Sample records for rare earth elements

  1. Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Rare Earth Element Mines, Deposits, and Occurrences by Greta J. Orris1 and Richard I. Grauch2 Open Table 1. Rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names.......................................................................................6 Table 2. Non-rare earth mineral codes and associated mineral names

  2. Rapporteur's Report - workshop on rare earth elements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative, cambridge, Massachusetts december 3, 2010...

  3. Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospects for Rare Earth Elements From Marine Minerals Rare earth elements (REEs) compose in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical proper es, rare earth elements are typically. Briefing Paper 02/12 Jim Hein | May 2012 www.isa.org.jm Table 1: Rare Earth Elements This paper

  4. Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imashuku, Susumu, E-mail: imashuku.susumu.2m@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

  5. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ExplorationExploitation Tool? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration...

  6. Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process: Energetics of the REE-X Systems (XA;, Mg, Zn, Si, Sn, Mn, Pb, Fe, Co, Ni) Apr 17 2015 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM In-Ho...

  7. Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells Lihong Wanga,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xing-Wang

    Rare earth elements activate endocytosis in plant cells Lihong Wanga,b,1 , Jigang Lic,d,1 , Qing (sent for review May 15, 2014) It has long been observed that rare earth elements (REEs) regulate, such as rare earth elements (REEs), have been observed for a long time to be beneficial to plant growth (1, 2

  8. Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare-metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behaviour of zirconium, niobium, yttrium and the rare earth elements in the Thor Lake rare in the Northwest Territories of Canada represents one of the largest resources of zirconium, niobium, yttrium ressources de zircon, niobium, yttrium et des éléments du groupe des terres rares lourdes (REE) au monde. Une

  9. Rare Earth Elements: A Tool for Understanding the Behaviour of Trivalent Actinides in the Geosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buil, Belen; Gomez, Paloma; Garralon, Antonio; Turrero, M. Jesus [Medioambiente, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid, 28040 (Spain)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined in groundwaters, granite and fracture fillings in a restored uranium mine. The granitoids normalized REE patterns of groundwaters show heavy rare earth elements (HREE)-enrichment and positive Eu anomalies. This suggests that the REE are fractionated during leaching from the source rocks by groundwaters. Preferential leaching of HREE would be consistent with the greater stability of their aqueous complexes compared to those of the light rare earth elements (LREE), together with the dissolution of certain fracture filling minerals, dissolution/alteration of phyllosilicates and colloidal transport. (authors)

  10. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal and Coal Byproducts Replies to the RFI are due October 10, 2014, by 8:00 p.m. EDT. Details about how and...

  11. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A NewExploratio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Behavior Of...

  12. RARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . U.S. imports of cerium compounds and rare-earth metals and alloys decreased (table 5). YttriumRARE EARTHS--2003 60.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were, geographic information specialist. The rare earths are a moderately abundant group of 17 elements comprising

  13. RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RARE-EARTH METALS--1997 61.1 RARE-EARTH METALS By James B. Hedrick The rare earths are a relatively million, to thulium and lutetium, the least abundant rare-earth elements at about 0.5 parts per million. Scandium, atomic number 21, is the lightest rare-earth element. It is the 31st most abundant element

  14. Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Izawa, Yasukazu [ARCBS, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) and Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan) and Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetric charge-transfer cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements (Sc, Y, and Gd) in the impact energy range of 30 to 1000 eV were measured for the first time. The experiments were performed with a crossed-beam apparatus that featured primary ion production by photoionization with a tunable dye laser. Comparing the cross sections of IIIa rare-earth-metal elements ({sigma}{sub Sc}, {sigma}{sub Y}, and {sigma}{sub Gd}) with those of alkali metals or helium {sigma}{sub 0}, we found that {sigma}{sub 0{approx_equal}{sigma}Sc}<{sigma}{sub Y}<{sigma}{sub Gd{approx_equal}}2{sigma}{sub 0}at an impact energy of 1000 eV.

  15. Ultra-low rare earth element content in accreted ice from sub-glacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Ultra-low rare earth element content in accreted ice from sub-glacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica Paolo. We suggest that such ultra-low concentrations are unlikely to be representative of the real REE

  16. New Rare Earth Element Abundance Distributions for the Sun and Five r-Process-Rich Very Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J; Ivans, Inese I; Hartog, Elizabeth A Den

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived new abundances of the rare-earth elements Pr, Dy, Tm, Yb, and Lu for the solar photosphere and for five very metal-poor, neutron-capture r-process-rich giant stars. The photospheric values for all five elements are in good agreement with meteoritic abundances. For the low metallicity sample, these abundances have been combined with new Ce abundances from a companion paper, and reconsideration of a few other elements in individual stars, to produce internally-consistent Ba, rare-earth, and Hf (56<= Z <= 72) element distributions. These have been used in a critical comparison between stellar and solar r-process abundance mixes.

  17. Rare Earth Elements--End Use and Recyclability Scientific Investigations Report 20115094

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pass, Calif., mine. The Mountain Pass mine is one of the two largest rare earth mines in the world........................................................................................................................................8 Neodymium-Iron-Boron Magnets..........................................................................................................................................13 Figures 1. Chart showing world mine production of rare earth oxides from 1990 through 2008 ....................................................................................

  18. STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halbach, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ^3 LBL-8906 STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES tfl Klausowned righu. STRONG RARE EARTH COBALT QUADRUPOLES Klausof i new family of strong Rare Earth Cobalt quadrupoles are

  19. Phase stable rare earth garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Roberts, Jeffery J.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A transparent ceramic according to one embodiment includes a rare earth garnet comprising A.sub.hB.sub.iC.sub.jO.sub.12, where h is 3.+-.10%, i is 2.+-.10%, and j is 3.+-.10%. A includes a rare earth element or a mixture of rare earth elements, B includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, and C includes at least one of aluminum, gallium and scandium, where A is at a dodecahedral site of the garnet, B is at an octahedral site of the garnet, and C is at a tetrahedral site of the garnet. In one embodiment, the rare earth garment has scintillation properties. A radiation detector in one embodiment includes a transparent ceramic as described above and a photo detector optically coupled to the rare earth garnet.

  20. Behavior of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems; A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott A. Wood

    2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this four-year project was to provide a database by which to judge the utility of the rare earth elements (REE) in the exploration for and exploitation of geothermal fields in the United States. Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: (1) the North Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); (2) the Cascades of Oregon; (3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; (4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; (5) Palinpion, the Philippines: (6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and (7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from all fields for REE except the last two.

  1. Study on the electrochemical extraction of rare earth elements from FLINAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Dewu; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Feng; Tian, Lifang; Li, Qingnuan [Department of Radiochemistry and Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics - SINAP, Chinese Academy of Sciences - CAS, Shanghai 201800 (Costa Rica)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical behaviors of rare earth elements, such as NdF{sub 3}, GdF{sub 3}, SmF{sub 3}, YF{sub 3}, and EuF{sub 3}, were investigated in a LiF-NaF-KF (46.5-11.5-42.0 mol %, FLINAK, m. p. 454 Celsius degrees) solvent. The results indicated that it is possible to extract Nd, Gd and Y directly by electrochemical deposition since the reductions of those cations to metal are located in the electrochemical window of the FLINAK eutectic, while the reductions of Sm and Eu metal are out of the range of the medium. Subsequently electro-deposition of Nd was carried out with two kinds of cathodic materials, namely, an inert cathode, Pt, and a reactive electrode, Cu. The collected products were characterized by various techniques revealing that a Nd-rich product was obtained. (authors)

  2. Rare earth element components in atmospheric particulates in the Bayan Obo mine region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lingqing, E-mail: wanglq@igsnrr.ac.cn; Liang, Tao, E-mail: liangt@igsnrr.ac.cn; Zhang, Qian; Li, Kexin

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bayan Obo mine, located in Inner Mongolia, China, is the largest light rare earth body ever found in the world. The research for rare earth elements (REEs) enrichment in atmospheric particulates caused by mining and ore processing is fairly limited so far. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 ?m (PM{sub 10}) were collected around the Bayan Obo mine region, in August 2012 and March 2013, to analyze the levels and distributions of REEs in particles. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 149.8 and 239.6 ng/m{sup 3}, and those for PM{sub 10} were 42.8 and 68.9 ng/m{sup 3}, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factor was calculated for all 14 REEs in the TSP and PM{sub 10} and the results indicated that REEs enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in springtime. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient concentration in the prevailing wind direction. REE chondrite normalized patterns of TSP and PM{sub 10} were similar and the normalized curves inclined to the right side, showing the conspicuous fractionation between the light REEs and heavy REE, which supported by the chondrite normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La{sub N}/Yb{sub N}, La{sub N}/Sm{sub N}, Gd{sub N}/Yb{sub N}). - Highlights: • TSP and PM{sub 10} samples were collected to analyze the levels and distributions of REE. • Enrichment factors indicated that REE enrichment was caused by anthropogenic sources. • The distribution of REEs showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. • Obvious fractionation between LREEs and HREEs is observed in atmospheric particulates.

  3. About Rare Earth Metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Rare Earth Metals What Are Rare Earths? Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center The Ames Process for Purification of Rare Earths USGS Rare Earth Information Rare Earth...

  4. 13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakhmouradian, Anton

    13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of rare metals in natural fluids 551 13.21.2.2.2 Aqueous complexation and mineral solubility 552 13 Acknowledgments 564 References 564 13.21.1 Introduction Rare-element mineral deposits, also called rare-metal

  5. Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption onto natural microbial mats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adsorption of rare earth elements onto bacterial cell walls and its implication for REE sorption Received 8 May 2004; received in revised form 7 January 2005; accepted 15 February 2005 Abstract Adsorption. The occurrence of M-type tetrad effect suggests that REE form inner sphere complexes during their adsorption onto

  6. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is presented of the thermoelectric properties of rare earth compounds: A discussion is presented of the prospects for future improvements in the figure of merit.

  7. Microstructure and properties of 17-4PH steel plasma nitrocarburized with a carrier gas containing rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, R.L., E-mail: ruiliangliu@126.com [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yan, M.F., E-mail: yanmufu@hit.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wu, Y.Q. [National Key Laboratory for Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhao, C.Z. [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin150001 (China)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of rare earth addition in the carrier gas on plasma nitrocarburizing of 17-4PH steel was studied. The microstructure and crystallographically of the phases in the surface layer as well as surface morphology of the nitrocarburized specimens were characterized by optical microscope, X-ray diffraction and scanning tunneling microscope, respectively. The hardness of the surface layer was measured by using a Vickers hardness test. The results show that the incorporation of rare earth elements in the carrier gas can increase the nitrocarburized layer thickness up to 55%, change the phase proportion in the nitrocarburized layer, refine the nitrides in surface layer, and increase the layer hardness above 100HV. The higher surface hardening effect after rare earth addition is caused by improvement in microstructure and change in the phase proportion of the nitrocarburized layer.

  8. Thulium anomalies and rare earth element patterns in meteorites and Earth: Nebular fractionation and the nugget effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauphas, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study reports the bulk rare earth element (REEs, La-Lu) compositions of 41 chondrites, including 32 falls and 9 finds from carbonaceous (CI, CM, CO and CV), enstatite (EH and EL) and ordinary (H, L and LL) groups, as well as 2 enstatite achondrites (aubrite). The CI-chondrite-normalized REE patterns and Eu anomalies in ordinary and enstatite chondrites show more scatter in more metamorphosed than in unequilibrated chondrites. This is due to parent-body redistribution of the REEs in various carrier phases during metamorphism. The dispersion in REE patterns of equilibrated ordinary chondrites is explained by the nugget effect associated with concentration of REEs in minor phosphate grains. Terrestrial rocks and samples from ordinary and enstatite chondrites display negative Tm anomalies of ~-4.5 % relative to ca chondrites. In contrast, CM, CO and CV (except Allende) show no significant Tm anomalies. Allende CV chondrite shows large excess Tm (~+10 %). These anomalies are similar to those found in group II...

  9. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  10. Production method for making rare earth compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Ellis, T.W.; Dennis, K.W.; Hofer, R.J.; Branagan, D.J.

    1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g., a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g., a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g., Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B or LaNi{sub 5}) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

  11. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  12. RARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths are iron gray to silvery lustrous metals that are typically soft, malleable, ductile decreased as imports of rare-earth alloys, compounds, and metals declined. Production of bastnäsiteRARE EARTHS--2002 61.1 RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick Domestic survey data and tables were

  13. Extraction processes and solvents for recovery of cesium, strontium, rare earth elements, technetium and actinides from liquid radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitsev, Boris N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Esimantovskiy, Vyacheslav M. (St. Petersburg, RU); Lazarev, Leonard N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Dzekun, Evgeniy G. (Ozersk, RU); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Brewer, Ken N. (Arco, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cesium and strontium are extracted from aqueous acidic radioactive waste containing rare earth elements, technetium and actinides, by contacting the waste with a composition of a complex organoboron compound and polyethylene glycol in an organofluorine diluent mixture. In a preferred embodiment the complex organoboron compound is chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, the polyethylene glycol has the formula RC.sub.6 H.sub.4 (OCH.sub.2 CH.sub.2).sub.n OH, and the organofluorine diluent is a mixture of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of diethylene glycol with at least one of bis-tetrafluoropropyl ether of ethylene glycol and bis-tetrafluoropropyl formal. The rare earths, technetium and the actinides (especially uranium, plutonium and americium), are extracted from the aqueous phase using a phosphine oxide in a hydrocarbon diluent, and reextracted from the resulting organic phase into an aqueous phase by using a suitable strip reagent.

  14. Control of interface fracture in silicon nitride ceramics: influence of different rare earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, E.Y.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.; Hsueh, Chun-Hway; Plucknett, K.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hoffmann, M.J. [Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Keramik im Maschinenbau

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The toughness of self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics is improved by enhancing crack deflection and crack bridging mechanisms. Both mechanisms rely on the interfacial debonding process between the elongated {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grains and the intergranular amorphous phases. The various sintering additives used for densification may influence the interfacial debonding process by modifying the thermal and mechanical properties of the intergranular glasses, which will result in different residual thermal expansion mismatch stresses; and the atomic bonding structure across the {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} glass interface. Earlier studies indicated that self-reinforced silicon nitrides sintered with different rare earth additives and/or different Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} ratios could exhibit different fracture behavior that varied from intergranular to transgranular fracture. No studies have been conducted to investigate the influence of sintering additives on the interfacial fracture in silicon nitride ceramics. Because of the complexity of the material system and the extremely small scale, it is difficult to conduct quantitative analyses on the chemistry and stress states of the intergranular glass phases and to relate the results to the bulk properties. The influence of different sintering additives on the interfacial fracture behavior is assessed using model systems in which {Beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}whiskers are embedded in SIAIRE (RE: rare-earth) oxynitride glasses. By systematically varying the glass composition, the role of various rare-earth additives on interfacial fracture has been examined. Specifically, four different additives were investigated: Al{sub 2}0{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}0{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, applying the results from the model systems, the R- curve behavior of self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramics sintered with different Y{sub 2}0{sub 3}:AI{sub 2}0{sub 3} ratios was characterized.

  15. Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? See Rare Earth, by Ward and Brownlee #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZfp nH fl fi fc L/T ·N Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain an atmosphere Earth has had a stable climate The Sun is particularly inactive

  16. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  17. Ames Lab 101: Rare Earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Karl

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Mr. Rare Earth," Ames Laboratory scientist Karl Gschneidner Jr., explains the importance of rare-earth materials in many of the technologies we use today -- ranging from computers to hybrid cars to wind turbines. Gschneidner is a world renowned rare-earths expert at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory.

  18. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conduction  in  Rare-­Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  Conduction  in  Rare-­?Earth  Phosphates   by   Hannah  conduction  in  rare  earth  phosphates.  Specifically,  

  19. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12-31-08 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

  20. Partitioning and Leaching Behavior of Actinides and Rare Earth Elements in a Zirconolite- Bearing Hydrothermal Vein System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Timothy E.; Hart, Kaye P.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; McGlinn, Peter J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, 2234 (Australia); Giere, Reto [Mineralogisch-Geochemisches Institut, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg, D-79104 (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical extraction techniques and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the distribution and behavior of actinides and rare earth elements (REE) in hydrothermal veins at Adamello (Italy). The six samples discussed in this paper were from the phlogopite zone, which is one of the major vein zones. The samples were similar in their bulk chemical composition, mineralogy, and leaching behavior of major elements (determined by extraction with 9 M HCl). However, there were major differences in the extractability of REE and actinides. The most significant influence on the leaching characteristics appears to be the amounts of U, Th and REE incorporated in resistant host phases (zirconolite and titanite) rather than readily leached phases (such as apatite). Uranium and Th are very highly enriched in zirconolite grains. Actinides were more readily leached from samples with a higher content of U and Th, relative to the amount of zirconium. The results show that REE and actinides present in chemically resistant host minerals can be retained under aggressive leaching conditions. (authors)

  1. PROJECT SUMMARY Many metals, such as the rare earth elements, Nb, Ta, Ge, In, Ga...are finding new applications both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    PROJECT SUMMARY Many metals, such as the rare earth elements, Nb, Ta, Ge, In, Ga...are finding new years ago access to natural metal resources, which were both abundant and easily accessible, caused of geologic context, metal concentration in rocks, separation and concentration techniques, and recycling

  2. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo (Omiya, JP); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Beaudry, Bernard J. (Ames, IA)

    1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

  3. Trace and rare earth elemental variation in Arabian sea sediments through a transect across the oxygen minimum zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rao, C.M. [National Institute of Oceanography, Goa (India); Bau, M. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), organic carbon (C{sub org}), trace element, and rare earth element (REE) composition of surface sediments collected from a transect on the central western continental shelf and slope of India in the Eastern Arabian Sea. The transect samples across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) allows us to compare the relative abundances of trace elements and REEs in the sediments beneath and beyond the OMZ. Shale-normalized REE patterns, La{sub n}/Yb{sub n} ratios, and Eu/Eu* anamolies indicate that the sediments in the study area are either derived from the adjoining Archaean land masses or from distal Indus source. Sediment deposited in the OMZ have high U values from 3.6 to 8.1 ppm, with their U{sub excess} (of that can be supplied by continental particles) values ranging between 82-91% of the total U, indicating that the U may be precipitated as U{sup +4} in the reducing conditions of OMZ. Sediments deposited beneath the intense OMZ (<0.2 mL/L) and away from the OMZ (1-2 mL/L) show slight negative Ce anomalies, with no significant differences between these two sets of sediments. The Ce/Ce*{sub shale} values are poorly related to U and C{sub org} which are indicators of suboxic bottom waters. Normative calculations suggest that two sources, namely, terrestrial and seawater (terrestrial > seawater) contribute to the total Ce anomaly of the sediments. The Ce anomaly values of the calculated seawater derived component are similar to the anomalies reported for other coastal waters and the oxygenated surface waters of the Arabian Sea and do not show any correspondence to the lowered redox state of the overlying water, probably due to the redirection of dissolved Ce into the oxic deeper water. 103 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Am phases in the matrix of a U-Pu-Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn E Janney; J. Rory Kennedy; James W. Madden; Thomas P. O'Holleran

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ?-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in ?-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and ?-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  5. 2006 Minerals Yearbook RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bastnäsite. Rare earths were not mined in the United States in 2006; however, the mine and plant at Mountain-earth ores were primarily mined in China, with lesser amounts coming from Brazil, India, and Russia. Domestic, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium

  6. Thorium, uranium and rare earth elements content in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue of Lynas advanced materials plant (LAMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Majid, Amran Ab., E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com; Sarmani, Sukiman, E-mail: walareqi@yahoo.com [Nuclear Science Programme, School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lynas Advanced Materials Plant (LAMP) has been licensed to produce the rare earths elements since early 2013 in Malaysia. LAMP processes lanthanide concentrate (LC) to extract rare earth elements and subsequently produce large volumes of water leach purification (WLP) residue containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This residue has been rising up the environmental issue because it was suspected to accumulate thorium with significant activity concentration and has been classified as radioactive residue. The aim of this study is to determine Th-232, U-238 and rare earth elements in lanthanide concentrate (LC) and water leach purification (WLP) residue collected from LAMP and to evaluate the potential radiological impacts of the WLP residue on the environment. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and ?-spectrometry were used for determination of Th, U and rare earth elements concentrations. The results of this study found that the concentration of Th in LC was 1289.7 ± 129 ppm (5274.9 ± 527.6Bq/kg) whereas the Th and U concentrations in WLP were determined to be 1952.9±17.6 ppm (7987.4 ± 71.9 Bq/kg) and 17.2 ± 2.4 ppm respectively. The concentrations of Th and U in LC and WLP samples determined by ?- spectrometry were 1156 ppm (4728 ± 22 Bq/kg) and 18.8 ppm and 1763.2 ppm (7211.4 Bq/kg) and 29.97 ppm respectively. This study showed that thorium concentrations were higher in WLP compare to LC. This study also indicate that WLP residue has high radioactivity of {sup 232}Th compared to Malaysian soil natural background (63 - 110 Bq/kg) and come under preview of Act 304 and regulations. In LC, the Ce and Nd concentrations determined by INAA were 13.2 ± 0.6% and 4.7 ± 0.1% respectively whereas the concentrations of La, Ce, Nd and Sm in WLP were 0.36 ± 0.04%, 1.6%, 0.22% and 0.06% respectively. This result showed that some amount of rare earth had not been extracted and remained in the WLP and may be considered to be reextracted.

  7. RARE EARTHS--2001 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mined in Brazil, India, Russia, and the United States. Demand decreased for rare earths used), neodymium (Nd), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy of the group at 60 ppm, followed, in decreasing order, by yttrium at 33 ppm, lanthanum at 30 ppm, and neodymium

  8. RARE EARTHS--2000 62.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the 1880s with the mining in Sweden and Norway of the rare-earth thorium-phosphate mineral monazite requiring only the oxides of thorium and cerium. The mantles also used small amounts of neodymium was recorded in 1893 in North Carolina; however, a small tonnage of monazite was reportedly mined as early

  9. Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imestigation ol" Maenons in Rare Earth Metals b\\ Inelastic Neutron Scattering tL Bjerrum Moiler #12;BLANK PAGE #12;Riso Report No. 178 Investigation of Magnons in Rare Earth Metals by Inelastic NeutronN LANGF h. a. dec. #12;Contents Page PREFACE 7 I. INTRODUCTION *> 1. Magnetism of Rare Earth Metals 10 2

  10. Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained personnel to bring the entire rare earth industry, from mining to original equipment manufacturers (OEM), up to full speed in the next few years. Accompanying this decline in technical expertise, innovation and new products utilizing rare earth elements has slowed dramatically, and it may take a decade or more to recapture America's leading role in technological advancements of rare earth containing products. Before the disruption of the US rare earth industry, about 25,000 people were employed in all aspects of the industry from mining to OEM. Today, only about 1,500 people are employed in these fields. The ratio of non-technically trained persons to those with college degrees in the sciences or engineering varies from about 8 to 1 to about 4 to 1, depending on the particular area of the industry. Assuming an average of 6 to 1, the number of college degree scientists and engineers has decreased from about 4,000 to 250 employed today. In the magnetic industry the approximate numbers are: 6,000 total with 750 technically trained people in the 1980s to 500 totally employed today of which 75 have degrees. The paucity of scientists and engineers with experience and/or training in the various aspects of production and commercialization of the rare earths is a serious limitation to the ability of the US to satisfy its own needs for materials and technologies (1) to maintain our military strength and posture, (2) to assume leadership in critical energy technologies, and (3) to bring new consumer products to the marketplace. The lack of experts is of even greater national importance than the halting in the 1990s and the recent restart of the mining/benification/separation effort in the US; and thus governmental intervention and support for at least five to 10 years will be required to ameliorate this situation. To respond quickly, training programs should be established in conjunction with a national research center at an educational institution with a long tradition in multiple areas of rare earth and other critical elements research and technology. This center should

  11. Are Earths Rare? Perhaps Not

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal FacilityAprilAre Earths Rare? Perhaps Not Are

  12. Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

    1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

  13. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    300-500°C. Doping rare earth phosphate glasses with Ce, andRare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Protonconductivity of alkaline-earth doped rare earth phosphate

  14. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- -- 22 Rare-earth metals, alloys 271 352 235 284 406 Cerium Exports:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- -- 3 27 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 71 44 194 329 456 Cerium compounds. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31.3% ad val

  15. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  16. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  17. The addition of a US Rare Earth Element (REE) supply-demand model improves the characterization and scope of the United States Department of Energy's effort to forecast US REE Supply and Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancco, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the development of a new US Rare Earth Element (REE) Supply-Demand Model for the explicit forecast of US REE supply and demand in the 2010 to 2025 time period. In the 2010 Department of Energy (DOE) ...

  18. ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    397 ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES C thin evaporated foils of heavy rare earths (Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in three different chemical of high energy incident electrons (75 keV) transmitted through thin foils of yttric rare earth elements

  19. Synthesis and luminescence properties of rare earth activated phosphors for near UV-emitting LEDs for efficacious generation of white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jinkyu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mn 2+ and some of rare earth metals showing 4f-5d transitionare typically transition metal or rare earth elements. The

  20. Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

  1. Rare Earth-Bearing Murataite Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey; Stefanovsky, Olga [SIA Radon, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Yudintsev, Sergey; Nikonov, Boris [IGEM RAS, Moscow, 119017 (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase composition of the murataite-based ceramics containing 10 wt.% lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, europium, gadolinium, yttrium, zirconium oxides was studied. The ceramics were prepared by melting of oxide mixtures in 20 mL glass-carbon crucibles in air at {approx}1500 deg. C. They are composed of predominant murataite-type phases and minor extra phases: rutile, crichtonite, perovskite, ilmenite/pyrophanite, and zirconolite (in the Zr-bearing sample only). Three murataite-related phases with five- (5C), eight- (8C), and three-fold (3C) elementary fluorite unit cell are normally present in all the ceramics. These phases form core, intermediate zone, and rim of the murataite grains, respectively. They are predominant host phases for the rare earth elements whose concentrations are reduced in a row: 5C>8C>3C. Appreciate fraction of La and Ce may enter the perovskite phase. (authors)

  2. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, A.D.; Modine, F.A.; Lauf, R.J.; Alim, M.A.; Mahan, G.D.; Bartkowiak, M.

    1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2--4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5--4.0% Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, 0.05--0.4% K{sub 2}O, 0.05--0.2% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--0.2% CaO, 0.00005--0.01% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0--2% MnO, 0--0.05% MgO, 0--0.5% TiO{sub 3}, 0--0.2% SnO{sub 2}, 0--0.02% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, balance ZnO. 4 figs.

  3. Rare earth doped zinc oxide varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMillan, April D. (Knoxville, TN); Modine, Frank A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Alim, Mohammad A. (Medina, OH); Mahan, Gerald D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bartkowiak, Miroslaw (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A varistor includes a Bi-free, essentially homogeneous sintered body of a ceramic composition including, expressed as nominal weight %, 0.2-4.0% oxide of at least one rare earth element, 0.5-4.0% Co.sub.3 O.sub.4, 0.05-0.4% K.sub.2 O, 0.05-0.2% Cr.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-0.2% CaO, 0.00005-0.01% Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, 0-2% MnO, 0-0.05% MgO, 0-0.5% TiO.sub.3, 0-0.2% SnO.sub.2, 0-0.02% B.sub.2 O.sub.3, balance ZnO.

  4. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

    1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  5. Valuable rare earth metals from old electronics | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valuable rare earth metals from old electronics Scientists at the Critical Materials Institute have developed a two-step recovery process that makes recycling rare-earth metals...

  6. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Magnets

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCallum, Bill

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Senior Scientist, Bill McCallum, briefly discusses rare-earth magnets and their uses and how Ames Lab is research new ways to save money and energy using magnets.

  7. RARE EARTHS By James B. Hedrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at its separation Domestic mine production of rare earths Uruguay Round of Multilateral Trade plant at Mountain Pass, CA. Rhône-Poulenc increased in 1994. The domestic economy Negotiation. The GATT Uruguay

  8. Laminated rare earth structure and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Senor, David J [West Richland, WA; Johnson, Roger N [Richland, WA; Reid, Bruce D [Pasco, WA; Larson, Sandra [Richland, WA

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A laminated structure having two or more layers, wherein at least one layer is a metal substrate and at least one other layer is a coating comprising at least one rare earth element. For structures having more than two layers, the coating and metal substrate layers alternate. In one embodiment of the invention, the structure is a two-layer laminate having a rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a metal substrate. In another embodiment of the invention, the structure is a three-layer laminate having the rare earth coating electrospark deposited onto a first metal substrate and the coating subsequently abonded to a second metal substrate. The bonding of the coating to the second metal substrate may be accomplished by hot pressing, hot rolling, high deformation rate processing, or combinations thereof. The laminated structure may be used in nuclear components where reactivity control or neutron absorption is desired and in non-nuclear applications such as magnetic and superconducting films.

  9. Rare earth phosphors and phosphor screens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Maple, T. Grant (Sunnyvale, CA); Sklensky, Alden F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to rare earth phosphor screens for converting image carrying incident radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation and to the rare earth phosphor materials utilized in such screens. The invention further relates to methods for converting image carrying charged particles to image carrying radiation principally in the blue and near-ultraviolet region of the spectrum and to stabilized rare earth phosphors characterized by having a continuous surface layer of the phosphors of the invention. More particularly, the phosphors of the invention are oxychlorides and oxybromides of yttrium, lanthanum and gadolinium activated with trivalent cerium and the conversion screens are of the type illustratively including x-ray conversion screens, image amplifier tube screens, neutron imaging screens, cathode ray tube screens, high energy gamma ray screens, scintillation detector screens and screens for real-time translation of image carrying high energy radiation to image carrying visible or near-visible radiation.

