Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Rappahannock River Basin Commission The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity

2

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

3

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

4

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

5

Rappahannock Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rappahannock Electric Cooperative) Rappahannock Electric Cooperative) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rappahannock Electric Coop Place Fredericksburg, Virginia Utility Id 40228 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rappahannock Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project was awarded $15,694,097 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $31,388,194. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COINCIDENT PEAK DEMAND RIDER Industrial

6

Rappahannock Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rappahannock Electric Coop Rappahannock Electric Coop Place Fredericksburg, Virginia Utility Id 40228 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rappahannock Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project was awarded $15,694,097 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $31,388,194. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COINCIDENT PEAK DEMAND RIDER Industrial FARM, HOME AND CIVIC SERVICE SCHEDULE A Multi-Phase Residential

7

Colorado River Basin Hydroclimatic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of annual hydroclimatic variability in the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) for the period of 1906–2006 was performed to understand the dominant modes of multidecadal variability. First, wavelet-based spectral analysis was employed ...

Kenneth Nowak; Martin Hoerling; Balaji Rajagopalan; Edith Zagona

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

9

Rappahannock Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REC) REC) Jump to: navigation, search Name Rappahannock Electric Coop Place Fredericksburg, Virginia Utility Id 40228 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rappahannock Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project was awarded $15,694,097 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $31,388,194. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COINCIDENT PEAK DEMAND RIDER Industrial FARM, HOME AND CIVIC SERVICE SCHEDULE A Multi-Phase Residential

10

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

11

Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts for River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology has been formulated to aid a field forecaster in preparing probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) for river basins. The format of probabilistic QPF is designed to meet three requirements: (i) it is compatible with ...

Roman Krzysztofowicz; William J. Drzal; Theresa Rossi Drake; James C. Weyman; Louis A. Giordano

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Snake River Basin environmental program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Snake River Basin Environmental Program was designed to evaluate existing environmental data with respect to potential geothermal development in eight Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRAs) in Idaho. State and federal agencies, public interest groups, consulting groups, and universities participated in the DOE program. Final reports for the program are intended to be utilized as reference documents and planning tools for future environmental studies. Evaluation of the data indicated that the majority of the existing data base is adequate for small-scale direct-use developments. The potential impacts of development on water quality and water supply are the primary environmental concern. Preliminary data suggest that subsidence and induced seismicity may be a problem in several of the KGRAs. Sensitive animal species and habitats have been identified in each area; development in the Castle Creek KGRA may be restricted due to the Birds of Prey Natural Area. Two workshops provided public input on concerns and land use planning for geothermal development in Idaho. Based on the data evaluation and public input, a plan for supplementing the existing environmental data base was prepared.

Spencer, S.G.; Sullivan, J.F.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Climatic Aspects of the 1993 Upper Mississippi River Basin Flood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1993 record-breaking summer flood in the Upper Mississippi River Basin resulted from an unprecedentedly persistent heavy rain pattern. Rainfall totals for the Upper Mississippi River Basin were, by a large margin, the largest of this century ...

Kenneth E. Kunkel; Stanley A. Changnon; James R. Angel

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

Robert Caldwell

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

16

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Listening Workshops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2010, American Farmland Trust held two listening workshops in the Wabash River Watershed to provide information and collect feedback on the Ohio River Basin Trading Project. Each session began with a basic primer on water quality trading given by Jim Klang of Kieser Associates. The presentations were followed by facilitated discussions. Participants were prompted with several questions, developed from earlier listening sessions, addressing issues that producers will likely face in water quality ...

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Systems Integrator Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1961 State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Project Review Section The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New

18

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

19

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Catawba Wateree River Basin Advisory Commission

20

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies The USGS published a USGS Professional Paper in 2010 entitled 

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Powder River Basin (WY, MT) Coal and Coalbed Methane: Evaluating and Revising 100 Years of Studies Dataset Summary...

22

The Water Budget of the Kuparuk River Basin, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A water budget study that considers precipitation, river runoff, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture for the Kuparuk River basin on the North Slope of Alaska is presented. Numerical simulations of hydrologic processes using the NASA Catchment-...

Stephen J. Déry; Marc Stieglitz; Åsa K. Rennermalm; Eric F. Wood

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Sequence stratigraphy of the lower Pierre Shale in southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Powder River Basin is one of the biggest interior sedimentary basins in the Rocky Mountain region. The Upper Cretaceous section of the southern Powder River… (more)

Kaykun, Armagan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

25

Rappahannock Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperative Cooperative Country United States Headquarters Location Fredericksburg, Virginia Recovery Act Funding $15,694,097.00 Total Project Value $31,388,194.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Rappahannock Electric Cooperative Smart Grid Project Coordinates 38.3031837°, -77.4605399° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

26

Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

28

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity,… (more)

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Microsoft Word - Powder River Basin 1_6_06.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Powder River Basin Economics of Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Gregory C. Bank Vello A. Kuuskraa vkuuskraa@adv-res.com Advanced Resources International, Inc. January 2006 Disclaimer This material was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The Economics of Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development

30

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

31

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA By G.D. Stricker Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

32

Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

1985-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Simple Predictive Tool for Lower Brahmaputra River Basin Monsoon Flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brahmaputra River of South Asia is the fourth largest river in the world in terms of annual discharge. The lower Brahmaputra River basin is susceptible to catastrophic flooding with major social, economic, and public health impacts. There is ...

Shithi Kamal-Heikman; Louis A. Derry; Jery R. Stedinger; Christopher C. Duncan

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Management at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

36

Temporal–Spatial Climate Variability in the Headwater Drainage Basins of the Yangtze River and Yellow River, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variability of the climate in the headwater drainage basins of the Yangtze River and Yellow River during 1961–2010 was investigated by examining four typical climatic variables: daily minimum, mean, and maximum temperatures and daily ...

Yan-Fang Sang; Zhonggen Wang; Changming Liu; Tongliang Gong

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: applications; Basin and Range Province; Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture zones; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain; surveys; United States; Western U.S. Author(s): Kumamoto, L.H.

38

Staging Effects on Catalyst Deactivation with Powder River Basin Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the current study were to investigate cost benefits or disadvantages resulting from operating Powder River Basin (PRB-) fired boilers at different combustion staging levels. The study's inherent assumption is that increased staging levels increases catalyst deactivation, requiring less ammonia consumption at the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit but more catalyst replacement events. The program sought to evaluate the impacts of staging on total SCR operation and maintenance (OM) ...

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Agricultural Stakeholder Listening Workshops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On October 14, 2010, American Farmland Trust held a listening workshop in Sardinia, Ohio, to provide information to and collect feedback from farmers and agricultural representatives on the Ohio River Basin Trading Project. The session began with a basic primer on water quality trading given by Jim Klang of Kieser & Associates. The presentation was followed by facilitated discussions. Participants were prompted with a variety of questions developed from earlier listening workshops held in other regions o...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Joint Session: Air, Water, Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) project managers in air, water, and climate programs are working together to address the complex, interrelated issues associated with water and air quality in the United States. This session provided background and told the story of the pilot effort in the Ohio River Basin to develop broad, nontraditional collaborations that will support multi-stakeholder programs for water quality trading, carbon trading, and ecosystem services protection. Through this pilot effo...

2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evidence for fluival-controlled coal deposition in the upper Tongue River Member (Fort Union Formation, Paleocene), Powder River Basin, Wyoming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent exploration in the Powder River basin has targeted shallow, coal-bed methane, and basin reserves may be as high as 39 trillion cubic feet. Both… (more)

Bauders, Coen M. (Coen Michael)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

43

CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

44

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin

45

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

46

Response of Streamflow to Climate Changes in the Yellow River Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate changes impact hydrological processes and control streamflow at the basin scale. The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of climate change on streamflow in the Yellow River basin (YRB), China. The temporal trends of ...

Zhifeng Yang; Qiang Liu

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

48

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, and to increase irrigated rice areas. The goal of this ...

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

Haglund, Karl T

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Are Paleoclimate Reconstructions of Past Severe Drought in the Colorado Basin Accurate Enough to Warrant Changing the Current "Law of the River"?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1593 severe sustained drought in the Colorado River Basin: aStreamflow Trends in the Upper Colorado River Basin Based onOscillation in the Upper Colorado River Basin Hydroclimate."

Dracup, John A.; MacDonald, Glen A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

52

Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1991, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. 1991 was the final year of this five year project. Work started in May 1 and ended on November 31. Preconstruction activity consisted of final layout and design of the project, movement of approximately 600 cubic yards of large boulders and 12 log trucks loads of woody material to the construction site. A total of five rock weirs, five rock deflectors, 20 woody debris placements and 79 individual boulder placements were constructed in the South Fork and the main stem of the Umatilla River. A total of twelve log weirs, four rock weirs, two rock deflectors, and ten woody debris placements were placed in Meacham Creek. In addition, 47 weirs in Thomas Creek and the upper portion of the South Fork of the Umatilla River were repaired. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the Umatilla River construction project area, and mapping and photographing all structures.

Northrop, Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Thermal springs in the Salmon River basin, central Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salmon River basin within the study area occupies an area of approximately 13,000 square miles in central Idaho. Geologic units in the basin are igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; however, granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith are predominant. Water from thermal springs ranges in temperature from 20.5/sup 0/ to 94.0/sup 0/ Celsius. The waters are slightly alkaline and are generally a sodium carbonate or bicarbonate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations are variable and range from 103 to 839 milligrams per liter. Estimated reservoir temperatures determined from the silicic acid-corrected silica, sodium-potassium-calcium, and sulfate-water isotope geothermometers range from 30/sup 0/ to 184/sup 0/ Celsius. Tritium concentrations in sampled thermal waters are near zero and indicate the waters are at least 100 years old. Stable-isotope data indicate it is unlikely that a single hot-water reservoir supplies hot springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged at least 15,800 acre-feet of water in 1980. Associated convective heat flux is 2.7 x 10/sup 7/ calories per second.

Young, H.W.; Lewis, R.E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Umatilla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement : FY 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summer of 1990, construction continued on the Bonneville Power Administration funded anadromous fish habitat enhancement project in the Umatilla River sub-basin, Umatilla County, State of Oregon. Work started on 5/1/90 and ended 10/30/90. A total of five large log weirs, eight large rock weirs, 17 associated weir structures, 19 small to medium rock deflectors, four bank and island reinforcements, three rock flow controls, 19 woody debris placements, and 85 individual boulders were constructed in the South Fork of the Umatilla River. In addition, one large rock weir was constructed at the confluence of the North and South Forks of the Umatilla River, and repair work was completed on 33 structures in Thomas Creek. Also, 300 cubic yards of rock and some logs and woody material were moved on site for use in 1991. Preconstruction activity consisted of moving approximately 1,500 cubic yards of large boulders, and dive log truck loads of woody material to the construction site. Project monitoring consisted of sediment sampling above and below the project area and, mapping and photographing and structures. 7 figs.

Northrop, Michael

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hydroclimatic Trends in the Mississippi River Basin from 1948 to 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trends of the surface water and energy budget components in the Mississippi River basin from 1948 to 2004 are investigated using a combination of hydrometeorological observations and observation-constrained simulations of the land surface ...

Taotao Qian; Aiguo Dai; Kevin E. Trenberth

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

A Tree-Ring-Based Reconstruction of Delaware River Basin Streamflow Using Hierarchical Bayesian Regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hierarchical Bayesian regression model is presented for reconstructing the average summer streamflow at five gauges in the Delaware River basin using eight regional tree-ring chronologies. The model provides estimates of the posterior ...

Naresh Devineni; Upmanu Lall; Neil Pederson; Edward Cook

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A Comparison of in Situ, Reanalysis, and Satellite Water Budgets over the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using in situ, reanalysis, and satellite-derived datasets, surface and atmospheric water budgets of the Upper Colorado River basin are analyzed. All datasets capture the seasonal cycle for each water budget component. For precipitation, all ...

Rebecca A. Smith; Christian D. Kummerow

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interannual Variability of Summer Water Balance Components in Three Major River Basins of Northern Eurasia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated water balance components in the three major river basins of Siberia (the Lena, Yenisey, and Ob) based on the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)–Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison ...

