(syst) x 10{sup -3}. This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  3. Search For B --> K* Nu Anti-Nu Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.

    2008-08-15

    We present a search for the decays B {yields} K* {nu}{bar {nu}} using 454 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We first select an event sample where one B is reconstructed in a semileptonic or hadronic mode with one charmed meson. The remaining particles in the event are then examined to search for a B {yields} K* {nu}{bar {nu}} decay. The charged K* is reconstructed as K*{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} or K*{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}; the neutral K* is identified in K*{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode. We establish upper limits at 90% confidence level of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 8 x 10{sup -5}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup 0} {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 12 x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B {yields} K* {nu}{bar {nu}}) < 8 x 10{sup -5}.

  4. Neutrinoless double beta decay and future neutrino oscillation precision experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choubey, Sandhya [Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Rodejohann, Werner [Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Strasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    We discuss to what extent future precision measurements of neutrino mixing observables will influence the information we can draw from a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay. Whereas the {delta}m{sup 2} corresponding to solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations are expected to be known with good precision, the parameter {theta}{sub 12} will govern a large part of the uncertainty. We focus, in particular, on the possibility of distinguishing the neutrino mass hierarchies and on setting a limit on the neutrino mass. We give the largest allowed values of the neutrino masses which allow to distinguish the normal from the inverted hierarchy. All aspects are discussed as a function of the uncertainty stemming from the involved nuclear matrix elements. The implications of a vanishing, or extremely small, effective mass are also investigated. By giving a large list of possible neutrino mass matrices and their predictions for the observables, we finally explore how a measurement of (or an improved limit on) neutrinoless double beta decay can help to identify the neutrino mass matrix if more precise values of the relevant parameters are known.

  5. Decaying leptophilic dark matter at IceCube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boucenna, Sofiane M.; Chianese, Marco; Mangano, Gianpiero; Miele, Gennaro; Morisi, Stefano; Pisanti, Ofelia; Vitagliano, Edoardo

    2015-12-29

    We present a novel interpretation of IceCube high energy neutrino events (with energy larger than 60 TeV) in terms of an extraterrestrial flux due to two different contributions: a flux originated by known astrophysical sources and dominating IceCube observations up to few hundreds TeV, and a new flux component where the most energetic neutrinos come from the leptophilic three-body decays of dark matter particles with a mass of few PeV. Differently from other approaches, we provide two examples of elementary particle models that do not require extremely tiny coupling constants. We find the compatibility of the theoretical predictions with the IceCube results when the astrophysical flux has a cutoff of the order of 100 TeV (broken power law). In this case the most energetic part of the spectrum (PeV neutrinos) is due to an extra component such as the decay of a very massive dark matter component. Due to the low statistics at our disposal we have considered for simplicity the equivalence between deposited and neutrino energy, however such approximation does not affect dramatically the qualitative results. Of course, a purely astrophysical origin of the neutrino flux (no cutoff in energy below the PeV scale — unbroken power law) is still allowed. If future data will confirm the presence of a sharp cutoff above few PeV this would be in favor of a dark matter interpretation.

  6. Dual-sensor technique for characterization of carrier lifetime decay transients in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrenkiel, R. K.; Johnston, S. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Tynan, Jerry

    2014-12-07

    This work addresses the frequent discrepancy between transient photoconductive (PC) decay and transient photoluminescence (PL) decay. With this dual- sensor technique, one measures the transient PC and PL decay simultaneously with the same incident light pulse, removing injection-level uncertainty. Photoconductive decay measures the transient photoconductivity, Δσ(t). PCD senses carriers released from shallow traps as well as the photo-generated electron-hole pairs. In addition, variations in carrier mobility with injection level (and time) contribute to the decay time. PL decay senses only electron-hole recombination via photon emission. Theory and experiment will show that the time dependence of the two techniques can be quite different at high injection.

  7. Competing decay modes of a high-spin isomer in the proton-unbound nucleus ??Ta*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, R. J.; Page, R. D.; Joss, D. T.; Uusitalo, J.; Darby, I. G.; Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Gray-Jones, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Hadinia, B.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppnen, A. -P.; Nyman, M.; O'Donnell, D.; Pakarinen, J.; Rahkila, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Sarn, J.; Scholey, C.; Seweryniak, D.; Simpson, J.

    2015-01-01

    An isomeric state at high spin and excitation energy was recently observed in the proton-unbound nucleus 158Ta. This state was observed to decay by both ? and ? decay modes. The large spin change required to decay via ?-ray emission incurs a lifetime long enough for ? decay to compete. The ? decay has an energy of 8644(11) keV, which is among the highest observed in the region, a partial half-life of 440(70) ?s and changes the spin by 11?. In this study, additional evidence supporting the assignment of this ? decay to the high-spin isomer in 158Ta will be presented.