  10. Potential synergy: the thorium fuel cycle and rare earths processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ault, T.; Wymer, R.; Croff, A.; Krahn, S. [Vanderbilt University: 2301 Vanderbilt Place/PMB 351831, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thorium in nuclear power programs has been evaluated on a recurring basis. A concern often raised is the lack of 'thorium infrastructure'; however, for at least a part of a potential thorium fuel cycle, this may less of a problem than previously thought. Thorium is frequently encountered in association with rare earth elements and, since the U.S. last systematically evaluated the large-scale use of thorium (the 1970's,) the use of rare earth elements has increased ten-fold to approximately 200,000 metric tons per year. Integration of thorium extraction with rare earth processing has been previously described and top-level estimates have been done on thorium resource availability; however, since ores and mining operations differ markedly, what is needed is process flowsheet analysis to determine whether a specific mining operation can feasibly produce thorium as a by-product. Also, the collocation of thorium with rare earths means that, even if a thorium product stream is not developed, its presence in mining waste streams needs to be addressed and there are previous instances where this has caused issues. This study analyzes several operational mines, estimates the mines' ability to produce a thorium by-product stream, and discusses some waste management implications of recovering thorium. (authors)

  11. ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ONDES DE SPIN MAGNETISM IN THE LIGHT RARE EARTH 'METALS A. R. MACKINTOSH H. C. Mrsted Institute terres rares Ikgeres. Abstract. -The magnetic properties of the light rare earth metals are reviewed the last decade, the magnetism of the heavy rare earth metals is now rather well understood. The magnetic

  12. Crystalline rare-earth activated oxyorthosilicate phosphor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClellan, Kenneth J.; Cooke, D. Wayne

    2004-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystalline, transparent, rare-earth activated lutetium oxyorthosilicate phosphor. The phosphor consists essentially of lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of lutetium gadolinium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Lu(.sub.2-x-z)Gd.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor also consists essentially of gadolinium yttrium oxyorthosilicate activated with a rare-earth metal dopant M and having the general formula Gd(.sub.2-x-z)Y.sub.x M.sub.z SiO.sub.5, wherein 0.00.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.95, wherein 0.001.ltoreq.z.ltoreq.0.02, and wherein M is selected from Sm, Tb, Tm, Eu, Yb, and Pr. The phosphor may be optically coupled to a photodetector to provide a radiation detector.

  13. MATERIALS WORLD January 201216 Dr Steve Barrett from the University of Liverpool, UK, has been studying rare earth metals for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Steve D.

    studying rare earth metals for 20 years. Here he explains how preparation of the surface layer is crucial to the functionality of these scarce elements. S tudies into the properties of rare earth metals have been active since of the geometric and electronic structure of single crystal rare earth metal surfaces were published. Studies

  14. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, T.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation. 2 figs.

  15. Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of treating rare earth metal-bearing scrap, waste or other material (e.g. Nd--Fe--B or Dy--Tb--Fe scrap) to recover the rare earth metal comprising melting the rare earth metal-bearing material, melting a Group IIA metal extractant, such as Mg, Ca, or Ba, in which the rare earth is soluble in the molten state, and contacting the melted material and melted extractant at a temperature and for a time effective to extract the rare earth from the melted material into the melted extractant. The rare earth metal is separated from the extractant metal by vacuum sublimation or distillation.

  16. Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.

    1985-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

  17. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

  18. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

  19. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

  20. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

  1. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

  2. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

  3. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

  4. The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Riedemann, Trevor

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

  5. 2005 Minerals Yearbook RaRe eaRths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and shipped. substantial stocks of lanthanide concentrates and intermediate and refined compounds were for the petroleum industry and processed cerium and zirconia compounds In 2005, world rare-earth production decreased as did imports of individual rare-earth compounds and mixed rare-earth compounds. U.s. imports

  6. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. ,and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Karl A. Gschneidner, Jr. ,and Chemistry of Rare Earths; Gschneidner, K. A. , Bünzli,

  7. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of rare earths by end use was as follows: automotive catalytic converters, 25%; petroleum refining, and consumer of rare-earth products in 2007. The estimated value of refined rare earths consumed in the United -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 1,130 804 880 867 831 Cerium compounds 2,630 1,880 2,170 2,590 3,090 Mixed

  8. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Mountain Pass were further processed into rare-earth compounds and metal products. The United States,980 3,770 2,840 5,800 Rare-earth metals, alloy 226 525 468 240 390 Exports: 2 Cerium compounds 840 1,350 1,640 992 730 Rare-earth metals, alloys 4,930 1,380 3,030 2,080 1,000 Other rare-earth compounds 455

  9. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , was as follows: chemical catalysts, 22%; metallurgical applications and alloys, 21%; petroleum refining catalysts, and importer of rare-earth products in 2010. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United) -- -- -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 867 784 564 188 250 Cerium compounds 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,500 1,400 Mixed REOs

  10. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalytic converters, 9%; glass polishing and ceramics, 6%; permanent magnets, 5%; petroleum refining, and importer of rare-earth products in 2009. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United) -- -- -- -- 20 Rare-earth metals, alloy 880 867 784 679 210 Cerium compounds 2,170 2,590 2,680 2,080 1,190 Mixed

  11. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- -- 22 -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 352 235 284 905 442 Cerium compounds 806 1:3 Thorium ore, monazite -- 3 27 -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 44 194 329 444 272 Cerium compounds.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad val. 31

  12. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- -- -- -- Imports: Thorium ore (monazite) -- 22 56 11 --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 284 905 429 529 760 Cerium 121 123 Exports: Thorium ore, monazite 27 -- -- -- --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 329 444 250 991 856 (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

  13. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Thorium ore (monazite) -- -- 22 56 --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 235 284 905 429 507 Cerium compounds 1 Exports: Thorium ore, monazite 3 27 -- -- --3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 194 329 444 250 879 Cerium for individual rare-earth metals and compounds, with most import categories slightly behind 1996's record high

  14. Ecotoxicity of rare earth elements Rare earth elements (REEs) or rare earth metals is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    electronic, optical, magnetic and catalytic applications. So far, the ecotoxicological properties. For example, gadolinium is the most commonly used con- trast agent in magnetic resonance imaging for tumour refrigeration, and new water treatment technologies both for drinking water and wastewater from mining

  15. Synthesis, Computations and Characterizations of Low Dimensional Rare-Earth Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chun-Yu

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced rare-earth (Ln, lanthanide elements) compounds with low-dimensional Ln-Ln-bonded structures are promising candidates for magnetic materials because Ln-Ln-bonded molecules and solids have delocalized 5d electrons that make strong magnetic...

  16. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  17. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  18. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,380 840 1,350 1,400 Rare-earth metals, alloys 1,470 1,390 4,920 1,380 3,400 Other rare-earth compounds 1,750 5,480 2,300 Rare-earth oxides, compounds 9,900 8,820 5,130 3,980 3,700 Rare-earth metals, alloy 784 scrap. Import Sources (2007­10): Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 79%; France, 6%; Estonia, 4

  19. Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike today’s large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldor’s motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

  20. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  1. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Paul G. (8544 Electric Ave., Vienna, VA 22182)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  2. Enhanced pinning in mixed rare earth-123 films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Judith L. (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An superconductive article and method of forming such an article is disclosed, the article including a substrate and a layer of a rare earth barium cuprate film upon the substrate, the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals capable of yielding a superconductive composition where ion size variance between the two or more rare earth metals is characterized as greater than zero and less than about 10.times.10.sup.-4, and the rare earth barium cuprate film including two or more rare earth metals is further characterized as having an enhanced critical current density in comparison to a standard YBa.sub.2Cu.sub.3O.sub.y composition under identical testing conditions.

  3. New CMI process recycles valuable rare earth metals from old...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behind. Then the rare earths are recovered from the magnesium through vacuum distillation. In the second step, another material is used to bind with and extract the heavier...

  4. Australian Mining carries rare-earth-like iron release | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Australian Mining carries rare-earth-like iron release Australian Mining, the leading news source for the mining industry in Australia, carried a story on research Ames Lab...

  5. Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing The Critical Materials Institute, a Department of Energy Innovation Hub led by the Ames Labratory, has created a new chemical...

  6. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , televisions, and x-ray-intensifying film, 14%; chemicals and petroleum refining catalysts, 11%; ceramics, 3, and importer of rare-earth products in 2008. The estimated value of refined rare earths imported by the United,880 2,170 2,590 2,680 2,180 Mixed REOs 1,660 640 1,570 2,570 2,750 Rare-earth chlorides 1,310 2,670 2

  7. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 56 11 -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 429 529 953 1,780 2,370 Cerium compounds 3,180 1,810 4,940 3 metals, alloys 250 991 724 1,600 1,830 Cerium compounds 6,100 5,890 4,640 3,960 3,870 Other rare-earth-99): Monazite: Australia, 67%; France, 33%; Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 71%; France, 23%; Japan

  8. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) -- -- -- -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloy 1,420 1,450 1,130 804 945 Cerium compounds 3,850 2,540 2,630 1,880 2,210 Mixed, compounds 9,150 7,260 10,900 11,400 9,800 Ferrocerium, alloys 118 89 111 105 142 Exports:2 Rare-earth metals-04): Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 76%; France, 14%; Japan, 6%; Austria, 2%; and other, 2

  9. RARE EARTHS1 [Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Mountain Pass, CA, were further processed into rare-earth compounds and metal products. The United States -- -- -- -- 7,000 Exports: 2 Cerium compounds 1,380 840 1,350 1,640 1,100 Rare-earth metals, alloys 1,390 4,980 3,770 2,700 Rare-earth metals, alloy 679 226 525 468 280 Thorium ore (monazite or various thorium

  10. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10,000 e 5,000 5,000 Imports:3 Thorium ore (monazite) 22 56 11 -- -- Rare-earth metals, alloys 905,720 5,600 Ferrocerium, alloys 78 107 121 117 122 Exports:3 Rare-earth metals, alloys 444 250 991 724 1%; Rare-earth metals, compounds, etc.: China, 75%; France, 19%; Japan, 3%; United Kingdom, 1%; and other

  11. alloyed rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alloyed rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Rare earth focused ion beam...

  12. anhydrous rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anhydrous rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Copper Sheath Rare Earth Material...

  13. Tunable, rare earth-doped solid state lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Emmett, John L. (Pleasanton, CA); Jacobs, Ralph R. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Weber, Marvin J. (Danville, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser apparatus comprising combinations of an excimer pump laser and a rare earth-doped solid matrix, utilizing the 5d-4f radiative transition in a rare earth ion to produce visible and ultra-violet laser radiation with high overall efficiency in selected cases and relatively long radiative lifetimes.

  14. Rare-Earth Surface Alloying: A New Phase for GdAu2 M. J. Verstraete,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the age, from electric cars to efficient light bulbs to very large wind turbines and future magnetic refrigeration, are made pos- sible by an unusual group of elements: the rare earths (REs). The rare earths materials very chal- lenging. The REs demonstrate varying magnetism, coordi- nation, oxidation states

  15. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; glass polishing and ceramics, 14%; metallurgical additives and alloys, 13%; petroleum refining catalysts continued to be a major exporter and consumer of rare-earth products in 2004. The estimated value of refined,980 Mixed REOs 2,190 2,040 1,040 2,150 1,540 Rare-earth chlorides 1,330 2,590 1,800 1,890 1,520 Rare

  16. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction chemistry of rare-earth metal complexes supportedof a series of rare-earth metal arene complexes. Highlightsmechanism for rare-earth metals; (2) the synthesis of the

  17. Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering of Rare-Earth and Copper Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kvashnina, Kristina

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bombardment for twelve rare-earths metals [1] . Accord- ingal. [3] have showed that rare-earth metals such as La has aof most of the rare- earths metals, oxides, and chlorides.

  18. POWDER METALLURGICAL PROCESSING OF MAGNETOSTRICTIVE MATERIALS BASED ON RARE EARTH-IRON INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malekzadeh, Manoochehr

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by using an excess of rare earth metals during the course ofCrystal structure of rare earth-transition metal Laves phasemagnetostrictions among rare earth-transition metal as well

  19. Bimetallic cleavage of aromatic C-H bonds by rare-earth-metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, W; Huang, W; Dulong, F; Khan, SI; Cantat, T; Diaconescu, PL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aromatic C-H Bonds by Rare Earth Metal Complexes Wenliangone week prior to use. Rare earth metal oxides (scandium,

  20. Ames Lab scientist hopes to improve rare earth purification process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab scientist hopes to improve rare earth purification process Using the second fastest supercomputer in the world, a scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory...

  1. acidic rare earths: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acid-Based Synthesis of Monodisperse Rare-Earth-Doped Colloidal SiO2 Spheres Materials Science Websites Summary: Acid-Based Synthesis...

  2. Formation of rare earth carbonates using supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fernando, Quintus (Tucson, AZ); Yanagihara, Naohisa (Zacopan, MX); Dyke, James T. (Santa Fe, NM); Vemulapalli, Krishna (Tuscon, AZ)

    1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a process for the rapid, high yield conversion of select rare earth oxides or hydroxides, to their corresponding carbonates by contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

  3. MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS B. COQBLIN Laboratoire de impurities. 1. Introduction. -The rare-earth metals can be divided in two groups : - The (( normal )) rare-earths lantha- num are (( anomalous )) rare-earths metals. The same duality exists in alloys with rareearth

  4. METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    METAL-NON METAL TRANSITIONS /N RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS. EXPERIMENT AND THEORK /. VALENCE INSTABILITIES, superconductivity, electron-phonon and band theory, to name a few. 2. Properties of normal rare earth metals. - Before discussing rare earth valence instabilities, three relevant general features of rare earth metals

  5. METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides J. J. Rhyne and G. E on the rare earth site. The rare earth spins disorder at a temperature lower than the bulk Tc in ErFe2 H3 5 per formula unit assuming complete occupation of 3 tetrahedral sites. The heavy rare earth (RFe2

  6. Method for preparing high cure temperature rare earth iron compound magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Yuhong (West Hills, CA); Wei, Qiang (West Hills, CA); Zheng, Haixing (Oak Park, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insertion of light elements such as H,C, or N in the R.sub.2 Fe.sub.17 (R=rare earth metal) series has been found to modify the magnetic properties of these compounds, which thus become prospective candidates for high performance permanent magnets. The most spectacular changes are increases of the Curie temperature, T.sub.c, of the magnetization, M.sub.s, and of coercivity, H.sub.c, upon interstitial insertion. A preliminary product having a component R--Fe--C,N phase is produced by a chemical route. Rare earth metal and iron amides are synthesized followed by pyrolysis and sintering in an inert or reduced atmosphere, as a result of which, the R--Fe--C,N phases are formed. Fabrication of sintered rare earth iron nitride and carbonitride bulk magnet is impossible via conventional process due to the limitation of nitridation method.

  7. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMasters, O.D.

    1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Rods of magnetostrictive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube. 5 figs.

  8. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA)

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a prefused, rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF.sub.2, CaCl.sub.2 or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy.

  9. Method for treating rare earth-transition metal scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g., iron) scrap (e.g., Nd-Fe-B scrap) is flux (slag) remelted to reduce tramp non-metallic impurities, such as oxygen and nitrogen, and metallic impurities, such as Li, Na, Al, etc., picked up by the scrap from previous fabrication operations. The tramp impurities are reduced to concentrations acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. The scrap is electroslag or inductoslag melted using a rare earth fluoride-bearing flux of CaF[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2] or mixtures thereof or the slag resulting from practice of the thermite reduction process to make a rare earth-iron alloy. 3 figs.

  10. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P., E-mail: pbermel@purdue.edu [Birck Nanotechnology Center, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, 1205 W. State St., West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573?K (1300?°C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  11. Magnetism of the rare earth, 3d --Theoretical review Abstract. --Compounds of rare earth and transition metals exhibit unusual and quite different behaviour. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and secondly those determined mainly by rare earth metals. The first group are those rich in transition metal except TCo2, TNi5, T2Ni7, TNi3, TNi2. When the transition metal is magnetic, the coupling between rare-earth temperature are much smaller, and magnetic properties bear resemblances with rare earth metals. Thus we

  12. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  13. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  14. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

    1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

  15. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  16. The Rare Earth Peak : An Overlooked r-Process Diagnostic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mumpower; G. McLaughlin; R. Surman

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The astrophysical site or sites responsible for the r-process of nucleosynthesis still remains an enigma. Since the rare earth region is formed in the latter stages of the r-process it provides a unique probe of the astrophysical conditions during which the r-process takes place. We use features of a successful rare earth region in the context of a high entropy r-process (S>100k_B) and discuss the types of astrophysical conditions that produce abundance patterns that best match meteoritic and observational data. Despite uncertainties in nuclear physics input, this method effectively constrains astrophysical conditions.

  17. Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA); Lincoln, Lanny P. (Woodward, IA)

    1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

  18. Prospects for Non-Rare Earth Permanent Magnets for Traction Motors and Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Matthew; McCallum, Kendall; Anderson, Iver; Constantinides, Steven

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of high-flux density permanent magnets based on rare earth elements such as neodymium (Nd) in the 1980s, permanent magnet-based electric machines had a clear performance and cost advantage over induction machines when weight and size were factors such as in hybrid electric vehicles and wind turbines. However, the advantages of the permanent magnet-based electric machines may be overshadowed by supply constraints and high prices of their key constituents, rare earth elements, which have seen nearly a 10-fold increase in price in the last 5 years and the imposition of export limits by the major producing country, China, since 2010. We outline the challenges, prospects, and pitfalls for several potential alloys that could replace Nd-based permanent magnets with more abundant and less strategically important elements.

  19. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The approximate distribution in 2002 by end use was as follows: petroleum refining catalysts, 27%; glass polishing. The estimated value of refined rare earths consumed in the United States was more than $1 billion-earth metals, alloy 1,780 2,470 1,420 1,450 1,130 Cerium compounds 3,990 4,310 3,850 2,540 2,630 Mixed REOs 5

  20. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , televisions, computer monitors, radar, and X-ray intensifying film, 10%; petroleum refining catalysts, 8 continued to be a major exporter and consumer of rare-earth products in 2006. The estimated value of refined-earth metals, alloy 1,450 1,130 804 880 947 Cerium compounds 2,540 2,630 1,880 2,170 2,530 Mixed REOs 1,040 2

  1. amorphous rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    amorphous rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Acoustic propagation at low...

  2. aqueous rare earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous rare earth First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrothermal transport and...

  3. Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals &Rare

  4. UQM Patents Non-Rare Earth Magnet Motor under DOE-Supported Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that do not use rare earth metals will potentially be less expensive and have more stable prices. Non-rare earth motors may also rely more on domestic resources and processing...

  5. Rare-earth tantalates and niobates suitable for use as nanophosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S& gt

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  6. Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials Alternative High-Performance Motors with Non-Rare Earth Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Rare-earth-free Magnetic Manganese Bismuth Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jian Q.; Cui, Huizhong; Huang, Xiaopeng; Gong, Maogang; Qin, Wei; Kirkeminde, Alec; Cui, Jun; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth abundant manganese bismuth (MnBi) has long been of interest due to its large magnetocrystalline anisotropy and high energy density for advanced permanent magnet applications. However, solution synthesis of MnBi phase is challenging due to the reduction potential mismatch between Mn and Bi elements. In this study, we show a versatile MnBi synthesis method involving the metal co-reduction followed by thermal annealing. The magnetically hard MnBi crystalline phase is then exchange coupled with magnetically soft cobalt coating. Our processing approach offers a promising strategy for manufacturing rare-earth-free magnetic nanocrystals.

  8. Nuclear orientation studies of rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krane, K.S.; Morgan, G.L.; Moses, J.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The angular distributions of gamma rays from /sup 166m/Ho and /sup 160/Tb aligned at low temperatures in, respectively, Ho metal and Tb metal have been measured. Large hyperfine splittings, expected for the rare earths, have been deduced from the temperature dependence of the gamma-ray anisotropies. Both samples show a macroscopic magnetic anisotropy that is not consistent with an interpretation in terms of a randomly oriented polycrystalline structure.

  9. Rare Isotopes in Cosmic Explosions and Accelerators on Earth

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hendrik Schatz

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare isotopes are nature?s stepping stones to produce the heavy elements, and they are produced in large quantities in stellar explosions. Despite their fleeting existence, they shape the composition of the universe and the observable features of stellar explosions. The challenge for nuclear science is to produce and study the very same rare isotopes so as to understand the origin of the elements and a range of astronomical observations. I will review the progress that has been made to date in astronomy and nuclear physics, and the prospects of finally addressing many of the outstanding issues with the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), which DOE will build at Michigan State University.

  10. Formation Of The Rare Earth Peak: Gaining Insight Into Late-Time r-Process Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Mumpower; Gail McLaughlin; Rebecca Surman

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and final structure of the rare earth peak ($A\\sim160$) of the $r$-process nucleosynthesis. The rare earth peak forms at late times in the $r$-process after neutron exhaustion (neutron-to-seed ratio unity or R=1) as matter decays back to stability. Since rare earth peak formation does not occur during \

  11. Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-45 Structure of liquid transition and rare earth metals S. N. Khanna and F. Cyrot-Lackmann Groupe It is shown that the observed structure factors of transition and rare earth liquid metals can be reaso- nably. The difference is particularly large for V, Ti, and rare earth metals which are precisely the metals where

  12. A Rare Earth-DOTA-Binding Antibody: Probe Properties and Binding Affinity across the Lanthanide Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew J.

    1) binds transition metals and rare earths with extreme stability under physiological conditionsA Rare Earth-DOTA-Binding Antibody: Probe Properties and Binding Affinity across the Lanthanide affinity and exquisite specificity.1 An antibody that binds rare earth complexes selectively could be used

  13. Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Pressure-Induced Electronic Phase Transitions in Transition Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals Metal Oxides and Rare Earth Metals by Brian Ross Maddox Electron correlation can affect profound changes transition in a transition metal monoxide. iv #12;The lanthanides (the 4f metals also known as rare-earths

  14. Half-metallic to insulating behavior of rare-earth nitrides C. M. Aerts,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    Half-metallic to insulating behavior of rare-earth nitrides C. M. Aerts,1 P. Strange,1 M. Horne,1 W in the literature that rare-earth nitrides may form half-metallic ferromagnets.6­8 This is sur- prising because 30 January 2004 The electronic structure of the rare-earth nitrides is studied systematically using

  15. Review Article: Rare-earth monosulfides as durable and efficient cold cathodesa) Marc Cahayb)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boolchand, Punit

    structure, rare-earth monosulfides offer a more stable alternative to alkali metals to attain lowReview Article: Rare-earth monosulfides as durable and efficient cold cathodesa) Marc Cahayb made of these materials are very unstable. Beginning in 2001, we have studied rare-earth (RE

  16. Disordered electronic and magnetic systems - transition metal (Mn) and rare earth (Gd) doped amorphous group IV semiconductors (C, Si, Ge)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Li

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    various transition or rare-earth metals provide a rich ?eldTransition Metal (Mn) and Rare Earth (Gd) Doped AmorphousTransition Metal (Mn) and Rare Earth (Gd) Doped Amorphous

  17. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    %; permanent magnets, 16%; petroleum refining catalysts, 12%; metallurgical additives and alloys, 9%; rare-earth products. Domestic ore production was valued at an estimated $28 million. The estimated value of refined, alloy 529 953 1,780 2,470 1,670 Cerium compounds 1,810 4,940 3,990 4,310 4,940 Mixed REOs 974 2,530 5

  18. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse spherical SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles with core-shell structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Zhang, C.M. [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Lin, J., E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles have been coated with rare earth oxide layers by a Pechini sol-gel process, leading to the formation of core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectra as well as lifetimes were used to characterize the resulting SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) samples. The obtained core-shell phosphors have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution (average size ca. 380 nm), smooth surface and non-agglomeration. The thickness of shells could be easily controlled by changing the number of deposition cycles (40 nm for two deposition cycles). Under the excitation of ultraviolet, the Ln{sup 3+} ion mainly shows its characteristic emissions in the core-shell particles from Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) shells. - Graphical abstract: The advantages of core-shell phosphors are the easy availability of homogeneous spherical morphology in different size, and its corresponding luminescence color can change from red, yellow to green.

  19. Coupling of a locally implanted rare-earth ion ensemble to a superconducting micro-resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisby, I., E-mail: ilana.wisby@npl.co.uk; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Graaf, S. E. de; Adamyan, A.; Kubatkin, S. E. [Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, MC2, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296, Gothenburg (Sweden); Gwilliam, R. [Advanced Technology Institute, Faculty of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Meeson, P. J. [Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Lindström, T. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the coupling of rare-earth ions locally implanted in a substrate (Gd{sup 3+} in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to a superconducting NbN lumped-element micro-resonator. The hybrid device is fabricated by a controlled ion implantation of rare-earth ions in well-defined micron-sized areas, aligned to lithographically defined micro-resonators. The technique does not degrade the internal quality factor of the resonators which remain above 10{sup 5}. Using microwave absorption spectroscopy, we observe electron-spin resonances in good agreement with numerical modelling and extract corresponding coupling rates of the order of 1?MHz and spin linewidths of 50–65?MHz.

  20. The formation of crystals in glasses containing rare earth oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fadzil, Syazwani Mohd [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hrma, Pavel [Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang, South Korea and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States); Crum, Jarrod [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington (United States); Siong, Khoo Kok; Ngatiman, Mohammad Fadzlee; Said, Riduan Mt [National University of Malaysia, Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Korean spent nuclear fuel will reach the capacity of the available temporary storage by 2016. Pyroprocessing and direct disposal seems to be an alternative way to manage and reuse spent nuclear fuel while avoiding the wet reprocessing technology. Pyroprocessing produces several wastes streams, including metals, salts, and rare earths, which must be converted into stabilized form. A suitable form for rare earth immobilization is borosilicate glass. The borosilicate glass form exhibits excellent durability, allows a high waste loading, and is easy to process. In this work, we combined the rare earths waste of composition (in wt%) 39.2Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–22.7CeO{sub 2}–11.7La{sub 2}O{sub 3}–10.9PrO{sub 2}–1.3Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}–1.3Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}–8.1Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}–4.8Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a baseline glass of composition 60.2SiO{sub 2}–16.0B{sub 2}O{sub 3}–12.6Na{sub 2}O–3.8Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–5.7CaO–1.7ZrO{sub 2}. Crystallization in waste glasses occurs as the waste loading increases. It may produce complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. To study crystal formation, we initially made glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and then glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% of the complete rare earth mix. Samples were heat-treated for 24 hours at temperatures 800°C to 1150°C in 50°C increments. Quenched samples were analyzed using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Stillwellite (LaBSiO{sub 5}) and oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) were found in glasses containing La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while oxyapatite (Ca{sub 2}La{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} and NaNd{sub 9}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}) precipitated in glasses with additions of mixed rare earths. The liquidus temperature (T{sub L}) of the glasses containing 5%, 10% and 15% La{sub 2}O{sub 3} were 800°C, 959°C and 986°C, respectively; while T{sub L} was 825°C, 1059°C and 1267°C for glasses with 5%, 10% and 15% addition of mixed rare earth oxides. The component coefficients T{sub B2O3}, T{sub SiO2}, T{sub CaO}, and T{sub RE2O3} were also evaluated using a recently published study.

  1. Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEnginesVacantmagnetic materials Non-Rare Earth

  2. Electronic structure of rare-earth metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater UseC SupportsElectronic structure of rare-earth

  3. Rare Earth Metals & Alloys | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals & Alloys

  4. Rare Earth Metals for Science | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals &

  5. Tipping elements in the Earth's climate system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenton, T.M. [Univ. of East Anglia and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, Norwich (GB). School of Environmental Sciences; Held, H.; Lucht, W.; Rahmstorf, S. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany); Kriegler, E. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany)]|[Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Engineering and Public Policy; Hall, J.W. [Newcastle Univ. and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (GB). School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences; Schellnhuber, H.J. [Potsdam Inst. for Climate Impact Research (Germany)]|[Oxford Univ. and Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research (GB). Environmental Change Inst.

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The term 'tipping point' commonly refers to a critical threshold at which a tiny perturbation can qualitatively alter the state or development of a system. Here the authors introduce the term 'tipping element' to describe large-scale components of the Earth system that may pass a tipping point. They critically evaluate potential policy-relevant tipping elements in the climate system under anthropogenic forcing, drawing on the pertinent literature and a recent international workshop to compile a short list, and they assess where their tipping points lie. An expert elicitation is used to help rank their sensitivity to global warming and the uncertainty about the underlying physical mechanisms. Then the authors explain how, in principle, early warning systems could be established to detect the proximity of some tipping points.

  6. Coherent properties of single rare-earth spin qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Siyushev; K. Xia; R. Reuter; M. Jamali; N. Zhao; N. Yang; C. Duan; N. Kukharchyk; A. D. Wieck; R. Kolesov; J. Wrachtrup

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare-earth-doped crystals are excellent hardware for quantum storage of optical information. Additional functionality of these materials is added by their waveguiding properties allowing for on-chip photonic networks. However, detection and coherent properties of rare-earth single-spin qubits have not been demonstrated so far. Here, we present experimental results on high-fidelity optical initialization, effcient coherent manipulation, and optical readout of a single electron spin of Ce$^{3+}$ ion in a YAG crystal. Under dynamic decoupling, spin coherence lifetime reaches $T_2$=2 ms and is almost limited by the measured spin-lattice relaxation time $T_1$=3.8 ms. Strong hyperfine coupling to aluminium nuclear spins suggests that cerium electron spins can be exploited as an interface between photons and long-lived nuclear spin memory. Combined with high brightness of Ce$^{3+}$ emission and a possibility of creating photonic circuits out of the host material, this makes cerium spins an interesting option for integrated quantum photonics.

  7. Sublattice Magnetic Relaxation in Rare Earth Iron Garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCloy, John S.; Walsh, Brian

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetic properties of rare earth garnets make them attractive materials for applications ranging from optical communications to magnetic refrigeration. The purpose of this research was to determine the AC magnetic properties of several rare earth garnets, in order to ascertain the contributions of various sublattices. Gd3Fe5O¬12, Gd3Ga5O12, Tb3Fe5O12, Tb3Ga5O12, and Y3Fe5O12 were synthesized by a solid state reaction of their oxides and verified by x-ray diffraction. Frequency-dependent AC susceptibility and DC magnetization were measured versus temperature (10 – 340 K). Field cooling had little effect on AC susceptibility, but large effect on DC magnetization, increasing magnetization at the lowest temperature and shifting the compensation point to lower temperatures. Data suggest that interaction of the two iron lattices results in the two frequency dependent magnetic relaxations in the iron garnets, which were fit using the Vogel-Fulcher and Arrhenius laws.