Yoshiki Fukutomi; Hiromichi Igarashi; Kooiti Masuda; Tetsuzo Yasunari

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approach—that is, the advection–aridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007—and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Transport of Atmospheric Moisture during Three Extreme Rainfall Events over the Mackenzie River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian trajectories were computed for three extreme summer rainfall events (with rainfall exceeding 100 mm) over the southern Mackenzie River basin to test the hypothesis that the low-level moisture feeding these rainstorms can be traced back ...

Julian C. Brimelow; Gerhard W. Reuter

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Moisture Transport Diagnosis of a Wintertime Precipitation Event in the Mackenzie River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime precipitation events in the Mackenzie River basin (MRB) play an important role in the hydrology of the region because they contribute substantially to water storage prior to the spring runoff maximum. The Mesoscale Compressible ...

Gary M. Lackmann; John R. Gyakum; Robert Benoit

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effects of Land Cover Change on the Energy and Water Balance of the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of land cover change on the energy and water balance of the Mississippi River basin are analyzed using the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) model. Results of a simulated conversion from complete forest cover to crop cover over a ...

Tracy E. Twine; Christopher J. Kucharik; Jonathan A. Foley

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of Climate Variability on Water Storage in the Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the long-term (interannual–decadal) variability of water availability in river basins is paramount for water resources management. Here, the authors analyze time series of simulated terrestrial water storage components, observed ...

Ruud Hurkmans; Peter A. Troch; Remko Uijlenhoet; Paul Torfs; Matej Durcik

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Planning Investments in Water Resources by Mixed-Integer Programming: The Vardar-Axios River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mixed integer programming model for planning water resources investments is presented. The model is a sequencing model applied to the Vardar-Axios river basin in Yugoslavia and Greece. The structure of the model is ...

Elliot, Dorothy P.

66

A Detailed Evaluation of GPCP 1° Daily Rainfall Estimates over the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an intensive evaluation of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) 1° daily (1DD) rainfall products over the Mississippi River basin, which covers 435 1° latitude × 1° longitude grids for the period of January 1997–...

Mekonnen Gebremichael; Witold F. Krajewski; Mark L. Morrissey; George J. Huffman; Robert F. Adler

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydrologic Effects of Urbanization and Climate Change on the Flint River Basin, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential effects of long-term urbanization and climate change on the freshwater resources of the Flint River basin were examined by using the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). PRMS is a deterministic, distributed-parameter ...

Roland J. Viger; Lauren E. Hay; Steven L. Markstrom; John W. Jones; Gary R. Buell

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ENSO and PDO Effects on Hydroclimatic Variations of the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linkages between tropical Pacific Ocean monthly climatic variables and the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) hydroclimatic variations from 1909 to 1998 are analyzed at interseasonal timescales. A study of the changes in these linkages through the ...

Hugo G. Hidalgo; John A. Dracup

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Trends in Precipitation Extremes in the Zhujiang River Basin, South China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial and temporal characteristics of precipitation trends in the Zhujiang River basin, South China, are analyzed. Nonparametric trend tests are applied to daily precipitation data from 192 weather stations between 1961 and 2007 for the ...

Marco Gemmer; Thomas Fischer; Tong Jiang; Buda Su; Lü Liu Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Predictability of Heavy Precipitation in the Waikato River Basin of New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the predictability of heavy precipitation in the economically important Waikato River basin of New Zealand. A 2-yr archive of Global Forecast System (GFS) model data to +180 h for the period August 2005–August 2007 forms ...

Stacey Dravitzki; James McGregor

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Powder River Basin Coal Supply and Suitability: EPRI Report Series on Low-Sulfur Coal Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility use of subbituminous coals from the Powder River Basin is expected to increase 100 million tons by the year 2000, with much of the growth coming from units designed for high-sulfur bituminous coal. This report addresses whether Powder River Basin coal suppliers will be able to command a premium for their product and documents the recent and rapid improvements utilities have made in using subbituminous coals.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the Yakima River.

Blanton, S.L.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Neitzel, D.A.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Understanding Controls on Historical River Discharge in the World’s Largest Drainage Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term (20 yr) river discharge records from 30 of the world’s largest river basins have been used to characterize surface hydrologic flows in relation to net precipitation inputs, ocean climate teleconnections, and human land/water use ...

Christopher Potter; Pusheng Zhang; Steven Klooster; Vanessa Genovese; Shashi Shekhar; Vipin Kumar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Irrigation Depletions 1928-1989 : 1990 Level of Irrigation, Snake Yakima and Deschutes River Basins.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The vast amount of irrigation in relation to the available water and extensive system of reservoirs located in the Snake River Basin above Brownlee reservoir precludes this area from using methods such as Blaney-Criddle for estimating irrigation depletions. Also the hydrology, irrigation growth patterns, and water supply problems are unique and complex. Therefore regulation studies were utilized to reflect the net effect on streamflow of the changes in irrigated acreage in terms of corresponding changes in storage regulation and in the amount of water depleted and diverted from and returned to the river system. The regulation study for 1990 conditions was conducted by the Idaho Department of Water Resources. The end product of the basin simulation is 61 years of regulated flows at various points in the river system that are based on 1990 conditions. Data used by the Idaho Department of Water Resources is presented in this section and includes natural gains to the river system and diversions from the river system based on a 1990 level of development and operation criteria. Additional information can be obtained for an Idaho Department of Water Resources Open-File Report ``Stream Flows in the Snake River Basin 1989 Conditions of Use and Management`` dated June 1991. Similar considerations apply to the Yakima and Deschutes river basins.

United States. Bonneville Power Administation; A.G. Crook Company

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Evaluating GCM Land Surface Hydrology Parameterizations by Computing River Discharges Using a Runoff Routing Model: Application to the Mississippi Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To relate general circulation model (GCM) hydrologic output to readily available river hydrographic data, a runoff routing scheme that routes gridded runoffs through regional- or continental-scale river drainage basins is developed. By following ...

G. E. Liston; Y. C. Sud; E. F. Wood

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Examination of Meteorological and Soil Moisture Conditions in the Babocomari River Basin Before the Flood Event of 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT) program has deployed a soil moisture observing network in the Babocomari River Basin located in southeastern Arizona. The Babocomari River is a major ...

Robert J. Zamora; Edward P. Clark; Eric Rogers; Michael B. Ek; Timothy M. Lahmers

79

Landscape Based Modeling of Nonpoint Source Nitrogen Loading in the Neuse River Basin, North Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to arrive at a quantitative and qualitative assessment of nonpoint sources of potential excess N under different land use/land cover (LULC) categories in the Neuse River Basin on a seasonal time scale. This assessment is being supplied to EPA's Landscape Characterization Branch, National Exposure Research Laboratory, in Research Triangle Park, NC, for inclusion in a hydrologic model to predict seasonal fluxes of N from the terrestrial landscape to surface receiving waters and groundwater in the Neuse River Basin. The analysis was performed in the following five steps: (1) development of a conceptual model to predict potential excess N on land, (2) a literature review to parameterize N fluxes under LULC categories found in the Neuse River Basin, (3) acquisition of high resolution (15-m pixel) LULC data from EPA's Landscape Characterization Branch, National Exposure Research Laboratory, in Research Triangle Park, NC, (4) acquisition of a soil N inventory map for the Neuse River Basin, (5) calculations of potential excess N on a seasonal basis for the entire Neuse River Basin.

Garten, C.T.

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Survey of Columbia River Basin streams for Columbia pebblesnail Fluminicola columbiana and shortface lanx Fisherola nuttalli  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, there are only two remaining sizable populations of Columbia pebblesnails Fluminicola columbiana; those in the Methow and Okanogan rivers, Washington. Smaller populations survive in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, and the lower Salmon River, Idaho, and possibly in the middle Snake River, Idaho; Hells Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, and the Grande Ronde River, Oregon and Washington. Neither large population is at present protected, and there has been a substantial documented reduction in the species` historic range. Large populations of the shortface lanx Fisherolla nuttalli persist in four streams: the Deschutes River, Oregon; the Hanford Reach and Bonneville Dam area of the Columbia River, Washington and Oregon; Hens Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho and Oregon; and the Okanogan River, Washington. Smaller populations, or ones of uncertain size, are known from the lower Salmon and middle Snake rivers, Idaho; the Grande Ronde Washington and Oregon; Imnaha, and John Day rivers, Oregon; and the Methow River, Washington. While substantial range reduction has occurred in this species, and the large populations are not well protected, the problem is not as severe as in the case of the Columbia pebblesnail. Both species appear to have been widespread historically in the mainstem Columbia River and the Columbia River Basin prior to the installation of the current dam system. Both are now apparently reduced within the Columbia River to populations in the Hanford Reach and possibly other sites that are now separated by large areas of unsuitable habitat from those in the river`s major tributaries.

Neitzel, D.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Frest, T.J. [Deixis Consultants, Seattle, WA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: applications; Basin and Range Province; Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture...

82

Survey of Columbia River Basin streams for Columbia pebblesnail Fluminicola columbiana and shortface lanx Fisherola nuttalli  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At present, there are only two remaining sizable populations of Columbia pebblesnails Fluminicola columbiana; those in the Methow and Okanogan rivers, Washington. Smaller populations survive in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, Washington, and the lower Salmon River, Idaho, and possibly in the middle Snake River, Idaho; Hells Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, and the Grande Ronde River, Oregon and Washington. Neither large population is at present protected, and there has been a substantial documented reduction in the species' historic range. Large populations of the shortface lanx Fisherolla nuttalli persist in four streams: the Deschutes River, Oregon; the Hanford Reach and Bonneville Dam area of the Columbia River, Washington and Oregon; Hens Canyon of the Snake River, Idaho and Oregon; and the Okanogan River, Washington. Smaller populations, or ones of uncertain size, are known from the lower Salmon and middle Snake rivers, Idaho; the Grande Ronde Washington and Oregon; Imnaha, and John Day rivers, Oregon; and the Methow River, Washington. While substantial range reduction has occurred in this species, and the large populations are not well protected, the problem is not as severe as in the case of the Columbia pebblesnail. Both species appear to have been widespread historically in the mainstem Columbia River and the Columbia River Basin prior to the installation of the current dam system. Both are now apparently reduced within the Columbia River to populations in the Hanford Reach and possibly other sites that are now separated by large areas of unsuitable habitat from those in the river's major tributaries.

Neitzel, D.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Frest, T.J. (Deixis Consultants, Seattle, WA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Injection in basin and range-type reservoirs: the Raft River experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Injection testing at the Raft River KGRA has yielded some interesting results which can be useful in planning injection systems in Basin and Range type reservoirs. Because of inhomogeneities and possible fracturing in basin fill sediment, rapid pressure response to injection has been observed in one shallow monitor well, but not others. In some monitor wells in the injection field, pressure drops are observed during injection suggesting plastic deformation of the sediments. Seismicity, however, has not accompanied these observed water level changes.

Petty, S.; Spencer, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysing the forcing mechanisms for net primary productivity changes in the Heihe River Basin, north-west China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the inland river basins in north-west China have experienced ecosystem degradation and even desertification in the last few decades. As a case study, we estimated the net primary productivity (NPP) of the Heihe river basin and analysed its difference ...

L. Lu; X. Li; F. Veroustraete; E. Kang; J. Wang

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United States of America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United The growing significance of the Powder River Basin's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) to United States domestic energy approximates 6% above the coal as well as inside the coal layer. This difference can be attributed primarily

Harris, Jerry M.

87

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1988 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1988. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the amended Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined it has authority and responsibility to implement. The FY 1988 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 95 ongoing projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. These continuing activities are summarized briefly by Program area: (1) mainstem passage; (2) artificial propagation; (3) natural propagation; (4) resident fish and wildlife; and (5) planning activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Northwest Power Planning Council (U.S.); Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

89

DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PD DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

90

A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SW A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

91

ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PA ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

92

FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

93

SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

94

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

95

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Atmospheric Water Balance over the Semiarid Murray–Darling River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric water balance over the semiarid Murray–Darling River basin in southeast Australia is analyzed based on a consecutive series of 3- to 24-h NWP forecasts from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s Limited Area Prediction System (...