  8. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  9. Multicanonical sampling of rare events in random matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Nen; Iba, Yukito; Hukushima, Koji

    2010-09-15

    A method based on multicanonical Monte Carlo is applied to the calculation of large deviations in the largest eigenvalue of random matrices. The method is successfully tested with the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble, sparse random matrices, and matrices whose components are subject to uniform density. Specifically, the probability that all eigenvalues of a matrix are negative is estimated in these cases down to the values of {approx}10{sup -200}, a region where simple random sampling is ineffective. The method can be applied to any ensemble of matrices and used for sampling rare events characterized by any statistics.

  10. Population and community ecology of the rare plant amsinckia grandiflora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsen, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    Research was conducted between the fall of 1992 and the spring on the population and community ecology of the rare annual plant, Amsinckia glandiflora (Gray) Kleeb. ex Greene (Boraginaceae). The research goal was to investigate the causes of the species rarity, data useful to restorative efforts. The work focused on the examination of competitive suppression by exotic annual grasses; comparisons with common, weedy congener; and the role of litter cover and seed germination and seedling establishment. Annual exotic grasses reduced A. grandiflora reproductive output to a greater extent than did the native perennial bunch grass.

  11. Rare earth element patterns in biotite, muscovite and tourmaline minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.

    1986-04-21

    Rare earth element concentrations in the minerals biotite and muscovite from the mica schist country rocks of the Etta pegmatite and tourmalines from the Bob Ingersoll pegmatite have been measured by INAA and CNAA. The concentrations range from 10/sup -4/ g/g to 10/sup -10g//sub g/. The REE patterns of biotite, muscovite and tourmaline reported herein are highly fractionated from light to heavy REE. The REE concentrations in biotite and muscovite are high and indigenous. The pegmatite tourmalines contain low concentrations of REE. Variations in tourmaline REE patterns reflect the geochemical evolution of pegmatite melt/fluid system during crystallization.

  12. Quantum Decay of the 'False Vacuum' and Pair Creation of Soliton Domain Walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John H. Jr.

    2011-03-28

    Quantum decay of metastable states ('false vacua') has been proposed as a mechanism for bubble nucleation of new universes and phase transitions in the early universe. Experiments indicate the occurrence of false vacuum decay, within a region bounded by soliton domain walls that nucleate via quantum tunneling, in a highly anisotropic condensed matter system. This phenomenon provides a compelling example of false vacuum decay in the laboratory.

  13. Double beta decay versus cosmology: Majorana CP phases and nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank; Paes, Heinrich [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Suhonen, Jouni [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O.B. 35, FIN-40014, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2005-08-01

    We discuss the relation between the absolute neutrino mass scale, the effective mass measured in neutrinoless double beta decay, and the Majorana CP phases. Emphasis is placed on estimating the upper bound on the nuclear matrix element entering calculations of the double beta decay half-life. Combining the claimed evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay with the neutrino mass bound from cosmology, one of the Majorana CP phases can be constrained.

  14. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  15. Charmless Three-Body $B$ Decays at BABAR (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Charmless Three-Body B Decays at BABAR Citation Details In-Document Search ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Experiment-HEP,HEPEX Word ...

  16. On the use of Extreme Value Theory in analyses of continuum gamma decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Ruiz, R. F.; Cristancho, F.

    2010-08-04

    Extreme Value theory seems to be a promising tool for analysing experimental continuum gamma decay spectra in order to obtain physical parameters at high excitation energy.

  17. On the ability of Order Statistics to distinguish different models for continuum gamma decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, J. J.; Cristancho, F.

    2007-10-26

    A simulation procedure to calculate some important parameters to the application of Order Statistics in the analysis of continuum gamma decay is presented.

  18. Large Hadron Collider Probe of Supersymmetric Neutrinoless Double-Beta-Decay Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Paes, H. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, D-44221, Dortmund (Germany)

    2009-08-28

    In the minimal supersymmetric extension to the standard model, a nonzero lepton number violating coupling {lambda}{sub 111}{sup '} predicts both neutrinoless double-beta-decay and resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We show that, in this case, if neutrinoless double beta decay is discovered in the next generation of experiments, there exist good prospects to observe single slepton production at the LHC. Neutrinoless double beta decay could otherwise result from a different source (such as a nonzero Majorana neutrino mass). Resonant single slepton production at the LHC can therefore discriminate between the {lambda}{sub 111}{sup '} neutrinoless double-beta-decay mechanism and others.

  19. Plasma wave aided two photon decay of an electromagnetic wave in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, K. K. Magesh; Singh, Rohtash; Krishan, Vinod

    2014-11-15

    The presence of a Langmuir wave in an unmagnetized plasma is shown to allow parametric decay of an electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic waves, which is otherwise not allowed due to wave number mismatch. The decay occurs at plasma densities below one ninth the critical density and the decay waves propagate at finite angles to the pump laser. Above the threshold, the growth rate scales linearly with the amplitude of the Langmuir wave and the amplitude of the pump electromagnetic wave. The frequency ω of the lower frequency decay wave increases with the angle its propagation vector makes with that of the pump. The growth rate, however, decreases with ω.