  8. Experimental demonstration of efficient and selective population transfer and qubit distillation in a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, Dieter

    in a rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystal Lars Rippe, Mattias Nilsson, and Stefan Kröll Department of Physics on optical interactions in rare-earth- metal-ion-doped crystals. The optical transition lines of the rare-earth-metal out in preparation for two-qubit gate operations in the rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals

  9. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    8erkeley Laboratory (LBL), the Earth Sciences Division, wasactivation analysis: rare earth element distribution (D)can be used to generate earth- quake records for use in

  10. Anisotropic rare-earth spin ensemble strongly coupled to a superconducting resonator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Probst; H. Rotzinger; S. Wünsch; P. Jung; M. Jerger; M. Siegel; A. V. Ustinov; P. A. Bushev

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacing photonic and solid-state qubits within a hybrid quantum architecture offers a promising route towards large scale distributed quantum computing. Ideal candidates for coherent qubit interconversion are optically active spins magnetically coupled to a superconducting resonator. We report on a cavity QED experiment with magnetically anisotropic Er3+:Y2SiO5 crystals and demonstrate strong coupling of rare-earth spins to a lumped element resonator. In addition, the electron spin resonance and relaxation dynamics of the erbium spins are detected via direct microwave absorption, without aid of a cavity.

  11. Reduction Chemistry of Rare-Earth Metal Complexes: Toward New Reactivity and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wenliang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elsner, A. ; Milliken, M. As hybrid cars gobble rare metals,rare-earths are heavily used in fuel-efficient hybrid cars.In a leading model of hybrid car, 1 kilogram of neodymium

  12. Methods for preparation of nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates for lighting applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manoharan, Mohan; Martins Loureiro, Sergio Paulo; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed here are methods for the preparation of optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates. The optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates may be used as one or more of quantum-splitting phosphor, visible-light emitting phosphor, vacuum-UV absorbing phosphor, and UV-emitting phosphor. Also disclosed herein are discharge lamps comprising the optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates provided by these methods.

  13. Magnetic properties of RT2Zn20; R = rare earth, T = Fe, Co, Ru, Os and Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Shuang

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that rare earth intermetallic compounds have versatile, magnetic properties associated with the 4f electrons: a local moment associated with the Hund's rule ground state is formed in general, but a strongly correlated, hybridized state may also appear for specific 4f electronic configuration (eg. for rare earth elements such as Ce or Yb). On the other hand, the conduction electrons in rare earth intermetallic compounds, certainly ones associated with non hybridizing rare earths, usually manifest non-magnetic behavior and can be treated as a normal, non-interacted Fermi liquid, except for some 3d-transition metal rich binary or ternary systems which often manifest strong, itinerant, d electron dominant magnetic behavior. Of particular interest are examples in which the band filling of the conduction electrons puts the system in the vicinity of a Stoner transition: such systems, characterized as nearly or weakly ferromagnet, manifest strongly correlated electronic properties [Moriya, 1985]. For rare earth intermetallic compounds, such systems provide an additional versatility and allow for the study of the behaviors of local moments and hybridized moments which are associated with 4f electron in a correlated conduction electron background.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization and Structural Transformation of A Condensed Rare Earth Metal Coordination Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Synthesis, Characterization and Structural Transformation of A Condensed Rare Earth Metal metals under hydrothermal conditions.5 In this work, 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid has been selected

  15. Epitaxial growth of rare-earth silicides on (111) Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.

    1986-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid heating with an electron beam has been used to react overlayers of rare-earth (RE) metals with (111) Si, forming epitaxial layers of silicides of Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Under conventional furnace annealing, forming such silicides on Si typically leads to rough, pitted surfaces. The use of fast beam heating not only results in a much smoother surface topology but also helps promote epitaxial growth on (111) Si in both solid and liquid phase reactions. These epitaxial silicides have a hexagonal RESi/sub approximately1.7/ structure (defected AlB/sub 2/ type). Their orientation with the Si substrate is (0001)parallel(111), with predicted lattice mismatches ranging from +0.83 to -2.55%.

  16. Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    air for the presence of minor amounts of elements, particularly transition metals, rare earth elements, actinides, and alkali and alkaline earth elements. The invention...

  17. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  18. Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tew, Gregory N.

    Dialing in color with rare earth metals: facile photoluminescent production of true white light of lanthanide ions which is the focus of this report. Rare earth metal complexes have relatively good Combining polymeric architectures with metal ions produces hybrid materials with extremely rich properties

  19. Rare Earth ? N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Rare Earth ? #12;N to date N = N* fs fGHZ fp nH fl ·N* = 4 x 1011 ·fs = 0.2 ·fGHZ = 0.1 ·fp = 0.8 ·nH = 2 ·fl = 1.0 N = 1.3 x 1010 #12;The Goldilocks Effect Earth is "Just Right" Yes, life on Earth has adapted to Earth, but ... Earth has just the right mass to be ·Tectonically-active ·Retain

  20. Modeling the Value Recovery of Rare Earth Permanent Magnets at End-of-Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Timothy J [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Permanent magnets containing rare earth elements (REEs) such as Dysprosium and Neodymium offer an advantage over non-REE containing magnets (e.g. ferrite or AlNiCo) in terms of power relative to size. However, REE availability has varied significantly in recent years leading to volatility in the cost of rare earth permanent magnets (REPMs). The supply of REEs can be increased by recycling consumer products and industrial machinery that contain REPMs at product end-of-life (EOL). This paper discusses the REE recovery process for EOL products. The optimal dismantling of products is examined with an emphasis placed on obtaining used REPMs. The challenge of collecting, managing, transporting, and processing used products is addressed through the development of a cost model for REPM recovery. This model is used to investigate several EOL strategies for recovering REPMs. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to identify the key factors that influence value recovery economics. A hard disk drive serves as a case study for model demonstration.

  1. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, M.K.

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  2. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi-Kyung Han

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe{sub 13-x}Si{sub x} system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 14-y} and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi{sub 2}: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4}: Partially ordered structure of Tb{sub 3}Zn{sub 3.6}Al{sub 7.4} compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn{sub 39}(Cr{sub x}Al{sub 1-x}){sub 81}: These layered structures are similar to icosahedral Mn-Al quasicrystalline compounds. Therefore, this compound may provide new insights into the formation, composition and structure of quasicrystalline materials.

  3. Monolithic integration of rare-earth oxides and semiconductors for on-silicon technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dargis, Rytis, E-mail: dargis@translucentinc.com; Clark, Andrew; Erdem Arkun, Fevzi [Translucent, Inc., 952 Commercial St., Palo Alto, California 94303 (United States); Grinys, Tomas; Tomasiunas, Rolandas [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio al. 10, LT-10223 Vilnius (Lithuania); O'Hara, Andy; Demkov, Alexander A. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, C1600, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several concepts of integration of the epitaxial rare-earth oxides into the emerging advanced semiconductor on silicon technology are presented. Germanium grows epitaxially on gadolinium oxide despite lattice mismatch of more than 4%. Additionally, polymorphism of some of the rare-earth oxides allows engineering of their crystal structure from hexagonal to cubic and formation of buffer layers that can be used for growth of germanium on a lattice matched oxide layer. Molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition of gallium nitride on the rare-earth oxide buffer layers on silicon is discussed.

  4. Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients for their interaction with helium atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xi

    Dynamic polarizabilities of rare-earth-metal atoms and dispersion coefficients; published 29 March 2007 The dynamic scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the rare-earth-metal atoms coefficients for the interactions of the rare-earth-metal atoms with helium atoms. The static polarizabilities

  5. The impact of trade costs on rare earth exports : a stochastic frontier estimation approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Prabuddha; Brady, Patrick Vane; Vugrin, Eric D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study develops a novel stochastic frontier modeling approach to the gravity equation for rare earth element (REE) trade between China and its trading partners between 2001 and 2009. The novelty lies in differentiating betweenbehind the border' trade costs by China and theimplicit beyond the border costs' of China's trading partners. Results indicate that the significance level of the independent variables change dramatically over the time period. While geographical distance matters for trade flows in both periods, the effect of income on trade flows is significantly attenuated, possibly capturing the negative effects of financial crises in the developed world. Second, the total export losses due tobehind the border' trade costs almost tripled over the time period. Finally, looking atimplicit beyond the border' trade costs, results show China gaining in some markets, although it is likely that some countries are substituting away from Chinese REE exports.

  6. Rare earth/iron fluoride and methods for making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Neveda, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate mixture of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, where RE is a rare earth element, is reacted with an excess of HF acid to form an insoluble fluoride compound (salt) comprising REF.sub.3 and FeF.sub.3 present in solid solution in the REF.sub.3 crystal lattice. The REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound is dried to render it usable as a reactant in the thermite reduction process as well as other processes which require an REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 mixture. The dried REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound comprises about 5 weight % to about 40 weight % of FeF.sub.3 and the balance REF.sub.3 to this end.

  7. Green exciplex emission from a bilayer light-emitting diode containing a rare earth ternary complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Green exciplex emission from a bilayer light-emitting diode containing a rare earth ternary complex form 18 October 2001 Abstract A bilayer organic light-emitting diode using a blue-fluorescent yttrium

  8. Engineering broadband and anisotropic photoluminescence emission from rare earth doped tellurite thin film photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanhoutte, Michiel

    Broadband and anisotropic light emission from rare-earth doped tellurite thin films is demonstrated using Er[superscript 3+]-TeO[subscript 2] photonic crystals (PhCs). By adjusting the PhC parameters, photoluminescent light ...

  9. U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table © 2-4-2015 page 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a temperature equal to or lower than a sintering temperature of the magnet base material, wherein: a) a content of a rare earth in a metallic state in the magnet base...

  10. The effect of machine and material parameters on rare earth roller separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Esther, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses the affect of machine and material factors on the separation of PET plastic and aluminum on the Rare Earth Roller magnetic separator. The purposes of this study are to gain a better understanding of ...

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Non-Rare Earth Motor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about non-rare earth...

  12. Origin of enhanced magnetization in rare earth doped multiferroic bismuth ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayek, C.; Thirmal, Ch.; Murugavel, P., E-mail: muruga@iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 36 (India); Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S. [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai 25 (India)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report structural and magnetic properties of rare earth doped Bi{sub 0.95}R{sub 0.05} FeO{sub 3} (R?=?Y, Ho, and Er) submicron particles. Rare earth doping enhances the magnetization and the magnetization shows an increasing trend with decreasing dopant ionic radii. In contrast to the x-ray diffraction pattern, we have seen a strong evidence for the presence of rare earth iron garnets R{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} in magnetization measured as a function of temperature, in selected area electron diffraction, and in Raman measurements. Our results emphasised the role of secondary phases in the magnetic property of rare earth doped BiFeO{sub 3} compounds along with the structural distortion favoring spin canting by increase in Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange energy.

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979, page C5-65 THE ELECTRON/C STRUCTURE OF RARE-EARTHS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /C STRUCTURE OF RARE-EARTHS. Band structures of rare earth metals(*) B. N. Harmon Ames Laboratory structure of the rare earth metals. The first calculations for the paramagnetic state of these fascinating structure of rare earth metals. The reviews by Dimmock [I] and Freeman [2] are well known. In addition a new

  14. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nobre, G. P. A.; Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Brown, D.; Hoblit, S.; Dietrich, F. S.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, wemore »have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.« less

  15. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. A. Nobre; A. Palumbo; F. S. Dietrich; M. Herman; D. Brown; S. Hoblit

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.

  16. Derivation of an optical potential for statically deformed rare-earth nuclei from a global spherical potential

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nobre, G. P. A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Palumbo, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hoblit, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dietrich, F. S. [Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled-channel theory is a natural way of treating nonelastic channels, in particular those arising from collective excitations characterized by nuclear deformations. A proper treatment of such excitations is often essential to the accurate description of experimental nuclear-reaction data and to the prediction of a wide variety of scattering observables. Stimulated by recent work substantiating the near validity of the adiabatic approximation in coupled-channel calculations for scattering on statically deformed nuclei, we explore the possibility of generalizing a global spherical optical model potential (OMP) to make it usable in coupled-channel calculations on this class of nuclei. To do this, we have deformed the Koning-Delaroche global spherical potential for neutrons, coupling a sufficient number of states of the ground state band to ensure convergence. We present an extensive study of the effects of collective couplings and nuclear deformations on integrated cross sections as well as on angular distributions for neutron-induced reactions on statically deformed nuclei in the rare-earth region. We choose isotopes of three rare-earth elements (Gd, Ho, W), which are known to be nearly perfect rotors, to exemplify the results of the proposed method. Predictions from our model for total, elastic and inelastic cross sections, as well as for elastic and inelastic angular distributions, are in reasonable agreement with measured experimental data. These results suggest that the deformed Koning-Delaroche potential provides a useful regional neutron optical potential for the statically deformed rare earth nuclei.

  17. Coherent storage of microwave excitations in rare-earth nuclear spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gary Wolfowicz; Hannes Maier-Flaig; Robert Marino; Alban Ferrier; Hervé Vezin; John J. L. Morton; Philippe Goldner

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Interfacing between various elements of a computer - from memory to processors to long range communication - will be as critical for quantum computers as it is for classical computers today. Paramagnetic rare earth doped crystals, such as Nd$^{3+}$:Y$_2$SiO$_5$ (YSO), are excellent candidates for such a quantum interface: they are known to exhibit long optical coherence lifetimes (for communication via optical photons), possess a nuclear spin (memory) and have in addition an electron spin that can offer hybrid coupling with superconducting qubits (processing). Here we study two of these three elements, demonstrating coherent storage and retrieval between electron and $^{145}$Nd nuclear spin states in Nd$^{3+}$:YSO. We find nuclear spin coherence times can reach 9 ms at $\\approx 5$ K, about two orders of magnitude longer than the electron spin coherence, while quantum state and process tomography of the storage/retrieval operation reveal an average state fidelity of 0.86. The times and fidelities are expected to further improve at lower temperatures and with more homogeneous radio-frequency excitation.

  18. Computer modelling of the reduction of rare earth dopants in barium aluminate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezende, Marcos V. dos S; Valerio, Mario E.G. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe, 49100-000 Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil); Jackson, Robert A., E-mail: r.a.jackson@chem.keele.ac.uk [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long lasting phosphorescence in barium aluminates can be achieved by doping with rare earth ions in divalent charge states. The rare earth ions are initially in a trivalent charge state, but are reduced to a divalent charge state before being doped into the material. In this paper, the reduction of trivalent rare earth ions in the BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} lattice is studied by computer simulation, with the energetics of the whole reduction and doping process being modelled by two methods, one based on single ion doping and one which allows dopant concentrations to be taken into account. A range of different reduction schemes are considered and the most energetically favourable schemes identified. - Graphical abstract: The doping and subsequent reduction of a rare earth ion into the barium aluminate lattice. Highlights: > The doping of barium aluminate with rare earth ions reduced in a range of atmospheres has been modelled. > The overall solution energy for the doping process for each ion in each reducing atmosphere is calculated using two methods. > The lowest energy reduction process is predicted and compared with experimental results.

  19. Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelly X. Li; Steven D. Herrmann; Michael F. Simpson

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental Investigations into U/TRU Recovery using a Liquid Cadmium Cathode and Salt Containing High Rare Earth Concentrations Shelly X. Li, Steven D. Herrmann, and Michael F. Simpson Pyroprocessing Technology Department Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 USA Abstract - A series of six bench-scale liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) tests was performed to obtain basic separation data with focus on the behavior of rare earth elements. The electrolyte used for the tests was a mixed salt from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiners, in which spent metal fuels from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) had been processed. Rare earth (RE) chlorides, such as NdCl3, CeCl3, LaCl3, PrCl3, SmCl3, and YCl3, were spiked into the salt prior to the first test to create an extreme case for investigating rare earth contamination of the actinides collected by a LCC. For the first two LCC tests, an alloy with the nominal composition of 41U-30Pu-5Am-3Np-20Zr-1RE was loaded into the anode baskets as the feed material. The anode feed material for Runs 3 to 6 was spent ternary fuel (U-19Pu-10Zr). The Pu/U ratio in the salt varied from 0.6 to 1.3. Chemical and radiochemical analytical results confirmed that U and transuranics can be collected into the LCC as a group under the given run conditions. The RE contamination level in the LCC product was up to 6.7 wt% of the total metal collected. The detailed data for partitioning of actinides and REs in the salt and Cd phases are reported in the paper.

  20. Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow,Bayport

  1. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow,BayportExploration/Exploitation Tool? |

  2. CMI Webinar: Recycling of Rare Earth Elements: A Microbiological Approach |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Siteandscience, and8Critical Materials Institute

  3. alkaline earth elements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth elements First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Bose-Einstein condensation of alkaline...

  4. alkali earth elements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alkali earth elements First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Long range interactions between...

  5. DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » ContactDepartment of Energy| Department ofRFI on Rare

  6. Interfacing Superconducting Qubits and Telecom Photons via a Rare-Earth Doped Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher O'Brien; Nikolai Lauk; Susanne Blum; Giovanna Morigi; Michael Fleischhauer

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme to couple short single photon pulses to superconducting qubits. An optical photon is first absorbed into an inhomogeneously broadened rare-earth doped crystal using controlled reversible inhomogeneous broadening. The optical excitation is then mapped into a spin state using a series of $\\pi$-pulses and subsequently transferred to a superconducting qubit via a microwave cavity. To overcome the intrinsic and engineered inhomogeneous broadening of the optical and spin transitions in rare earth doped crystals, we make use of a special transfer protocol using staggered $\\pi$-pulses. We predict total transfer efficiencies on the order of 90%.

  7. Origin of Low-Lying Enhanced E1 Strength in Rare-Earth Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieker, M; Zilges, A; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental $E1$ strength distribution below 4 MeV in rare-earth nuclei suggests a local breaking of isospin symmetry. In addition to the octupole states, additional $1^-$ states with enhanced E1 strength have been observed in rare-earth nuclei by means of ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) experiments. By reproducing the experimental results, the spdf interacting boson model calculations provide further evidence for the formation of an $\\alpha$ cluster in medium-mass nuclei and might provide a new understanding of the origin of low-lying E1 strength.

  8. Metal enhanced fluorescence in rare earth doped plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derom, S; Pillonnet, A; Benamara, O; Jurdyc, A M; Girard, C; Francs, G Colas des

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically and numerically investigate metal enhanced fluorescence of plasmonic core-shell nanoparticles doped with rare earth (RE) ions. Particle shape and size are engineered to maximize the average enhancement factor (AEF) of the overall doped shell. We show that the highest enhancement (11 in the visible and 7 in the near-infrared) are achieved by tuning either the dipolar or quadrupolar particle resonance to the rare earth ions excitation wavelength. Additionally, the calculated AEFs are compared to experimental data reported in the literature, obtained in similar conditions (plasmon mediated enhancement) or when a metal-RE energy transfer mechanism is involved.

  9. Origin of Low-Lying Enhanced E1 Strength in Rare-Earth Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Spieker; S. Pascu; A. Zilges; F. Iachello

    2015-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental $E1$ strength distribution below 4 MeV in rare-earth nuclei suggests a local breaking of isospin symmetry. In addition to the octupole states, additional $1^-$ states with enhanced E1 strength have been observed in rare-earth nuclei by means of ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) experiments. By reproducing the experimental results, the spdf interacting boson model calculations provide further evidence for the formation of an $\\alpha$ cluster in medium-mass nuclei and might provide a new understanding of the origin of low-lying E1 strength.

  10. Rare-earth innovation to improve nylon manufacturing | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth MetalsRare-earth

  11. RARE EARTHS1 (Data in metric tons of rare-earth oxide (REO) content, unless otherwise noted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in 2001 by end use was as follows: glass polishing and ceramics, 34%; petroleum refining catalysts, 16-earth products. Domestic ore production was valued at an estimated $28 million. The estimated value of refined, alloy 953 1,780 2,470 1,420 1,520 Cerium compounds 4,940 3,990 4,310 3,850 2,660 Mixed REO's 2,530 5

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  13. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a permanent magnet wherein 1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and 2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties.

  14. Carbide/nitride grain refined rare earth-iron-boron permanent magnet and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCallum, R.W.; Branagan, D.J.

    1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a permanent magnet is disclosed wherein (1) a melt is formed having a base alloy composition comprising RE, Fe and/or Co, and B (where RE is one or more rare earth elements) and (2) TR (where TR is a transition metal selected from at least one of Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W, and Al) and at least one of C and N are provided in the base alloy composition melt in substantially stoichiometric amounts to form a thermodynamically stable compound (e.g. TR carbide, nitride or carbonitride). The melt is rapidly solidified in a manner to form particulates having a substantially amorphous (metallic glass) structure and a dispersion of primary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates. The amorphous particulates are heated above the crystallization temperature of the base alloy composition to nucleate and grow a hard magnetic phase to an optimum grain size and to form secondary TRC, TRN and/or TRC/N precipitates dispersed at grain boundaries. The crystallized particulates are consolidated at an elevated temperature to form a shape. During elevated temperature consolidation, the primary and secondary precipitates act to pin the grain boundaries and minimize deleterious grain growth that is harmful to magnetic properties. 33 figs.

  15. Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydrogen absorption characteristics of oxygen-stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds M Abstract. -- The thermal behavior of oxygen-stabilized RjFegO^-hydrogen (R = Y, Dy, Ho) systems was studied decade to the study of the hydrogenation characte- ristics of a variety of intermetallic compounds, our

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - adding rare earths Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    au n04, Tome 24, a v r i l 1989 Summary: obtenus. Les constantes de Verdet de ces aerogels o n t Bt6 determinees. Abstract - Rare-earth s i l i c... a t e s and TMOS. The...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - adjustable rare earth Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    au n04, Tome 24, a v r i l 1989 Summary: obtenus. Les constantes de Verdet de ces aerogels o n t Bt6 determinees. Abstract - Rare-earth s i l i c... a t e s and TMOS. The...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aged rare earth Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    au n04, Tome 24, a v r i l 1989 Summary: obtenus. Les constantes de Verdet de ces aerogels o n t Bt6 determinees. Abstract - Rare-earth s i l i c... a t e s and TMOS. The...

  19. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

  20. Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides. [Re = Eu, Sm or Yb

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Takeshita, Takuo; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.; Beaudry, B.J.

    1986-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula La/sub 3-x/M/sub x/S/sub 4/, where M is europium, samarium, or ytterbium, with x = 0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000/sup 0/C.

  1. aqueous rare-earth electrolyte: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous rare-earth electrolyte First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrothermal transport...

  2. Two types of rare earth-organic frameworks constructed by racemic tartaric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Zhanguo [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Lv Yaokang [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Cheng Jianwen [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Feng Yunlong, E-mail: sky37@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal reactions of rare earth oxides with racemic tartaric acid (H{sub 2}tar) yielded 7 rare earth(III) MOFs with general formulas [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (R=Y (1), Sm (4), Eu (5), Tb (6), Dy (7)) and [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}4nH{sub 2}O (R=La (2), Nd (3)). X-ray powder diffraction analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveal that they present two different structural types. MOFs 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are isostructural and crystallize in the orthorhombic non-centrosymmetric space group Iba2, and feature unusual fsc-3,4-Iba2 topology. MOFs 2 and 3 are isostructural and crystallize in monoclinic P2{sub 1}/c space group and display rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology containing hydrophilic channels bounded by triple helical chains along a axis. MOFs 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 exhibit intense lanthanide characteristic photoluminescence at room temperature. - Graphical Abstract: [R{sub 2}(tar){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}4nH{sub 2}O (R=La (2), Nd (3)) display rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology containing hydrophilic channels bounded by triple helical chains along a axis. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two types of rare earth MOFs were synthesized by hydrothermal conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MOFs feature unusual fsc-3,4-Iba2 and rare fsx-4,5-P2{sub 1}/c topology structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MOFs exhibit intense lanthanide characteristic photoluminescence.

  3. Room-temperature-grown rare-earth-doped GaN luminescent thin films D. S. Lee and A. J. Steckla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    efforts to achieve this goal with GaN growth on oxide films or on glass substrates3­6 being a main focus: 50­100 °C. GaN films were grown on p-type 111 Si substrate by MBE with a Ga elemental sourceRoom-temperature-grown rare-earth-doped GaN luminescent thin films D. S. Lee and A. J. Steckla

  4. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare earth tri-telluride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Giamarchi, T.; /Geneva U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to observe both the Drude component and the single-particle peak, ascribed to the contributions due to the free charge carriers and to the charge-density-wave gap excitation, respectively. The data analysis displays a diminishing impact of the charge-density-wave condensate on the electronic properties with decreasing lattice constant across the rare-earth series. We propose a possible mechanism describing this behavior and we suggest the presence of a one-dimensional character in these two-dimensional compounds. We also envisage that interactions and umklapp processes might play a relevant role in the formation of the charge-density-wave state in these compounds.

  5. Iron-Nitride Alloy Magnets: Transformation Enabled Nitride Magnets Absent Rare Earths (TEN Mare)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Case Western is developing a highly magnetic iron-nitride alloy to use in the magnets that power electric motors found in EVs and renewable power generators. This would reduce the overall price of the motor by eliminating the expensive imported rare earth minerals typically found in today’s best commercial magnets. The iron-nitride powder is sourced from abundant and inexpensive materials found in the U.S. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new magnet system, which contains no rare earths, in a prototype electric motor. This could significantly reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted in the U.S. each year by encouraging the use of clean alternatives to oil and coal.

  6. Valence, coordination number, and PAV cells in metallic rare earth compounds F. L. Carter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that the effective radius of the rare earth atoms is surprisingly variable and may even be anisotropic in some SmCo5], is indicated not only by the prediction [4] of the unstability of the SmCo5 structure [9], but even to the likely nature of one of the SmCo5-type distortions. For the first time this paper demonstrated

  7. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D. (Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik); Zamfir, N.V. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H. (Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik); Wesselborg, C. (Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J[sup [pi

  8. Spectral statistics of rare-earth nuclei: Investigation of shell model configuration effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabri, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral statistics of even-even rare-earth nuclei are investigated by using all the available empirical data for Ba, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb and Hf isotopes. The Berry- Robnik distribution and Maximum Likelihood estimation technique are used for analyses. An obvious deviation from GOE is observed for considered nuclei and there are some suggestions about the effect due to mass, deformation parameter and shell model configurations.

  9. Structural and crystal chemical properties of rare-earth titanate pyrochlores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, James Matthew [ORNL] [ORNL; Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL] [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL] [ORNL; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL] [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Bryan, Jeff C. [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare-earth titanates, RE2Ti2O7 (where RE = a rare-earth) with the pyrochlore structure continue to be investigated for use as potential stable host materials for nuclear and actinide-rich wastes. Accordingly, the present work is directed towards the elucidation of the fundamental structural, physical, and thermochemical properties of this class of compounds. Single-crystals of the rare earth pyrochlores were synthesized using a high-temperature flux technique and were subsequently characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The cubic lattice parameters display an approximately linear correlation with the RE-site cation radius. Theoretical calculations of the lattice constants and bond lengths of the subject materials were carried out using density functional theory, and the results are compared to the experimental values. The Sm and Eu titanates exhibit a covalency increase between the REO8 and TiO6 polyhedra resulting in a deviation from the increasing linear lattice parameter through the transition series. Gd2Ti2O7 with the 4f7 half-filled f-orbital Gd3+ sub-shell exhibits the lowest 48f oxygen positional parameter. The coefficient of thermal expansion for the rare-earth titanate series is approximately linear, and it has a range of 10.1 11.2 x 10-6 C-1. Raman spectroscopy indicated that the ~530 cm-1 peak associated with the Ti-O stretching mode follows a general trend of decreasing frequency with increasing RE reduced mass.

  10. Method of increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.; Finnemore, D.K.

    1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention comprises a method of increasing the magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron (RFe) magnetostrictive alloy rods by a thermal-magnetic treatment. The rod is heated to a temperature above its Curie temperature, viz. from 400 to 600 C; and, while the rod is at that temperature, a magnetic field is directionally applied and maintained while the rod is cooled, at least below its Curie temperature. 2 figs.

  11. First-principles study of He point-defects in HCP rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang; Chen, Ru; Peng, SM; Long, XG; Wu, Z.; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He defect properties in Sc, Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Lu were studied using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. The results indicate that the formation energy of an interstitial He atom is smaller than that of a substitutional He atom in all hcp rare-earth metals considered. Furthermore, the tetrahedral interstitial position is more favorable than an octahedral position for He defects. The results are compared with those from bcc and fcc metals.

  12. Spectral statistics of rare-earth nuclei: Investigation of shell model configuration effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sabri

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral statistics of even-even rare-earth nuclei are investigated by using all the available empirical data for Ba, Ce, Nd, Sm, Gd, Dy, Er, Yb and Hf isotopes. The Berry- Robnik distribution and Maximum Likelihood estimation technique are used for analyses. An obvious deviation from GOE is observed for considered nuclei and there are some suggestions about the effect due to mass, deformation parameter and shell model configurations.

  13. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979,page C5-40 High field magnetoresistanceof silver containing rare-earth impurities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and exchange scattering. 1. General. -Rare-earth impurities in metals give rise to an anisotropic magnetoresistanceof silver containing rare-earth impurities J. C. Ousset I.N.S.A., UniversitC Paul Sabatier, 31000 magnetoresistance dis- appears for Gd impurities (L = 0) and changes its sign half-way in the heavy rare-earth

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppliment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979,page C5-46 High-temperature Hall effect in rare earth metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -temperature Hall effect in rare earth metals M. V. Vedernikov, V. G. Dvunitkin and N. I. Moreva A. F. Ioffe. Abstract. - Up to date the Hall effect in rare earth metals (REM) was studied rather extensively below at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphyscol:1979518 #12;HIGH-TEMPERATURE HALL EFFECT IN RARE EARTH METALS C5

  15. Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to today’s best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

  16. Coherency strain enhanced dielectric-temperature property of rare-earth doped BaTiO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeon, Sang-Chae; Kang, Suk-Joong L. [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Core/shell-grained BaTiO{sub 3} samples were prepared with addition of rare earth elements. The core/shell interface was semi-coherent, and many misfit dislocations formed in Dy-doped samples. In contrast, a coherent interface and few dislocations were observed in Ho- and Er-doped samples. Dy-doped samples exhibited poor temperature stability, showing a peak with no frequency dispersion. Ho- and Er-doped samples exhibited a broad curve with frequency dispersion. This improved temperature stability is attributed to the coherency strain, which leads to the formation of polar nano-regions in the shell. Coherency at the core/shell interface is critical to improve the temperature stability of core/shell-structured BaTiO{sub 3}.