Clara Draper; Graham Mills

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

COLSTRIP COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PC COLSTRIP COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

98

COAL RESOURCES, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GN COAL RESOURCES, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 J of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal

99

Application of a Medium-Range Global Hydrologic Probabilistic Forecast Scheme to the Ohio River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003–07. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium-Range ...

Nathalie Voisin; Florian Pappenberger; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Roberto Buizza; John C. Schaake

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Integrating Green Hydropower Certification with Strategy Environment Assessment: Towards Sustainable River Basin Development in Yunnan, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China currently put the development of its western region as one of the most important goals. This greatly stimulated the initiative of hydropower development in its ecological sensitive Yunnan Province. Yet the use of a single tool, like strategy environment ... Keywords: strategic environmental assessment (SEA), green hydropower certification, sustainable river basin development, Yunnan Province

Peng Shengjing; Sun Zhenhua; Ou Xiaokun

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Trend Analysis of Precipitation in the Jinsha River Basin in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the mean seasonal and annual precipitation from 30 meteorological stations in the periods of 1961–2008, the precipitation trends are analyzed by using the Mann–Kendall (MK) test in the Jinsha River basin (JRB). Both the temporal and ...

Shunjiu Wang; Xinli Zhang; Zhigang Liu; Deming Wang

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Coupling real-time control and socio-economic issues in participatory river basin planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper an approach for coupling real-time control and socio-economic issues in participatory river basin planning is presented through a case study. It relies on the use of Bayesian Networks (Bns) to describe in a probabilistic way the behaviour ... Keywords: Bayesian Networks, Integrated Water Resource Management, Model integration, Participation, Reservoir operation

A. Castelletti; R. Soncini-Sessa

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Walla Walla River Basin Screening, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to meet the need for protective fish screening, the Walla Walla County Conservation District (WWCCD) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) formed a partnership to implement the WDFW Cooperative Compliance Review and Cost-Share Program. The program provides technical and financial assistance to irrigators in order to bring existing surface water diversions into compliance with state and federal juvenile fish screen criteria. The Walla Walla basin has two priority salmonid species currently listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, the Bull Trout and Mid-Columbia Basin Steelhead. Other partners in this effort include the Washington Department of Ecology, National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Walla Walla Community College Irrigation Department. A Screening Oversight Committee of representatives from these agencies sets policy and resolves issues.

Ahmann, Audrey; Jones, Rick

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Power requirements in the Missouri River Basin. [In 1950  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented on the physical characteristics of the Missouri River Region, which includes parts of Montana, Wyoming, North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri and Kansas, on the factors affecting the electric power market in 1950, and predictions on the growth of power demand. (LCL)

1950-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Food web architecture in natural and impounded rivers of the Upper Parana drainage basin, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Freshwater ecosystems are some of the most threatened on the planet. Efforts to conserve, restore, or otherwise manage large rivers and the services they provide are hindered by limited understanding of the functional dynamics of these systems. This shortcoming is especially evident with regard to trophic structure and energy flow. In this study I use natural abundances of carbon and nitrogen isotopes to examine patterns of energy flow and food-chain length of large-river food webs characterized by different landscape-scale hydrologic features. Ten locations along an approximately 500 km stretch of the Upper Paran�¡ River Basin, Brazil, provided the setting for this work. Carbon derived from C3 plants and phytoplankton were the dominant energy sources across all webs, but relative contributions differed among landscape types (low-gradient river, high-gradient river, river stretches downstream of reservoirs, and reservoirs). Increases in food chain length corresponded with higher relative importance of phytoplankton derived carbon, likely due to size-structured effects of the phytoplankton-zooplankton-secondary consumer trophic link. River impoundment corresponded with decreased ecological and economic efficiency of fisheries production, an important ecosystem service provided by many tropical rivers.

Hoeinghaus, David Joseph

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations in the Northwest are decreasing. Genetic diversity is being lost at an alarming rate. Along with reduced population and genetic variability, the loss of biodiversity means a diminished environmental adaptability. The Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) strives to ensure availability of genetic samples of the existing male salmonid population by establishing and maintaining a germplasm repository. The sampling strategy, initiated in 1992, has been to collect and preserve male salmon and steelhead genetic diversity across the geographic landscape by sampling within the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin, assuming a metapopulation structure existed historically. Gamete cryopreservation conserves genetic diversity in a germplasm repository, but is not a recovery action for listed fish species. The Tribe was funded in 2001 by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to coordinate gene banking of male gametes from Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin. In 2001, a total of 398 viable chinook salmon semen samples from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Lookingglass Hatchery (Imnaha River stock), Lake Creek, the South Fork Salmon River weir, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery, and Sawtooth Hatchery (upper Salmon River stock) were cryopreserved. Also, 295 samples of male steelhead gametes from Dworshak Hatchery, Fish Creek, Grande Ronde River, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery and Oxbow Hatchery were also cryopreserved. The Grande Ronde chinook salmon captive broodstock program stores 680 cryopreserved samples at the University of Idaho as a long-term archive, half of the total samples. A total of 3,206 cryopreserved samples from Snake River basin steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, from 1992 through 2001, are stored in two independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU). Two large freezer tanks are located at each university. Recommendations for future gene banking efforts include the need for establishment of a regional genome resource bank, an emphasis on cryopreserving wild unmarked fish, continued fertility trials, and genetic analysis on all fish represented in the germplasm repository.

Armstrong, Robyn; Kucera, Paul

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2001 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Projects continued to be maintained on 49 private properties, one 25-year Non-Exclusive Bureau of Indian Affairs' Easement was secured, six new projects implemented and two existing project areas improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River, upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek, Cottonwood Creek and Buckaroo Creek. New enhancements included: (1) construction of 11,264 feet of fencing between River Mile 43.0 and 46.5 on the Umatilla River, (2) a stream bank stabilization project implemented at approximately River Mile 63.5 Umatilla River to stabilize 330 feet of eroding stream bank and improve instream habitat diversity, included construction of eight root wad revetments and three boulder J-vanes, (3) drilling a 358-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 46.0 Umatilla River, (4) installing a 50-foot bottomless arch replacement culvert at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek, (5) installing a Geoweb stream ford crossing on Mission Creek (6) installing a 22-foot bottomless arch culvert at approximately River Mile 0.5 Cottonwood Creek, and (7) providing fence materials for construction of 21,300 feet of livestock exclusion fencing in the Buckaroo Creek Drainage. An approximate total of 3,800 native willow cuttings and 350 pounds of native grass seed was planted at new upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek and Cottonwood Creek project sites. Habitat improvements implemented at existing project sites included development of a 105-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 12.0 Wildhorse Creek and construction of an engineered stream ford at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek. A total of $277,848 in financial cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Workforce Investment Act, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Umatilla County and Pheasants Forever for planning efforts and habitat enhancements. Monitoring continued to quantify baseline conditions and the effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 96 existing and three newly established photo points to document habitat recovery and pre-project conditions. Transects were measured at three stream channel cross sections to assist with engineering and design and to obtain baseline data regarding channel morphology. Biological inventories were conducted at River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek to determine pre-project fish utilization above and below the passage barrier. Post-project inventories were also conducted at River Mile 85.0 of the Umatilla River at a project site completed in 1999. Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Eco-Pacific. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist project personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs. Water Works Consulting, Duck Creek Associates and Ed Salminen Consulting were subcontracted for watershed assessment and restoration planning in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed. A document detailing current conditions in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed and necessary restoration actions will be availa

Shaw, R. Todd; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program : Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam is the major counting and collection point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from October 23, 1992 to July 14, 1993. A total of 1,913 summer steelhead; 239 adult and 64 jack fall chinook; 355 adult and 174 jack coho; and 1,205 adult and 16 jack spring chinook were collected. Fish collected were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam using either a 370 or 3,000 gallon liberation unit. The Westland Canal facility, the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts was in operation from February 15 to July 29, 1993. During that period, fish were trapped 46 days. An estimated 3,228 pounds of fish were transported from the Westland Canal trap to the Umatilla River boat ramp at rivermile 0.5.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In spite of an intensive management effort, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Northwest have not recovered and are currently listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. In addition to the loss of diversity from stocks that have already gone extinct, decreased genetic diversity resulting from genetic drift and inbreeding is a major concern. Reduced population and genetic variability diminishes the environmental adaptability of individual species and entire ecological communities. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), in cooperation with Washington State University and the University of Idaho, established a germplasm repository in 1992 in order to preserve the remaining salmonid diversity in the region. The germplasm repository provides long-term storage for cryopreserved gametes. Although only male gametes can be cryopreserved, conserving the male component of genetic diversity will maintain future management options for species recovery. NPT efforts have focused on preserving salmon and steelhead gametes from the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin. However, the repository is available for all management agencies to contribute gamete samples from other regions and species. In 2002 a total of 570 viable semen samples were added to the germplasm repository. This included the gametes of 287 chinook salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River (Lookingglass Hatchery), Lake Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery), and upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Hatchery) and the gametes of 280 steelhead from the North Fork Clearwater River (Dworshak Hatchery), Fish Creek, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery) and Snake River (Oxbow Hatchery). In addition, gametes from 60 Yakima River spring chinook and 34 Wenatchee River coho salmon were added to the repository by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, respectively. To date, a total of 3,928 Columbia River salmon and steelhead gamete samples and three Kootenai River white sturgeon are preserved in the repository. Samples are stored in independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU).

Young, William; Kucera, Paul

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Relationships between Climatic and Hydrological Changes in the Upper Mississippi River Basin: A SWAT and Multi-GCM Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in major climatic and hydrological quantities in the upper Mississippi River basin and their interrelationships are studied with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool being driven by the contemporary climate and future scenario simulations ...

Er Lu; Eugene S. Takle; Jha Manoj

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A 36-yr Climatological Description of the Evaporative Sources of Warm-Season Precipitation in the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrestrial and oceanic sources of moisture that supply warm-season rainfall to the Mississippi River basin and its subbasins are examined over a 36-yr period (1963–98). Using hourly observed precipitation, National Centers for Environmental ...

Kaye L. Brubaker; Paul A. Dirmeyer; Arief Sudradjat; Benjamin S. Levy; Fredric Bernal

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Simulation of Water Sources and Precipitation Recycling for the MacKenzie, Mississippi, and Amazon River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An atmospheric general circulation model simulation for 1948–97 of the water budgets for the MacKenzie, Mississippi, and Amazon River basins is presented. In addition to the water budget, passive tracers are included to identify the geographic ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Jiun-Dar Chern

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Thermal Characteristics and Energy Balance of Various-Size Canadian Shield Lakes in the Mackenzie River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the thermal and energy budget characteristics of four different-size Canadian Shield lakes in the Mackenzie River basin during the ice-free season of 2000. The objectives are to characterize and compare the surface ...

Claire J. Oswald; Wayne R. Rouse

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Model-Based Estimation of Dynamic Effect on Twenty-First-Century Precipitation for Swiss River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of twenty-first-century precipitation for seven Swiss river basins are generated by linking high-resolution (2 km × 2 km) radar-estimated precipitation observations to a global climate model (GCM) via synoptic weather patterns. The use ...

James V. Rudolph; Katja Friedrich; Urs Germann

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Role of Multimodel Climate Forecasts in Improving Water and Energy Management over the Tana River Basin, Kenya  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Masinga Reservoir located in the upper Tana River Basin, Kenya, is extremely important in supplying country’s hydropower and protecting downstream ecology. The Dam serves as the primary storage reservoir, controlling streamflow through a ...

C. Oludhe; Sankarasubramanian Arumugam; Tushar Sinha; Naresh Devineni; Upmanu Lall

120

Relationships Between Landscape Habitat Variables and Chinook Salmon Production in the Columbia River Basin, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication concerns the investigation of potential relationships between various landscape habitat variables and estimates of fish production from 25 index stocks of spring/summer chinook salmon with the Columbia River Basin.

Thompson, William L.; Lee, Danny C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Columbia River Basin Seasonal Volumes and Statistics, 1928-1989. 1990 Level Modified Streamflows Computed Seasonal Volumes 61-Year Statistics.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared by the A.G. Crook Company, under contract to Bonneville Power Administration, and provides statistics of seasonal volumes and streamflow for 28 selected sites in the Columbia River Basin.