  20. Searching for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of 130 Te with CUORE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless double-beta (0 ) decay is a hypothesized lepton-number-violating process that offers the only known means of asserting the possible Majorana nature of ...

  1. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay in Light of SNO Salt Data (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dirac neutrinos if the invertedor degenerate mass spectrum will be confirmed by the improvements in cosmology, tritium data beta decay, or long-baseline oscillation experiments. ...

  2. Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136: Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Double Beta Decay in Xenon-136: Measuring the Neutrino-Emitting Mode and Searching for Majoron-Emitting Modes Authors: Herrin, Steven ; Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC ...

  3. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draayer, Jerry P.

    2014-09-28

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  4. Assembly of uniaxially aligned rare-earth-free nanomagnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balamurugan, B; Das, B; Shah, VR; Skomski, R; Li, XZ; Sellmyer, DJ

    2012-09-17

    We report HfCo7 nanoparticles with appreciable permanent-magnet properties (magnetocrystalline anisotropy K-1 approximate to 10 Mergs/cm(3), coercivity H-c approximate to 4.4 kOe, and magnetic polarization J(s) approximate to 10.9 kG at 300 K) deposited by a single-step cluster-deposition method. The direct crystalline-ordering of nanoparticles during the gas-aggregation process, without the requirement of a high-temperature thermal annealing, provides an unique opportunity to align their easy axes uniaxially by applying a magnetic field of about 5 kOe prior to deposition, and subsequently to fabricate exchange-coupled nanocomposites having J(s) as high as 16.6 kG by co-depositing soft magnetic Fe-Co. This study suggests HfCo7 as a promising rare-earth-free permanent-magnet alloy, which is important for mitigating the critical-materials aspects of rare-earth elements. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4753950

  5. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  6. Precise trace rare earth analysis by radiochemical neutron activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Weimer, W.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1981-06-01

    A rare earth group separation scheme followed by normal Ge(Li), low energy photon detector (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometry significantly enhances the detection sensitivity of individual rare earth elements (REE) at or below the ppB level. Based on the selected ..gamma..-ray energies, normal Ge(Li) counting is favored for /sup 140/La, /sup 170/Tb, and /sup 169/Yb; LEPD is favored for low ..gamma..-ray energies of /sup 147/Nd, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 166/Ho, and /sup 169/Yb; and noncoincidence counting is favored for /sup 141/Ce, /sup 143/Ce, /sup 142/Pr, /sup 153/Sm, /sup 171/Er, and /sup 175/Yb. The detection of radionuclides /sup 152m/Eu, /sup 159/Gd, and /sup 177/Lu is equally sensitive by normal Ge(Li) and noncoincidence counting; /sup 152/Eu is equally sensitive by LEPD and normal Ge(Li); and /sup 153/Gd and /sup 170/Tm is equally favored by all the counting modes. Overall, noncoincidence counting is favored for most of the REE. Precise measurements of the REE were made in geological and biological standards.

  7. Angular correlations in top quark decays in standard model extensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batebi, S.; Etesami, S. M.; Mohammadi-Najafabadi, M.

    2011-03-01

    The CMS Collaboration at the CERN LHC has searched for the t-channel single top quark production using the spin correlation of the t-channel. The signal extraction and cross section measurement rely on the angular distribution of the charged lepton in the top quark decays, the angle between the charged lepton momentum and top spin in the top rest frame. The behavior of the angular distribution is a distinct slope for the t-channel single top (signal) while it is flat for the backgrounds. In this Brief Report, we investigate the contributions which this spin correlation may receive from a two-Higgs doublet model, a top-color assisted technicolor (TC2) and the noncommutative extension of the standard model.

  8. Active and sterile neutrino mass effects on beta decay spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boillos, Juan Manuel; Moya de Guerra, Elvira

    2013-06-10

    We study the spectra of the emitted charged leptons in charge current weak nuclear processes to analyze the effect of neutrino masses. Standard active neutrinos are studied here, with masses of the order of 1 eV or lower, as well as sterile neutrinos with masses of a few keV. The latter are warm dark matter (WDM) candidates hypothetically produced or captured as small mixtures with the active neutrinos. We compute differential decay or capture rates spectra in weak charged processes of different nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 187}Re, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 163}Ho, etc) using different masses of both active and sterile neutrinos and different values of the mixing parameter.

  9. Measurements of sextupole decay and snapback in Tevatron dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gueorgui V. Velev et al.

    2004-07-15

    To help optimize the performance of the Fermilab Tevatron accelerator in Collider Run II, we have undertaken a systematic study of the drift and subsequent snapback of dipole magnet harmonics. The study has mostly focused on the dynamic behavior of the normal sextupole component, b2, as measured on a sample of spare Tevatron dipoles at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. We measured the dependence of the decay amplitude and the snapback time on Tevatron ramp parameters and magnet operational history. A series of beam studies was also performed [1]. This paper summarizes the magnetic measurement results and concludes with proposals for an optimization of the b2 correction scheme which is derived from these measurements.