  17. Iron-Nickel-Based SuperMagnets: Multiscale Development of L10 Materials for Rare Earth-Free Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Northeastern University will develop bulk quantities of rare-earth-free permanent magnets with an iron-nickel crystal structure for use in the electric motors of renewable power generators and EVs. These materials could offer magnetic properties that are equivalent to today’s best commercial magnets, but with a significant cost reduction and diminished environmental impact. This iron-nickel crystal structure, which is only found naturally in meteorites and developed over billions of years in space, will be artificially synthesized by the Northeastern University team. Its material structure will be replicated with the assistance of alloying elements introduced to help it achieve superior magnetic properties. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate bulk magnetic properties that can be fabricated at the industrial scale.

  18. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated rare-earth intermetallics RIn? and RSn? (R=Sm, Eu, and Gd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafiq, M.; Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com, E-mail: dr.iftikhar@uom.edu.pk [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Hezar Gerib Avenue, Isfahan 81744 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the structural, elastic, and electronic properties of RIn? and RSn? (R = Sm, Eu, Gd) compounds have been investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave plus local orbital method within the density functional theory. The structural properties are investigated using the LDA, GGA, and the band correlated LDA+U and GGA+U schemes. The lattice parameters are in good agreement with the available experimental results and the divalent state of Eu is also verified. The spin-orbit coupling is included in order to predict the correct electronic properties and splitting of 4f states of the rare earth elements is also incorporated. We calculated Bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, anisotropic ratio, Kleinman parameters, Poisson's ratio, Lame's co-efficient, sound velocities for shear and longitudinal waves, and Debye temperature. We also predict the Cauchy pressure and B/G ratio in order to explore the ductile and brittle behaviors of these compounds.

  19. Exploration of R2XM2 (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge): Structural Motifs, the novel Compound Gd2AlGe2 and Analysis of the U3Si2 and Zr3Al2 Structure Types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean William McWhorter

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the process of exploring and understanding the influence of crystal structure on the system of compounds with the composition Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} several new compounds were synthesized with different crystal structures, but similar structural features. In Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, the main feature of interest is the magnetocaloric effect (MCE), which allows the material to be useful in magnetic refrigeration applications. The MCE is based on the magnetic interactions of the Gd atoms in the crystal structure, which varies with x (the amount of Si in the compound). The crystal structure of Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} can be thought of as being formed from two 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms, with additional Gd atoms in the cubic voids and Si/Ge atoms in the trigonal prismatic voids. Attempts were made to substitute nonmagnetic atoms for magnetic Gd using In, Mg and Al. Gd{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}InGe{sub 2} both possess the same 3{sup 2}434 nets of Gd atoms as Gd{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4}, but these nets are connected differently, forming the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} crystal structure. A search of the literature revealed that compounds with the composition R{sub 2}XM{sub 2} (R=Sc, Y, Ti, Zr, Hf, rare earth; X=main group element; M=transition metal, Si, Ge) crystallize in one of four crystal structures: the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}AlB{sub 2} and W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} crystal structures. These crystal structures are described, and the relationships between them are highlighted. Gd{sub 2}AlGe{sub 2} forms an entirely new crystal structure, and the details of its synthesis and characterization are given. Electronic structure calculations are performed to understand the nature of bonding in this compound and how electrons can be accounted for. A series of electronic structure calculations were performed on models with the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structures, using Zr and A1 as the building blocks. The starting point for these models was the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure, and models were created to simulate the transition from the idealized U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the distorted Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure. Analysis of the band structures of the models has shown that the transition from the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} structure to the Zr{sub 3}Al{sub 2} structure lifts degeneracies along the {Lambda} {yields} Z direction, indicating a Peierls-type mechanism for the displacement occurring in the positions of the Zr atoms.

  20. A rare opportunity beckons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gschneidner, K

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a great deal of uncertainty for the future of rare-earth production. Rare-earths are a collection of 17 chemical elements in the periodic table, which include scandium and yttrium as well as the 15 lanthanides, such as dysprosium and ytterbium. China has a stranglehold on today's rare-earth market, which was worth about $3bn in 2010, with the country accounting for about 95% of worldwide production. Yet China's future actions can only be guessed at best. In September it halted shipments of rare-earth elements to Japan over a diplomatic spat concerning the detention of a Chinese trawler captain. Although the ban was later lifted, the episode raised concerns around the world about China's rare-earth monopoly and its use in diplomacy. China has already warned that it will not export any rare-earth material in the coming years as it expects its own consumption of rare-earth metals to increase. The country has introduced export taxes as well as production and export quotas, and also refused to grant any new rare-earth mining licences. Furthermore, because its reserves are limited and China's internal markets are growing so rapidly, the country has suggested it will no longer export products that require rare-earth elements, especially those that need heavy rare-earth elements, such as terbium and dysprosium. China's actions have led to huge rises in the cost of rare-earth materials and products. Dysprosium oxide, for example, has shot up from $36 per kilogram in 2005 to a massive $305 per kilogram by late last year. This could have a huge impact on much of today's electronics industry, given that rare-earth elements are ubiquitous in electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) and mobile phones. Neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets, for example, are used as computer spindle drives. The question is: what can be done to ensure that China's dominance of the rare-earth industry does not affect the military and energy security of the US and other nations? Rare-earth elements are relatively plentiful in the Earth's crust but they are widely dispersed, which makes mining them economically nonviable. The rare-earth industry first took off in the early 1960s with the discovery of the intense red luminescence of europium when excited by electrons. This was quickly utilized by TV manufacturers in the US, which used the material to produce the colour red. Indeed, many of the rare-earth applications arise because each element is unique and so certain elements exhibit behaviours that match a particular application, such as neodymium for lasers and magnets or europium and terbium for the red and green colours in TVs. In the 1960s annual production of rare-earth elements was about 2000 tonnes, with the US company Molycorp supplying 50% of the rare-earth oxides from the Mountain Pass mine in California. This monopoly was broken in the early 1990s when China first began to export separated rare-earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s China was moving up the supply chain to higher-value products such as magnets and phosphors. Since the turn of the century it has supplied finished products including computers, LCDs and mobile phones. Production of rare-earth elements, which has been increasing by about 10% every year since the 1960s, reached 97,000 tonnes by 2009. Fortunately, new deposits of rare-earths are being discovered all over the world, which means that China now accounts for about 30% of worldwide deposits, rather than 70% as widely thought in the 1980s. But to take advantage of this and break the monopoly, governments outside China need to open new rare-earth deposits, especially those with high concentrations of the heavier rare-earth elements. They also need to expand and open new manufacturing facilities for products that need rare-earths, as well as train scientists to replace the intellectual capital lost during the last 20-30 years because of the Chinese monopoly. The bottom line is that to reduce the rest of the world's dependence on China for a sufficient and continuous supply of rare-ear

  1. Epithermal and thermal neutron response to rare earth doped fricke dosimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groves, Kenneth Lee

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . REFERENCES. APPENDICES. VITA. 13 31 36 44 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 G-values derived using heavy charged particles in ~Pa a Ferrous Sulfate dosimeter. Table 2 Rare Earth concentrations in 100 ml of Fricke dosimeter. Table 3 Table of threshold energy... in that it was shcwn that yields for heavy particle radiation tend to be much less than for beta particles and also showed that yields decrease with decreasing particle (') energy (Table 1). Table 1. G-values derived using heavy charged particles a Ferrous Sulfate...

  2. Synchrotron Diffraction Studies of Spontaneous Magnetostriction in Rare Earth Transition Metal Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ning Yang

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal expansion anomalies of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} (x = 0,2) (R = Y, Nd, Gd, Tb, Er) stoichiometric compounds are studied with high-energy synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction using Debye-Schemer geometry in temperature range 10K to 1000K. Large spontaneous magnetostriction up to their Curie temperatures (T{sub c}) is observed. The a-axes show relatively larger invar effects than c-axes in the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds whereas the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} show the contrary anisotropies. The iron sub-lattice is shown to dominate the spontaneous magnetostriction of the compounds. The contribution of the rare earth sublattice is roughly proportional to the spin magnetic moment of the rare earth in the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B compounds but in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x}, the rare earth sub-lattice contribution appears more likely to be dominated by the local bonding. The calculation of spontaneous magnetostrain of bonds shows that the bonds associated with Fe(j2) sites in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and the dumbbell sites in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}C{sub x} have larger values, which is strongly related to their largest magnetic moment and Wigner-Seitz atomic cell volume. The roles of the carbon atoms in increasing the Curie temperatures of the R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} compounds are attributed to the increased separation of Fe hexagons. The R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B phases with magnetic rare earth ions also show anisotropies of thermal expansion above T{sub c}. For R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} and R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B the a{sub a}/a{sub c} > 1 whereas the anisotropy is reversed with the interstitial carbon in R{sub 2}Fe{sub 17}. The average bond magnetostrain is shown to be a possible predictor of the magnetic moment of Fe sites in the compounds. Both of the theoretical and phenomenological models on spontaneous magnetostriction are discussed and a Landau model on the spontaneous magnetostriction is proposed.

  3. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  4. Aljazeera story on rare earths features Alex King | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic|Aljazeera story on rare earths features

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979,page C5-8 The evidence for anisotropic rare-earth-conduction electron interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - electric power of rare-earth impurities in metals and rare-earth intermetallic compounds-conduction electron (k-f) interaction. We consider rare-earth ions in two important contexts, as impurities in metals for anisotropic rare-earth-conduction electron interactions P. M. Levy Department of Physics, New York University

  6. Transmission electron microscopic study of pyrochlore to defect-fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karthik, Chinnathambi, E-mail: Karthikchinnathambi@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Anderson, Thomas J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Gout, Delphine [Oak Ridge National Lab, Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab, Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ubic, Rick [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates, Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu), has been identified. Neutron diffraction showed that the structure transforms from well-ordered pyrochloric to fully fluoritic through the lanthanide series from La to Lu with a corresponding increase in the position parameter x of the 48f (Fd3{sup Macron }m) oxygen site from 0.330 to 0.375. As evidenced by the selected area electron diffraction, La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a well-ordered pyrocholoric structure with the presence of intense superlattice spots, which became weak and diffuse (in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}) before disappearing completely as the series progressed towards the Lu end. High resolution electron microscopic studies showed the breakdown of the pyrochlore ordering in the form of antiphase domains resulting in diffused smoke-like superlattice spots in the case of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopic studies showed the ordered pyrochlore to defect fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates to occur via the formation of anti-phase domains to start with. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrochlore to fluorite structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} showed well ordered pyrochlore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Break down of pyrochlore ordering due to antiphase boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rest of the series showed fluoritic structure.

  7. Efficient, High-Torque Electric Vehicle Motor: Advanced Electric Vehicle Motors with Low or No Rare Earth Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: QM Power will develop a new type of electric motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs without the use of rare-earth-based magnets. Many of today’s EV motors use rare earth magnets to efficiently provide torque to the wheels. QM Power’s motors would contain magnets that use no rare earth minerals, are light and compact, and can deliver more power with greater efficiency and at reduced cost. Key innovations in this project include a new motor design with iron-based magnetic materials, a new motor control technique, and advanced manufacturing techniques that substantially reduce the cost of the motor. The ultimate goal of this project is to create a cost-effective EV motor that offers the rough peak equivalent of 270 horsepower.

  8. Capturing near-Earth asteroids around Earth Zaki Hasnain n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Shane

    metals and semiconducting elements on Earth may be supplemented or even replaced by the reserves floating twice the tonnage of such metals already harvested on Earth. There are $ 1000 NEAs with a diameter propellant to transport spacecraft between space habitats, Earth, the Moon, the asteroids, and beyond. Rare-Earth

  9. Modification of phonon processes in nano-structured rare-earth-ion-doped crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Thomas; Thiel, Charles W; Cone, Rufus L; Barclay, Paul E; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-structuring impurity-doped crystals affects the phonon density of states and thereby modifies the atomic dynamics induced by interaction with phonons. We propose the use of nano-structured materials in the form of powders or phononic bandgap crystals to enable, or improve, persistent spectral hole-burning and optical coherence for inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. This is crucial for applications such as ultra-precise radio-frequency spectrum analyzers and certain approaches to optical quantum memories. We specifically discuss how phonon engineering can enable spectral hole burning in erbium-doped materials operating in the telecommunication band, and present simulations for density of states of nano-sized powders and phononic crystals for the case of Y$_2$SiO$_5$, a widely-used material in current quantum memory research.

  10. Magnetization switching of rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yiming; Cao, Shixun, E-mail: sxcao@shu.edu.cn; Ren, Wei; Feng, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shujuan; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu, Bo [Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of single phase rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3} and its magnetic properties. A canted antiferromagnetic transition with thermal hysteresis at T?=?260?K is observed, and a magnetic compensation (zero magnetization) near 133?K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Ce{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments. At low temperature, field induced magnetization reversal starting from 43?K for H?=?1.2 kOe reveals the spin flip driven by Zeeman energy between the net moments and the applied field. These findings may find potential uses in magnetic switching devices such as nonvolatile magnetic memory which facilitates two distinct states of magnetization.

  11. Low-phonon-frequency chalcogenide crystalline hosts for rare earth lasers operating beyond three microns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Page, Ralph H. (San Ramon, CA); Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); Nostrand, Michael C. (Livermore, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA); Schunemann, Peter G. (Malden, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention comprises a RE-doped MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 crystalline gain medium, where M includes a divalent ion such as Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb, Eu, or Yb; A is selected from trivalent ions including Al, Ga, and In; X is one of the chalcogenide ions S, Se, and Te; and RE represents the trivalent rare earth ions. The MA.sub.2 X.sub.4 gain medium can be employed in a laser oscillator or a laser amplifier. Possible pump sources include diode lasers, as well as other laser pump sources. The laser wavelengths generated are greater than 3 microns, as becomes possible because of the low phonon frequency of this host medium. The invention may be used to seed optical devices such as optical parametric oscillators and other lasers.

  12. High fidelity readout scheme for rare-earth solid state quantum computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Walther; L. Rippe; Y. Yan; J. Karlsson; D. Serrano; A. N. Nilsson; S. Bengtsson; S. Kröll

    2015-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and analyze a high fidelity readout scheme for a single instance approach to quantum computing in rare-earth-ion-doped crystals. The scheme is based on using different species of qubit and readout ions, and it is shown that by allowing the closest qubit ion to act as a readout buffer, the readout error can be reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The scheme is shown to be robust against certain experimental variations, such as varying detection efficiencies, and we use the scheme to predict the expected quantum fidelity of a CNOT gate in these solid state systems. In addition, we discuss the potential scalability of the protocol to larger qubit systems. The results are based on parameters which we believed are experimentally feasible with current technology, and which can be simultaneously realized.

  13. Coherent spectroscopy of rare-earth-metal-ion-doped whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Korystov, D.; Longdell, J. J. [Jack Dodd Centre for Photonics and Ultra-Cold Atoms, Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. (New Zealand)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an investigation into the properties of Pr{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} whispering-gallery-mode resonators as a first step toward achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with rare-earth-metal-ion-doped crystals. Direct measurement of cavity QED parameters are made using photon echoes, giving good agreement with theoretical predictions. By comparing the ions at the surface of the resonator to those in the center, it is determined that the physical process of making the resonator does not negatively affect the properties of the ions. Coupling between the ions and resonator is analyzed through the observation of optical bistability and normal-mode splitting.

  14. Nanophotonic coherent light-matter interfaces based on rare-earth-doped crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Tian; Miyazono, Evan; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum light-matter interfaces (QLMIs) connecting stationary qubits to photons will enable optical networks for quantum communications, precise global time keeping, photon switching, and studies of fundamental physics. Rare-earth-ion (REI) doped crystals are state-of-the-art materials for optical quantum memories and quantum transducers between optical photons, microwave photons and spin waves. Here we demonstrate coupling of an ensemble of neodymium REIs to photonic nano-cavities fabricated in the yttrium orthosilicate host crystal. Cavity quantum electrodynamics effects including Purcell enhancement (F=42) and dipole-induced transparency are observed on the highly coherent 4I9/2-4F3/2 optical transition. Fluctuations in the cavity transmission due to statistical fine structure of the atomic density are measured, indicating operation at the quantum level. Coherent optical control of cavity-coupled REIs is performed via photon echoes. Long optical coherence times (T2~100 microseconds) and small inhomogeneous...

  15. Lattice distortion in single crystal rare-earth arsenide/GaAs nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, A. J. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Schultz, B. D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9560 (United States); Palmstrøm, C. J., E-mail: cpalmstrom@ece.ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9560 (United States)

    2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial single crystal nanocomposites comprised of rare-earth arsenide nanoparticles embedded in GaAs (001) layers produce a larger change in lattice parameter than expected from the lattice parameters of relaxed films. Despite similar cubic structures and lattice parameters, elongation of the interfacial bond length between the two materials induces additional strain causing an expansion in the nanocomposite lattice. The interface bond length is material dependent with an average atomic layer spacing at the ErAs:GaAs interface of 1.9?Å while the spacing at the ScAs:GaAs interface is only 1.4?Å. Implications for lattice matching various single crystal epitaxial nanostructures in semiconductors are discussed.

  16. Effect of hydrocarbon adsorption on the wettability of rare earth oxide ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, Daniel J.; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sack, Jean; Queeney, John; Wang, Evelyn N., E-mail: enwang@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Enright, Ryan [Thermal Management Research Group, Efficient Energy Transfer (etaET) Department, Bell Labs Ireland, Dublin 15 (Ireland)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor condensation is routinely used as an effective means of transferring heat, with dropwise condensation exhibiting a 5???7x heat transfer improvement compared to filmwise condensation. However, state-of-the-art techniques to promote dropwise condensation rely on functional hydrophobic coatings, which are often not robust and therefore undesirable for industrial implementation. Natural surface contamination due to hydrocarbon adsorption, particularly on noble metals, has been explored as an alternative approach to realize stable dropwise condensing surfaces. While noble metals are prohibitively expensive, the recent discovery of robust rare earth oxide (REO) hydrophobicity has generated interest for dropwise condensation applications due to material costs approaching 1% of gold; however, the underlying mechanism of REO hydrophobicity remains under debate. In this work, we show through careful experiments and modeling that REO hydrophobicity occurs due to the same hydrocarbon adsorption mechanism seen previously on noble metals. To investigate adsorption dynamics, we studied holmia and ceria REOs, along with control samples of gold and silica, via X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and dynamic time-resolved contact angle measurements. The contact angle and surface carbon percent started at ?0 on in-situ argon-plasma-cleaned samples and increased asymptotically over time after exposure to laboratory air, with the rare earth oxides displaying hydrophobic (>90°) advancing contact angle behavior at long times (>4 days). The results indicate that REOs are in fact hydrophilic when clean and become hydrophobic due to hydrocarbon adsorption. Furthermore, this study provides insight into how REOs can be used to promote stable dropwise condensation, which is important for the development of enhanced phase change surfaces.

  17. A photon-pair source with controllable delay based on shaped inhomogeneous broadening of rare-earth doped solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavel Sekatski; Nicolas Sangouard; Nicolas Gisin; Hugues de Riedmatten; Mikael Afzelius

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous Raman emission in atomic gases provides an attractive source of photon pairs with a controllable delay. We show how this technique can be implemented in solid state systems by appropriately shaping the inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal is eminently feasible with current technology and provides a realistic solution to entangle remote rare-earth doped solids in a heralded way.

  18. Photon-pair source with controllable delay based on shaped inhomogeneous broadening of rare-earth-metal-doped solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekatski, Pavel; Sangouard, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Riedmatten, Hugues de [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); ICFO-Institute of Photonic Sciences, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, E-08015 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous Raman emission in atomic gases provides an attractive source of photon pairs with a controllable delay. We show how this technique can be implemented in solid state systems by appropriately shaping the inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal is eminently feasible with current technology and provides a realistic solution to entangle remote rare-earth-metal-doped solids in a heralded way.

  19. Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    relation of both hcp-Fe and the iron-silicon alloy at 300 K. The inner core of the Earth is the remotest area on the globe, mostly impossible to study directly. It is an area...

  20. Low lying electric dipole excitations in nuclei of the rare earth region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Brentano, P.; Zilges, A.; Herzberg, R.D. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Zamfir, N.V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kneissl, U.; Heil, R.D.; Pitz, H.H. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik; Wesselborg, C. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From many experiments with low energy photon scattering on deformed rare earth nuclei we have obtained detailed information about the distribution of electric dipole strength below 4 MeV. Apart from some weaker transitions between 2 and 4 MeV we observed one, and sometimes two, very strong El-groundstate transitions around 1.5 MeV in all examined nuclei. They arise from the de-excitation of the bandheads of the (J{sup {pi}},K)=(l{sup {minus}},0) and (J{sup {pi}},K)=(l{sup {minus}},1) octupole vibrational bands. It is shown that the decay branching ratios and the absolute transition strengths of these states can be reproduced rather well with an improved T(El)-operator in the sdf-Interacting Boson Model. Another class of octupole states has been investigated in the region of the semimagic nucleus {sup 142}Nd. Here a quintuplet of collective excitations around 3.5 MeV is expected due to the coupling of the 3{minus}-octupole vibration with the 2+-quadrupole vibration. We performed photon scattering experiments on the odd A neighboring nucleus {sup 141}Pr and found first evidence for the existence of 3{sup {minus}}{circle_times}2+{circle_times}particle-states.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of ultra-pure rare-earth-coped glass for laser refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Wendy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in synthesizing and characterizing ultra-pure, rare-earth doped ZIBLAN (ZrF{sub 4}-InF{sub 3}BaF{sub 2}-LaF{sub 3}-AlF{sub 3}-NaF) glass capable of laser refrigeration. The glass was produced from fluorides which were purified and subsequently treated with hydrofluoric gas at elevated temperatures to remove impurities before glass formation. Several Yb3 +-doped samples were studied with degrees of purity and composition with successive iterations producing an improved material. We have developed a non-invasive, spectroscopic technique, two band differential luminescence thermometry (TBDLT), to evaluate the intrinsic quality of the ytterbium doped ZIBLAN used for laser cooling experiments. TBDLT measures local temperature changes within an illuminated volume resulting solely from changes in the relative thermal population of the excited state levels. This TBDLT technique utilizes two commercially available band pass filters to select and integrate the 'difference regions' of interest in the luminescence spectra. The goal is to determine the minimum temperature to which the ytterbium sample can cool on the local scale, unphased by surface heating. This temperature where heating and cooling are exactly balanced is the zero crossing temperature (ZCT) and can be used as a measure for the presence of impurities and the overall quality of the laser cooling material. Overall, favorable results were obtained from 1 % Yb3+-doped glass, indicating our glasses are desirable for laser refrigeration.

  2. First identification of large electric monopole strength in well-deformed rare earth nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Wimmer; V. Bildstein; K. Eppinger; R. Gernhäuser; D. Habs; Ch. Hinke; Th. Kröll; R. Krücken; R. Lutter; H. -J. Maier; P. Maierbeck; Th. Morgan; O. Schaile; W. Schwerdtfeger; S. Schwertel; P. G. Thirolf

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in the well-deformed rare earth isotopes $^{154}$Sm and $^{166}$Er were populated via ``safe'' Coulomb excitation at the Munich MLL Tandem accelerator. Conversion electrons were registered in a cooled Si(Li) detector in conjunction with a magnetic transport and filter system, the Mini-Orange spectrometer. For the first excited $0^+$ state in $^{154}$Sm at 1099 keV a large value of the monopole strength for the transition to the ground state of $\\rho^2(\\text{E0}; 0^+_2 \\to 0^+_\\text{g}) = 96(42)\\cdot 10^{-3}$ could be extracted. This confirms the interpretation of the lowest excited $0^+$ state in $^{154}$Sm as the collective $\\beta$-vibrational excitation of the ground state. In $^{166}$Er the measured large electric monopole strength of $\\rho^2(\\text{E0}; 0^+_4 \\to 0^+_1) = 127(60)\\cdot 10^{-3}$ clearly identifies the $0_4^+$ state at 1934 keV to be the $\\beta$-vibrational excitation of the ground state.

  3. Electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural transformations in rare earth dialuminides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudyal, Durga, E-mail: durga@ameslab.gov [The Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3020 (United States); Pecharsky, V. K.; Gschneidner, K. A. [The Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-3020 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-2300 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report electronic structure, magnetic properties, and magnetostructural transformations of selected rare earth dialuminides calculated by using local spin density approximation (LSDA), including the Hubbard U parameter (LSDA?+?U) approach. Total energy calculations show that CeAl{sub 2} and EuAl{sub 2} adopt antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground states, while dialuminides formed by other magnetic lanthanides have ferromagnetic (FM) ground states. The comparison of theoretical and experimental magnetic moments of CeAl{sub 2} indicates that the 4f orbital moment of Ce in CeAl{sub 2} is quenched. Theoretical calculations confirm that Eu in EuAl{sub 2} and Yb in YbAl{sub 2} are divalent. PrAl{sub 2} exhibits a tetragonal distortion near FM transition. HoAl{sub 2} shows a first order magnetostructural transition while DyAl{sub 2} shows a second order transformation below magnetic transition. The dialuminides formed by Nd, Tb, and Er are simple ferromagnets without additional anomalies in the FM state.

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Unknown Exploration Basis The goal of this project was to create a database of rare earth elements found in exploration for geothermal resources. Notes Geothermal fluids from...

  5. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism branching ratios, L[subscript 3] / L[subscript 2], for heavy rare earths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yongbin; Kim, Jong-Woo; Goldman, Alan I.; Harmon, Bruce N. (Iowa State)

    2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we have used first principles electronic structure methods to investigate the detailed contributions to the L{sub 3}/L{sub 2} branching ratio in the heavy rare earth elements. The calculations use the full potential, relativistic, linear augmented plane wave method with the LSDA+U approach for consideration of the local 4f electronic orbitals. With no spin orbit coupling (SOC) in the conducting bands, and with the same radial function for the 2p{sub 3/2} and 2p{sub 1/2} core states, the branching ratio (BR) is exactly 1:-1 for the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra of the ferromagnetic heavy rare earth metals. However, with full SOC the BR ranges from 1.5 to 6.0 in going from Gd to Er. The energy and spin dependence of the 5d radial functions are important. The results point to problems with modified atomic models which have been proposed to explain the BR. Recent x-ray resonant magentic scattering experiments on (Gd,Tb,Dy,Ho,Er,Tm)Ni{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} are discussed.

  6. Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=rare-earth metal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Tobash, Paul H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of rare-earth metal-magnesium-germanides RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) has been synthesized by reactions of the corresponding elements at high temperature. Their structures have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and belong to the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). Temperature dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime for all members of the family, excluding Y{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, Sm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, and Lu{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}. At cryogenic temperatures (ca. 60 K and below), most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases enter into an antiferromagnetic ground-state, except for Er{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Tm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, which do not undergo magnetic ordering down to 5 K. The structural variations as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals, following the lanthanide contraction, and the changes in the magnetic properties across the series are discussed as well. - Graphical Abstract: The structure of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) can be best viewed as 2-dimensional slabs of Mg and Ge atoms (anionic sub-lattice), and layers of rare-earth metal atoms (cationic sub-lattice) between them. Within this description, one should consider the Ge-Ge dumbbells (formally Ge{sup 6-}{sub 2}), interconnected with square-planar Mg atom as forming flat [MgGe{sub 2}] layers (z=0), stacked along the c-axis with the layers at z=1/2, made of rare-earth metal cations (formally RE{sup 3+}). Highlights: > RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) are new ternary germanides. > Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. > Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. > Most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases are antiferromagnetically ordered at cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Synthesis, Structures, and Magnetic Properties of Rare-Earth Cobalt Arsenides, RCo2As2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Corey [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Tan, Xiaoyan [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kovnir, Kirill [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL] [ORNL; Shatruk, Michael [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four rare-earth cobalt arsenides, RCo2As2 (R = La, Ce, Pr, Nd), were obtained by reactions of constituent elements in molten Bi. The use of Bi flux also allowed the growth of representative single crystals. All compounds are isostructural and belong to the ThCr2Si2 structure type (space group I4/mmm). The formation of Co vacancies is observed in all structures, while the structures of La- and Ce-containing compounds also show incorporation of minor Bi defects next to the R crystallographic site. Correspondingly, the general formula of these materials can be written as R1 xBixCo2 As2, with x/ = 0.03/0.1, 0.05/0.15, 0/0.2, and 0/0.3 for R = La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, respectively. All compounds exhibit high-temperature ferromagnetic ordering of Co magnetic moments in the range of 150-200 K. Electronic band structure calculations revealed a high peak in the density of states at the Fermi level, thus supporting the itinerant nature of magnetism in the Co sublattice. The magnetic ordering in the lanthanide sublattice takes place at lower temperatures, with the R moments aligning antiparallel to the Co moments to give a ferrimagnetic ground state. The measurements on oriented single crystals demonstrated significant magnetic anisotropy in the ferrimagnetic state, with the preferred moment alignment along the c axis of the tetragonal lattice. Neutron powder diffraction failed to reveal the structure of magnetically ordered states, but confirmed the presence of Co vacancies. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy on Ce1.95Bi0.05Co1.85As2 showed the average oxidation state of Ce to be +3.06. Solid state NMR spectroscopy revealed a substantially reduced hyperfine field on the Co atoms in the vicinity of Bi defects.