A.G. Crook Company

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessing the Performance of Multiple Regional Climate Model Simulations for Seasonal Mountain Snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study assesses the performance of the regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) for the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB), U.S. Rocky Mountains. The UCRB is a major ...

Nadine Salzmann; Linda O. Mearns

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Regional Parameter Estimation of the VIC Land Surface Model: Methodology and Application to River Basins in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for regional parameter estimation of the three-layer Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC-3L) land surface model with the goal of improving the streamflow simulation for river basins in China. This methodology is ...

Zhenghui Xie; Fei Yuan; Qingyun Duan; Jing Zheng; Miaoling Liang; Feng Chen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin; 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first year report of a multi-year project that monitors the outmigration and survival of hatchery and naturally produced juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project supplements and complements ongoing or completed fisheries projects in the Umatilla river basin. Knowledge gained on outmigration and survival will assist researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts for natural fish populations. This project also completed tasks related to evaluating juvenile salmonid passage at Three Mile Falls Dam and West Extension Canal.

Knapp, Suzanne M.; Cameron, William A.; Shapleigh, Stacey L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, La Grande, OR)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning,and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. This report covers work accomplished by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation from April 1991 through May 1992. This program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Measure 704 (d)(1) 34.02) as partial mitigation for construction of hydroelectric dams and the subsequent losses of anadromous fish throughout the Columbia River system.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin; 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second year report of a multi-year project that monitors the outmigration and survival of hatchery and naturally-produced juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project supplements and complements ongoing or completed fisheries projects in the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on outmigration and survival will assist researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts for natural and restored fish populations. The authors also report on tasks related to evaluating juvenile salmonid passage at Three Mile Falls Dam and West Extension Canal.

Knapp, Suzanne M.; Kern, J. Chris; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ohio River Basin Trading Project Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) Informational Meeting: Ohio Department of Natural Resou rces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Basin Trading Project is a first-of-a-kind interstate nutrient trading program that represents a comprehensive approach to designing and developing credit markets for nitrogen and phosphorus discharges. The intent of this trading program is to allow exchanges of water quality credits for nitrogen and phosphorus aimed at protecting and improving watersheds at lower overall costs in the Ohio River Basin. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is coordinating this project with support f...

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seam Well Completion Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas September 2003 DOE/NETL-2003/1193 Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (Strategic Center for Natural Gas) DOE/NETL-2003/1193 September 2003 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

129

Barriers and Solutions for Farmer Participation in the Ohio River Basin Water Quality Trading Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a multiyear collaborative effort, American Farmland Trust (AFT) convened six listening sessions with approximately 150 agricultural producers (farmers) in the Ohio River Basin (ORB) to determine their readiness to sell nutrient credits in a regional water quality trading (WQT) market. In a WQT market, municipal wastewater treatment plants, industrial manufacturing plants, and electric power companies can purchase nutrient credits to meet their regulatory requirements. They pay farmers to imple...

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Impact of Powder River Basin Coal on Power and Fuel Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder River Basin coal is becoming everybody's business. Its use has skyrocketed, increasing beyond expectations in every time period since development took off in the 1970s. The trend shows no signs of slowing down and may even accelerate. This report explores how much further growth is possible by 2005, how power prices may be affected in different regions, and what this means for other coal supply regions.

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Response to Congressional inquiry regarding seepage basins at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared in response to the request by the House Appropriations Committee to address the permanent isolation and containment/removal of the contaminants associated with the seepage basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Many of the activities regarding groundwater monitoring and status referred to in this report will be discussed in detail in a companion report on the Groundwater Monitoring Program at the SRS [(U), WSRC-RP-89-889].

1989-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

File:Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf Size of this preview: 464 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 465 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,278 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 3.79 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 72 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:44, 13 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:44, 13 November 2012 1,278 × 1,650, 72 pages (3.79 MB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs)

133

Geothermal energy resource investigations in the Eastern Copper River Basin, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of a review of the geological, geochemical and geophysical data available for the Eastern Copper River basin with emphasis on the mud volcanoes, and the results of geophysical and geochemical studies carried out in the summers of 1982 and 1984. The purpose was to determine if there are geothermal energy resources in the Copper River Basin. The Eastern Copper River basin is situated on the flanks of a major volcano, Mt. Drum, which was active as late as 200,000 years ago and which is thought to have retained significant amounts of residual heat at high levels. Mt. Wrangell, farther to the east, has been volcanically active up to the present time. The 1982 geophysical and geochemical surveys located three principal areas of possible geothermal interest, one near Tazlina and two near the Klawasi mud volcanoes. The intensive survey work of 1984 was concentrated on those areas. We have integrated the results of soil helium, soil mercury, gravity, aeromagnetic, electrical, self-potential, and controlled-source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) surveys to evaluate the geothermal potential of the areas studied. 36 figs.

Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Assessing Pacific Lamprey Status in the Columbia River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the Columbia River drainage, salmonid-based monitoring programs have historically been used to assess status of both adult and juvenile Pacific lamprey. We compared adult lamprey counts at hydropower dams to recent radiotelemetry results and found that the counts underestimated losses between some dams and overestimated passage times through reservoirs. Count data were not correlated with trap captures of adults conducted in the same area and at the same time, likely due to lamprey-specific behaviors that result in inaccurate counts. We recommend maintenance of traditional count protocols, but emphasize the need for continued research to develop an accurate correction factor to apply to these data. Existing salmonid-based sampling for juvenile lamprey is inadequate and we highlight the need for standardized larval lamprey monitoring that provides both abundance and size distributions. Our electrofishing survey for juvenile lamprey indicated that this technique provides critical information on lamprey recruitment and is feasible over large spatial scales.

Moser, Mary L.; Close, David A.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Modelling the fate and transport of negatively buoyant storm-river water in small multi-basin lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of negatively buoyant river plumes in a small multi-basin kettle lake with steep bathymetry (Toolik Lake, AK) are simulated using a Cartesian hydrodynamic model based on the solution of the three-dimensional shallow water equations. To validate ... Keywords: Flow paths, Lakes, River, Shallow water models

Francisco J. Rueda; Sally MacIntyre

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration in the Powder River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unminable coal beds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this report is to provide a final topical report on enhanced coal bed methane recovery and CO2 sequestration to the U.S. Department of Energy in fulfillment of a Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership milestone. This report summarizes work done at Idaho National Laboratory in support of Phase II of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership. Research that elucidates the interaction of CO2 and coal is discussed with work centering on the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Sorption-induced strain, also referred to as coal swelling/shrinkage, was investigated. A new method of obtaining sorption-induced strain was developed that greatly decreases the time necessary for data collection and increases the reliability of the strain data. As coal permeability is a strong function of sorption-induced strain, common permeability models were used to fit measured permeability data, but were found inadequate. A new permeability model was developed that can be directly applied to coal permeability data obtained under laboratory stress conditions, which are different than field stress conditions. The coal permeability model can be used to obtain critical coal parameters that can be applied in field models. An economic feasibility study of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming was done. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 Mg) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin, they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

139

Preliminary geologic characterization of Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The geology and stratigraphy of natural gas deposits in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming, was investigated. The study will be utilized to help determine the gas potential of the basin.

Johnson, R.C.; Finn, T.M.; Keefer, W.R.; Flores, R.M.; Keighin, C.W.; Szmajter, R.J.; Nuccio, V.F.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Early life history study of Grande Ronde River Basin chinook salmon. Annual progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde River originates in the Blue Mountains in northeast Oregon and flows 334 kilometers to its confluence with the Snake River near Rogersburg, Washington. Historically, the Grande Ronde River produced an abundance of salmonids including stocks of spring, summer and fall chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon, and summer steelhead. During the past century, numerous factors have caused the reduction of salmon stocks such that only stocks of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead remain. The sizes of spring chinook salmon populations in the Grande Ronde basin also have been declining steadily and are substantially depressed from estimates of historic levels. It is estimated that prior to the construction of the Columbia and Snake River dams, more than 20,000 adult spring chinook salmon returned to spawn in the Grande Ronde River basin. A spawning escapement of 12,200 adults was estimated for the Grande Ronde River basin in 1957. Recent population estimates have been variable year to year, yet remain a degree of magnitude lower than historic estimates. In 1992, the escapement estimate for the basin was 1,022 adults (2.4 {times} number of redds observed). In addition to a decline in population abundance, a constriction of spring chinook salmon spawning distribution is evident in the Grande Ronde basin. Historically, 21 streams supported spawning chinook salmon, yet today the majority of production is limited to eight tributary streams and the mainstem upper Grande Ronde River. Numerous factors are thought to contribute to the decline of spring chinook salmon in the Snake River and its tributaries. These factors include passage problems and increased mortality of juvenile and adult migrants at mainstem Columbia and Snake river dams, overharvest, and habitat degradation associated with timber, agricultural, and land development practices. More than 80% of anadromous fish habitat in the upper Grande Ronde River is considered to be degraded.

Keefe, M.; Anderson, D.J.; Carmichasel, R.W.; Jonasson, B.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the Trenton-Black River interval to delineation of regional limestone diagenesis in the basin. A consistent basin-wide pattern of marine and burial diagenesis that resulted in relatively low porosity and permeability in the subtidal facies of these rocks has been documented across the study area. Six diagenetic stages have been recognized: four marine diagenesis stages and two burial diagenesis stages. This dominance of extensive marine and burial diagenesis yielded rocks with low reservoir potential, with the exception of fractured limestone and dolostone reservoirs. Commercial amounts of porosity, permeability and petroleum accumulation appear to be restricted to areas where secondary porosity developed in association with hydrothermal fluid flow along faults and fractures related to basement tectonics. A broad range of geochemical and fluid inclusion analyses have aided in a better understanding of the origin of the dolomites in the Trenton and Black River Groups over the study area. The results of these analyses support a hydrothermal origin for all of the various dolomite types found to date. The fluid inclusion data suggest that all of the dolomite types analyzed formed from hot saline brines. The dolomite is enriched in iron and manganese, which supports a subsurface origin for the dolomitizing brine. Strontium isotope data suggest that the fluids passed through basement rocks or immature siliciclastic rocks prior to forming the dolomites. All of these data suggest a hot, subsurface origin for the dolomites. The project database continued to be redesigned, developed and deployed. Production data are being reformatted for standard relational database management system requirements. Use of the project intranet by industry partners essentially doubled during the reporting period.

Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Estimating Total Discharge in the Yangtze River Basin Using Satellite-Based Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: The measurement of total basin discharge along coastal regions is necessary for understanding the hydrological and oceanographic issues related to the water and energy cycles. However, only the observed streamflow (gauge-based observation) is used to estimate the total fluxes from the river basin to the ocean, neglecting the portion of discharge that infiltrates to underground and directly discharges into the ocean. Hence, the aim of this study is to assess the total discharge of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang) basin. In this study, we explore the potential response of total discharge to changes in precipitation (from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission—TRMM), evaporation (from four versions of the Global Land Data Assimilation—GLDAS, namely, CLM, Mosaic, Noah and VIC), and water-storage changes (from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment—GRACE) by using the terrestrial water budget method. This method has been validated by comparison with the observed streamflow, and shows an agreement with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 14.30 mm/month for GRACE-based discharge and 20.98 mm/month for that derived from precipitation minus evaporation (P ? E). This improvement of approximately 32 % indicates that monthly terrestrial water-storage

Vagner G. Ferreira; Zheng Gong; Xiufeng He; Yonglei Zhang; Samuel A. Andam-akorful

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in the Meacham Creek, Wildhorse Creek, Greasewood Creek, West Fork of Greasewood Creek and Mission Creek watersheds. Additional enhancements on Wildhorse Creek and the lower Greasewood Creek System included: (1) installation of 0.43 miles of smooth wire between river mile (RM) 10.25 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek (fence posts and structures had been previously placed on this property during the 1994 - 95 project period), (2) construction of 46 sediment retention structures in stream channels and maintenance to 18 existing sediment retention structures between RM 9.5 and RM 10.25 Wildhorse Creek, and (3) revegetation of stream corridor areas and adjacent terraces with 500 pounds of native grass seed or close species equivalents and 5,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funds were cost shared with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, provided under this project, to accomplish habitat enhancements. Water quality monitoring continued and was expanded for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Physical habitat surveys were conducted on the lower 13 river miles of Wildhorse Creek and within the Greasewood Creek Project Area to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area.