  10. Search for B+ meson decay to a1+ K*0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {alpha}{sup +}{sub 1}(1260)K*{sup 0}(892). The data, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, represent 465 million B{anti B} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at the energy of the {Upsilon}(4S). We find no significant signal and set an upper limit at 90% confidence level on the product of branching fractions B(B{sup +} --> {alpha}{sup +}{sub 1}(1260)K*{sup 0}(892)) x B({alpha}{sup +}{sub 1}(1260) --> {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) of 1.8 x 10{sup -6}.

  11. Radiopurity control in the NEXT-100 double beta decay experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    lvarez, V.; Crcel, S.; Cervera, A.; Daz, J.; Ferrario, P.; Gil, A.; Gmez-Cadenas, J. J.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lorca, D.; Martn-Albo, J.; Martnez, A.; Monrabal, F.; Muoz Vidal, J.; Nebot-Guinot, M.; Rodrguez, J.; Serra, L.; Simn, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M. [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valncia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)] [Instituto de Fsica Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universitat de Valncia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); and others

    2013-08-08

    An extensive material screening and selection process is underway in the construction of the 'Neutrino Experiment with a Xenon TPC' (NEXT), intended to investigate neutrinoless double beta decay using a high-pressure xenon gas TPC filled with 100 kg of Xe enriched in {sup 136}Xe. Determination of the radiopurity levels of the materials is based on gamma-ray spectroscopy using ultra-low background germanium detectors at the Laboratorio Subterrneo de Canfranc (Spain) and also on Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry. Materials to be used in the shielding, pressure vessel, electroluminescence and high voltage components and energy and tracking readout planes have been already taken into consideration. The measurements carried out are presented, describing the techniques and equipment used, and the results obtained are shown, discussing their implications for the NEXT experiment.

  12. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ?? decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, P. K.

    2013-12-30

    To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0?/0N) for the 0{sup +} ? 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ?? decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

  13. Role of quantum statistics in multi-particle decay dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchewka, Avi; Granot, Er’el

    2015-04-15

    The role of quantum statistics in the decay dynamics of a multi-particle state, which is suddenly released from a confining potential, is investigated. For an initially confined double particle state, the exact dynamics is presented for both bosons and fermions. The time-evolution of the probability to measure two-particle is evaluated and some counterintuitive features are discussed. For instance, it is shown that although there is a higher chance of finding the two bosons (as oppose to fermions, and even distinguishable particles) at the initial trap region, there is a higher chance (higher than fermions) of finding them on two opposite sides of the trap as if the repulsion between bosons is higher than the repulsion between fermions. The results are demonstrated by numerical simulations and are calculated analytically in the short-time approximation. Furthermore, experimental validation is suggested.

  14. Neutrinoless double-beta decay in covariant density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, P.; Yao, J. M.; Song, L. S.; Hagino, K.; Meng, J.

    2015-10-15

    We use covariant density functional theory beyond mean field in order to describe neutrinoless double-beta decay in a fully relativistic way. The dynamic effects of particle-number and angular-momentum conservations as well as shape fluctuations of quadrupole character are taken into account within the generator coordinate method for both initial and final nuclei. The calculations are based on the full relativistic transition operator. The nuclear matrix elements (NME’s) for a large number of possible transitions are investigated. The results are compared with various non-relativistic calculations, in particular also with the density functional theory based on the Gogny force. We find that the non-relativistic approximation is justified and that the total NME’s can be well approximated by the pure axial-vector coupling term. This corresponds to a considerable reduction of the computational effort.

  15. Evolution of density perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borges, H. A.; Pigozzo, C.; Carneiro, S.; Fabris, J. C.

    2008-02-15

    We study cosmological perturbations in the context of an interacting dark energy model, in which the cosmological term decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, with concomitant matter production. A previous joint analysis of the redshift-distance relation for type Ia supernovas, barionic acoustic oscillations, and the position of the first peak in the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background has led to acceptable values for the cosmological parameters. Here we present our analysis of small perturbations, under the assumption that the cosmological term, and therefore the matter production, are strictly homogeneous. Such a homogeneous production tends to dilute the matter contrast, leading to a late-time suppression in the power spectrum. Nevertheless, an excellent agreement with the observational data can be achieved by using a higher matter density as compared to the concordance value previously obtained. This may indicate that our hypothesis of homogeneous matter production must be relaxed by allowing perturbations in the interacting cosmological term.