  8. Semi-microscopic description of the double backbending in some deformed even-even rare earth nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Budaca; A. A. Raduta

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A semi-microscopic model to study the neutron and proton induced backbending phenomena in some deformed even-even nuclei from the rare earth region, is proposed. The space of particle-core states is defined by the angular momentum projection of a quadrupole deformed product state. The backbending phenomena are described by mixing four rotational bands, defined by a set of angular momentum projected states, and a model Hamiltonian describing a set of paired particles moving in a deformed mean field and interacting with a phenomenological deformed core. The ground band corresponds to the configuration where all particles are paired while the other rotational bands are built on one neutron or/and one proton broken pair. Four rare earth even-even nuclei which present the second anomaly in the observed moments of inertia are successfully treated within the proposed model.

  9. A mathematical simulation of earth satellite explosion debris orbital elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mabrey, Wayne Edward

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    perspective: (1) By simulating the explosion of a satellite we mean that: given the knowledge of' the number of pieces and the force vector of each piece, we will simulate the resulting trajectories. (2) The simulation of a satellite trajectory... classical elements of each debris piece as a function of: (1) the trajectory of the center of mass of *he explosion debris and (2) the explosive forces. Computer program modules are developed to create an explosion and calculate the elements of each...

  10. Luminescent nanocrystals in the rare-earth niobate–zirconia system formed via hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori, E-mail: hirano@aitech.ac.jp; Dozono, Hayato

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminescent nanocrystals based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}, were hydrothermally formed as cubic phase under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. The lattice parameter of the as-prepared nanoparticles corresponding to the composition of Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7}–4ZrO{sub 2} that was estimated as a single phase of cubic gradually increased as the content of europium x increased. The existence of small absorbance peaks at 395 and 466 nm corresponding to the Eu{sup 3+7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}L{sub 6}, and {sup 7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}D{sub 2} excitation transition, respectively, was clearly observed in the diffuse reflectance spectra of the as-prepared samples containing europium. The optical band gap of the as-prepared samples was in the range from 3.5 to 3.7 eV. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium showed orange and red luminescences with main peaks at 590 and 610 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, under excitation at 395 nm Xe lamp. The emission intensity corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition increased as heat-treatment temperature rose from 800 to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract shows the excitation and emission spectra and a transmission electron microscopy image of nanocrystals (with composition based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}) formed via hydrothermal route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystals composed of 50 mol% Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2} was directly formed. • The nanocrystals were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. • The Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} showed an UV-blue and broad-band emission under excitation at 240 nm. • The emission is originated from the niobate octahedral group [NbO{sub 6}]{sup 7?}. • The nanocrystals showed orange and red luminescences ({sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} , Eu{sup 3+})

  11. Lateral color integration on rare-earth-doped GaN electroluminescent D. S. Lee and A. J. Steckla)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    and thermal robust- ness. GaN films were grown on p-type 111 Si substrate by molecular beam epitaxy MBE growth from solid sources. GaN:RE layers were typically grown for 1 h at either 100 or 400 °C substrateLateral color integration on rare-earth-doped GaN electroluminescent thin films D. S. Lee and A. J

  12. Polarization dependence of two-photon transition intensities in rare-earth doped crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Nguyen, An-Dien

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarization dependence technique has been developed as a tool to investigate phonon scattering (PS), electronic Raman scattering (ERS), and two-photon absorption (TPA) transition intensities in vanadate and phosphate crystals. A general theory for the polarization dependence (PD) of two-photon transition intensities has been given. Expressions for the polarization dependent behavior of two-photon transition intensities have been tabulated for the 32 crystallographic point groups. When the wavefunctions for the initial and final states of a rare-earth doped in crystals are known, explicit PD expressions with no unknown parameters can be obtained. A spectroscopic method for measuring and interpreting phonon and ERS intensities has been developed to study PrVO{sub 4}, NdVO{sub 4}, ErVO{sub 4}, and TmVO{sub 4} crystals. Relative phonon intensities with the polarization of the incident and scattered light arbitrarily varied were accurately predicted and subsequently used for alignment and calibration in ERS measurements in these systems for the first time. Since ERS and PS intensities generally follow different polarization curves as a function of polar angles, the two can be uniquely identified by comparing their respective polarization behavior. The most crucial application of the technique in ERS spectroscopy is the establishment of a stringent test for the Axe theory. For the first time, the F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} ratio extracted from the experimental fits of the ERS intensities were compared with those predicted by theories which include both the second- and third-order contributions. Relatively good agreement between the fitted values of F{sub 1}/F{sub 2} and the predicted values using the second-order theory has been found.

  13. Features of an intermetallic n-ZrNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with atoms of rare-earth metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V. A., E-mail: vromaka@polynet.lviv.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Ya. Pidstryhach Institute for Applied Problems of Mechanics and Mathematics (Ukraine); Fruchart, D.; Hlil, E. K. [CNRS, Institute Neel (France); Gladyshevskii, R. E. [Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Ukraine); Gignoux, D. [CNRS, Institute Neel (France); Romaka, V. V.; Kuzhel, B. S. [Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Ukraine); Krayjvskii, R. V. [Lvivska Politechnika National University (Ukraine)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal structure, density of electron states, electron transport, and magnetic characteristics of an intermetallic n-ZrNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with atoms of rare-earth metals (R) have been studied in the ranges of temperatures 1.5-400 K, concentrations of rare-earth metal 9.5 x 10{sup 19}-9.5 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}, and magnetic fields H {<=} 15 T. The regions of existence of Zr{sub 1-x}R{sub x}NiSn solid solutions are determined, criteria for solubility of atoms of rare-earth metals in ZrNiSn and for the insulator-metal transition are formulated, and the nature of 'a priori doping' of ZrNiSn is determined as a result of redistribution of Zr and Ni atoms at the crystallographic sites of Zr. Correlation between the concentration of the R impurity, the amplitude of modulation of the bands of continuous energies, and the degree of occupation of potential wells of small-scale fluctuations with charge carriers is established. The results are discussed in the context of the Shklovskii-Efros model of a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  14. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque CS, supplPment au nO. 6, Tome 41, juin 1980,page C5-297 INTERMEDIATE VALENCE : THEORETICAL MODELS FOR ANOFALOUS RARE-EARTH ALLOYS AND COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    temperature behaviour of compounds such as CeA12, CeA13 or TmSe . 1. Introduction.-The rare-earth metals is applied. The normal rare-earth metals have been extensively studied and already revie- wed in detail /1 VALENCE : THEORETICAL MODELS FOR ANOFALOUS RARE-EARTH ALLOYS AND COMPOUNDS B. Coqblin

  15. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supple'ment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979, page C5-54 Hyperfine fields of S-rare earth impurities in noble hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that the trivalent rare earth (e.g. Gd3+)contributes two s-p electrons, for monovalent hosts like noble metals fields of S-rare earth impurities in noble hosts A. Troper, 0.L. T. de Menezes and A. A. Gomes Centro previously developed for rare earth impurities diluted in s-p hosts [I]. Numerical results for the hyperfine

  16. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, supplkment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979,page C5-71 The de Haas-van Alphen effect and the Fermi surfaces of rare earth metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -van Alphen effect and the Fermi surfaces of rare earth metals R. C . Young Department of Physics, University (some transition metals, rare earths, inter- metallic compounds) it is difficult to achieve an & of even been achieved for Fermi surface investigation of rare earth metals. Substantial dHvA results have now

  17. Grant Helps Make U.S. Rare Earth Magnets More Common | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    magnets - which are not actually rare - and are used in hybrid vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. | Illustration Courtesy of of Electron Energy Corporation | With sintered...

  18. Characterization of ferromagnetic saturation at 4.2K of selected bulk rare earth metals for compact high-field superconducting cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norsworthy, Mark A. (Mark Andrew)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The saturation magnetization of the rare earth ferromagnetic metals gadolinium and holmium was investigated. Cylindrical samples were placed in a superconducting test magnet and induced magnetic field measured at various ...

  19. alkaline-earth elements studied: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alkaline-earth elements studied First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A theoretical study of...

  20. Preprint of the paper "A Boundary Element Numerical Approach for Earthing Grid Computation"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colominas, Ignasi

    ~na, SPAIN Abstract Analysis and design of substation earthing involves computing the equivalent re- sistance in the margin of error [4]. A Boundary Element approach for the numerical computation of substation grounding introduced in the BEM formulation to reduce computational cost for speci#12;c choices of the test and trial

  1. An x-ray absorption spectroscopic study of the electronic structure and bonding of rare-earth orthoferrites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.R.; Grosvenor, A.P. (Saskatchewan)

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare-earth orthoferrites, REFeO{sub 3} (RE=rare earth; Y), are tremendously adaptable compounds that are being investigated for use in a wide variety of applications including gas sensors, vehicle catalytic converters, and solid-oxide fuel cells. They also exhibit interesting magnetic properties such as high-temperature antiferromagnetism, making them useful for data storage applications. The compounds adopt a distorted perovskite-type structure where the tilt angle of the octahedra increases (Fe-O-Fe bond angle decreases) as the size of the rare-earth atom decreases. Despite intensive study of the physical properties of these compounds, very few studies have investigated how the bonding and electronic structure of these systems change with substitution of the RE. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a technique well-suited for such a study, and, in view of this, Fe L-, Fe K- and O K-edge spectra from a series of REFeO{sub 3} compounds (RE=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Ho, Yb, Y) have been collected, and are presented here. Fe L-edge spectra show that Fe is octahedrally coordinated and that the Fe-centered octahedra do not appear to distort with changes in the identity of the RE. The Fe K-edge spectra contain an intersite hybrid peak, which is an ill-studied feature that is attributed to non-local transitions of 1s electrons to 3d states on the next-nearest-neighbor atom that are hybridized with 4p states on the absorbing atom through O 2p states. In this study, it is shown that the intensity of this feature is strongly dependent on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle; the lower the Fe-O-Fe bond angle, the less intense the intersite hybrid peak is.

  2. Effects of Lorentz Symmetry Violation in the Spectra of Rare-Earth Ions in a Crystal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harabati, C; Flambaum, V V; Hohensee, M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that experiments measuring the transition energies of rare-earth ions doped in crystalline lattices are sensitive to violations of Local Lorentz Invariance and Einstein's Equivalence Principle. Using the crystal field of LaCl$_{3}$ as an example, we calculate the frame-dependent energy shifts of the transition frequencies between low-lying states of Ce$^{3+}$, Nd$^{3+}$, and Er$^{3+}$ dopants in the context of the Standard Model Extension, and show that they have high sensitivity to electron anomalies that break rotational invariance.

  3. Parity assignments in 172,174Yb using polarized photons and the K quantum number in rare earth nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Savran; S. Müller; A. Zilges; M. Babilon; M. W. Ahmed; J. H. Kelley; A. Tonchev; W. Tornow; H. R. Weller; N. Pietralla; J. Li; I. V. Pinayev; Y. K. Wu

    2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The 100 % polarized photon beam at the High Intensity gamma-ray Source (HIgS) at Duke University has been used to determine the parity of six dipole excitations between 2.9 and 3.6 MeV in the deformed nuclei 172,174 Yb in photon scattering (g,g') experiments. The measured parities are compared with previous assignments based on the K quantum number that had been assigned in Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) experiments by using the Alaga rules. A systematic survey of the relation between gamma-decay branching ratios and parity quantum numbers is given for the rare earth nuclei.

  4. Down Converter Device Combining Rare-Earth Doped Thin Layer and Photonic Crystal for c-Si Based Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deschamps, Thierry; Peretti, Romain; Lalouat, Loïc; Fourmond, Erwann; Fave, Alain; Guille, Antoine; Pereira, António; Moine, Bernard; Seassal, Christian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the study is to develop ultra-compact structures enabling an efficient conversion of single high energy photon (UV) to two lower energy photons (IR). The proposed structure combines rare-earths doped thin layer allowing the down-conversion process with a photonic crystal (PhC), in order to control and enhance the down-conversion using optical resonances. On the top of the rare-earths doped layer, a silicon nitride (SiN) 2D planar PhC is synthesized. For that, SiN is first deposited by PECVD. After holographic lithography and reactive ion etching, a periodic square lattice of holes is generated on the SiN layer. The PhC topographical parameters as well as the layers thickness are optimized using Finite-Difference-Time-Domain simulations. The design and realization of such PhC-assisted down-converter structures is presented. Optical simulations demonstrate that the PhC leads to the establishment of resonant modes located in the underneath doped layer, allowing a drastic enhancement of the absorption ...

  5. From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition and rare earth element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition, and S. Cravatte (2013), From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic waters (112 samples) in the Southern Tropical Pacific. The relatively detailed picture of these tracer

  6. Hydrogeochemistry and rare earth element behavior in a volcanically acidified watershed in Patagonia, Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    in Patagonia, Argentina Christopher H. Gammons a,*, Scott A. Wood b , Fernando Pedrozo c , Johan C. Varekamp d, ID, United States c Universidad del Comahue, Bariloche, Argentina d Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, United States e CONICET, Argentina Received 10 January 2005; received in revised form 9 May 2005

  7. The Effect of Rare Earth Elements, Temperature and Rolling Speed on the Microstructure Evolution of Magnesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    of Magnesium Jie Pan¹, supervised by Mehdi Sanjari¹ and Prof. Stephen Yue¹ ¹Department of Mining and Materials and neodymium additive samples were acquired then subsequently rolled at different temperatures (300°C and 450°C of the precipitate which led to a less pinning effect. ·The neodymium samples have longer grain growth period than

  8. Rare earth elements in the sediments of Lake Baikal Lawrence M. Och a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    as an example for early stage ocean formation (e.g. Crane et al., 1991; Granina et al., 2010). In addition, like most of the ocean, the water column of Lake Baikal is pervasively oxic with a constant chemical; Vologina and Sturm, 2009; Watanabe et al., 2009; Och et al., 2012), leads oxygen to penetrate deeply

  9. Rare Earth Elements--Critical Resources for High Technology U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , magnetic refrigeration) to futuristic (high- temperature superconductivity, safe storage and transport increased dramatically. The diverse nuclear, metallurgical, chemical, catalytic, electrical, magnetic from mundane (lighter flints, glass polishing) to high-tech (phosphors, lasers, magnets, batteries

  10. Stable isotope and Rare Earth Element evidence for recent ironstone pods within the Archean Barberton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hren, Michael

    (up to $200 m long) hematite and goethite ironstone bodies within the 3.2 to 3.5 Ga Barberton of goethite and hematite components of the ironstones to determine whether these deposits reflect formation. Goethite d18 O values range from À0.7 to +1.0& and dD from À125 to À146&, which is consistent

  11. Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartmentDRAFTEnergy Review - Today!

  12. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| Department ofServices » Environment »

  13. Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success| Department ofServices » Environment »for a Clean

  14. DOE Seeks Your Novel Ideas for Recovery of Rare Earth Elements from Coal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions andDefinition of Showerheadand Coal Byproducts |

  15. All-optical preparation of coherent dark states of a single rare earth ion spin in a crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Kangwei; Wang, Ya; Siyushev, Petr; Reuter, Rolf; Kornher, Thomas; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Wieck, Andreas D; Villa, Bruno; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All-optical addressing and control of single solid-state based qubits allows for scalable architectures of quantum devices such as quantum networks and quantum simulators. So far, all-optical addressing of qubits was demonstrated only for color centers in diamond and quantum dots. Here, we demonstrate generation of coherent dark state of a single rare earth ion in a solid, namely a cerium ion in yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG). The dark state was formed under the condition of coherent population trapping. Furthermore, high-resolution spectroscopic studies of native and implanted single Ce ions have been performed. They revealed narrow and spectrally stable optical transitions between the spin sublevels of the ground and excited optical states, indicating the feasibility of interfacing single photons with a single electron spin of a cerium ion.

  16. Testing Skyrme energy-density functionals with the QRPA in low-lying vibrational states of rare-earth nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Terasaki; J. Engel

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Although nuclear energy density functionals are determined primarily by fitting to ground state properties, they are often applied in nuclear astrophysics to excited states, usually through the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). Here we test the Skyrme functionals SkM* and SLy4 along with the self-consistent QRPA by calculating properties of low-lying vibrational states in a large number of well-deformed even-even rare-earth nuclei. We reproduce trends in energies and transition probabilities associated with gamma-vibrational states, but our results are not perfect and indicate the presences of multi-particle-hole correlations that are not included in the QRPA. The Skyrme functional SkM* performs noticeably better than SLy4. In a few nuclei, changes in the treatment of the pairing energy functional have a significant effect. The QRPA is less successful with "beta-vibrational" states than with the gamma-vibrational states.

  17. Theoretical Studies of Rare-Earth Nuclei leading to $_{50}$Sn-Daughter Products and the Associated Shell Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushil Kumar

    2012-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cluster decays of rare-earth nuclei are studied with a view to look for neutron magic shells for the $_{50}$Sn nucleus as the daughter product always. The $^{100}$Sn and $^{132}$Sn radioactivities are studied to find the most probable cluster decays and the possibility, if any, of new neutron shells. For a wide range of parent nuclei considered here (from Ba to Pt) $^{12}$C from $^{112}$Ba and $^{78}$Ni from $^{210}$Pt parent are predicted to be the most probable clusters (minimum decay half-life) referring to $^{100}$Sn and $^{132}$Sn daughters, respectively. Also, $^{22}$Mg decay of $^{122}$Sm is indicated at the second best possibilty for $^{100}$Sn-daughter decay. In addition to these well known magic shells (Z=50, N=50 and 82), a new magic shell at Z=50, N=66 ($^{116}$Sn daughter) is indicated for the $^{64}$Ni decay from $^{180}$Pt parent.

  18. A strong magneto-optical activity in rare-earth La{sup 3+} substituted M-type strontium ferrites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Feng; Liu Xiansong; Zhu Deru [Engineering Technology Research Center of Magnetic Materials, Anhui Province, School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Fernandez-Garcia, Lucia; Suarez, Marta; Luis Menendez, Jose [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO - Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-type strontium ferrites with substitution of Sr{sup 2+} by rare-earth La{sup 3+} were prepared by conventional ceramic technology. The structure, magnetic properties, and magneto-optical Kerr activity of Sr{sub 1-x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and magneto-optical ellipsometry, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that the samples sintered at 1290 deg. C for 3 h were single M-type hexagonal ferrites. The magnetic properties were remarkably changed due to the valence change of Fe ions induced by the substitution of La ions. Most significantly, an important magneto-optical activity was induced in the La{sup 3+} substituted M-type strontium ferrites around 3 eV.

  19. Theoretical study of native and rare-earth defect complexes in -PbF2 Huitian Jiang, Aurora Costales,* Miguel A. Blanco,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    and dielectric constants of PbF2 very well. The calculated formation energies for native defects suggestARTICLES Theoretical study of native and rare-earth defect complexes in -PbF2 Huitian Jiang, Aurora Costales,* Miguel A. Blanco, Mu Gu, and Ravindra Pandey Department of Physics, Michigan Technological

  20. 28th European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition 1.BO11.2 DOWN CONVERTER DEVICE COMBINING RARE-EARTH DOPED THIN LAYER AND PHOTONIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COMBINING RARE-EARTH DOPED THIN LAYER AND PHOTONIC CRYSTAL FOR C-SI BASED SOLAR CELL Thierry Deschamps1 of the spectrum, hence demonstrating the relevance of such an approach. Keywords: Thin Film Solar Cell reducing the use of raw material, meaning the PV cell cost. Concerning the crystalline silicon-based solar

  1. Novel kinds of down/up-conversion luminescent rare earth doped fluoride BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} microcrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Zhi-Yuan; Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn; Jia, Li-Ping

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: We achieve the liquid phase chemical synthesis of rare earth fluoride system BaMgF4: RE{sup 3+} microphosphors, which realize down/up-conversion luminescence. - Highlights: • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} microphosphors are firstly prepared by hydrothermal process. • Doped BaMgF{sub 4} nanosheets are firstly prepared by high temperature solution reaction. • The down-conversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. • The upconversion luminescence is realized in the rare earth doped BaMgF{sub 4}. - Abstract: In this paper, we realize the liquid-phase chemical synthesis of high-quality orthorhombic polycrystalline BaMgF{sub 4}: RE{sup 3+} (RE = Eu, Tb, Sm, Dy, Yb–Er/Tm) compounds with hydrothermal and high-temperature solution methods, respectively. The products from hydrothermal technology show the micrometer size while the products from hydrothermal technology present nanosheet morphology. The rare earth ions doped BaMgF{sub 4} from hydrothermal synthesis are discussed in details, which can realize the downconversion luminescence for doped Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} and upconversion luminescence for Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} (Tm{sup 3+}), respectively. To our knowledge, the hydrothermal or high temperature solution synthesis and photoluminescence (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} or Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}(Tm{sup 3+})) of these fluoride systems are firstly reported.

  2. Rare-earth transition-metal gallium chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7} (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudyk, Brent W.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Oliynyk, Anton O.; Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Six series of quaternary rare-earth transition-metal chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7} (M=Fe, Co, Ni; Ch=S, Se), comprising 33 compounds in total, have been prepared by reactions of the elements at 1050 °C (for the sulphides) or 900 °C (for the selenides). They adopt noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structures (ordered Ce{sub 3}Al{sub 1.67}S{sub 7}-type, space group P6{sub 3}, Z=2) with cell parameters in the ranges of a=9.5–10.2 Å and c=6.0–6.1 Å for the sulphides and a=10.0–10.5 Å and c=6.3–6.4 Å for the selenides as refined from powder X-ray diffraction data. Single-crystal structures were determined for five members of the sulphide series RE{sub 3}FeGaS{sub 7} (RE=La, Pr, Tb) and RE{sub 3}CoGaS{sub 7} (RE=La, Tb). The highly anisotropic crystal structures consist of one-dimensional chains of M-centred face-sharing octahedra and stacks of Ga-centred tetrahedra all pointing in the same direction. Magnetic measurements on the sulphides reveal paramagnetic behaviour in some cases and long-range antiferromagnetic behaviour with low Néel temperatures (15 K or lower) in others. Ga L-edge XANES spectra support the presence of highly cationic Ga tetrahedral centres with a tendency towards more covalent Ga–Ch character on proceeding from the sulphides to the selenides. Band structure calculations on La{sub 3}FeGaS{sub 7} indicate that the electronic structure is dominated by Fe 3d-based states near the Fermi level. - Graphical abstract: The series of chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaS{sub 7}, which form for a wide range of rare-earth and transition metals (M=Fe, Co, Ni), adopt highly anisotropic structures containing chains of M-centred octahedra and stacks of Ga-centred tetrahedra. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Six series (comprising 33 compounds) of chalcogenides RE{sub 3}MGaCh{sub 7} were prepared. • They adopt noncentrosymmetric hexagonal structures with high anisotropy. • Most compounds are paramagnetic; some show antiferromagnetic ordering. • Ga L-edge XANES confirms presence of cationic Ga species.

  3. Generation and Characterization of Anisotropic Microstructures in Rare Earth-Iron-Boron Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oster, Nathaniel

    2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to investigate methods in which anisotropy could be induced in fine-grained alloys. We have identified two general processing routes to creating a fine, textured microstructure: form an amorphous precursor and devitrify in a manner that induces texture or form the fine, textured microstructure upon cooling directly from the liquid state. Since it is possible to form significant amounts of amorphous material in RE-Fe-B alloys, texture could be induced through biasing the orientationof the crystallites upon crystallization of the amorphous material. One method of creating this bias is to form glassy material and apply uniaxial pressure during crystallization. Experiments on this are presented. All of the work presented here utilizes melt-spinning, either to create precursor material, or to achieve a desired final microstructure. To obtain greater control of the system to process these materials, a study was done on the effects of heating the wheel and modifying the wheel’s surface finish on glass formation and phase selection. The second general approach—creating the desired microstructure directly from the liquid—can be done through directional rapid solidification. In particular, alloys melt-spun at low tangential wheel speeds often display directional columnar growth through a portion of the ribbon. By refining and stabilizing the columnar growth, a highly textured fine microstructure is achieved. The effects of adding a segregating element (Ag) on the columnar growth are characterized and presented.

  4. Selecting the suitable dopants: electronic structures of transition metal and rare earth doped thermoelectric sodium cobaltate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assadi, M H N; Yu, A B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered Na0.75CoO2 is considered a prime candidate to achieve high efficiency thermoelectric systems to regenerate electricity from waste heat. In this work, three elements with outmost electronic configurations, (1) an open d shell (Ni), (2) a closed d shell (Zn), and (3) an half fill f shell (Eu) with a maximum unpaired electrons, were selected to outline the dopants' effects on electronic and crystallographic structures of Na0.75CoO2. Systematic ab initio density functional calculations showed that the formation energy of these dopants was found to be lowest when residing on sodium layer and ranked as -1.1 eV, 0.44 eV and 3.44 eV for Eu, Ni and Zn respectively. Furthermore Ni was also found to be stable when substituting Co ion. As these results show great harmony with existing experimental data, they provide new insights into the fundamental principle of dopant selection for manipulating the physical properties in the development of high performance sodium cobaltate based thermoelectric materials.

  5. On-the-fly machine-learning for high-throughput experiments: search for rare-earth-free permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusne, Aaron Gilad [University of Maryland; Gao, Tieren [University of Maryland; Mehta, Apurva [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ke, Liqin [Ames Laboratory; Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory; Antropov, Vladimir [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Long, Christian [University of Maryland; Takeuchi, Ichiro [University of Maryland

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced materials characterization techniques with ever-growing data acquisition speed and storage capabilities represent a challenge in modern materials science, and new procedures to quickly assess and analyze the data are needed. Machine learning approaches are effective in reducing the complexity of data and rapidly homing in on the underlying trend in multi-dimensional data. Here, we show that by employing an algorithm called the mean shift theory to a large amount of diffraction data in high-throughput experimentation, one can streamline the process of delineating the structural evolution across compositional variations mapped on combinatorial libraries with minimal computational cost. Data collected at a synchrotron beamline are analyzed on the fly, and by integrating experimental data with the inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD), we can substantially enhance the accuracy in classifying the structural phases across ternary phase spaces. We have used this approach to identify a novel magnetic phase with enhanced magnetic anisotropy which is a candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnet.

  6. Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K. [Glass Science and Technology Section, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata - 700 032 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

  7. Enhanced optical limiting effects in a double-decker bis(phthalocyaninato) rare earth complex using radially polarized beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jia-Lu; Gu, Bing, E-mail: gubing@seu.edu.cn; Liu, Dahui; Cui, Yiping, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [Advanced Photonics Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Sheng, Ning [Advanced Photonics Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Key Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry in Universities of Shandong, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jining University, Qufu 273155 (China)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting (OL) effects can be enhanced by exploiting various limiting mechanisms and by designing nonlinear optical materials. In this work, we present the large enhancement of OL effects by manipulating the polarization distribution of the light field. Theoretically, we develop the Z-scan and nonlinear transmission theories on a two-photon absorber under the excitation of cylindrical vector beams. It is shown that both the sensitivity of Z-scan technique and the OL effect using radially polarized beams have the large enhancement compared with that using linearly polarized beams (LPBs). Experimentally, we investigate the nonlinear absorption properties of a double-decker Pr[Pc(OC{sub 8}H{sub 17}){sub 8}]{sub 2} rare earth complex by performing Z-scan measurements with femtosecond-pulsed radially polarized beams at 800?nm wavelength. The observed two-photon absorption process, which originates from strong intramolecular ?–? interaction, is exploited for OL application. The results demonstrate the large enhancement of OL effects using radially polarized beams instead of LPBs.

  8. Optical and dielectric characteristics of the rare-earth metal oxide Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ordin, S. V., E-mail: stas_ordin@mail.ru; Shelykh, A. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide and their variations controlled by compositional defects are studied. The defects are anion vacancies produced on partial reduction of the oxide. Such defects exhibit features typical of quantum objects and have a profound effect on the optical transmittance spectrum, the character of conduction (insulator or semiconductor properties) and the order of magnitude of the permittivity {epsilon} (capable of varying from 11.2 to 125). The structural features of vacancies in the oxides are considered, and the effect of vacancies on the polarization, conductivity, and lattice vibrations is studied. The studies are carried out in the temperature range 200-900 K, the wavelength range 0.03-50 {mu}m, and the current frequency range 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} Hz. The rare-earth metal oxides attract interest for applications in microelectronics due to their high permittivity (several times higher than the permittivity of SiO{sub 2}) and, hence, the prospects for use of these oxides instead of SiO{sub 2}.

  9. Strong-coupling cavity QED using rare-earth-metal-ion dopants in monolithic resonators: What you can do with a weak oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAuslan, D. L.; Longdell, J. J.; Sellars, M. J. [Jack Dodd Centre for Photonics and Ultra-Cold Atoms, Department of Physics, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Laser Physics Centre, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of achieving the strong coupling regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics using rare-earth-metal-ions as impurities in monolithic optical resonators. We conclude that due to the weak oscillator strengths of the rare-earth-metals, it may be possible but difficult to reach the regime where the single photon Rabi frequency is large compared to both the cavity and atom decay rates. However, reaching the regime where the saturation photon and atom numbers are less than one should be much more achievable. We show that in this 'bad cavity' regime, transfer of quantum states and an optical phase shift conditional on the state of the atom is still possible and suggest a method for coherent detection of single dopants.

  10. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 1. Scandium Group (Sc, Y, La)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warsaw (Poland); Gumi?ski, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents an assessment of solubility data for rare earth metal fluorides (generally of trivalent metals and of CeF{sub 4}) in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were seldom studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or binary salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. The literature has been covered through the end of 2013.

  11. The interplay of long-range magnetic order and single-ion anisotropy in rare earth nickel germanides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Islam, Z.