Shaw, R.Todd

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Agribusiness geothermal energy utilization potential of Klamath and Western Snake River Basins, Oregon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Resource assessment and methods of direct utilization for existing and prospective food processing plants have been determined in two geothermal resource areas in Oregon. Ore-Ida Foods, Inc. and Amalgamated Sugar Company in the Snake River Basin; Western Polymer Corporation (potato starch extraction) and three prospective industries--vegetable dehydration, alfalfa drying and greenhouses--in the Klamath Basin have been analyzed for direct utilization of geothermal fluids. Existing geologic knowledge has been integrated to indicate locations, depth, quality, and estimated productivity of the geothermal reservoirs. Energy-economic needs and balances, along with cost and energy savings associated with field development, delivery systems, in-plant applications and fluid disposal have been calculated for interested industrial representatives.

Lienau, P.J.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydrological Cycle over South and Southeast Asian River Basins as Simulated by PCMDI/CMIP3 Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate how CMIP3 climate models describe the hydrological cycle over four major South Asian river basins (Indus, Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong) for the XX, XXI, and XXII centuries. For the XX century, models simulated water balance and total runoff quantities are neither consistent with the observed mean river discharges nor among the models. Most of the models underestimate the water balance for the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Mekong basin and overestimate it for the Indus basin. The only modest inter-model agreement is found for the Indus basin in terms of precipitation, evaporation and the strength of the hydrological cycle and for the Brahmaputra basin in terms of evaporation. While some models show inconsistencies for the Indus and the Ganges basins, most of the models seem to conserve water at the river basin scale up to a good degree of approximation. Models agree on a negative change of the water balance for Indus and a positive change in the strength of the hydrological cycle, whereas for Brahma...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Pascale, Salvatore

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Agricultural implications of reduced water supplies in the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of the energy sector in the energy-rich but water-restricted Western US has presented a potential conflict with the irrigated agricultural sector. This study measures the direct impacts on farm income and employment resulting from the transfer of water from agriculture to energy in two specific geographical areas - the Green and Upper Yellowstone River Basins. We used a linear programming model to evaluate the impacts of reduced water supplies. Through the use of regional multipliers, we expanded our analysis to include regional impacts. Volume I provides the major analysis of these impacts. Volume II provides further technical data.

Lansford, R. R.; Roach, F.; Gollehon, N. R.; Creel, B. J.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

NOx Reduction Assessment for Tangentially Fired Boilers Burning Powder River Basin Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of and the most cost-effective approaches for reducing nitrous oxide (NOx) emissions for tangentially fired boilers burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in order to achieve average NOx emission rates of 0.15 lb/mmBtu (110 ppm), or lower. This is typically achievable by a deep level of combustion air staging, which may be possible if operational issues experienced during low combustion air operation (for example, slagging) can be mitigated. Acc...

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Evaluation of Flammability and Explosibility Characteristics of Powder River Basin Coals and Switchgrass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass co-firing is currently a low-cost renewable-energy option; Powder River Basin (PRB) coal is currently a low-sulfur, low-NOx fuel. Both biomass and PRB are very dusty fuels, and with the proper concentrations and an ignition source, these dusts can create powerful explosions. Understanding and measuring their levels of concentration and explosibility will aid in avoiding a high concentration of these dusts in identified power plant locations. This knowledge will help lower the risk of explosion at...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six projects, two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River were part of the exercise. Several thousand native plants as bare-root stock and cuttings were reintroduced to the sites and 18 acres of floodplain corridor was seeded with native grass seed. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan.

Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Velocity Measurements at Six Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Summer 1988 : Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE) are funding the construction and evaluation of fish passage facilities and fish protection facilities at irrigation and hydroelectric diversions in the Yakima River Basin, Washington State. The program provides offsite enhancement to compensate for fish and wildlife losses caused by hydroelectric development throughout the Columbia River Basin, and addresses natural propagation of salmon to help mitigate the impact of irrigation in the Yakima River Basin. This report evaluates the flow characteristics of the screening facilities. Studies consisted of velocity measurements taken in front of the rotary drum screens and within the fish bypass systems during peak flows. Measurements of approach velocity and sweep velocity were emphasized in these studies; however, vertical velocity was also measured. 5 refs., 18 figs., 15 tabs.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Differences in the Potential Hydrologic Impact of Climate Change to the Athabasca and Fraser River Basins of Canada with and without Considering Shifts in Vegetation Patterns Induced by Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research objectives are to estimate differences between the potential impact of climatic change to the Athabasca River basin (ARB) and Fraser River basin (FRB) of Canada with and without considering shifts in vegetation patterns induced by ...

E. Kerkhoven; T. Y. Gan

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Feedback mechanisms between water availability and water use in a semi-arid river basin: A spatially explicit multi-agent simulation approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the processes responsible for the distribution of water availability over space and time is of great importance to spatial planning in a semi-arid river basin. In this study the usefulness of a multi-agent simulation (MAS) approach for ... Keywords: Brazil, Irrigation, Multi-agent simulation, River basin, Semi-arid, Water availability

Pieter R. van Oel; Maarten S. Krol; Arjen Y. Hoekstra; Renzo R. Taddei

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Climate control on Quaternary coal fires and landscape evolution, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana  

SciTech Connect

Late Cenozoic stream incision and basin excavation have strongly influenced the modern Rocky Mountain landscape, but constraints on the timing and rates of erosion are limited. The geology of the Powder River basin provides an unusually good opportunity to address spatial and temporal patterns of stream incision. Numerous coal seams in the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Wasatch Formations within the basin have burned during late Cenozoic incision, as coal was exposed to dry and oxygen-rich near-surface conditions. The topography of this region is dominated by hills capped with clinker, sedimentary rocks metamorphosed by burning of underlying coal beds. We use (U-Th)/He ages of clinker to determine times of relatively rapid erosion, with the assumption that coal must be near Earth's surface to burn. Ages of 55 in situ samples range from 0.007 to 1.1 Ma. Clinker preferentially formed during times in which eccentricity of the Earth's orbit was high, times that typically but not always correlate with interglacial periods. Our data therefore suggest that rates of landscape evolution in this region are affected by climate fluctuations. Because the clinker ages correlate better with eccentricity time series than with an oxygen isotope record of global ice volume, we hypothesize that variations in solar insolation modulated by eccentricity have a larger impact on rates of landscape evolution in this region than do glacial-interglacial cycles.

Riihimaki, C.A.; Reiners, P.W.; Heffern, E.L. [Drew University, Madison, NJ (USA). Dept. of Biology

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Decision Support System for irrigation water allocation along the middle reaches of the Heihe River Basin, Northwest China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the water resource management of the inland river basins of northwestern China, a Decision Support System (DSS) is developed to provide an operative computer platform for decision makers. The DSS is designed according to actual water resource ... Keywords: Decision Support System, GIS, Irrigation management, Irrigation water allocation, Water resource management

Yingchun Ge, Xin Li, Chunlin Huang, Zhuotong Nan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reservoir Characterization of Coals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, to Test the Feasibility of CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

80 65 51 36 21 mD a) b) c) 7 Reservoir Characterization of Coals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming are particularly interested in whether hydraulically fracturing the coal will increase injectivity and improve of sequestration. We found that gravity and buoyancy were the major driving forces behind gas flow within the coal

Stanford University

162

Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

Haak, Hein

163

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents a brief synopsis and discussion of wildlife activities undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration. The objectives of the program were wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. (ACR)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys: Cowlitz River Basin, 1934-1942 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Cowlitz River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead. The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, [open quotes]to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes[close quotes]. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946. Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration conducted a study relating to the epidemiology and control of three fish diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These three diseases were ceratomyxosis caused by the myxosporidan parasite Ceratomyxa Shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the causative agent Renibacterium salmoninarum, and infectious hematopoietic necrosis, caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is highly destructive and difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The geographic range of the infectious stage of C. Shasta has been extended to include the Snake River to the Oxbow and Hells Canyon Dams. These are the farthest upriver sites tested. Infections of ceratomyxosis were also initiated in the east fork of the Lewis River and in the Washougal River in Washington. Laboratory studies with this parasite failed to indicate that tubeficids are required in its life cycle. Bacterial kidney disease has been demonstrated in all life stages of salmonids: in the eggs, fry, smolts, juveniles and adults in the ocean, and in fish returning to fresh water. Monoclonal antibodies produced against R. salmoninarum demonstrated antigenic differences among isolates of the bacterium. Monoclonal antibodies also showed antigens of R. salmoninarum which are similar to those of a wide variety of gram positive and gram negative bacteria. A demonstration project at Round Butte Hatchery showed U V treatment to be an effective method for reducing the microbial population of the water supply and could reduce risks of IHNV. Tangential flow filtration was used successfully to concentrate IHNV from environmental water. At Round Butte Hatchery the carrier rate of IHNV in adults was very low and there was no subsequent mortality resulting from IHN in juveniles.

Fryer, John L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy  

SciTech Connect

We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1983 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration conducted a study relating to the epidemiology and control of three fish diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These three diseases were ceratomyxosis which is caused by the myxosporidan parasite Ceratomyxa shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the etiological agent of which is Renibacterium salmoninarum, and infectious hematopoietic necrosis, which is caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is highly destructive and difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The presence of ceratomyxosis in rainbow trout exposed at McNary and Little Goose Dams extends the range of this disease about 200 miles further up the Columbia River and into the Snake River drainage. Wallowa steelhead trout were less resistant to this disease than other upriver stocks tested. Juvenile salmonids entering the Columbia River estuary were collected periodically between May to September, 1983. Nine percent of the beach seined chinook salmon and 5, 11 and 12%, respectively, of the purse seined coho and chinook salmon and steelhead trout were infected with Ceratomyxa shasta. Experiments indicated ceratomyxosis progresses in salt water at the same rate as in fresh water once the fish have become infected. These data indicate a longer exposure to infective stages of C. shasta than previously identified and that approximately 10% of the migrating salmonids are infected and will probably die from this organism after entering salt water. Since sampling began in 1981 the bacterial kidney disease organism, Renibacterium salmoninarum, has been detected by the fluorescent antibody test in seven salmonid species caught in the open ocean off the coasts of Washington and Oregon. The bacterium has been found primarily in chinook salmon (11%) with lesions in 2.5% of these fish. This disease was also detected at levels ranging from 17% in coho salmon to 25% in chinook salmon seined from the Columbia River just before entering the estuary. Interpretation of these numbers suggests an even greater economic impact on Columbia River salmonid stocks than that proposed for C. shasta. Fertilized eggs from bacterial kidney disease infected parents examined after one month of incubation revealed the presence of bacteria with identical morphology to R. salmoninarum on or in the egg wall further reinforcing the proposed vertical transmission of this disease organism. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was recovered at the 67% level from seeded water samples supplemented with 1% fetal calf serum. Virus injected into unfertilized eggs survived for over two weeks; in eyed eggs the virus also replicated. Epizootics caused by IHNV occurred in two of the 8 separate groups of steelhead trout fingerlings held in LJV treated water at Round Butte Hatchery. Comparing these results to those in the vertical transmission experiment where none of the groups developed IHNV suggests that vertical transmission of IHNV, if it occurs, is a very infrequent or random event. On three occasions IHNV was detected in ovarian fluid samples after storage for 6--9 days at 4 C. No virus had been detected in these samples at spawning. This suggests the presence of an interfering substance, perhaps anti-IHNV antibody in ovarian fluid. This observation raises the possibility that IHNV is much more widespread throughout Columbia River Basin salmonid stocks than previously believed.