  16. Dalitz Plot Analysis of B+- --> pi+-pi+-pi-+ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present a Dalitz-plot analysis of charmless B{sup {+-}} decays to the final state {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} using a sample of (465 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR experiment at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. They measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}}) = (15.2 {+-} 0.6 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(770){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (8.1 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 1.2{sub -1.1}{sup +0.4}) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup {+-}}) = (1.57 {+-} 0.42 {+-} 0.16{sub -0.19}{sup +0.53}) x 10{sup -6}, and {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} nonresonant) = (5.3 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and model-dependent, respectively. Measurements of branching fractions for the modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}(1450){pi}{sup {+-}} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(1370){pi}{sup {+-}} are also presented. They observe no significant direct CP asymmetries for the above modes, and there is no evidence for the decays B{sup {+-}} {yields} f{sub 0}(980){pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c0}{pi}{sup {+-}}, or B{sup {+-}} {yields} {chi}{sub c2}{pi}{sup {+-}}.

  17. The decay of debris disks around solar-type stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierchio, J. M.; Rieke, G. H.; Su, K. Y. L.; Gspr, Andras, E-mail: sierchio@mit.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We present a Spitzer MIPS study of the decay of debris disk excesses at 24 and 70 ?m for 255 stars of types F4-K2. We have used multiple tests, including consistency between chromospheric and X-ray activity and placement on the H-R diagram, to assign accurate stellar ages. Within this spectral type range, at 24 ?m, 13.6% 2.8% of the stars younger than 1 Gyr have excesses at the 3? level or more, whereas none of the older stars do, confirming previous work. At 70 ?m, 22.5% 3.6% of the younger stars have excesses at ?3? significance, whereas only 4.7{sub ?2.2}{sup +3.7}% of the older stars do. To characterize the far-infrared behavior of debris disks more robustly, we doubled the sample by including stars from the DEBRIS and DUNES surveys. For the F4-K4 stars in this combined sample, there is only a weak (statistically not significant) trend in the incidence of far-infrared excess with spectral type (detected fractions of 21.9{sub ?4.3}{sup +4.8}%, late F; 16.5{sub ?3.3}{sup +3.9}%, G; and 16.9{sub ?5.0}{sup +6.3}%, early K). Taking this spectral type range together, there is a significant decline between 3 and 4.5 Gyr in the incidence of excesses, with fractional luminosities just under 10{sup 5}. There is an indication that the timescale for decay of infrared excesses varies roughly inversely with the fractional luminosity. This behavior is consistent with theoretical expectations for passive evolution. However, more excesses are detected around the oldest stars than are expected from passive evolution, suggesting that there is late-phase dynamical activity around these stars.

  18. Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiang, R. T.

    2013-07-01

    The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

  19. The effect of the partner atom on the spectra of interatomic Coulombic decay triggered by resonant Auger processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miteva, T. Chiang, Y.-C.; Kuleff, A. I.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Gokhberg, K.; Koloren?, P.

    2014-10-28

    The resonant-Auger interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) cascade was recently suggested as an efficient means of controlling the course of the ICD process. Recent theoretical and experimental works show that control over the energies of the emitted ICD electrons can be achieved either by varying the photon energy to produce different initial core excitations or by changing the neighboring species. This work presents a theoretical investigation on the role of the rare-gas neighbor and clarifies how the latter influences the ICD process. For this purpose, we compare fully ab initio computed ICD-electron and kinetic energy release spectra following the 2p{sub 3/2} ? 4s, 2p{sub 1/2} ? 4s and 2p{sub 3/2} ? 3d of Ar in ArKr and Ar{sub 2}. We demonstrate that the presence of the chemically softer partner atom results in an increase in the energies of the emitted ICD electrons, and also in the appearance of additional ICD-active states. The latter leads to a threefold increase in the ICD yield for the case of the 2p{sub 3/2,} {sub 1/2} ? 4s parent core excitations.

  20. Search for the decay modes D⁰→e⁺e⁻, D⁰→μ⁺μ⁻, and D⁰→e±μ∓

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Mullin, E.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-01

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D⁰→e⁺e⁻, D0→μ⁺μ⁻, and D⁰→e±μ in continuum e⁺e⁻→cc¯ events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb⁻¹. These decays are highly Glashow–Iliopoulos–Maiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D⁰→μ⁺μ⁻ channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman–Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: B(D⁰→e⁺e⁻)<1.7×10⁻⁷, B(D⁰→μ⁺μ⁻) within [0.6,8.1]×10⁻⁷, and B(D⁰→e±μ)<3.3×10⁻⁷.

  1. Search for the decay modes D⁰→e⁺e⁻, D⁰→μ⁺μ⁻, and D⁰→e±μ∓

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; et al

    2012-08-01

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D⁰→e⁺e⁻, D0→μ⁺μ⁻, and D⁰→e±μ∓ in continuum e⁺e⁻→cc¯ events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb⁻¹. These decays are highly Glashow–Iliopoulos–Maiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D⁰→μ⁺μ⁻ channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman–Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions:more » B(D⁰→e⁺e⁻)<1.7×10⁻⁷, B(D⁰→μ⁺μ⁻) within [0.6,8.1]×10⁻⁷, and B(D⁰→e±μ∓)<3.3×10⁻⁷.« less

  2. Search for the Decay Modes D0 to e+ e-, D0 to mu+ mu-, and D0 to e+/- mu+/-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.