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is concerned with the interplay of long-range order and anisotropy in the tetragonal RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = rare earth) family of compounds. Microscopic magnetic structures were studied using both neutron and x-ray resonant exchange scattering (XRES) techniques. The magnetic structures of Tb, Dy, Eu and Gd members have been determined using high-quality single-crystal samples. This work has correlated a strong Fermi surface nesting to the magnetic ordering in the RNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} compounds. Generalized susceptibility, {chi}{sub 0}(q), calculations found nesting to be responsible for both incommensurate ordering wave vector in GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, and the commensurate structure in EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}. A continuous transition from incommensurate to commensurate magnetic structures via band filling is predicted. The surprisingly higher T{sub N} in EuNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} than that in GdNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} is also explained. Next, all the metamagnetic phases in TbNi{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} with an applied field along the c axis have been characterized with neutron diffraction measurements. A mixed phase model for the first metamagnetic structure consisting of fully-saturated as well as reduced-moment Tb ions is presented. The moment reduction may be due to moment instability which is possible if the exchange is comparable to the low-lying CEF level splitting and the ground state is a singlet. In such a case, certain Tb sites may experience a local field below the critical value needed to reach saturation.

  12. Fiber-optic thermometer application of thermal radiation from rare-earth end-doped SiO{sub 2} fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsumata, Toru, E-mail: katsumat@toyo.jp; Morita, Kentaro; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Visible light thermal radiation from SiO{sub 2} glass doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu were studied for the fiber-optic thermometer application based on the temperature dependence of thermal radiation. Thermal radiations according to Planck's law of radiation are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu at the temperature above 1100 K. Thermal radiations due to f-f transitions of rare-earth ions are observed from the SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb at the temperature above 900 K. Peak intensities of thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} fibers increase sensitively with temperature. Thermal activation energies of thermal radiations by f-f transitions seen in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb doped SiO{sub 2} fibers are smaller than those from SiO{sub 2} fibers doped with Y, La, Ce, Pr, Eu, Tb, and Lu. Thermal radiation due to highly efficient f-f transitions in Nd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb ions emits more easily than usual thermal radiation process. Thermal radiations from rare-earth doped SiO{sub 2} are potentially applicable for the fiber-optic thermometry above 900 K.

  13. Influence of rare-earth ions on SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass structure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J. A.; Benmore, C. J.; Holland, D.; Du, J.; Beuneu, B.; Mekki, A. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Tennessee Space Institute); (Univ. of Warwick); (Univ.of North Texas); (Lab. Leon Brillouin); (King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals)

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Praseodymium and europium sodium silicate glasses of nominal composition (SiO{sub 2}){sub 0.70-x}(Na{sub 2}O){sub 0.30}(RE{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub x}, where RE is the rare earth and 0 {le} x {le} 0.10, were studied by neutron and high-energy x-ray scattering and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The observation of a significant x-ray intensity in doped as compared to un-doped glasses is indicative of RE-RE correlations at a distance of {approx} 3.7-3.9 {angstrom}, much shorter than would be expected for a homogeneous distribution, suggesting that clustering of the rare-earth cations occurs in both these glass systems at low concentrations. Above x = 0.075 (nominal), minimal changes in this region indicate that the RE atoms are incorporated much more randomly into the glass structure. The molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the rare-earth ions enter the sodium-rich regions in the sodium silicate glasses and act as modifiers. A cluster analysis performed on the model systems indicates that the tendency for clustering is higher in praseodymium-containing glasses than in the europium glasses.

  14. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enthusiastic employees: sustaining the Earth January 30, 2014 Green Teams work hard to make sustainable choices at home, at work The Lab has made many energy sustainable...

  15. NdHfSrPb isotopes and trace element geochemistry of Proterozoic lamproites from southern India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Asish R.

    compositions. The Krishna lamproites show nearly uniform, parallel rare earth element (REE) distribution,, Dalim K. Paul b a Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY India, a rare Proterozoic occurrence of lamproites which are usually Cretaceous or younger in age

  16. Deformation of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei produced with the SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam and studied with EXOGAM + DIAMANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redon, N.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Rosse, B.; Stezowski, O. [IPN Lyon, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Prevost, A. [IPN Lyon, IN2P3/CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CSNSM Orsay, IN2P3/CNRS, Bat 104, F-91405 Orsay Campus (France); Nolan, P.J.; Andreoiu, C.; Boston, A.J.; Descovich, M.; Evans, A.O.; Gros, S.; Norman, J.; Page, R.D.; Paul, E.S.; Rainovski, G.; Sampson, J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); France, G. de; Casandjian, J. M. [GANIL, B.P. 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France)] [and others

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the very neutron-deficient rare-earth nuclei has been investigated in the first experiment with the EXOGAM gamma array coupled to the DIAMANT light charged particle detector using radioactive beam of 76Kr delivered by the SPIRAL facility. Very neutron-deficient Pr, Nd and Pm isotopes have been populated at rather high spin by the reaction 76Kr + 58Ni at a beam energy of 328 MeV. We report here the first results of this experiment.

  17. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  18. Europium-activated phosphors containing oxides of rare-earth and group-IIIB metals and method of making the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium-activated phosphors comprise oxides of at least a rare-earth metal selected from the group consisting of gadolinium, yttrium, lanthanum, and combinations thereof and at least a Group-IIIB metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and combinations thereof. A method for making such phosphors comprises adding at least a halide of at least one of the selected Group-IIIB metals in a starting mixture. The method further comprises firing the starting mixture in an oxygen-containing atmosphere. The phosphors produced by such a method exhibit improved absorption in the UV wavelength range and improved quantum efficiency.

  19. Synthesis and crystal structure of the isotypic rare earth thioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}], and Nd[BS{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunger, Jens; Borna, Marija [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kniep, Ruediger, E-mail: kniep@cpfs.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared from mixtures of the rare earth (RE) metals together with amorphous boron and sulfur summing up to the compositions CeB{sub 3}S{sub 6}, PrB{sub 5}S{sub 9} and NdB{sub 3}S{sub 6}. The following preparation routes were used: solid state reactions with maximum temperatures of 1323 K and high-pressure high-temperature syntheses at 1173 K and 3 GPa. Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were also obtained from rare earth chlorides RECl{sub 3} and sodium thioborate Na{sub 2}B{sub 2}S{sub 5} by metathesis type reactions at maximum temperatures of 1073 K. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The thioborates are isotypic and crystallize in the orthorhombic spacegroup Pna2{sub 1} (No. 33; Z=4; Ce: a=7.60738(6)A, b=6.01720(4)A, c=8.93016(6)A; Pr: a=7.56223(4)A, b=6.00876(2)A, c=8.89747(4)A; Nd: a=7.49180(3)A, b=6.00823(2)A, c=8.86197(3)A) . The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of undulated kagome nets, which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species. - Abstract: Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure The isotypic orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared using different preparation routes. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of corrugated kagome nets (sketched with blue dotted lines), which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species.

  20. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    and rare earth elements, in combination with grain size distribution data, from a set of core-top sedimentsEarth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252­263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Earth and Planetary Science Letters www.elsevier.com/locate/epsl Eolian dust input to the Subarctic

  1. Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on Rare-Earth Research Critical Materials and Rare Futures: Ames Laboratory Signs a New Agreement on...

  2. Earth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet Update WinterEXPLANATIONScienceEarth

  3. Trace-element evidence for the origin of desert varnish by direct aqueous atmospheric deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    , Ni, Pb and the rare-earth elements (REEs). In particular, they have anomalously high Ce/La and low Y Nivedita Thiagarajan, Cin-Ty Aeolus Lee* Department of Earth Science, MS-126, Rice University, Houston, TX elemental fractionations. One remaining possibility is that the Fe, Mn and trace metals in varnish

  4. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Fischer, Donald F. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR).

  5. Iron-Nitride-Based Magnets: Synthesis and Phase Stabilization of Body Center Tetragonal (BCT) Metastable Fe-N Anisotropic Nanocomposite Magnet- A Path to Fabricate Rare Earth Free Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The University of Minnesota will develop an early stage prototype of an iron-nitride permanent magnet material for EVs and renewable power generators. This new material, comprised entirely of low-cost and abundant resources, has the potential to demonstrate the highest energy potential of any magnet to date. This project will provide the basis for an entirely new class of rare-earth-free magnets capable of generating power without costly and scarce rare earth materials. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate a prototype with magnetic properties exceeding state-of-the-art commercial magnets.

  6. MICROSTRUCTURE STUDY ON THE La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 AND RARE-EARTH OXIDE VERTICALLY ALIGNED NANOCOMPOSITE THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazariwala, Harshad

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    interfacial area where magnetoelectric coupling in BaTiO3:CoFe2O4 and BiFeO3:NiFe2O4, 3,4 and strain tuning in BiFeO3:Sm2O3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3:ZnO have been achieved. 5 In this work, epitaxial La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and rare-earth oxide nanocomposites have... interfaces. At the beginning of the project, we processed ceramic composite targets by following the standard solid state reaction and analyze the target crystalline properties in order to _______________ This thesis follows the style of Applied Physics...

  7. Rare?Earth?Free Permanent Magnets for Electrical Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn?Bi and M?type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Yang-Ki [University of Alabama] [University of Alabama; Haskew, Timothy [University of Alabama] [University of Alabama; Myryasov, Oleg [University of Alabama] [University of Alabama; Jin, Sungho [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego; Berkowitz, Ami [University of California San Diego] [University of California San Diego

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The research we conducted focuses on the rare-earth (RE)-free permanent magnet by modeling, simulating, and synthesizing exchange coupled two-phase (hard/soft) RE-free core-shell nano-structured magnet. The RE-free magnets are made of magnetically hard core materials (high anisotropy materials including Mn-Bi-X and M-type hexaferrite) coated by soft shell materials (high magnetization materials including Fe-Co or Co). Therefore, our research helps understand the exchange coupling conditions of the core/shell magnets, interface exchange behavior between core and shell materials, formation mechanism of core/shell structures, stability conditions of core and shell materials, etc.

  8. Characterizing the elements of Earth s radiative budget: Applying uncertainty quantification to the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Madison [ORNL; Zhuang, Zibo [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding and characterizing sources of uncertainty in climate modeling is an important task. Because of the ever increasing sophistication and resolution of climate modeling it is increasing important to develop uncertainty quantification methods that minimize the computational cost that occurs when these methods are added to climate modeling. This research explores the application of sparse stochastic collocation with polynomial edge detection to characterize portions of the probability space associated with the Earth s radiative budget in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Specifically, we develop surrogate models with error estimates for a range of acceptable input parameters that predict statistical values of the Earth s radiative budget as derived from the CESM simulation. We extend these results in resolution from T31 to T42 and in parameter space increasing the degrees of freedom from two to three.

  9. An iterative finite element time-domain method for simulating three-dimensional electromagnetic diffusion in earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Um, E.S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an axially symmetric earth for vertical magnetic dipoleDevelopment Grants from Earth Sciences Division. Editor Dr.electromagnetic diffusion in earth Evan Schankee Um, 1 Jerry

  10. An experimental study of the solubility and speciation of the Rare Earth Elements (III) in fluoride-and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    ). Moreover, most have been for neodymium-bearing species. Only one experimental study, Gammons et al. (2002 Cosmochimica Acta 73 (2009) 7087­7109 #12;were based on extrapolation of stability constants deter- mined

  11. Iron Isotope and Rare Earth Element Patterns of the Neoproterozoic Fulu Formation, South China: Implications for Late Proterozoic Ocean Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldbaum, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V. W. (1981). Chemical diagenesis in Narragansett Bayinfluences on the diagenesis of Beecher's Trilobite Bed andvalue unaffected by diagenesis. 4. Results and Discussion

  12. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, suppliment au no 8, Tome 39, aotit 1978, page C6-1379 LONG RANGE MAGNETIC ORDER I N THE SUPERCONDUCTING STATE OF HEAVY RARE EARTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MAGNETIC ORDER I N THE SUPERCONDUCTING STATE OF HEAVY RARE EARTH MOLYBDENUM SULFIDES AND THEIR PSEUDOTERNARY COMPOUNDS M. Ishikawa, 0. Fischer and J. Muller De'pmtement de Physique de Za MatiBre Condense Qgalement exposds. Abstract.- Various experimental evidences for long range magnetic order

  13. Crystal and electronic structures of CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type rare-earth copper zinc phosphides RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Pr, Nd, Gd-Tm, Lu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Peter E.R.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Cavell, Ronald G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada); Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2G2 (Canada)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quaternary rare-earth phosphides RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Pr, Nd, Gd-Tm, Lu) have been prepared by reaction of the elements at 900 {sup o}C, completing this versatile series which forms for nearly all RE metals. They adopt the trigonal CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure (Pearson symbol hP5, space group P3-bar m1, Z=1), as confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis on ErCuZnP{sub 2} and powder X-ray diffraction analysis on the remaining members. The Cu and Zn atoms are assumed to be disordered over the single transition-metal site. Band structure calculations on a hypothetically ordered YCuZnP{sub 2} model suggest a semimetal, with a zero band gap between the valence and conduction bands. This electronic structure is supported by XPS valence band spectra for RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Gd-Er), in which the intensity drops off smoothly at the Fermi edge. The absence of a band gap permits the electron count to deviate from the precise value of 16 e{sup -} per formula unit, as demonstrated by the formation of a solid solution in GdCu{sub x}Zn{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} (1.0{<=}x{<=}1.3), while still retaining the CaAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type structure. Because the Cu 2p XPS spectra indicate that the Cu atoms are always monovalent, the substitution of Cu for Zn leads to a decrease in electron count and a lowering of the Fermi level in the valence band. The magnetic susceptibility of RECuZnP{sub 2} (RE=Gd-Er), which obeys the Curie-Weiss law, confirms the presence of trivalent RE atoms. -- Graphical abstract: The absence of a band gap in the semimetallic quaternary rare-earth phosphides RECuZnP{sub 2} permits the formation of a solid solution such as GdCu{sub x}Zn{sub 2-x}P{sub 2} through hole-doping of the valence band. Display Omitted

  14. Partitioning of light lithophile elements during basalt eruptions on Earth and application to Martian shergottites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmonds, Marie

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    /La and pressure derived from H2O-CO2 saturation (not shown); this is due to both melt 315 heterogeneity inducing variable relationships between degassing and crystallization; and to 316 the effects of post-entrapment crystallization on CO2 sequestration into a... result in a much higher Dv m than 367 observed for terrestrial basalts. The anomalies are unlikely to be due to CO2 fluxing, as 368 observed in carbon-rich systems on Earth (Métrich and Wallace, 2008), as unreasonable 369 fluxes of CO2 would...

  15. Raman spectra of R{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R—rare earth) sesquioxides with C-type bixbyite crystal structure: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrashev, M. V., E-mail: mvabr@phys.uni-sofia.bg [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorov, N. D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, BG-1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Geshev, J. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Raman spectra of R{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R—Sc, Er, Y, Ho, Gd, Eu, and Sm) powders with C-type bixbyite crystal structure are measured. With the help of these data and ones, previously published for other oxides from the same structural family, general dependencies of the frequencies of the Raman peaks on the cubic crystal unit cell parameter are constructed. Using these dependencies and knowing the symmetry of the peaks for one of the oxides, determined from previous single-crystal measurements, it is possible to find out the symmetry of the peaks from the spectra of all compounds. It was found that the frequency of the six lowest frequency peaks scales with the square root of the mass of the rare earth showing that mainly R ions take part in these vibrations. These results agree with performed here lattice dynamical calculations. The anomalous softening of the frequency of some peaks in the spectra of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discussed.

  16. Magnetic ordering of divalent europium in double perovskites Eu{sub 2}LnTaO{sub 6} (Ln=rare earths)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misawa, Yoshitaka; Doi, Yoshihiro [Division of Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Hinatsu, Yukio, E-mail: hinatsu@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Division of Chemistry, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures and magnetic properties of double perovskite-type oxides Eu{sub 2}LnTaO{sub 6} (Ln=Eu, Dy-Lu) were investigated. These compounds adopt a distorted double perovskite structure with space group P2{sub 1}/n. Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, and {sup 151}Eu Moessbauer spectrum measurements show that the Eu{sup 2+} ions at the 12-coordinate sites of the perovskite structure are antiferromagnetically ordered at {approx}4 K, and that Ln{sup 3+} ions at the 6-coordinate site are in the paramagnetic state down to 1.8 K. - Graphical abstract: Magnetic properties of double perovskite-type oxides Eu{sub 2}LnTaO{sub 6} (Ln=Eu, Dy-Lu) were investigated. Magnetic susceptibility, specific heat, and {sup 151}Eu Moessbauer spectrum measurements show that the Eu{sup 2+} ions at the 12-coordinate sites of the perovskite structure are antiferromagnetically ordered at {approx}4 K. Highlights: > Crystal structures of double perovskites Eu{sub 2}LnTaO{sub 6} (Ln=rare earth) were determined. > We found that these compounds show an antiferromagnetic ordering at {approx}4 K. > The magnetic ordering is due to the interactions of Eu{sup 2+} ions. > It was elucidated by specific heat and {sup 151}Eu Moessbauer spectrum measurements.

  17. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252263 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    different geochemical tracers of eolian dust, 4 He, 232 Th and rare earth elements, in combination Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Eolian dust is a major driver in the global climateEarth and Planetary Science Letters 387 (2014) 252­263 Contents lists available at Science

  18. Synthesis of main group, rare-earth, and d{sup 0} metal complexes containing beta-hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Ka King [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of organometallic compounds containing the tris(dimethylsilyl)methyl ligand are described. The potassium carbanions KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} and KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA are synthesized by deprotonation of the hydrocarbon HC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3} with potassium benzyl. KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}TMEDA crystallizes as a dimer with two types of three-center-two-electron KH- Si interactions. Homoleptic Ln(III) tris(silylalkyl) complexes containing ?-SiH groups M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) are synthesized from salt elimination of the corresponding lanthanide halide and 3 equiv. of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The related reactions with Sc yield bis(silylalkyl) ate-complexes containing either LiCl or KCl. The divalent calcium and ytterbium compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) are prepared from MI{sub 2} and 2 equiv of KC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}. The compounds M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} react with 1 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to give 1,3- disilacyclobutane {Me2Si-C(SiHMe2)2}2 and MC(SiHMe2)3HB(C6F5)3L, and La{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}, respectively. The corresponding reactions of Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu) give the ?-SiH abstraction product [{(Me{sub 2}HSi){sub 3}C}{sub 2}LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}SiMe{sub 2}][HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}] (Ln = Y, Lu), but the silene remains associated with the Y or Lu center. The abstraction reactions of M{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2 }or TMEDA) and Ln{C(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}}{sub 3} (Ln = Y, Lu, La) and 2 equiv of B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} give the expected dicationic M{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2}L (M = Ca, Yb; L = THF{sub 2} or TMEDA) and dicationic mono(silylalkyl) LnC(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 3}{HB(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3}}{sub 2} (Ln = Y, Lu, La), respectively. Salt metathesis reactions of Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrX (X = Cl, I, OTf; R = t-Bu, SiHMe{sub 2}) and lithium hydrosilazide ultimately afford hydride products Cp{sub 2}(NR{sub 2})ZrH that suggest unusual ?-hydrogen elimination processes. A likely intermediate in one of these reactions, Cp{sub 2}Zr[N(SiHMe{sub 2})t-Bu][N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}], is isolated under controlled synthetic conditions. Addition of alkali metal salts to this zirconium hydrosilazide compound produces the corresponding zirconium hydride. However as conditions are varied, a number of other pathways are also accessible, including C-H/Si-H dehydrocoupling, ?-abstraction of a CH, and ?-abstraction of a SiH. Our observations suggest that the conversion of (hydrosilazido)zirconocene to zirconium hydride does not follow the classical four-center ?- elimination mechanism. Elimination and abstraction reactions dominate the chemistry of ligands containing ?- hydrogen. In contrast, Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}H and Cp{sub 2}Zr{N(SiHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}}Me undergo selective ?-CH bond activation to yield the azasilazirconacycle Cp{sub 2Zr}{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}}, even though there are reactive ?-hydrogen available for abstraction. The ?-SiH groups in metallacycle provide access to new pathways for sixteen-electron zirconium alkyl compounds, in which Cp{sub 2}Zr{?{sup 2}-N(SiHMe{sub 2})SiHMeCH{sub 2}} undergoes a rare ?-bond metathesis reaction with ethylene. The resulting vinyl intermediate undergoes ?-hydrogen abstraction to reform ethylene and a silanimine zirconium species that reacts with ethylene to give a metallacyclopentane as the isolated product. The pendent ?-SiH in metallocycle also reacts with paraformaldehyde through an uncatalyzed hydrosilylation to form an exocyclic methoxysilyl moiety, while the zirconium-carbon bond in metallocycle is surprisingly inert toward formaldehyde. Still, the Zr-C moiety in metallocycle is available for chemistry, and it interacts with the carbon monoxide and strong electrophile B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 3} to provide Cp{sub 2}Zr[?{sup 2}- OC(=CH{sub 2})SiMeHN(SiHMe

  19. RARE EARTHS--1999 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium million, lanthanum at 30 parts per million, and neodymium at 28 parts per million. Thulium and lutetium gadolinite) from a feldspar and quartz mine near the village of Ytterby, Sweden (Weeks and Leicester, 1968, p

  20. RARE EARTHS--1998 61.1 RARE EARTHS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium million, lanthanum at 30 parts per million, and neodymium at 28 parts per million. Thulium and lutetium gadolinite) from a feldspar and quartz mine near the village of Ytterby, Sweden (Weeks and Leicester, 1968, p

  1. K{sub 3}Ln[OB(OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[HOPO{sub 3}]{sub 2} (Ln=Yb, Lu): Layered rare-earth dihydrogen borate monohydrogen phosphates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Yan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Hoffmann, Stefan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Huang Yaxi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter; Menezes, Prashanth W.; Carrillo-Cabrera, Wilder; Sichelschmidt, Joerg [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mi Jinxiao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Kniep, Ruediger, E-mail: kniep@cpfs.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotypic layered rare-earth borate phosphates, K{sub 3}Ln[OB(OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[HOPO{sub 3}]{sub 2} (Ln=Yb, Lu), were synthesized hydrothermally and the crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction (R3-bar , Z=3, Yb: a=5.6809(2) A, c=36.594(5) A, V=1022.8(2) A{sup 3}, Lu: a=5.6668(2) A, c=36.692(2) A, V=1020.4(1) A{sup 3}). The crystal structure can be described in terms of stacking of Glaserite-type slabs consisting of LnO{sub 6} octahedra interlinked by phosphate tetrahedra and additional layers of [OB(OH){sub 2}]{sup -} separated by K{sup +} ions. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the magnetic susceptibility of the Yb-compound revealed Curie-Weiss paramagnetic behavior above 120 K ({mu}{sub eff}=4.7 {mu}{sub B}). Magnetic ordering was not observed down to 1.8 K. - Graphical abstract: Two isotypic layered rare-earth borate phosphates, K{sub 3}Ln[OB(OH){sub 2}]{sub 2}[HOPO{sub 3}]{sub 2} (Ln = Yb, Lu), were synthesized hydrothermally and the crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The structure can be described by stacking of Glaserite-type slabs and dihydrogen borate layers separated by potassium cations. Highlights: > First hydrothermal synthesis of rare-earth borate phosphates. > Instead of microcrystalline powders the synthesis of single crystals was achieved. > Successful single-crystal X-ray structure determination. > 2D arrangement of magnetic rare-earth ions. > EPR spectrum of Yb{sup 3+} at 5 K.

  2. Magnesium substitutions in rare-earth metal germanides with the Gd5Si4 type. Synthesis, structure determination and magnetic properties of RE5-xMgxGe4 (RE=Gd-Tm, Lu and Y)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobash, P H [UNIV. OF DE; Bobev, S [UNIV. OF DE

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of magnesium-substituted rare-earth metal germanides with a general formula RE{sub 5-x}Mg{sub x}Ge{sub 4} (x {approx} 1.0-2.3; RE =Gd-Tm, Lu, Y) have been synthesized by high-temperature reactions and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. These compounds crystallize with the common Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62; Z =4; Pearson's code oP36) and do not appear to undergo temperature-induced crystallographic phase transitions down to 120 K. Replacing rare-earth metal atoms with Mg, up to nearly 45 % at., reduces the valence electron count and is clearly expressed in the subtle changes of the Ge-Ge and metal-metal bonding. Magnetization measurements as a function of the temperature and the applied field reveal complex magnetic structures at cryogenic temperatures, and Curie-Weiss paramagnetic behavior at higher temperatures. The observed local moment magnetism is consistent with RE+ ground states in all cases. In the magnetically ordered phases, the magnetization cannot reach saturation in fields up to 50 kOe. The structural trends across the series and the variations of hte magnetic properties as a function of the Mg content are also discussed. KEYWORDS: Rare-earth intermetallics, germanides, crystal structure,Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4} type.

  3. Rare earth metal rich magnesium compounds RE{sub 4}NiMg (RE=Y, Pr-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu)-Synthesis, structure, and hydrogenation behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncel, Selcan [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Roquefere, Jean Gabriel; Stan, Cristina [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Bobet, Jean-Louis [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac Cedex (France)], E-mail: bobet@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr; Chevalier, Bernard [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac Cedex (France)], E-mail: chevalie@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr; Gaudin, Etienne [CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, ICMCB, 87 Avenue du Docteur Albert Schweitzer, F-33608 Pessac Cedex (France); Hoffmann, Rolf-Dieter; Rodewald, Ute Ch [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.de

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The rare earth metal rich compounds RE{sub 4}NiMg (RE=Y, Pr-Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) were synthesized from the elements in sealed tantalum tubes in an induction furnace. All compounds were investigated by X-ray diffraction on powders and single crystals: Gd{sub 4}RhIn type, space group F4-bar 3m, Z=16, a=1367.6(2) pm for Y{sub 4}NiMg, a=1403.7(3) pm for Pr{sub 4}NiMg, a=1400.7(1) pm for Nd{sub 4}NiMg, a=1386.5(2) pm for Sm{sub 4}NiMg, a=1376.1(2) pm for Gd{sub 4}NiMg, a=1362.1(1) pm for Tb{sub 4}NiMg, a=1355.1(2) pm for Dy{sub 4}NiMg, a=1355.2(1) pm for Ho{sub 4}NiMg, a=1354.3(2) pm for Er{sub 4}NiMg, a=1342.9(3) pm for Tm{sub 4}NiMg, and a=1336.7(3) pm for Lu{sub 4}NiMg. The nickel atoms have trigonal prismatic rare earth coordination. These NiRE{sub 6} prisms are condensed via common edges to a three-dimensional network which leaves voids for Mg{sub 4} tetrahedra and the RE1 atoms which show only weak coordination to the nickel atoms. The single crystal data indicate two kinds of solid solutions. The RE1 positions reveal small RE1/Mg mixing and some compounds also show Ni/Mg mixing within the Mg{sub 4} tetrahedra. Y{sub 4}NiMg and Gd{sub 4}NiMg have been tested for hydrogenation. These compounds absorb up to eleven hydrogen atoms per formula unit under a hydrogen pressure of 1 MPa at room temperature. The structure of the metal atoms is maintained with only an increase of the lattice parameters ({delta}V/V{approx}22%) if the absorption is done at T<363 K as at higher temperature a decomposition into REH{sub 2}-REH{sub 3} hydrides occurred. Moreover, the hydrogenation affects drastically the magnetic properties of these intermetallics. For instance, Gd{sub 4}NiMg exhibits an antiferromagnetic behavior below T{sub N}=92 K whereas its hydride Gd{sub 4}NiMgH{sub 11} is paramagnetic down to 1.8 K. - Graphical abstract: The Mg{sub 4} and NiGd{sub 6} units in Gd{sub 4}NiMg and Gd{sub 4}NiMgH{sub x}.

  4. New high pressure rare earth tantalates RE{sub x}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5+1.5x} (RE=La, Eu, Yb)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zibrov, Igor P., E-mail: zibrov@mail.ru [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kaluzhskoe Highway 14, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Filonenko, Vladimir P., E-mail: filv@hppi.troitsk.ru [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kaluzhskoe Highway 14, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, Nikolai D., E-mail: zakharov@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Werner, Peter, E-mail: werner@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Drobot, Dmitrii V., E-mail: dvdrobot@mail.ru [Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology, Prospect Vernadskogo 86, Moscow 119571 (Russian Federation); Nikishina, Elena E.; Lebedeva, Elena N., E-mail: helena_nick@mail.ru [Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology, Prospect Vernadskogo 86, Moscow 119571 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare earth tantalates La{sub 0.075}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.113}, Eu{sub 0.089}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.134} and Yb{sub 0.051}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.077} have been prepared by solid state reaction at P=7.0 GPa and T=1050–1100 °C and studied by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and electron microscopy. Low hydrated amorphous tantalum, lanthanum, europium and ytterbium hydroxides were used as starting materials. Aqueous as well as anhydrous compounds were obtained. Title tantalates are crystallized in the structure type of F–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} [Zibrov et al. Russ. J. Inorg. Chem. 48 (2003) 464–471] [5]. The structure was refined by the Rietveld method from X-ray powder diffractometer data: La{sub 0.075}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.113}, a=10.5099(2), b=7.2679(1), c=6.9765(1) Å, V=532.90(1) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, space group Ibam; Eu{sub 0.089}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.134}, a=10.4182(3), b=7.2685(1), c=6.9832(1) Å, V=528.80(2) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, space group Ibam; Yb{sub 0.051}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.077}, a=10.4557(2), b=7.3853(1), c=6.8923(1) Å, V=532.21(1) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, space group Ibam. RE atoms do not replace the tantalum in its positions but the only water in the channels of the structure. Highly charged cations RE{sup +3} compress the unit cell so that its volume becomes less than that of F–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Significant decrease of the unit cell volume after water removal from the structure is possible due to the puckering of pentagonal bipyramid layers and change of the corrugation angle in the layer. - Graphical abstract: The structure of RE{sub x}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5+1.5x} and its HRTEM image (“A” arrows show empty channel, “B” arrows show filled channel). - Highlights: • We synthesized new tantalates of RE under high pressure high temperature conditions. • RE atoms replace water molecules in the channels of the structure. • Aqueous as well as anhydrous tantalates were obtained. • Highly charged cations RE{sup +3} compress the unit cell decreasing RE–O distances.