Fryer, John L.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

SWAT UNGAUGED: HYDROLOGICAL BUDGET AND CROP YIELD PREDICTIONS IN THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physically based, distributed hydrologic models are increasingly used in assessments of water resources, best management practices, and climate and land use changes. Model performance evaluation in ungauged basins is an important research topic. In this study, we propose a framework for developing Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) input data, including hydrography, terrain, land use, soil, tile, weather, and management practices, for the Upper Mississippi River basin (UMRB). We also present a performance evaluation of SWAT hydrologic budget and crop yield simulations in the UMRB without calibration. The uncalibrated SWAT model ably predicts annual streamflow at 11 USGS gauges and crop yield at a four?digit hydrologic unit code (HUC) scale. For monthly streamflow simulation, the performance of SWAT is marginally poor compared with that of annual flow, which may be due to incomplete information about reservoirs and dams within the UMRB. Further validation shows that SWAT can predict base flow contribution ratio reasonably well. Compared with three calibrated SWAT models developed in previous studies of the entire UMRB, the uncalibrated SWAT model presented here can provide similar results. Overall, the SWAT model can provide satisfactory predictions on hydrologic budget and crop yield in the UMRB without calibration. The results emphasize the importance and prospects of using accurate spatial input data for the physically based SWAT model. This study also examines biofuel?biomass production by simulating all agricultural lands with switchgrass, producing satisfactory results in estimating biomass availability for biofuel production.

Srinivasan, Raghavan; Zhang, Xuesong; Arnold, J. G.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Expert initial review of Columbia River Basin salmonid management models: Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past years, several fish passage models have been developed to examine the downstream survival of salmon during their annual migration through the Columbia River reservoir system to below Bonneville Dam. More recently, models have been created to simulate the survival of salmon throughout the entire life cycle. The models are used by various regional agencies and native American tribes to assess impacts of dam operation, harvesting, and predation on salmonid abundance. These models are now also being used to assess extinction probabilities and evaluate restoration alternatives for threatened and endangered salmonid stocks. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) coordinated an initial evaluation of the principal models by a panel of outside, expert reviewers. None of the models were unequivocally endorsed by any reviewer. Significant strengths and weaknesses were noted for each with respect to reasonability of assumptions and equations, adequacy of documentation, adequacy of supporting data, and calibration procedures. Although the models reviewed differ in some important respects, all reflect a common conceptual basis in classical population dynamic theory and a common empirical basis consisting of the available time series of salmonid stock data, hydrographic records, experimental studies of dam passage parameters, and measurements of reservoir mortality. The results of this initial review are not to be construed as a comprehensive scientific peer review of existing Columbia River Basin (CRB) salmon population models and data. The peer review process can be enhanced further by a dynamic exchange regional modelers and scientific panel experts involving interaction and feedback.

Barnthouse, L.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1987 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration has been conducting a study concerning the epidemiology and control of three fish pathogens which cause major disease problems in salmonids of the Columbia River basin. The pathogens studied include Cera to myxa Shasta, the myxosporean parasite which causes ceratomyxosis; Renibacterium salmoninarum, the bacterium which is the etiological agent of bacterial kidney disease; and the rhabdovirus which causes infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN). During this project, the host and geographic range of C. Shasta have been more precisely determined and the known geographic range has been significantly expanded. The effects of the parasite on fish migrating through the Columbia River and on their introduction into salt water have been examined. Similar studies have been conducted with R. salmoninarum and it has been shown that bacterial kidney disease occurs at all life stages of salmonids and is responsible for mortality in both fresh and salt water. It has also been demonstrated that different isolates of R. salmoninarum have different antigenic composition. Results of demonstration projects designed to control IHN by using UV treated water for early rearing of salmonid fry were equivocal. The scope of the project was considerably narrowed and focused during the past two years The project has concentrated on a study concerning the biology of C. Shasta and the identification of potential chemotherapeutants for control of bacterial kidney disease. The emphasis of work on C. Shasta has been its pathogenesis. This aspect of the parasite has been investigated using histopathologic and immunologic methodology. Mode of transmission, the nature of the infectious stage, and potential intermediate hosts of the parasite have also been areas of active research. Classes of chemotherapeutants with the highest potential for efficacy against R. salmoninarum have been identified through literature searches and consultation with pharmacologists. Experimental drugs have been requested and received from several pharmaceutical manufacturers. The in vitro sensitivity of R. salmoninarum and other selected fish pathogens to more than 100 antimicrobial compounds has been tested. The project is related to measure 704(h)(2)(d) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The results will contribute to fish health which will directly contribute to the protection of fish.

Fryer, John L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparison of Rainfall Characteristics and Convective Properties of Monsoon Precipitation Systems over South China and the Yangtze and Huai River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall characteristics and convective properties of monsoon precipitation systems over South China (SC) and the Yangtze and Huai River basin (YHRB) are investigated using multiple satellite products, surface rainfall observations, NCEP ...

Yali Luo; Hui Wang; Renhe Zhang; Weimiao Qian; Zhengzhao Luo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Water Balance for the Ji-Paraná River Basin, Western Amazon, Using a Simple Method through Geographical Information Systems and Remote Sensing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thornthwaite–Mather climatological model integrated into a Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to simulate the monthly water balance for the Ji-Paraná river basin, in the western Amazonian state of Rondônia (RO), from February 1995 ...

Danielde Castro Victoria; Alailson Venceslau Santiago; Maria Victoria Ramos Ballester; Antonio Roberto Pereira; Reynaldo Luiz Victoria; Jeffrey E. Richey

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

184

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Microbiology at Oregon State University with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration has conducted a study since 1983 relating to the epidemiology and control of three diseases of salmonids in the Columbia River Basin. These diseases are ceratomyxosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Ceratomyxa Shasta, bacterial kidney disease, the etiological agent of which is Renibacterium salmoninarum and infectious hematopoietic necrosis which is caused by a rhabdovirus. Each of these diseases is difficult or impossible to treat with antimicrobial agents. The presence of the infectious stage of C. shasta was again detected at Little Goose Dam on the Snake River. The prevalence of ceratomyxosis increased from 1.1% in 1984 to 10% in 1985. None of the susceptible rainbow trout exposed in the Yakima and Umatilla Rivers died of this disease. Ceratomyxosis in resistant chinook salmon smolts seined from the Columbia River just above the estuary seems dependent on whether or not they are held after capture in fresh or salt water. In fresh water the disease incidence ranged from 7--19%, whereas in salt water it ranged from 0--3%. These results which suggest that recovery from ceratomyxosis may occur after the smolts enter salt water are different from those obtained with susceptible Alsea steelhead trout where experimental groups in salt water have died at the same rate as those in fresh water. Comparing data from groups of Columbia River chinook smolts held after capture in either fresh or salt water, R. salmoninarum is a much more effective pathogen in the salt water environment. After four years of sampling smolts in the open ocean, numbers of this microorganism sufficient to cause death have been detected in chinook (7%) and, coho salmon (2%) and steelhead trout (1%). Results from three years of sampling have consistently indicated that additional fish infected with R. salmoninarum will be detected if egg washings are included in the procedures for monitoring bacterial kidney disease in adults. Antigenic differences among strains of R. salmoninarum and common antigens present on both R. salmoninarum and other Gram positive bacteria have been demonstrated for the first time using monoclonal antibodies. All of the monoclonal antibodies belong to the murine IgGl, IgG3 or TgG2a class and subclass. Field studies at Round Butte Hatchery with the molecular filtration apparatus detected IHNV in effluent water from the adult holding pond and in water from a tank containing steelhead trout fry infected with IHN disease. The concentrations of IHNV detected in these samples suggested that in the order of 10{sup 10} virions are being released each day into the Deschutes River at the peak of steelhead trout spawning at Round Butte Hatchery. Isolation of IHNV from dead eggs suggested that virus replication during incubation may be a possible cause of egg mortality. Two possible reasons for inconsistencies in the data from the IHNV transmission studies at Round Butte Hatchery are: (1) UV treatment does not completely sterilize the water and (2) vertical transmission occurs but under, as yet, undescribed conditions. Constant IHNV production over a prolonged period has been recorded in unfiltered ovarian fluid samples. Filtration eliminates this virus production. These observations suggest that cellular components in ovarian fluid are responsible for producing the delayed appearance of IHNV after storage at 4 C for 8 to 16 days.

Fryer, John L.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2004; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2004 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

190

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fault control of channel sandstones in Dakota Formation, southwest Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The Dakota Formation is an important oil reservoir in the southwestern Powder River basin and adjoining Casper arch. Two fields, Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek, are used as examples to show the depositional environments of the Dakota and to indicate the influence of tectonic control on the distribution of the environments. Burke Ranch field is a stratigraphic trap which produces oil from the upper bench of the Dakota. The environment of deposition of the reservoir, determined by subsurface analysis, is a channel sandstone. South Cole Creek field is a structural-stratigraphic trap which produces from the lower bench of the Dakota. Two distinct facies, a channel and channel margin sandstone, exist at South Cole Creek. At both Burke Ranch and South Cole Creek it can be shown that the Dakota channels were deposited on the downthrown side of faults, which were present during Dakota time and which now are reflected on the surface by drainage patterns. An understanding of the environments of deposition of the Dakota and control of the environments by paleotectonics is necessary for exploration for these prolific reservoirs.

Moore, W.R.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin at least three times each between April 30 and August 22, 1997. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the river. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypass met current NMFS criteria and promoted timely fish bypass, if fish were protected from injury due to impingement, entrainment, and predation, and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. A bi-directional flow meter and underwater video system were essential in completing the investigation. In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites were acceptable by NMFS standards. High approach velocities and slow bypass flow were the most common problems noted. Although velocities often fluctuated from one sampling location to the next, average sweep and approach velocities were very good. In general, fish should not be impinged or experience delays in returning to the river under normal operating conditions. Most screens were properly sealed to prevent fish entrainment and injury, although potential problems were identified at several screen sites. Three sites had gap openings from the forebay to the aftbay, allowing fish to be entrained. Other sites had spaces larger than 3/32 inch where small fish could become trapped. Some drum screens had flat spots but these were not been confirmed as underwater gaps, primarily because of siltation. On rare occasions, seals were intact, but cracked or turned under. Submergence levels at the drum screen sites exceeded 85% for one third of our evaluations. Eight of 12 drum screen sites experienced high water levels during at least one evaluation. Only one operating site's submergence was measured at less than 65% submergence. Two flat plate screen sites were completely overtopped with water during one evaluation each. Although 1997 was an extreme high-water year, these overtopping events point out that some screens do not completely protect fish under the full range of potential operating conditions. Water depths at the outfall pipe were acceptable at all but four sites. Generally, water depths were low near the end of the irrigation season due to low river flows. Rock removal around the outfall pipe or pipe extension would improve the situation. We gauged the potential for predation by qualitatively measuring the types and amount of cover provided for predators in front of the screens and by recording random observations of fish large enough to be considered predators in the forebay. Predation was more likely to occur at drum screen sites than at flat plate screen sites. Drum sites provide more predator hiding places because greater amounts of woody debris accumulate under the drums and against the concrete walls that divide one screen bay from the next. Four sites had both woody debris and large fish present. These four sites were considered most likely to experience juvenile salmonid loss to predation. Periodic removal of woody debris from underneath the curvature of drum screens would decrease the likelihood of predation at these sites. Screens were generally well maintained. Automated cleaning brushes functioned properly, chains and other moving parts were well greased, and inoperative and algae-covered drum screens were eventually repaired and cleaned. However, removal of sediment build-up and accumulated woody debris are areas where improvement should be considered. Maintenance checks should include observation of bypass outfalls on a regular basis, as conditions at the end of the bypass pipe are likely to change seasonally, especially in streams with high gradients or unstable gravel. Post-season evaluations were conducted at 11 sites in November to try and confirm seal and drum screen defects, and locations of excessive sedimentation. This proved effective in several cases, but the winterization process eliminated some of the evidence. Severa

Blanton, S.; Neitzel, C.; Abernethy, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Resource appraisal of three rich oil-shale zones in the Green River Formation, Piceance Creek Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The main oil-shale-bearing member of the Eocene Green River Formation, the Parachute Creek Member, contains several distinct rich oil-shale zones that underlie large areas of Piceance Creek Basin in NW. Colorado. Three of these have been selected for an oil-shale resource-appraisal study. Two over-lie and one underlies the main saline zone in the Parachute Creek Member. The uppermost of these zones, the Mahogany Zone, is in the upper third of the Parachute Creek Member/ it ranges in thickness from less than 75 to more than 225 ft and is the most persistent oil- shale unit in the Green River Formation underlying an area of more than 1,200 sq miles in the Piceance Creek Basin. The second rich zone is separated from the Mahogany Zone by a variable thickness of sandstone, siltstone, or low- grade oil shale. This zone attains a maximum thickness of more than 250 ft and underlies an area of more than 700 sq miles. The third rich oil-shale zone is in the lower third of the Parachute Creek Member. It underlies an area of about 300 sq miles near the depositional center of the Piceance Creek Basin and attains a thickness of more than 150 ft. The 3 rich oil-shale zones have total resources of 317 billion bbl of oil in the areas appraised.