    2012-08-03

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}, D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, and D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} in continuum e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}. These decays are highly GIM suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the Standard Model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman-Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -7}, {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) within [0.6, 8.1] x 10{sup -7}, and {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -7}.

  3. Gaps and pseudogaps in perovskite rare earth nickelates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, S. James; Ouellette, Daniel G.; Kally, James; Kozhanov, Alex; Hauser, Adam J.; Mikheev, Evgeny; Zhang, Jack Y.; Moreno, Nelson E.; Son, Junwoo; Stemmer, Susanne; Balents, Leon

    2015-06-01

    We report on tunneling measurements that reveal the evolution of the quasiparticle state density in two rare earth perovskite nickelates, NdNiO{sub 3} and LaNiO{sub 3}, that are close to a bandwidth controlled metal to insulator transition. We measure the opening of a sharp gap of ∼30 meV in NdNiO{sub 3} in its insulating ground state. LaNiO{sub 3}, which remains a correlated metal at all practical temperatures, exhibits a pseudogap of the same order. The results point to both types of gaps arising from a common origin, namely, a quantum critical point associated with the T = 0 K metal-insulator transition. The results support theoretical models of the quantum phase transition in terms of spin and charge instabilities of an itinerant Fermi surface.

  4. Detecting Rare Events in the Time-Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rest, A; Garg, A

    2008-10-31

    One of the biggest challenges in current and future time-domain surveys is to extract the objects of interest from the immense data stream. There are two aspects to achieving this goal: detecting variable sources and classifying them. Difference imaging provides an elegant technique for identifying new transients or changes in source brightness. Much progress has been made in recent years toward refining the process. We discuss a selection of pitfalls that can afflict an automated difference imagine pipeline and describe some solutions. After identifying true astrophysical variables, we are faced with the challenge of classifying them. For rare events, such as supernovae and microlensing, this challenge is magnified because we must balance having selection criteria that select for the largest number of objects of interest against a high contamination rate. We discuss considerations and techniques for developing classification schemes.

  5. SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohman, T.P.

    1961-11-21

    A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

  6. Heavy-ion excitation of rare-gas excimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, A.; Koerner, H.J.; Kroetz, W.; Ribitzki, G.; Murnick, D.E.; Matthias, E.; Kienle, P.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.

    1987-07-15

    Beams of high-energy heavy ions (Ar and U) from the UNILAC accelerator have been used to excite rare gases at pressures near 1 bar. The dominant spectroscopic feature observed in Ar, Kr, and Xe gases was molecular excimer emission at the second excimer continuum at 130, 150, and 170 nm, respectively. The excimer radiation was studied as a function of time (with respect to the excitation pulse), ion-beam current, pressure, and excitation density. The efficiency of excimer production from heavy-ion-beam energy was found to be several percent. Details of spectral shape, especially the ratio of first-to-second continuum emission, were found to depend on pressure and exciting beam type.

  7. Cryogenic distribution for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Jones, Dana Arenius, Adam Fila, P. Geutschow, Helmut Laumer, Matt Johnson, Cory S. Waltz, J. G. Weisend II

    2012-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) is a new National User Facility for nuclear science funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science and operated by Michigan State University. The FRIB accelerator linac consists of superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) cavities operating at 2 K and SC magnets operating at 4.5 K all cooled by a large scale cryogenic refrigeration system. A major subsystem of the cryogenic system will be the distribution system whose primary components will include a distribution box, the transfer lines and the interconnect valve boxes at each cryogenic device. An overview of the conceptual design of the distribution system including engineering details, capabilities and schedule is described.

  8. A Diffusion Cloud Chamber Study of Very Slow Mesons. II. Beta Decay of the Muon

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lederman, L. M.; Sargent, C. P.; Rinehart, M.; Rogers, K.

    1955-03-01

    The spectrum of electrons arising from the decay of the negative mu meson has been determined. The muons are arrested in the gas of a high pressure hydrogen filled diffusion cloud chamber. The momenta of the decay electrons are determined from their curvature in a magnetic field of 7750 gauss. The spectrum of 415 electrons has been analyzed according to the theory of Michel.

  9. Proton decay from the isoscalar giant dipole resonance in {sup 58}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunyadi, M.; Hashimoto, H.; Fujimura, H.; Fujiwara, M.; Hara, K.; Itoh, M.; Nakanishi, K.; Okumura, S.; Li, T.; Garg, U.; Hoffman, J.; Nayak, B. K.; Akimune, H.; Gacsi, Z.; Harakeh, M. N.