  5. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ColZoque C8, suppldment au n08, Tome 43, aou't 1980, page C8-882 A P P L I C A T I O N S OF A M O R P H O U S Fe-, Co-METALLOID AND RARE EARTH ALLOY THIN FILMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A T I O N S OF A M O R P H O U S Fe-, Co-METALLOID AND RARE EARTH ALLOY THIN FILMS D.W. Forester, J. 20375, U.S. A. Abstract.- Amorphous thin films of transition metal (TM)-metalloid and TM-rare earth (R candidates for use as polar magneto- optic mirrors. INTRODUCTION Thin film technology is a very impor- tant

  6. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C2, suppl&mentau no 3, Tome 40, mars 1979,page C2-135 MOSSBAUER AND MAGNET1C MEASUREMENTS I N AMORPHOUS RARE EARTH-TRANS I T 1ON METAL F I LMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    AND MAGNET1C MEASUREMENTS I N AMORPHOUS RARE EARTH-TRANS I T 1ON METAL F I LMS T. Katayama, Y. Nishihara, Y perpendicular to the film phous rare earth-transition metal (R-T) films, being planes. But the spectra of B,., is the isomer shift relative to metallic iron, H the hyperfine field at the maximum proba&ility in P(H) curve

  7. JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE ColloqueC1, suppl4mentau nO 1 , Tome41,janvier 1980,page C1-25 ELECTRONIC R E W T I O N IN RARE EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS -A NON-KRAFZERS W P L E : m3+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    T I O N IN RARE EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS - A NON-KRAFZERS W P L E : m3+ N.S. Dixon, L.S. F r i t z , Y relaxation i n rare earth materials has been a subject of considerable i n t e r e s t i n recent years. Several metallic thulium compounds, Tm, TmA1, h C u , and Tm,Y1-xCu, were studied using MEssbauer

  8. Photoluminescence properties of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) activated NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite host lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asiri Naidu, S.; Boudin, S. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France); Varadaraju, U.V. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Raveau, B., E-mail: bernard.raveau@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoluminescence (PL) studies on NaIn{sub 1-x}RE{sub x}W{sub 2}O{sub 8}, with RE=Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} phases have shown that the relative contribution of the host lattice and of the intra-f-f emission of the activators to the PL varies with the nature of the rare earth cation. In the case of Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} activators, with yellow and blue emission, respectively, the energy transfer from host to the activator plays a major role. In contrast for Eu{sup 3+}, with intense red emission, the host absorption is less pronounced and the intra-f-f transitions of the Eu{sup 3+} ions play a major role, whereas for Tb{sup 3+} intra-f-f transitions are only observed, giving rise to green emission. - Graphical abstract: NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} double tungstate doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}and Tm{sup 3+} shows characteristic emission of intense red for Eu{sup 3+}, yellow for Dy{sup 3+}, green for Tb{sup 3+} and blue for Tm{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic emissions of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) are observed NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from host to the activators (Eu{sup 3+} Dy{sup 3+} Tm{sup 3+} is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL properties of rare earth ions depend on minor structural variations in the host lattice.

  9. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1988-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  10. Process to separate transuranic elements from nuclear waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing transuranic elements from a waste chloride electrolytic salt containing transuranic elements in addition to rare earth and other fission product elements so the salt waste may be disposed of more easily and the valuable transuranic elements may be recovered for reuse. The salt is contacted with a cadmium-uranium alloy which selectively extracts the transuranic elements from the salt. The waste salt is generated during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel associated with the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). 2 figs.

  11. Magnetic, dielectric, and magneto-dielectric properties of rare-earth-substituted Aurivillius phase Bi{sub 6}Fe{sub 1.4}Co{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 18}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, X. Z.; Yang, J., E-mail: jyang@issp.ac.cn; Yuan, B.; Tang, X. W.; Zhang, K. J.; Zhu, X. B.; Song, W. H.; Dai, J. M., E-mail: jmdai@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Song, D. P. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Sun, Y. P. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the magnetic, dielectric, and magnetodielectric properties of rare-earth-substituted Aurivillius phase Bi{sub 6}Fe{sub 1.4}Co{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 18}. The room-temperature ferromagnetic behavior is observed in all samples, and the rare-earth-substituted samples exhibit an enhanced magnetization. The weak ferromagnetism can be ascribed to the spin canting of the antiferromagnetic coupling of the Fe-based and Co-based sublattices via Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. The dielectric loss of all samples exhibits two dielectric relaxation peaks corresponding to two different relaxation mechanisms. One relaxation process with E{sub a}?=?0.5?eV is related to the hoping process of oxygen vacancies and the other one with E{sub a}?=?1.6?eV can be ascribed to the intrinsic conduction. The Gd-doped sample exhibits a remarkable magnetodielectric effect (9.4%) at RT implying this Aurivillius phase may be the potential candidate for magnetodielectric applications.

  12. Elemental compositions and monazite age patterns of core sediments in the Changjiang Delta: Implications for sediment provenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Shouye

    parameters of rare earth elements (cerium and europium anomalies) and elemental ratios Cr/Th, Nb/Co and Th rights reserved. Keywords: Changjiang; geochemistry; monazite; Tibetan Plateau; Quaternary 1 budget of the global ocean [1­8]. Furthermore, the basin mor- phology and regional fluvial patterns

  13. Microstructure study of the rare-earth intermetallic compounds R5(SixGe1-x)4 and R5(SixGe1-x)3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Qing

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique combination of magnetic properties and structural transitions exhibited by many members of the R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} family (R = rare earths, 0 ? x ? 1) presents numerous opportunities for these materials in advanced energy transformation applications. Past research has proven that the crystal structure and magnetic ordering of the R{sub 5(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} compounds can be altered by temperature, magnetic field, pressure and the Si/Ge ratio. Results of this thesis study on the crystal structure of the Er{sub 5}Si{sub 4} compound have for the first time shown that the application of mechanical forces (i.e. shear stress introduced during the mechanical grinding) can also result in a structural transition from Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type orthorhombic to Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type monoclinic. This structural transition is reversible, moving in the opposite direction when the material is subjected to low-temperature annealing at 500 ?C. Successful future utilization of the R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} family in novel devices depends on a fundamental understanding of the structure-property interplay on the nanoscale level, which makes a complete understanding of the microstructure of this family especially important. Past scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation has shown that nanometer-thin plates exist in every R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} (“5:4”) phase studied, independent of initial parent crystal structure and composition. A comprehensive electron microscopy study including SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), selected area diffraction (SAD), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of a selected complex 5:4 compound based on Er rather than Gd, (Er{sub 0.9Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4}, has produced data supporting the assumption that all the platelet-like features present in the R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} family are hexagonal R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 3} (“5:3”) phase and possess the same reported orientation relationship that exists for the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} and Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} compounds, i.e. [010](102?){sub m} || [101?0](12?11){sub p}. Additionally, the phase identification in (Er{sub 0.9}Lu{sub 0.1}){sub 5}Si{sub 4} carried out using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) techniques revealed that the low amount of 5:3 phase is undetectable in a conventional laboratory Cu K? diffractometer due to detection limitations, but that extremely low amounts of the 5:3 phase can be detected using high resolution powder diffraction (HRPD) employing a synchrotron source. These results suggest that use of synchrotron radiation for the study of R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} compounds should be favored over conventional XRD for future investigations. The phase stability of the thin 5:3 plates in a Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} sample was examined by performing long-term annealing at very high temperature. The experimental results indicate the plates are thermally unstable above 1200?C. While phase transformation of 5:3 to 5:4 occurs during the annealing, the phase transition is still fairly sluggish, being incomplete even after 24 hours annealing at this elevated temperature. Additional experiments using laser surface melting performed on the surface of a Ho{sub 5}(Si{sub 0.8}Ge{sub 0.}2){sub 4} sample showed that rapid cooling will suppress the precipitation of 5:3 plates. Bulk microstructure studies of polycrystalline and monocrystalline Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} compounds examined using optical microscopy, SEM and TEM also show a series of linear features present in the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 3} matrix, similar in appearance in many ways to the 5:3 plates observed in R{sub 5}(Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x}){sub 4} compounds. A systematic microscopy analysis of these linear features revealed they also are thin plates with a stoichiometric composition of Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} with an orthorhombic structure. The orientation relationship between the 5:3 matrix and the precipitate 5:4 thin plates was determined as [101?0] (12?11){s

  14. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electrolytes: IX, rare earth chlorides, nitrates, andU E OF AQUIFER RESPONSE TO EARTH TIDES AS A MEANS O F SLawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Earth Sciences Division, 1977.

  15. Life Before Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei A. Sharov; Richard Gordon

    2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; there was no intelligent life in our universe prior to the origin of Earth, thus Earth could not have been deliberately seeded with life by intelligent aliens; Earth was seeded by panspermia; experimental replication of the origin of life from scratch may have to emulate many cumulative rare events; and the Drake equation for guesstimating the number of civilizations in the universe is likely wrong, as intelligent life has just begun appearing in our universe. Evolution of advanced organisms has accelerated via development of additional information-processing systems: epigenetic memory, primitive mind, multicellular brain, language, books, computers, and Internet. As a result the doubling time of complexity has reached ca. 20 years. Finally, we discuss the issue of the predicted technological singularity and give a biosemiotics perspective on the increase of complexity.

  16. Ternary rare-earth ruthenium and iridium germanides RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu; M=Ru, Ir)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliynyk, Anton O.; Stoyko, Stanislav S.; Mar, Arthur, E-mail: arthur.mar@ualberta.ca

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through arc-melting reactions of the elements and annealing at 800 °C, the ternary rare-earth germanides RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} and RE{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} have been prepared for most of the smaller RE components (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu). In the iridium-containing reactions, the new phases RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2} were also generally formed as by-products. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structures (space group Cmcm, Z=4) for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) and monoclinic Sc{sub 2}CoSi{sub 2}-type structures (space group C2/m, Z=4) for RE{sub 2}IrGe{sub 2}. Full crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for all members of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2477(6) Å, b=10.7672(16) Å, c=13.894(2) Å for RE=Y; a=4.2610(3)–4.2045(8) Å, b=10.9103(8)–10.561(2) Å, c=14.0263(10)–13.639(3) Å in the progression of RE from Gd to Lu) and for Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (a=4.2937(3) Å, b=10.4868(7) Å, c=14.2373(10) Å). Both structures can be described in terms of CrB- and ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type slabs built from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. However, band structure calculations on Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} support an alternative description for RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} based on [M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}] layers built from linked MGe{sub 4} tetrahedra, which emphasizes the strong M–Ge covalent bonds present. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} generally indicates metallic behaviour but with low-temperature transitions visible for some members (RE=Gd, Tb, Dy) that are probably associated with magnetic ordering of the RE atoms. Anomalously, Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibits semiconductor-like behaviour of uncertain origin. Magnetic measurements on Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} reveal antiferromagnetic ordering at 3 K and several unusual field-dependent transitions suggestive of complex spin reorientation processes. - Graphical abstract: RE{sub 3}M{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (M=Ru, Ir) adopts the Hf{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}Si{sub 3}-type structure containing slabs built up from Ge-centred trigonal prisms. - Highlights: • Crystal structures of RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (RE=Y, Gd–Tm, Lu) and Tb{sub 3}Ir{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} were determined. • Strong M–Ge covalent bonds were confirmed by band structure calculations. • Most RE{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} members except Y{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} exhibit metallic behaviour. • Dy{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} displays unusual field-dependent magnetic transitions.

  17. The synthesis and crystal structures of the first rare-earth alkaline-earth selenite chlorides MNd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 8} (M=Ca and Sr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdonosov, P.S. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: psberd@inorg.chem.msu.ru; Olenev, A.V.; Dolgikh, V.A. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Lightfoot, P. [EaStChem, School of Chemistry, St. Andrews University, St. Andrews, KY16 9ST (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new alkaline-earth Nd selenite chlorides MNd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 8} (M=Ca, Sr) were obtained using crystal growth from alkaline-earth chloride melts in quartz tubes. These new compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic system in space group C cca (no. 68). The compounds were studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that both compounds adopt the same structure type, constructed by complex [M{sub 11}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}]{sup 8+} slabs separated by chloride anion layers perpendicular to the longest cell parameter. The SeO{sub 3} groups show a pyramidal shape and may be described as SeO{sub 3}E tetrahedra. Such SeO{sub 3} groups decorate the Nd-O skeletons forming the [M{sub 11}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}]{sup 8+} slabs. - Graphical abstract: Two new alkaline-earth Nd selenite chlorides MNd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 8} (M=Ca, Sr) were synthesized. These structures are constructed by [M{sub 11}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}]{sup 8+} slabs separated by chloride anion layers.

  18. ELSEVIER Earth and Planetary Science Letters 167 (1999) 335345 Trace element distributions in the chalcopyrite wall of a black smoker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the chalcopyrite wall of a black smoker chimney: insights from laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass precipitation within those walls. Here, we utilise a combination of high sensitivity ICPMS and UV laser ablation Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: trace elements; sulfides; hydrothermal vents; laser

  19. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(03)00495-2 Carbonate Complexation of Yttrium and the Rare Earth Elements in Natural Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    1 [MCO3 ][H ][M3 ] 1 [HCO3 ] 1 and CO3 H 2 [M(CO3)2 ][H ]2 [M3 ] 1 [HCO3 ] 2 , have very similar dependencies on ionic strength because the reaction MCO3 HCO3 ºM(CO3)2 H is isocoulombic. Potentiometric complexation is gener- ally dominated by the formation of carbonate complexes MCO3 and M(CO3)2 (Byrne

  20. Rare-earth metal gallium silicides via the gallium self-flux method. Synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties of RE(Ga1–xSix)? (RE=Y, La–Nd, Sm, Gd–Yb, Lu)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darone, Gregory M.; Hmiel, Benjamin; Zhang, Jiliang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Saha, Shanta; Kirshenbaum, Kevin; Greene, Richard; Paglione, Johnpierre [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen ternary rare-earth metal gallium silicides have been synthesized using molten Ga as a molten flux. They have been structurally characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction to form with three different structures—the early to mid-late rare-earth metals RE=La–Nd, Sm, Gd–Ho, Yb and Y form compounds with empirical formulae RE(GaxSi1–x)? (0.38?x?0.63), which crystallize with the tetragonal ?-ThSi? structure type (space group I4?/amd, No. 141; Pearson symbol tI12). The compounds of the late rare-earth crystallize with the orthorhombic ?-GdSi? structure type (space group Imma, No. 74; Pearson symbol oI12), with refined empirical formula REGaxSi2–x–y (RE=Ho, Er, Tm; 0.33?x?0.40, 0.10?y?0.18). LuGa?.?????Si?.????? crystallizes with the orthorhombic YbMn?.??Si?.?? structure type (space group Cmcm, No. 63; Pearson symbol oC24). Structural trends are reviewed and analyzed; the magnetic susceptibilities of the grown single-crystals are presented. - Graphical abstract: This article details the exploration of the RE–Ga–Si ternary system with the aim to systematically investigate the structural “boundaries” between the ?-ThSi? and ?-GdSi?-type structures, and studies of the magnetic properties of the newly synthesized single-crystalline materials. Highlights: • Light rare-earth gallium silicides crystallize in ?-ThSi? structure type. • Heavy rare-earth gallium silicides crystallize in ?-GdSi? structure type. • LuGaSi crystallizes in a defect variant of the YbMn?.??Si?.?? structure type.

  1. ANISO TROPIE ET MAGNETOSTRICTION MAGNETOCRYS T A L L N AM SOTROPYIN RARE EARTHSANDTHEIRALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . -Magnetocrystalline anisotropy of rare earth impurities doped in Gd metal was measured by torque method constants of rare earth metals was first attempted by Liu and al. [I]for Dy through the observation determination of the aniso- tropy constants. In the present experiments, one species of rare earth metals

  2. Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria (Winchester, MA); Liu, Wei (Cambridge, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reduction process for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO.sub.2 -containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO.sub.2 to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(OF.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1)n].sub.1-k M.sub.k, [(FO.sub.2).sub.1-n (RO.sub.1.5).sub.n ].sub.1-k M.sub.k, or [Ln.sub.x Zr.sub.1-x O.sub.2-0.5x ].sub.1-k M.sub.k wherein FO.sub.2 is a fluorite-type oxide; RO represents an alkaline earth oxide; RO.sub.1.5 is a Group IIIB or rare earth oxide; Ln is a rare earth element having an atomic number from 57 to 65 or mixtures thereof; M is a transition metal or a mixture of transition metals; n is a number having a value from 0.0 to 0.35; k is a number having a value from 0.0 to about 0.5; and x is a number having a value from about 0.45 to about 0.55.

  3. Tin oxide thick film by doping rare earth for detecting traces of CO{sub 2}: Operating in oxygen-free atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Ya; Zhang, Guozhu; Zhang, Shunping; Zeng, Dawen; Xie, Changsheng, E-mail: csxie@mail.hust.edu.cn

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • La, Gd, and Lu doped SnO{sub 2} with their sensing properties toward CO{sub 2} were compared. • The microstructures of SnO{sub 2}-based nanoparticles were elaborately characterized. • La-SnO{sub 2} thick film shows superior response toward trace ppm CO{sub 2}. • Our sensing material can be recommended to employ in oxygen-free environment. - Abstract: SnO{sub 2} thick films doped with atomic ratios ranging from 0 up to 8 at.% La, 8 at.% Gd, 8 at.% Lu were fabricated, respectively, via hydrothermal and impregnation methods. The crystal phase, morphology, and chemical composition of the SnO{sub 2}-based nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, EDX, HRTEM and XPS. Sensing properties of La-SnO{sub 2}, Gd-SnO{sub 2}, Lu-SnO{sub 2} films, as well as the pure SnO{sub 2} film, were analyzed toward CO{sub 2} in the absence of O{sub 2}. It was found that the optimal doping element was La and the best doping ratio was 4 at.%. The maximum response appeared at an operating temperature of 250 °C, on which condition the 4 at.% La-SnO{sub 2} exhibited a remarkable improvement of response from 5.12 to 29.8 when increasing CO{sub 2} concentration from 50 to 500 ppm. Furthermore, the working mechanism underlying such enhancement in CO{sub 2}-sensing functions by La additive in the absence of O{sub 2} was proposed and discussed.

  4. Modeling of optical amplifier waveguide based on silicon nanostructures and rare earth ions doped silica matrix gain media by a finite-difference time-domain method: comparison of achievable gain with Er3+ or Nd3+ ions dopants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardin, Julien; Dufour, Christian; Gourbilleau, Fabrice

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study of the gain achievement is performed in a waveguide optical amplifier whose active layer is constituted by a silica matrix containing silicon nanograins acting as sensitizer of either neodymium ions (Nd 3+) or erbium ions (Er 3+). Due to the large difference between population levels characteristic times (ms) and finite-difference time step (10 --17 s), the conventional auxiliary differential equation and finite-difference time-domain (ADE-FDTD) method is not appropriate to treat such systems. Consequently, a new two loops algorithm based on ADE-FDTD method is presented in order to model this waveguide optical amplifier. We investigate the steady states regime of both rare earth ions and silicon nanograins levels populations as well as the electromagnetic field for different pumping powers ranging from 1 to 10 4 mW.mm-2. Furthermore, the three dimensional distribution of achievable gain per unit length has been estimated in this pumping range. The Nd 3+ doped waveguide shows a higher gross...

  5. Effect of Mn doping on structural and magnetic susceptibility of C-type rare earth nano oxides Er{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiba, Zein K. [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt) [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Taif University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr, E-mail: mbm1977@yahoo.com [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Fuess, H. [Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)] [Materials Science, Darmstadt University of Technology, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Er{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x}·O{sub 3} (0.0 ? x ? 0.20) prepared by sol–gel method. ? The change in lattice parameter is not linear with x due to the change in crystallite size with doping. ? Anomalous concentration dependence is found in magnetic susceptibility. ? The effective magnetic moment ?{sub eff} is found to decrease with composition parameter x. ? Superexchange interactions between Er ions depending on the amount of Mn or Er in different sites. -- Abstract: The manganese doped rare earth oxides Er{sub 2?x}Mn{sub x} O{sub 3} (0.0 ? x ? 0.20) were synthesized by a sol–gel process and analyzed by X-ray diffraction using Rietveld refinement methods. A single phase solid solution is formed up to x = 0.15 while for x ? 0.2 a manganese oxide phase appears in the diffraction pattern. Preferential cationic distribution between the non-equivalent sites 8b and 24d of space group Ia3{sup ¯} is found for all samples but to a different extent. The octahedral volume and average bond length of Er{sub 1}-O for 8b site decrease while both octahedral volume and bond length of Er{sub 2}-O for 24d site increase. Magnetization measurements were done in the temperature range 5–300 K. The effective magnetic moment ?{sub eff} is found to decrease with composition parameter x, except for sample x = 0.05 where the magnetization is enhanced. The Curie-Weiss paramagnetic temperatures indicate antiferromagnetic interaction.

  6. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spark  Plasma  Sintering..powders,   spark   plasma   sintering,   and   glass-­?25-­?0189).       2.1.5  Spark  Plasma  Sintering   Powder  

  7. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and   the   short   circuit   current   (I SC ),   allows  below  the   short   circuit   current   to   above   the  potential.  Short  circuit  currents  will  be  negative  

  8. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry,  defect  equilibria,  and  transport  processes  in  the  material.     1.1.1  Electrochemical  Energy  Storage  and  Conversion  

  9. Mixed Conduction in Rare-Earth Phosphates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Hannah Leung

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scale   energy   storage   technologies.     Energy  install   energy   storage   technologies   to   stabilize  energy   storage   and   conversion   technologies   such  

  10. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    94 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology Degree options MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint placement. * The Geology and Environmental Earth Sciences degrees are accredited by the Geological Society

  11. Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo for the Gold inDepartmentGood

  12. Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 BudgetGoals and Requirements Goals and RequirementsOtherGood

  13. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  14. HISTORY OF THE ORIGIN OF THE CHEMICAL ELEMENTS AND THEIR DISCOVERIES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the chemical elements show a wide diversity with some of these elements having their origin in antiquity. Still other elements have been synthesized within the past fifty years via nuclear reactions on heavy elements, because these other elements are unstable and radioactive and do not exist in nature. The names of the elements come from many sources including mythological concepts or characters; places, areas or countries; properties of the element or its compounds, such as color, smell or its inability to combine; and the names of scientists. There are also some miscellaneous names as well as some obscure names for particular elements. The claim of discovery of an element has varied over the centuries. Many claims, e.g., the discovery of certain rare earth elements of the lanthanide series, involved the discovery of a mineral ore from which an element was later extracted. The honor of discovery has often been accorded not to the person who first isolated the element but to the person who discovered the original mineral itself, even when the ore was impure and contained many elements. The reason for this is that in the case of these rare earth elements, the ''earth'' now refers to oxides of a metal not to the metal itself. This fact was not realized at the time of their discovery, until the English chemist Humphry Davy showed that earths were compounds of oxygen and metals in 1808. In the early discoveries, the atomic weight of an element and spectral analysis of the element were not available. Later both of these elemental properties would be required before discovery of the element would be accepted. In general, the requirements for discovery claims have tightened through the years and claims that were previously accepted would no longer meet the minimum constraints now imposed. There are cases where the honor of discovery is not given to the first person to actually discover the element but to the first person to claim the discovery in print. If a publication was delayed, the discoverer has often historically been ''scooped'' by another scientist.

  15. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  16. NO HEAVY-ELEMENT DISPERSION IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Judith G., E-mail: jlc@astro.caltech.edu [Palomar Observatory, Mail Stop 249-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Although there have been recent claims that there is a large dispersion in the abundances of the heavy neutron capture elements in the old Galactic globular cluster M92, we show that the measured dispersion for the absolute abundances of four of the rare earth elements within a sample of 12 luminous red giants in M92 ({<=}0.07 dex) does not exceed the relevant sources of uncertainty. As expected from previous studies, the heavy elements show the signature of the r-process. Their abundance ratios are essentially identical to those of M30, another nearby globular cluster of similar metallicity.

  17. activated bleaching earth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    earth implanted GaN CERN Preprints Summary: This paper reviews the current knowledge on rare earths (REs) implanted into GaN with a special focus on their lattice location and on...

  18. Earth's Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: From Mongolia, land of fermented mare's milk, comes this beguiling morsel of nomadic oral tradition. It's called yertonciin gorav or Earth's Three. Earth's three what? Well, Earth's three top things in a number of categories...

  19. Galactic Cosmochronometry from Radioactive Elements in the Spectra of Very Old Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sneden; J. E. Lawler; J. J. Cowan

    2001-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a short review of neutron-capture elemental abundances in Galactic halo stars, emphasis is placed on the use of these elements to estimate the age of the Galactic halo. Two prominent characteristics of neutron-capture elements in halo stars are their large star-to-star scatter in the overall abundance level with respect to lighter elements, and the dominance of r-process abundance patterns at lowest stellar metallicities. The r-process abundance signature potentially allows the direct determination of the age of the earliest Galactic halo nucleosynthesis events, but further developments in r-process theory, high resolution spectroscopy of very metal-poor stars, and in basic atomic data are needed to narrow the uncertainties in age estimates. Attention is brought to the importance of accurate transition probabilities in neutron-capture element cosmochronometry. Recent progress in the transition probabilities of rare earth elements is discussed, along with suggestions for future work on other species.

  20. Earth Sciences Environmental Earth Sciences,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    84 Earth Sciences­ Environmental Earth Sciences, Geology MGeol (Single Honours Degrees) Earth Sciences BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Environmental Earth Sciences Geology BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) and among the most research-intensive in Europe. Features * The Department of Earth and Environmental

  1. Introduction to carbon physics Carbon is in many ways a unique element. Most importantly, it is crucial for life on earth as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    5 Chapter 2 Introduction to carbon physics Carbon is in many ways a unique element. Most out of carbon. Scientifically, the whole huge field of organic chemistry deals entirely with carbon-based compounds; and in the field of physics carbon is one of the most intensively studied materials. There even

  2. Toward Control of Matter: Basic Energy Science Needs for a New Class of X-Ray Light Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenholz, Elke

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a variety of both rare earth and transition metal elements [of transition metals and rare earths, respectively. Thein transition-metal-oxide and rare-earth compounds. Strong

  3. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C5, suppKment au no 5, Tome 40, Mai 1979, page C5-24 Nonlinear s-f exchange interaction effect and magnetic properties of rare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -f exchange interaction effect and magnetic properties of rare earth metals K. Kaino and T. Kasuya. Introduction. - Rare earth metals are known as the most typical materials in which the s-f exchange model electrons in rare earth metals is the existenceof the flat surfaceperpendicular to c-axis [3], which

  4. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  5. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  6. Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Terry

    #12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12 #12;First shell Second shell Third shell Hydrogen 1H Lithium 3Li Sodium 11Na Beryllium 4Be Magnesium energy Higher energy (a) A ball bouncing down a flight of stairs provides an analogy for energy levels

  7. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2004. Yttrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-ray-intensifying screens. Yttrium also was used, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous-casting nozzles, jet engine coatings in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding, medical and dental surgical

  8. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-ray-intensifying screens. Yttrium also was used, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous-casting nozzles, jet engine coatings in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding, medical and dental surgical

  9. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in phosphors used in color televisions and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature-resistant and corrosion-resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous casting was an important component in yttrium-aluminum garnets (YAG) laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  10. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnsite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    televisions and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and x-resistant and corrosion-resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  11. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-ray-intensifying screens, seals and bearings, high- temperature refractories for continuous-casting nozzles, jet engine coatings in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding, medical and dental surgical

  12. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    communications, distance and temperature sensing, industrial cutting and welding, nonlinear optics televisions and computer monitors, temperature sensors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, and x-ray-intensifying screens. Yttria-stabilized zirconia was used in alumina-zirconia abrasives, bearings and seals, high-temperature

  13. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , temperature sensors, and X-ray intensifying screens. As a stabilizer in zirconia, yttrium was used in wear-resistant and corrosion-resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high- temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  14. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , temperature sensors, and X-ray intensifying screens. As a stabilizer in zirconia, yttrium was used in wear-resistant and corrosion-resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  15. [Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted] Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    communications, distance and temperature sensing, industrial cutting and welding, nonlinear optics televisions and computer monitors, temperature sensors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, and x-ray-intensifying screens. Yttria-stabilized zirconia was used in alumina-zirconia abrasives, bearings and seals, high-temperature

  16. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-ray-intensifying screens, seals and bearings, high- temperature refractories for continuous-casting nozzles, jet engine coatings in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding, medical and dental surgical

  17. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2005. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    televisions and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-resistant and corrosion-resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  18. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2007. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    televisions and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-resistant and corrosion- resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium- aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  19. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2006. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    televisions and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and X-resistant and corrosion- resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium- aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  20. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used in color televisions and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors-resistant and corrosion-resistant cutting tools, seals and bearings, high-temperature refractories for continuous was an important component in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding

  1. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2009. All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    communications, distance and temperature sensing, industrial cutting and welding, nonlinear optics televisions and computer monitors, temperature sensors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, and x-ray-intensifying screens. Yttria-stabilized zirconia was used in alumina-zirconia abrasives, bearings and seals, high-temperature

  2. (Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and computer monitors, trichromatic fluorescent lights, temperature sensors, and x-ray-intensifying screens, seals and bearings, high- temperature refractories for continuous-casting nozzles, jet engine coatings in yttrium-aluminum garnet laser crystals used in industrial cutting and welding, medical and dental surgical

  3. Experimental determination of CePO4 and YPO4 solubilities in H2O-NaF at 800°C and 1 GPa: Implications for rare earth element transport in high-grade metamorphic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tropper, P; Manning, CE; Harlov, DE

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Mineralogy and Petrology, 119, 213–23. Bohlen SR (1984)Nadu, India. Journal of Petrology, 48, Harlov DE, Wirth R (SW Sweden. Journal of Petrology, 47, 3–33. Harrison TM,

  4. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  5. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  6. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fleischhauer, Grier S. (Midlothian, VA); Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Richmond, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  7. Iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, V.K.; Deevi, S.C.; Fleischhauer, G.S.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Lilly, A.C. Jr.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, {<=}1% Cr and either {>=}0.05% Zr or ZrO{sub 2} stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or {>=}0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, {<=}2% Ti, {<=}2% Mo, {<=}1% Zr, {<=}1% C, {<=}0.1% B, {<=}30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, {<=}1% rare earth metal, {<=}1% oxygen, {<=}3% Cu, balance Fe. 64 figs.