Donnell, J.R.; Blair, R.W. Jr.

1970-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Removal of mercury from powder river basin coal by low-temperature thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) to remove mercury from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal as part of the research performed under Task 2.1, Development and Optimization of a Process for the Production of a Premium Solid Fuel from Western US Coals, of the 1993 Annual Project Plan. In the tests minus 16 mesh PRB coal was fed to a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor where it was heated by contact with carbon dioxide fluidizing gas. A side stream of the gas from the reactor was passed through traps containing activated carbon where mercury driven from the coal was collected. The feed coal (which contains about 0.062 milligrams of mercury/kilogram of coal), the fines elutriated from the reactor, the activated carbon, and the condensed water from the reactor were analyzed for mercury. The solid products were analyzed using cold vapor atomic adsorption spectroscopy (ASTM D3684) while the water was analyzed using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 245.1 which is based upon reduction of mercury to elemental form followed by adsorption at a wave length of 253.7 nanometers. The results of these tests show that about 70 to 80 wt % of the mercury is removed from the coal when the temperature is raised from about 300{degree}F (149{degree}C) to about 550{degree}F (288{degree}C). The remaining 20 wt % of the mercury remains in the char at temperatures up to about 1100{degree}F (593{degree}C). About 0.5 wt % of the mercury in the feed coal is condensed with water recovered from the coal. Nearly all of the mercury driven from the coal remains in the gas stream. Fines elutriated from the reactor contain about the same concentration of mercury as the feed coal.

Merriam, N.W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

White, Tara

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead.

Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effect of Switching to Powder River Basin Coal on Increased Attemperator Use and Cold Reheat Piping Thermal Quench Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Powder River Basin PRB coal consumption has grown rapidly over the past several years. The combination of low cost and low sulfur content makes PRB coal an ideal choice to meet low SOx and NOx emission standards. Many utilities have switched to PRB coal in boilers not designed for its use, and there are significant downsides to the use of this coal. Because of the insulating quality of PRB coal ash, much of the heat from PRB coal combustion that would normally be absorbed by the waterwall tubes is carrie...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

An investigation of two homologous series of carboxylic acids in Black Trona Water from the Green River Basin  

SciTech Connect

Two series of carboxylic acids were identified in the dialysate from a sample of Black Trona Water from the Green River Basin of Wyoming. One of the series consists of straight-chain dicarboxylic acids ranging in carbon number from four to fourteen. This series had been observed by previous workers. The other series, much less abundant than the dicarboxylic acids, appears to be a series of homologous tricarboxylic acids that are derivatives of succinic acid. The structures of these compounds were determined by analysis of the mass spectra of their methyl esters and trideuteromethyl esters. Definitive biological precursors of this unusual class of compounds could not be assigned.

Branthaver, J.F.; Thomas, K.P.; Logan, E.R.; Barden, R.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The year of 2002 represented the eighth year of a multi-year project, monitoring the outmigration and survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project both supplements and complements various ongoing and completed work within the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on juvenile outmigration and survival assists researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal and fish ladder operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts of natural and restored fish populations. Findings from this study also assist in assessment of the success of upriver habitat improvement projects and provide an overall evaluation of the Umatilla River fisheries restoration program. General project objectives include: Evaluation of the outmigration and survival of natural and hatchery juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River, in an effort to enhance the understanding of migration characteristics, survival bottlenecks, species interactions and effects of management strategies. Specific objectives for 2002 included: (1) Operation of the remote interrogation system at Three Mile Falls Dam, West Extension Canal; (2) Design of improved PIT tag detection capabilities at Three Mile Falls Dam east bank adult fish ladder; (3) Estimates of migrant abundance, migration timing and in-basin survival of tagged juvenile salmonids representing various hatchery, rearing, acclimation and release strategies; (4) Monitoring of abundance and trends in natural production of salmon, steelhead and pacific lamprey; (5) Continuation of transport evaluation studies to evaluate the relative survival between transported and nontransported fish; (6) Assessment of the condition, health, size, growth and smolt status of hatchery and natural migrants; (7) Investigation of the effects of canal and fishway operations and environmental conditions on fish migration and survival; (8) Documentation of temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species; and (9) Participation in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results. Key findings for 2002 revealed: (1) Migrant abundance of natural fish was roughly 10% that of hatchery produced fish; (2) An undetermined number of hatchery summer steelhead are residualizing in the upper Umatilla basin and potentially overwintering and migrating out as 2 year old smolts; (3) Transported fish may have a survival advantage over non-transported fish; (4) The later release of hatchery summer steelhead resulted in emigration timing that differed from that of naturally-produced fish; (5) Large-grade summer steelhead released lower in the river displayed improved survival over fish released higher; (6) Extended reared steelhead did not exhibit a survival advantage over standard reared fish; (7) Second year evaluation following reduction in the subyearling fall chinook program revealed survival to be similar to pre-reduction estimates; (8) Migration success was not improved nor in-river residence time reduced by acclimation of coho salmon at RM 56; (9) Early released spring chinook salmon migration and survival was unable to be evaluated due downstream monitoring facilities being in-operable during the early migration.

White, Tara C.; Hanson, Josh T.; Jewett, Shannon M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Factors Affecting the Survival of Upstream Migrant Adult Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 9 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is developing conservation planning documentation to support the National Marine Fisheries Service`s (NMFS) recovery plan for Columbia Basin salmonid stocks that are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Information from the conservation planning documentation will be used as a partial scientific basis for identifying alternative conservation strategies and to make recommendations toward conserving, rebuilding, and ultimately removing these salmon stocks from the list of endangered species. This report describes the adult upstream survival study, a synthesis of biological analyses related to conditions affecting the survival of adult upstream migrant salmonids in the Columbia River system. The objective of the adult upstream survival study was to analyze existing data related to increasing the survival of adult migrant salmonids returning to the Snake River system. The fate and accountability of each stock during its upstream migration period and the uncertainties associated with measurements of escapement and survival were evaluated. Operational measures that affected the survival of adult salmon were evaluated including existing conditions, augmented flows from upstream storage release, and drawdown of mainstem reservoirs. The potential impacts and benefits of these measures to each ESA stock were, also described based on considerations of species behavior and run timing.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Biweekly and 21–30-Day Variations of the Subtropical Summer Monsoon Rainfall over the Lower Reach of the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lower reach of the Yangtze River basin (LYRB) is located at the central region of the mei-yu and baiu front, which represents the subtropical East Asian (EA) summer monsoon. Based on the newly released daily rainfall data, two dominant ...

Jing Yang; Bin Wang; Bin Wang; Qing Bao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Coal Blending for the Reduction of Acid Gas Emissions: A Characterization of the Milling and Combustion Blends of Powder River Basin Coal and Bituminous Coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a systematic study of performance and emission parameters from the combustion of Eastern bituminous coal, a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, and various blends of these two coals. This study also investigated the effects of coal blending on mill performance, combustion, particulate emissions, and various emissions.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Characteristics of Vertical Circulation in the Convective Boundary Layer over the Huaihe River Basin in China in the Early Summer of 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to clarify the characteristics of the convective boundary layer (CBL) over a humid terrestrial area, the Huaihe River basin in China, which is covered by a large, nearly flat plain with uniform farmland. Data were ...

Satoshi Endo; Taro Shinoda; Tetsuya Hiyama; Hiroshi Uyeda; Kenji Nakamura; Hiroki Tanaka; Kazuhisa Tsuboki

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Rainfall Variability over Mountainous and Adjacent Lake Areas: The Case of Lake Tana Basin at the Source of the Blue Nile River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The water resource of the Blue Nile River is of key regional importance to the northeastern African countries. However, little is known about the characteristics of the rainfall in the basin. In this paper, the authors presented the space–time ...

Alemseged T. Haile; Tom Rientjes; Ambro Gieske; Mekonnen Gebremichael

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1985 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status for resident fish projects currently implemented by the Bonneville Power Administration under the amended Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Projects that have been in place for a sufficient length of time are discussed in greater detail with a brief evaluation presented.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

Wilson, Wayne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Climate and Salmon Restoration in the Columbia River Basin: The Role and Usability of Seasonal Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest is dependent on the vast and complex Columbia River system for power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, municipal and industrial water supplies, and fish and wildlife habitat. In recent years ...

Roger S. Pulwarty; Kelly T. Redmond

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Space–Time Variability of Rainfall and Extreme Flood Response in the Menomonee River Basin, Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrometeorological processes that control flash flooding are examined through analyses of space–time rainfall variability and flood response in the Milwaukee metropolitan region. The analyses focus on four flood events in the Menomonee River ...

Yu Zhang; James A. Smith

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Surface Energy and Water Balance for the Arkansas–Red River Basin from the ECMWF Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average surface energy and water budgets, subsurface variables, and atmospheric profiles were computed online with an hourly timescale from the ECMWF reanalysis for five subbasins of the Mississippi River from 1985–93. The results for the ...

Alan K. Betts; Pedro Viterbo; Eric Wood

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

Stull, Elizabeth Ann

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Colorado river basin and climatic change. The sensitivity of streamflow and water supply to variations in temperature and precipitation  

SciTech Connect

Growing international concern about the greenhouse effect has led to increased interest in the regional implications of changes in temperature and precipitation patterns for a wide range of societal and natural systems, including agriculture, sea level, biodiversity, and water resources. The accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to human activities are likely to have significant, though still poorly understood, impacts on water quality and availability. One method developed over the last several years for determining how regional water resources might be affected by climatic change is to develop scenarios of changes in temperature and precipitation and to use hydrologic simulation models to study the impacts of these scenarios on runoff and water supply. In the paper the authors present the results of a multi-year study of the sensitivity of the hydrology and water resources systems in the Colorado River Basin to plausible climatic changes.

Nash, L.L.; Gleick, P.H.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Snow–Ground Interface Temperatures in the Kuparuk River Basin, Arctic Alaska: Measurements and Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air and snow–ground interface temperatures were measured during two winters at 33 stations spanning the 180-km-long Kuparuk basin in arctic Alaska. Interface temperatures averaged 7.5°C higher than air temperatures and varied in a manner that was ...

Brian Taras; Matthew Sturm; Glen E. Liston

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

224

Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Loss Assessment Summary at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities; Willamette River Basin, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat based assessments were conducted of the US Army Corps of Engineers' hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin, Oregon, to determine losses or gains to wildlife and/or wildlife habitat resulting from the development and operation of the hydroelectric-related components of the facilities. Preconstruction, postconstruction, and recent vegetation cover types at the project sites were mapped based on aerial photographs. Vegetation cover types were identified within the affected areas and acreages of each type at each period were determined. Wildlife target species were selected to represent a cross-section of species groups affected by the projects. An interagency team evaluated the suitability of the habitat to support the target species at each project for each time period. An evaluation procedure which accounted for both the quantity and quality of habitat was used to aid in assessing impacts resulting from the projects. The Willamette projects extensively altered or affected 33,407 acres of land and river in the McKenzie, Middle Fork Willamette, and Santiam river drainages. Impacts to wildlife centered around the loss of 5184 acres of old-growth conifer forest, and 2850 acres of riparian hardwood and shrub cover types. Impacts resulting from the Willamette projects included the loss of critical winter range for black-tailed deer and Roosevelt elk, and the loss of year-round habitat for deer, upland game birds, furbearers, spotted owls, pileated woodpeckers, and many other wildlife species. Bald eagles and ospreys were benefited by an increase in foraging habitat. The potential of the affected areas to support wildlife was greatly altered as a result of the Willamette projects. Losses or gains in the potential of the habitat to support wildlife will exist over the lives of the projects. Cumulative or system-wide impacts of the Willamette projects were not quantitatively assessed.