    2009-10-15

    Proton decay from the 3({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega} isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR) in {sup 58}Ni has been measured using the ({alpha},{alpha}{sup '}p) reaction at a bombarding energy of 386 MeV to investigate its decay properties. We have extracted the ISGDR strength under the coincidence condition between inelastically scattered {alpha} particles at forward angles and decay protons emitted at backward angles. Branching ratios for proton decay to low-lying states of {sup 57}Co have been determined, and the results compared with predictions of recent continuum-RPA calculations. The final-state spectra of protons decaying to the low-lying states in {sup 57}Co were analyzed for a more detailed understanding of the structure of the ISGDR. It is found that there are differences in the structure of the ISGDR as a function of excitation energy.

  10. Status and prospects of investigations into the collinear cluster decay of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyatkov, Yu. V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Alexandrov, A. A.; Alexandrova, I. A.; Mkaza, N.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Kondratyev, N. A.; Kuznetsova, E. A. Mishinsky, G. V.; Malaza, V.; Strekalovsky, A. O.; Strekalovsky, O. V.

    2014-12-15

    Basic experimental results confirming the existence a new cluster-decay type called collinear cluster tripartition (CCT) are presented. Decays of this type manifest themselves, in particular, as a two-dimensional region of a locally enhanced yield of fragments (bump) that corresponds to specific missing-mass values in the mass-mass distribution of fission fragments. One of the decay modes that contribute to the bump can be treated as a cluster-decay type that is new in relation to the well-known heavy-ion or lead radioactivity. The conclusions drawn from an analysis of correlation mass distributions are confirmed by the results obtained from neutron-gated data, measurements of the nuclear charge for CCT events, and the direct detection of new-decay products.

  11. SCALAR AND VECTOR NONLINEAR DECAYS OF LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVN WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvn waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvn wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvn and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ?{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0?}{sup 2}decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvn and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ?{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0?}{sup 2}>?{sub 0}/?{sub ci}, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ? {sub i} k {sub 0} ? 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvn product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1?{sub 0} and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  12. Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-06

    We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

  13. kendall_aps06.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kaon decay in MiniBooNE Kendall Mahn Columbia University * MiniBooNE beamline overview * Kaon flux predictions * Kaon measurements in MiniBooNE - high energy events * Summary MiniBooNE beamline * MiniBooNE is searching for ν µ to ν e oscillations - Produce a beam of ν µ , look for ν e * 8 GeV protons hit Be target, producing: - π+ (primary source of ν µ ) - K+/- (decay to ν µ , ν e ) - K 0 (decay to ν e ) Oscillation search backgrounds * Three major backgrounds: - misID'd π 0 s *

  14. Study of B̄→Xulν̄ decays in BB̄ events tagged by a fully reconstructed B-meson decay and determination of |Vub|

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; et al

    2012-08-07

    We report measurements of partial branching fractions for inclusive charmless semileptonic B decays B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ and the determination of the Cabibbo–Kobayashi–Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vub|. The analysis is based on a sample of 467×10⁶ Υ(4S)→BB¯¯¯ decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ storage rings. We select events in which the decay of one of the B mesons is fully reconstructed and an electron or a muon signals the semileptonic decay of the other B meson. We measure partial branching fractions ΔB in several restricted regions of phase space and determine the CKM element |Vub| based on different QCDmore » predictions. For decays with a charged lepton momentum p*l>1.0 GeV in the B meson rest frame, we obtain ΔB=(1.80±0.13stat±0.15sys±0.02theo)×10⁻³ from a fit to the two-dimensional MX-q² distribution. Here, MX refers to the invariant mass of the final state hadron X and q² is the invariant mass squared of the charged lepton and neutrino. From this measurement we extract |Vub|=(4.33±0.24exp±0.15theo)×10⁻³ as the arithmetic average of four results obtained from four different QCD predictions of the partial rate. We separately determine partial branching fractions for B¯¯¯0 and B⁻ decays and derive a limit on the isospin breaking in B¯¯¯→Xulν¯ decays.« less

  15. Analysis of preloaded bolted joints under exponentially decaying pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmailzadeh, E.; Chorashi, M.; Ohadi, A.R.

    1996-11-01

    Dynamic properties of joints must be considered when designing complex structures. A good deal of investigation has been carried out for a better understanding of the dynamic behavior of mechanical joints. It is suitable initially to identify the parameters of a mechanical joint by using either experimental modal analysis or accurate finite element model, and then predicating the behavior of closure bolting system by means of spring-mass-damper model. The effect of bolt prestress on the maximum bolt displacement and stress has been treated. The loading is assumed to be initially peaked, exponentially decaying internal pressure pulse acting on the closure. The dependence of peak bolt stresses and deflections on the bolt prestress level and system damping is investigated. It has been shown that the derived formulas, if damping is neglected, reduce to those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the damping effect is shown to be most important, especially for large natural frequencies, longer loading duration, and lower levels of prestress. Existence of damping, which results in the reduction of maximum bolt displacement and stress, was shown to be beneficial, especially for longer loading duration. The importance of bolt displacement reduction from the viewpoint of fatigue life, vibration loosening, and sealing, especially for lower values of prestress, has been fully emphasized.