  8. 146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    146 Earth Science 147 Earth Science ESCI 101 The Earth or ESCI 102 Evolution of the Earth or ESCI 107 Oceans and Global Change or ESCI 108 Crises of the Earth ESCI 105 Introductory Lab for Earth Geophysics I ESCI 444 Exploration Geophysics II or ESCI 446 Solid Earth Geophysics Math and Other Sciences

  9. Situ Discovery Electrostatic Potential, Trapping Electrons and Mediating Fast Reconnection Earth's Magnetotail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan

    Situ Discovery Electrostatic Potential, Trapping Electrons and Mediating Fast Reconnection Earth phase distributions, measured Wind spacecraft a rare crossing diffusion region in Earth's magnetotail, the presence a strong electrostatic potential within ion diffusion region is revealed. potential reaching

  10. Improved Laboratory Transition Probabilities for Ce II, Application to the Cerium Abundances of the Sun and Five r-process Rich, Metal-Poor Stars, and Rare Earth Lab Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawler, J E; Cowan, J J; Ivans, I I; Hartog, E A Den

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent radiative lifetime measurements accurate to +/- 5% using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) on 43 even-parity and 15 odd-parity levels of Ce II have been combined with new branching fractions measured using a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to determine transition probabilities for 921 lines of Ce II. This improved laboratory data set has been used to determine a new solar photospheric Ce abundance, log epsilon = 1.61 +/- 0.01 (sigma = 0.06 from 45 lines), a value in excellent agreement with the recommended meteoritic abundance, log epsilon = 1.61 +/- 0.02. Revised Ce abundances have also been derived for the r-process-rich metal-poor giant stars BD+17 3248, CS 22892-052, CS 31082-001, HD 115444 and HD 221170. Between 26 and 40 lines were used for determining the Ce abundance in these five stars, yielding a small statistical uncertainty of 0.01 dex similar to the Solar result. The relative abundances in the metal-poor stars of Ce and Eu, a nearly pure r-process element in the Sun, matches r-process ...

  11. The Search for Heavy Elements

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1994 documentary "The Search for Heavy Elements" chronicles the expansion of the periodic table through the creation at Berkeley Lab of elements heavier than uranium. The documentary features a mix of rarely-seen archival footage, historical photos, and interviews with scientists who made history, such as Glenn Seaborg and Albert Ghiorso.

  12. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  13. alkaline earth lithium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

  14. Rare Iron Oxide in Ancient Chinese Pottery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,AssistanceRare Earth Metals

  15. Earth's Magnetosphere

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational Earth Science SHARE EarthMysterious

  16. Breaking Earth Poems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Scott Mcnaul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Breaking Earth Poems A Thesis submittedFestival……………………………………………………………………..…..14 Earth Against Mylittle else in their hands. Earth Against My Back I lay in

  17. Claude Dalpe Don R. Baker Experimental investigation of large-ion-lithophile-element-,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    -earth elements (REE: La to Lu; +Y) were measured with a LASER ablation inductively coupled plasma ± mass

  18. Microstructural investigations of rare-earth transition-metal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Corp. Temperature dependences of BH max Source: Prof. Oliver Gutfleisch, IFW Dresden, Germany Nd-Fe-B Sm-Co 2:17 Nd-Dy-Fe-B Ferrite The state of the art in terms of magnetic...

  19. Research project -Master Thesis Investigation of mixed rare earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's) to fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) to superconducting emission-free energy by means of supercon- ducting generators for windmills, fusion reactors etc

  20. Ultracold chemistry with alkali-metal-rare-earth molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Makrides; J. Hazra; G. B. Pradhan; A. Petrov; B. K. Kendrick; T. González-Lezana; N. Balakrishnan; S. Kotochigova

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A first principles study of the dynamics of $^6$Li($^{2}$S) + $^6$Li$^{174}$Yb($^2\\Sigma^+$)$ \\to ^6$Li$_2(^1\\Sigma^+$) + $^{174}$Yb($^1$S) reaction is presented at cold and ultracold temperatures. The computations involve determination and analytic fitting of a three-dimensional potential energy surface for the Li$_2$Yb system and quantum dynamics calculations of varying complexities, ranging from exact quantum dynamics within the close-coupling scheme, to statistical quantum treatment, and universal models. It is demonstrated that the two simplified methods yield zero-temperature limiting reaction rate coefficients in reasonable agreement with the full close-coupling calculations. The effect of the three-body term in the interaction potential is explored by comparing quantum dynamics results from a pairwise potential that neglects the three-body term to that derived from the full interaction potential. Inclusion of the three-body term in the close-coupling calculations was found to reduce the limiting rate coefficients by a factor of two. The reaction exoergicity populates vibrational levels as high as $v=19$ of the $^6$Li$_2$ molecule in the limit of zero collision energy. Product vibrational distributions from the close-coupling calculations reveal sensitivity to inclusion of three-body forces in the interaction potential. Overall, the results indicate that a simplified model based on the long-range potential is able to yield reliable values of the total reaction rate coefficient in the ultracold limit but a more rigorous approach based on statistical quantum or quantum close-coupling methods is desirable when product rovibrational distribution is required.

  1. Rules for understanding rare-earth magnetic compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Lindsay Elizabeth

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    (H ii ?s in eV), and coefficients......................................................... 226 C1 Calculated charges and net spin densities for models of [Gd(AmPh)] 2... approach wherein the singlet-triplet splitting is expressed as: E S #0;#1; E T = #0;#1;J 12 + 1 2 J 11 + J 22 ()#0;#1; #0;#2; 1 #0;#1; #0;#2; 2 () 2 2K 12 where #0;#1; 1 and #0;#1; 2 are the energies of the molecular orbitals #0;#2; 1 and #0;#2; 2 , J...

  2. Synthesis, Structure and Characterization Of Polynuclear Rare Earth Alkoxide Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dempsey, Scotty Lee

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The versatile polyol/polyamine supporting ligand TDCI (1,3,5-tris(dimethylamino)- 1,3,5-trideoxy-cis-inositol was synthesized, and several lanthanide complex clusters of this ligand were produced.The coordination chemistry and characterization...

  3. Ultracold chemistry with alkali-metal-rare-earth molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makrides, C; Pradhan, G B; Petrov, A; Kendrick, B K; González-Lezana, T; Balakrishnan, N; Kotochigova, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A first principles study of the dynamics of $^6$Li($^{2}$S) + $^6$Li$^{174}$Yb($^2\\Sigma^+$)$ \\to ^6$Li$_2(^1\\Sigma^+$) + $^{174}$Yb($^1$S) reaction is presented at cold and ultracold temperatures. The computations involve determination and analytic fitting of a three-dimensional potential energy surface for the Li$_2$Yb system and quantum dynamics calculations of varying complexities, ranging from exact quantum dynamics within the close-coupling scheme, to statistical quantum treatment, and universal models. It is demonstrated that the two simplified methods yield zero-temperature limiting reaction rate coefficients in reasonable agreement with the full close-coupling calculations. The effect of the three-body term in the interaction potential is explored by comparing quantum dynamics results from a pairwise potential that neglects the three-body term to that derived from the full interaction potential. Inclusion of the three-body term in the close-coupling calculations was found to reduce the limiting rate ...

  4. Naphthacene Based Organic Thin Film Transistor With Rare Earth Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konwar, K. [Department of Physics, Digboi College, Digboi-786171, Assam (India); Baishya, B. [Department of Physics, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh-786004, Assam (India)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naphthacene based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) have been fabricated using La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as the gate insulator. All the OTFTs have been fabricated by the process of thermal evaporation in vacuum on perfectly cleaned glass substrates with aluminium as source-drain and gate electrodes. The naphthacene film morphology on the glass substrate has been studied by XRD and found to be polycrystalline in nature. The field effect mobility, output resistance, amplification factor, transconductance and gain bandwidth product of the OTFTs have been calculated by using theoretical TFT model. The highest value of field effect mobility is found to be 0.07x10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1} for the devices annealed in vacuum at 90 deg. C for 5 hours.

  5. Rare Earth Phosphate Glass and Glass-Ceramic Proton Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Ray, Hannah L.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and conductivity of cerium and lanthanum phosphate glasses and glass-ceramics were investigated. The effects of varying the metal to phosphate ratio in the glasses, doping LaP3O9 glasses with Ce, and recrystallization of CeP3O9 glasses, on the glasses' microstructure and total conductivity were investigated using XRD, SEM, and AC impedance techniques. Strong increases in conductivity occurred when the glasses were recrystallized: the conductivity of a cerium metaphosphate glass increased conductivity after recrystallization from 10-7.5 S/cm to 10-6 S/cm at 400oC.

  6. Non-Rare Earth magnetic materials (Agreement ID:19201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  7. Estimated Rare Earth Reserves and Deposits | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|July 14, 2014JulyEnergy’sMany of the

  8. Rare-earth doped aluminum oxide lasers for silicon photonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magden, Emir Salih

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reliable and CMOS-compatible deposition process for amorphous Al2O3 based active photonic components has been developed. Al2O3 films were reactively sputtered, where process optimization was achieved at a temperature of ...

  9. Non-Rare Earth High-Performance Wrought Magnesium Alloys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Investigation of the neutron activation of endohedral rare earth metallofullerenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilin, V. A., E-mail: shilin@pnpi.spb.ru; Lebedev, V. T.; Kolesnik, S. G.; Kozlov, V. S.; Grushko, Yu. S.; Sedov, V. P.; Kukorenko, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Endohedral lanthanide metallofullerenes and their water-soluble biocompatible derivatives have been synthesized. The effect that fast-neutron irradiation has on the stability and nuclear physical properties of endohedral metallofullerenes that are used as magnetocontrast materials ({sup 46}Sc, {sup 140}La, {sup 141}Nd, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 160}Tb, {sup 169}Yb, {sup 170}Tm (isomers I and III), and {sup 177}Lu) is studied. Our hypothesis, according to which carbon-shell relaxation is based on the fast nonradiative processes of an electron shake-off type, is confirmed.

  11. Synthesis, Structure and Characterization Of Polynuclear Rare Earth Alkoxide Clusters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dempsey, Scotty Lee

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The versatile polyol/polyamine supporting ligand TDCI (1,3,5-tris(dimethylamino)- 1,3,5-trideoxy-cis-inositol was synthesized, and several lanthanide complex clusters of this ligand were produced.The coordination chemistry ...

  12. DOE Science Showcase - Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice of Scientific and TechnicalOSTI, US

  13. Spomenka Kobe, Jozef Stefan Institut, Rare Earth Magnets in Europe |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverviewEnergy

  14. Understanding of Rare Earth Metals from Theory | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgramUndergraduate MonthlyDecoupling PamelaCatalysts

  15. Extraordinary Responsive Rare Earth Magnetic Materials | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploringGamma-ray Attenuation up

  16. What would we do without rare earths? | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRuraltheWelcome NationalEngineerWhatWhat

  17. Microsoft Word - rare earth speech 3-18 6am

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovemberi CONTENTSSTATEMENT OFCONTROLS,MATTHEW MCMILLEN

  18. CMI Offers Webinars on Critical Materials and Rare Earths | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAES HomeMaterials Institute Offers

  19. What are the Rare Earths? | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHEWeeklyTRUDoesmo·men·tum

  20. The Ames Process for Rare Earth Metals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed DonatARMDirectory:The Ames Process for

  1. DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAsAmandaRev.AFPCertification

  2. Thermoelectric Properties of Rare-Earth-Ruthenium-Germanium Compounds |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2DandEnergy ThereceiverInnovationEnergy

  3. Rare sulfur and triple oxygen isotope geochemistry of volcanogenic sulfate aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Rare sulfur and triple oxygen isotope geochemistry of volcanogenic sulfate aerosols I.N. Bindeman a of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA c Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, Que., Canada d Department of Geology and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland

  4. Essays on International Trade Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfayesus, Asrat

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Precious Metals, of Rare-Earth Metals, of RadioactiveElements of Rare-Earth Metals, of Radioactive Elements or of

  5. al qasim province: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: of the maximum abundances. In addition, we find that abundances of the rare earth elements (REE) in the South percolation; partial melting; rare earth elements....

  6. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 495506, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/495/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 7, 495­506, 2007 www.nat-hazards-earth-syst-sci.net/7/495/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Natural Hazards and Earth System as a function of the hazard, the elements at risk and the vul- nerability. From a natural sciences perspective

  7. Rare B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  8. Pyrometallurgical processes for recovery of actinide elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battles, J.E.; Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C.; Miller, W.E.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallic fuel alloy, nominally U-20-Pu-lOZr, is the key element of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle. Metallic fuel permits the use of an innovative, simple pyrometallurgical process, known as pyroprocessing, (the subject of this report), which features fused salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Electrorefining separates the actinide elements from fission products, without producing a separate stream of plutonium. The plutonium-bearing product is contaminated with higher actinides and with a minor amount of rare earth fission products, making it diversion resistant while still suitable as a fuel material in the fast spectrum of the IFR core. The engineering-scale demonstration of this process will be conducted in the refurbished EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility, which has entered the start-up phase. An additional pyrometallurgical process is under development for extracting transuranic (TRU) elements from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel in a form suitable for use as a feed to the IFR fuel cycle. Four candidate extraction processes have been investigated and shown to be chemically feasible. The main steps in each process are oxide reduction with calcium or lithium, regeneration of the reductant and recycle of the salt, and separation of the TRU product from the bulk uranium. Two processes, referred to as the lithium and salt transport (calcium reductant) processes, have been selected for engineering-scale demonstration, which is expected to start in late 1993. An integral part of pyroprocessing development is the treatment and packaging of high-level waste materials arising from the operations, along with the qualification of these waste forms for disposal in a geologic repository.

  9. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  10. GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view screen will be a view of the entire Earth from space. Navigation bar

  11. US-Japan rare elements meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success|Sustainable EnergyMotor Company |

  12. Neutrinos, Rare Isotopes of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between neutrino physics, nucleosynthesis of elements in astrophysical sites, laboratory measurements with rare exotic nuclei and astronomical observations is discussed. The key role played by neutrinos is emphasized and the close connection between neutrino physics and nucleosynthesis is highlighted.

  13. The alteration of metamict zircon and its role in the remobilization of high-field strength elements in the Georgeville granite, Nova Scotia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.J.; Wirth, R.; Thomas, R. (SFX); (GFZ)

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure and composition of metamict zircon from the Georgeville epizonal A-type granite in the Antigonish Highlands, Nova Scotia, were determined using EMPA, SXRF, LA-ICP-MS, Raman microspectroscopy and TEM data. Individual crystals of zircon are variably altered and consist of four domains distinguished on the basis of texture and composition. Domain A consists of zircon and zirconium oxide nanocrystals in an amorphous matrix and is trace-element-enriched. Replacement of domain A in proximity to microfractures produced a porous and relatively trace-element-poor zircon (domain B) with disseminated Th-U- and Y-enriched inclusions (domain C). Domain D consists of amorphous zirconium silicate that is depleted in trace elements but enriched in Hf. It is found in fractures, together with minor amounts of thorite and thorianite. It Domain D is anhydrous and free of inclusions and pore spaces and has a composition similar to highly crystalline zircon. Micro- and nanoscale element-distribution maps indicate that high-field-strength trace elements in metamict zircon were redistributed during alteration by diffusion and by dissolution-and-reprecipitation processes near microfractures and other fluid channelways. The anomalous chondrite-normalized rare-earth-element patterns and Nd isotopic signature of the granite is attributed largely to the preferential transport and deposition of rare-earth elements during subsolidus re-equilibration of metamict zircon. Hydrothermally deposited zirconium silicate (domain D) has a composition similar to that of highly crystalline Hf-rich zircon but is completely amorphous. This observation emphasizes the need to verify the structural integrity and aqueous durability of hydrothermally deposited zircon before it is used to reconstruct hydrothermal processes.

  14. Protecting Life on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to thePeter B. Protecting Life on Earth: An Introduction to theof Protecting Life on Earth is “to explain to an intelligent

  15. Magnesium transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a U-Fe alloy containing not less than about 84% by weight uranium at a temperature in the range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to produce additional uranium metal which dissolves in the U-Fe alloy raising the uranium concentration and having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The U-Fe alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with Mg metal which takes up the actinide and rare earth fission product metals. The U-Fe alloy retains the noble metal fission products and is stored while the Mg is distilled and recycled leaving the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission products isolated.

  16. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  17. ELEMENT 98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Street, K.,Jr.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W-7405-eng-48 Element 98 S. G. Thompson, K. Street, Jr. , A.3 ELliMENT 98 So Go Thompson, K. street, Jr. , A. Ghiorso

  18. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  19. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Earth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research. Display Options: Earth's Mineral Evolution Based on a CIW news release Mineral Kingdom Has Co

  20. Geo-neutrinos and silicate earth enrichment of U and Th Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, Hawaii, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Frontiers Geo-neutrinos and silicate earth enrichment of U and Th S.T. Dye Hawaii Pacific of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by 1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to 2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from

  1. Geo-neutrinos and Earth's interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianni Fiorentini; Marcello Lissia; Fabio Mantovani

    2007-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The deepest hole that has ever been dug is about 12 km deep. Geochemists analyze samples from the Earth's crust and from the top of the mantle. Seismology can reconstruct the density profile throughout all Earth, but not its composition. In this respect, our planet is mainly unexplored. Geo-neutrinos, the antineutrinos from the progenies of U, Th and K40 decays in the Earth, bring to the surface information from the whole planet, concerning its content of natural radioactive elements. Their detection can shed light on the sources of the terrestrial heat flow, on the present composition, and on the origins of the Earth. Geo-neutrinos represent a new probe of our planet, which can be exploited as a consequence of two fundamental advances that occurred in the last few years: the development of extremely low background neutrino detectors and the progress on understanding neutrino propagation. We review the status and the prospects of the field.

  2. Spectroscopic Studies of Extremly Metal-Poor Stars with Subaru/HDS:II.The r-process Elements, Including Thorium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Honda; W. Aoki; T. Kajino; H. Ando; T. C. Beers; H. Izumiura; K. Sadakane; M. Takada-Hidai

    2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the abundance analyses for the neutron-capture elements, and discuss the observed abundance distributions in very metal-poor stars with excesses of r-process elements. As has been found by previous abundance studies, the star-to-star scatter in the abundances of neutron-capture elements are very large. The abundance patterns of the heavy neutron-capture elements (56 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 70) in seven objects with moderate to large excesses of the neutron-capture elements are similar to that of the solar system r-process component. These results strongly suggest that the heavy neutron-capture elements in these objects are primarily synthesized by the r-process. On the other hand, the abundance ratios of the light neutron-capture elements (38 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 46) exhibit a rather large dispersion. Our inspection of the correlation between Sr and Ba abundances in very metal-poor stars reveals that the dispersion of the Sr abundances clearly decreases with increasing Ba abundance. This results support previous suggestions that the light neutron-capture elements are likely to have been produced in different astrophysical sites from those associated with the production of the heavier ones. The Th/Eu abundance ratios (log(Th/Eu)) measured for the seven r-process-enhanced stars range from -0.10 to -0.59. Since these very metal-poor stars are believed to be formed in the early Galaxy, this result means that a small dispersion appears in the abundance ratios between Th and rare-earth elements, such as Eu, in very metal-poor stars. In order to apply the Th/Eu ratios to estimates of stellar ages, further understanding for the Th production by the r-process nucleosynthesis is required.

  3. Argonne's Earth Day 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne celebrated Earth Day on April 21, 2011 with an event that featured green activities and information booths.

  4. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Venus to cross sun in rare celestial event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Venus to cross sun in rare celestial event By Robert Nolin, Sun passage across the face of the sun at twilight Tuesday. It's a sight you'll never see again. Called named for the Roman goddess of love will pass between the Earth and the sun for several hours at sunset

  5. Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH THE UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) Earth Systems Research Center is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrative scientists and students study the Earth's ecosystems, atmosphere, water, and ice using field measurements

  6. PARTICLE-SIZE-INDUCED VALENCE CHANGES IN SAMARIUM CLUSTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, M.G.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    weakly in some rare- earth metals. 11 This possibilitya general feature of the rare-earth metals. All of the rarethe bulk metals. The remaining nine rare-earth elements must

  7. Strongly correlated electron behavior in As-based and thin film Sb-based filled skutterudites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumbach, Ryan Eagle

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Chemistry of Rare Earths Vol 1 - Metals, eds K. A.and Chemistry of Rare Earths Vol 1 - Metals, eds K. A.in transition metal, rare earth, and actinide elements [1,

  8. Rare decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrington, S.M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The confidence level limits of the CDF and D0 searches for the B{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} rare decays are presented.

  9. RADIO SCIENCE, VOL. 49, 3643, doi:10.1002/2013RS005288, 2014 Rare examples of early VLF events observed in association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Earth's global electric circuit [Cummer et al., 2009]. The first GJs were observed from the groundRADIO SCIENCE, VOL. 49, 36­43, doi:10.1002/2013RS005288, 2014 Rare examples of early VLF events., T. Adachi, R.-R. Hsu, and A. B. Chen (2014), Rare examples of early VLF events observed

  10. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

  11. Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

    1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

  12. Carbon-Based Magnets: Discovery & Design of Novel Permanent Magnets using Non-strategic Elements having Secure Supply Chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: VCU is developing a new magnet for use in renewable power generators and EV motors that requires no rare earth minerals. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to process, but they make electric motors and generators smaller, lighter, and more efficient. VCU would replace the rare earth minerals in EV motor magnets with a low-cost and abundant carbon-based compound that resembles a fine black powder. This new magnet could demonstrate the same level of performance as the best commercial magnets available today at a significantly lower cost. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate this new magnet in a prototype electric motor.

  13. Elemental Solubility Tendency for the Phases of Uranium by Classical Models Used to Predict Alloy Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Blackwood; Travis Koenig; Saleem Drera; Brajenda Mishra; Davis Olson; Doug Porter; Robert Mariani

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional alloy theory models, specifically Darken-Gurry and Miedema’s analyses, that characterize solutes in solid solvents relative to physical properties of the elements have been used to assist in predicting alloy behavior. These models will be applied relative to the three solid phases of uranium: alpha (orthorhombic), beta (tetragonal), and gamma (bcc). These phases have different solubilities for specific alloy additions as a function of temperature. The Darken-Gurry and Miedema models, with modifications based on concepts of Waber, Gschneider, and Brewer will be used to predict the behavior of four types of solutes: 1) Transition metals that are used for various purposes associated with the containment as alloy additions in the uranium fuel 2) Transuranic elements in the uranium 3) Rare earth fission products (lanthanides) 4) Transition metals and other fission products Using these solute map criteria, elemental behavior will be predicted as highly soluble, marginally soluble, or immiscible (compound formers) and will be used to compare solute effects during uranium phase transformations. The overlapping of these solute maps are convenient first approximation tools for predicting alloy behavior.

  14. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from lwr fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl.sub.2 and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750.degree. C. to about 850.degree. C. to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl.sub.2 having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO.sub.2. The Ca metal and CaCl.sub.2 is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including Mg Cl.sub.2 to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy.

  15. Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

    1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

  16. Evolution of Life on Earth EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy

    Evolution of Life on Earth #12;EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH #12;Earth ~4.5 billion years ago A bad day .... #12;Old (Archean) Rocks #12;4.4 Billion year old Zircon Earth was temperate and had water 4.4 billion years ago! #12;#12;EVOLUTION OF LIFE ON EARTH #12;Making Organic Molecules : Miller & Urey Famous

  17. The Sun-Earth Connection The Temperature of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    AST248 The Sun-Earth Connection #12;The Temperature of the Earth The Earth is in equilibrium ­ the heat absorbed from the Sun with ­ the heat radiated by the Earth. Heat in = heat out #12;Heat constant) ­ L is the solar luminosity ­ d is the distance from the Earth to the Sun, 1AU ­ The solar

  18. Programmatic Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

  19. Review: Rare Plants of Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington Pamela Camp andField Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington. Seattle, WA:State’s 3600 vascular plants, 600 mosses, and 1000-1500

  20. Constraints of mixing matrix elements in the sequential fourthgeneration model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo

    2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review our works on the sequential fourth generation model and focus on the constriants of $4\\times 4$ quark mixing matrix elements. We investigate the quark mixing matrix elements from the rare $K,B$ meson decays. We talk about the $ hierarchy$ of the $4\\times 4$ matrix and the existence of fourth generation.

  1. carleton.ca Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    carleton.ca Earth Sciences #12;Earth is our home. It is a dynamic planet, integrating and recording spectrometers or electron microprobes--earth scientists investigate Earth's evolution to help understand future today and for the future is enhanced by the expertise of economic geologists. Knowledge of the Earth

  2. Earth Day 2010: Earth Day 40th Anniversary Poster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowacka, Izabela

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGJ Issue 30 Earth Day 2010 ISSN 1076-7975 In celebration of 40 Earth Day the Electronic GreenEconomics, Poznan, Poland. Earth image used from www.sxc.hu.

  3. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  4. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  5. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  6. Earth Sciences | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fully coupled, and intermodel comparison are underway. Moving forward, Earth system models that imbed a stochastic representation of variable Earth system behavior such...

  7. Geoneutrinos and Heat Production in the Earth: Constraints and Implications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bill McDonough

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from antineutrino (geoneutrino) studies at KamLAND are coincident with geochemical models of Th and U in the Earth.  KamLAND and Borexino detectors are on line, thus uncertainties in counting statistics will be reduced as data are accumulated.  The SNO+ detector, situated in the middle of the North American plate will come on line in ~3 yrs and will be best suited to yield a precise estimate of the continental contribution to the Earth?s Th & U budget.  The distribution of heat producing elements in the Earth drives convection and plate tectonics.  Geochemical models posit that ~40% of the heat producing elements are in the continental crust, with the remainder in the mantle.  Although models of core formation allow for the incorporation of heat producing elements, the core contribution of radiogenic heating is considered to be negligible.  Most parameterized convection models for the Earth require significant amounts of radiogenic heating of the Earth, a factor of two greater than geochemical models predict.  The initial KamLAND results challenge these geophysical models and support geochemical models calling for a significant contribution from secular cooling of the mantle.

  8. Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical and biological evolution of Earth. The oceans appear to be loosing oxygen due to on-going climate change, with resulting impacts on marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles. As oxygen levels

  9. Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Physical Earth Science Is Physical Earth Science right for me? If you are interested in learning a Physical Earth Science degree. The skills you will gain are wide-ranging and will provide a good basis for employment in almost any sector. Are all Physical Earth Science degrees the same? Universities do not have

  10. Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType The Alexandria Digital Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janée, Greg

    Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType The Alexandria Digital Earth Prototype System Terence Smith Greg Janée James Frew Anita Coleman #12;Alexandria Digital Earth ProtoType 2Smith et al. / JCDL 2001 / 2x Earth ProtoType 3Smith et al. / JCDL 2001 / 2x-Jun-2001 Core System (inherited from ADL) Components

  11. Earth System History Announcements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Earth System History GEOL 1020 [35] Announcements The demise of the Paleozoic (extinction, Nova Scotia. #12;The Carboniferous was marked by the progressive formation of the supercontinent Pangea, there is evidence of significant cooling and drying in the sedimentologi

  12. LANL Studies Earth's Magnetosphere

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Daughton, Bill

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new 3-D supercomputer model presents a new theory of how magnetic reconnection works in high-temperature plasmas. This Los Alamos National Laboratory research supports an upcoming NASA mission to study Earth's magnetosphere in greater detail than ever.

  13. Rammered Earth Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD MEASUREMENT OF LATERAL EARTH PRESSURES ON RETAINING WALLS A Thesis by Michael Riggins Approved as to style and content by: Cha rman of Committee Memb r Head of Departm t P Etc Member August 1974 ABSTRACT...

  14. Chemical composition of Earth-like planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronco, M P; Marboeuf, U; Alibert, Y; de Elía, G C; Guilera, O M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of planet formation are mainly focused on the accretion and dynamical processes of the planets, neglecting their chemical composition. In this work, we calculate the condensation sequence of the different chemical elements for a low-mass protoplanetary disk around a solar-type star. We incorporate this sequence of chemical elements (refractory and volatile elements) in our semi-analytical model of planet formation which calculates the formation of a planetary system during its gaseous phase. The results of the semi-analytical model (final distributions of embryos and planetesimals) are used as initial conditions to develope N-body simulations that compute the post-oligarchic formation of terrestrial-type planets. The results of our simulations show that the chemical composition of the planets that remain in the habitable zone has similar characteristics to the chemical composition of the Earth. However, exist differences that can be associated to the dynamical environment in which they were formed.

  15. Earth Day 2014 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Day 2014 Earth Day 2014 Earth Day 2014 This year, we're celebrating Earth Day all week long. It's Earth Week on Energy.gov We're focusing on climate change, highlighting Earth Day...

  16. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  17. Ecotoxicit des terres rares Les terres rares sont un groupe de mtaux qui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    'automobile pour dépolluer les gaz d'échappement constituent le principal débouché des terres rares (tout véhicules hybrides, les turbines d'éoliennes ainsi que dans le nucléaire et l'armement. Les terres rares ont

  18. Primitive magmas of the Earth and Moon : a petrologic investigation of magma genesis and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Jay Arthur

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies, major and trace element geochemistry, isotopes, petrography, phase equilibrium experiments and thermodynamics are used investigate and understand primitive melts from the Earth and the Moon. Chapter 1 ...

  19. Modeling the earth system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  20. Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment of U and Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and thermal evolution poorly constrained. Terrestrial antineutrinos from {\\beta}-emitting daughter nuclei in the U and Th decay series traverse the earth with negligible attenuation. The rate at which large subsurface instruments observe these geo-neutrinos depends on the distribution of U and Th relative to the detector. Geo-neutrino observations with sensitivity to U and Th in the mantle are able to estimate silicate earth enrichment, leading to a more complete understanding of the origin, accretion, differentiation, and thermal history of the planet.