  16. Windmill wake turbulence decay: a preliminary theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossanyi, E.A.

    1983-02-01

    The results are given of initial theoretical attempts to predict dynamic wake characteristics, particularly turbulence decay, downstream of wind turbine generators in order to assess the potential for acoustic noise generation in clusters or arrays of turbines. These results must be considered preliminary, because the model described is at least partially based on the assumption of isotropy in the turbine wakes; however, anisotrpic conditions may actually exist, particularly in the near-wake regions. The results indicate that some excess spectral energy may still exist. The turbine-generated turbulence from one machine can reach the next machine in the cluster and, depending on the turbulent wavelengths critical for acoustic noise production and perhaps structural excitation, this may be a cause for concern. Such a situation is most likely to occur in the evening or morining, during the transition from the daytime to the nocturnal boundary layer and vice-versa, particularly at more elevated sites where the winds tend to increase after dark.

  17. Ground-State Decays for Nuclei A = 3 - 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ground State Beta-Decay and Particle Unbound Resonances Data for A = 3 - 20 Nuclei Go to the Text Only section below if you prefer to view the nuclides in a text list. 18Mg 19Mg 20Mg 17Na 18Na 19Na 20Na 15Ne 16Ne 17Ne 18Ne 19Ne 20Ne 14F 15F 16F 17F 18F 19F 20F 11O 12O 13O 14O 15O 16O 17O 18O 19O 20O 10N 11N 12N 13N 14N 15N 16N 17N 18N 19N 20N 7C 8C 9C 10C 11C 12C 13C 14C 15C 16C 17C 18C 19C 20C 6B 7B 8B 9B 10B 11B 12B 13B 14B 15B 16B 17B 18B 19B 20B 5Be 6Be 7Be 8Be 9Be 10Be 11Be 12Be 13Be 14Be

  18. Extracting bb Higgs Decay Signals using Multivariate Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W Clarke; /George Washington U. /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    For low-mass Higgs boson production at ATLAS at {radical}s = 7 TeV, the hard subprocess gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} dominates but is in turn drowned out by background. We seek to exploit the intrinsic few-MeV mass width of the Higgs boson to observe it above the background in b{bar b}-dijet mass plots. The mass resolution of existing mass-reconstruction algorithms is insufficient for this purpose due to jet combinatorics, that is, the algorithms cannot identify every jet that results from b{bar b} Higgs decay. We combine these algorithms using the neural net (NN) and boosted regression tree (BDT) multivariate methods in attempt to improve the mass resolution. Events involving gg {yields} h{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} are generated using Monte Carlo methods with Pythia and then the Toolkit for Multivariate Analysis (TMVA) is used to train and test NNs and BDTs. For a 120 GeV Standard Model Higgs boson, the m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstruction width is reduced from 8.6 to 6.5 GeV. Most importantly, however, the methods used here allow for more advanced m{sub h{sup 0}}-reconstructions to be created in the future using multivariate methods.

  19. Tribimaximal neutrino mixing and neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Morisi, S.; Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular-- C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2008-11-01

    We present a tribimaximal lepton mixing scheme where the neutrinoless double beta decay rate has a lower bound which correlates with the ratio {alpha}{identical_to}{delta}m{sub sol}{sup 2}/{delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} well determined by current data, as well as with the unknown Majorana CP phase {phi}{sub 12} characterizing the solar neutrino subsystem. For the special value {phi}{sub 12}=({pi}/2) (opposite CP-sign neutrinos) the {beta}{beta}{sub 0{nu}} rate vanishes at tree level when {delta}m{sub sol}{sup 2}/{delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2}=3/80, only allowed at 3{sigma}. For all other cases the rate is nonzero, and lies within current and projected experimental sensitivities close to {phi}{sub 12}=0. We suggest two model realizations of this scheme in terms of A{sub 4}xZ{sub 2} and A{sub 4}xZ{sub 4} flavor symmetries.

  20. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gmyrek, Bryan David; /Arizona U.

    2007-08-01

    A measurement of the fraction, f{sup +}, of right-handed W bosons produced in top quark decays is presented. This analysis is based on a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 370 pb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The helicity angle, {theta}*, is reconstructed for each lepton. f{sup +} is determined by comparing the cos {theta}* distribution from the data with that for the expected background and signal for various values of f{sup +}. The fraction of longitudinal W bosons, f{sup 0}, is assumed to be 0.7 as predicted by the standard model. This yields f{sup +} = 0.109 {+-} 0.094 (stat) {+-} 0.063 (syst), consistent with the standard model prediction of f{sup +} = 3.6x 10{sup -4}. The possibility that both f{sup +} and f{sup 0} stray from standard model values is also investigated. In this case cos {theta}* distributions for each possible W helicity state, along with the backgrounds, are fit to the cos {theta}* distribution for the data. The best fit values are f{sup +} = 0.82 {+-} 0.30(stat) and f{sup 0} = -0.58 {+-} 0.50(stat).