Noyes, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

227

An aerial radiological survey of the southwest drainage basin area of the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 106-square-mile area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), formerly the Savannah River Plant. The survey was conducted from August 24 through September 8, 1988, to collect baseline radiological data over the area. Both natural and man-made gamma emitting radionuclides were detected in the area. The detected man-made sources were confined to creeks, branches, and SRS facilities in the surveyed area and were a result of SRS operations. Naturally-occurring radiation levels were consistent with those levels detected in adjacent areas during previous surveys. The annual dose levels were within the range of levels found throughout the United States.

Feimster, E.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Potential use of geothermal resources in the Snake River Basin: an environmental overview. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Environmental baseline data for the Snake River Plain known geothermal resource areas (KGRAs) are evaluated for geothermal development. The objective is to achieve a sound data base prior to geothermal development. These KGRAs are: Vulcan Hot Springs, Crane Creek, Castle Creek, Bruneau, Mountain Home, Raft River, Island Park, and Yellowstone. Air quality, meteorology, hydrology, water quality, soils, land use, geology, subsidence, seismicity, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, demography, socioeconomics, and heritage resources are analyzed. This program includes a summary of environmental concerns related to geothermal development in each of the KGRAs, an annotated bibliography of reference materials (Volume II), detailed reports on the various program elements for each of the KGRAs, a program plan identifying future research needs, and a comprehensive data file.

Spencer, S.G.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F. (eds.)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Status Report of the Pacific Lamprey (Lampetra Trzdentata) in the Columbia River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The widespread decline of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Pacific Northwest, especially in the Columbia River system has led to concerns and questions from a number of regional agencies, Native American tribes, and the public. To address these concerns, new research efforts must focus on specific problems associated with this understudied species. The preservation and restoration of this species is critical for a number of reasons, including its importance to the tribes and its importance as an indicator of ecosystem health. Historically lamprey have been labeled a pest species due to the problems associated with the exotic sea lamprey, (Petromyzon marinus), invading the Great Lakes.

Close, David A.; Parker, Blaine; James, gary

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water for energy. Missouri River reservoirs: Pick--Sloan Missouri Basin Program. Draft environmental statement  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Reclamation proposes to make available for energy related industrial purposes up to 1.0 million acre-feet of water annually from main-stem Missouri River reservoirs. The anticipated areas of water use include eastern Montana, western North Dakota, parts of western and central South Dakota, and northeastern Wyoming. Water service contracts would be issued for 40 years or less, with water delivery terminating no later than the year 2035. A summary of the environmental impact and adverse environmental effects postulated is presented.

McPhail, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985 - April 1986, Action item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986 under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). Wildlife projects implemented prior to September 1985 are discussed in BPA's September 1985 Annual Report on Wildlife Activities. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. When available, annual and final reports are listed for each project. The wildlife section of the Program establishes a process intended to achieve two objectives: wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning; and implementation of actions to protect, mitigate, and enhance wildlife affected by development and operation of hydroelectric facilities in the Columbia River Basin. The wildlife mitigation planning process developed by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) is a stepwise process that proceeds through the review of the status of wildlife mitigation at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities [Measure 1004 (b)(l)]; estimates wildlife losses from hydroelectric development and operation [Measure 1004 (b)(2)]; and recommends actions for the protection, mitigation, or enhancement of wildlife [Measure 1004 (b)(3), Mitigation Plans]. Implementation of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement will occur upon amendment of wildlife actions into the Program by the Council. The majority of BPA's effort to date has gone towards coordinating and implementing wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning projects.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Umatilla, Tucannon, Asotin, and Grande Ronde River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Umatilla and Grande Ronde River basins, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960) inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and the newly constructed Garden City/Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington, in the Walla Walla River Basin during spring and summer 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) (formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City/Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Developing a Predation Index and Evaluating Ways to Reduce Salmonid Losses to Predation in the Columbia River Basin, Final Report August 1988-September 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report our results of studies to develop a predation index and evaluate ways to reduce juvenile salmonid losses to predation in the Columbia River Basin. Study objectives of each were: develop an index to estimate predation losses of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp) in reservoirs throughout the Columbia River Basin, describe the relationships among predator-caused mortality of juvenile salmonids and physical and biological variables, examine the feasibility of developing bounty, commercial or recreational fisheries on northern squawfish (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) and develop a plan to evaluate the efficacy of predator control fisheries; determine the economic feasibility of developing bounty and commercial fisheries for northern squawfish, assist ODFW with evaluating the economic feasibility of recreational fisheries for northern squawfish and assess the economic feasibility of utilizing northern squawfish, carp (Cyprinus carpio) and suckers (Castostomus spp) in multispecies fisheries; evaluate commercial technology of various fishing methods for harvesting northern squawfish in Columbia River reservoirs and field test the effectiveness of selected harvesting systems, holding facilities and transportation systems; and modify the existing Columbia River Ecosystem Model (CREM) to include processes necessary to evaluate effects of removing northern squawfish on their population size structure and abundance, document the ecological processes, mathematical equations and computer (FORTRAN) programming of the revised version of CREM and conduct systematic analyses of various predator removal scenarios, using revised CREM to generate the simulations. Individual reports are indexed separately.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 7110 of 28,560 results. 01 - 7110 of 28,560 results. Rebate Pollution Control: Storm Water Management (Maine) A person may not construct, or cause to be constructed, a project that includes one acre or more of disturbed area without prior approval from the department. A person proposing a project shall... http://energy.gov/savings/pollution-control-storm-water-management-maine Rebate Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the... http://energy.gov/savings/rappahannock-river-basin-commission-virginia Rebate Regulation of Tidal and Wave Energy Projects (Maine) State regulation of tidal and wave energy projects is covered under the

240

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

"1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900 "3. Milton R Young","Coal","Minnkota Power Coop, Inc",697 "4. Leland Olds","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",670 "5. Garrison","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",508 "6. Coyote","Coal","Otter Tail Power Co",427 "7. Stanton","Coal","Great River Energy",202 "8. Tatanka Wind Power LLC","Other Renewables","Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC",180 "9. Langdon Wind LLC","Other Renewables","FPL Energy Langdon Wind LLC",159

242

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003: Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City-Lowden II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and at the newly constructed Garden City-Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring and summer of 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries ((NOAA Fisheries), formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City-Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed. Based on the results of our studies in 2003, we concluded: Nursery Bridge Site: (1) 68% of the initial velocity measurements on the west screen exceeded the NOAA Fisheries criteria of 0.4 ft/s for approach velocity; (2) A simple adjustment of the existing louvers was not sufficient to fix the problem; (3) The sediment and debris load in the river upstream of the screens exceeded the design criteria for the site, which had frequent breakdowns in the screen cleaning systems; and (4) The rock weirs downstream of the dam would not be expected to impede upstream movement of juvenile fish during low flow conditions. Garden City-Lowden II: (1) The flat inclined-plate screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement and migration delay; (2) Approach velocities met the NMFS criteria of less than 0.4 ft/s in June, and no change in baffle settings was needed; (3) Sweep velocities were generally lower than approach velocities and did not increase toward the downstream end of the site; and (4) The automated cleaning system at the Garden City-Lowden II site works adequately when sediment loads are low, though its effectiveness at cleaning the screens decreases as sediment and debris loads and algal growth increase.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRAb) stated: The "business" of water resources management in Texas, and throughout the nation, is in the midst of transition and transformation. The transition is largely the result of ever increasing demands and competition for renewable but limited water supplies and a growing awareness of the limits of "traditional" water supply management strategies. ... In response to new challenges and uncertainties, it is imperative that water management institutions, at all levels, adopt a balanced, flexible approach that gives due weight to all the conflicting demands on the water, including the heavy economic dependence of the rice farmers on historic uses of irrigation water, rapidly emerging public interest in recreation, and environmental values. (p. 1) The problem is that the total quantity demanded is increasing and peak demand for agricultural, municipal, industrial, and recreational uses occurs at the same time of year. Since the supply is limited in any given year, efficient water management requires knowledge of the benefits to the various user groups. The research described in this paper focuses on the user group whose benefits have received relatively little attention in the past. These are the recreational and aesthetic users who own property and live around reservoirs in the Lower Colorado River basin. This study employs a "hedonic" or "implicit" price approach to examine a component of the recreational (and aesthetic) value of two lakes in the "Highland Lakes" chain. The study addresses the implicit recreational and aesthetic (RA) price placed on Lakes Austin and Travis by homeowners living near the lakes. It also examines the relationship between lake management practices and the value of lake front properties.

Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

StreamNet; Northwest Aquatic Resource Information Network - Status of Salmon and Steelhead in the Columbia River Basin, 1995 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information on fish populations, fisheries, and fish habitat is crucial to the success of ongoing program to protect, recover, enhance, and manage fish resources in the Columbia River Basin. However, pertinent data are often difficult to locate because it is scattered among many agencies and is often unpublished. The goal of this annual report is to bring many diverse data types and sources into a single comprehensive report on the status of anadromous fish runs in the Columbia River Basin and the environmental conditions that may affect that status. Brief summaries are provided to identify the type and scope of available information. This synopsis is intended to complement other more detailed reports to which readers are referred for comprehensive treatment of specific subjects. This first report focuses mainly on anadromous salmon and steelhead (primarily through 1994) but the authors intend to expand the scope of future issues to include resident species. This is the first of what the authors intend to be an annual report. They welcome constructive suggestions for improvements. This report is a product of the StreamNet (formerly Coordinated Information System and Northwest Environmental Data Base) project which is a part of the Bonneville Power Administration`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The project is called for in the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The project`s objective is to promote exchange and dissemination of information in a standardized electronic format throughout the basin. This project is administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission with active participation by tribal, state, and federal fish and wildlife agencies.

Anderson, Duane A.; Beamesderfer, Raymond C. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Enterprise, OR (United States); Woodard, Bob [Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Biodiversity and the Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Salmon Species in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report of 8 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stated purpose of the Endangered Species Act is to provide a means whereby the ecosystem upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved. Conservation of the Columbia River ecosystem and the diversity of gene pools, life histories, species, and communities that comprise it, should become a major objective of species recovery and fish and wildlife management programs in the Columbia River Basin. Biodiversity is important to both species and ecosystem health, and is a prerequisite to long-term sustainability of biological resources. In this paper, I provide an overview of various approaches to defining, measuring, monitoring, and protecting biodiversity. A holistic approach is stressed that simultaneously considers diverse species and resource management needs. Emphasis is on threatened and endangered species of salmon and their associated habitat.

Steward, C. R. (Cleveland R.)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Investigations into the [Early] Life History of Spring Chinook Salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin : Fish Research Project, Oregon : Annual Report 1994 : Project Period 1 June 1993 to 31 May 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to describe aspects of the life history strategies of spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde basin. During the past year we focused on rearing and migration patterns of juveniles and surveys of spawning adults. The specific objectives for the early life history portion of the study were: Objective 1, document the annual in-basin migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles in the upper Grande Ronde River, including the abundance of migrants, migration timing and duration; Objective 2, estimate and compare smolt survival indices to mainstem Columbia and Snake River dams for fall and spring migrating spring chinook salmon; Objective 3 initiate study of the winter habitat utilized by spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde River basin. The specific objectives for the spawning ground surveys were: Objective 4, conduct extensive and supplemental spring chinook salmon spawning ground surveys in spawning streams in the Grande Ronde and Imnaha basin, Objective 5; determine how adequately historic index area surveys index spawner abundance by comparing index counts to extensive and supplemental redd counts; Objective 6, determine what changes in index areas and timing of index surveys would improve the accuracy of index surveys; Objective 7, determine the relationship between number of redds observed and fish escapement for the Grande Ronde and Imnaha river basins.

Keefe, MaryLouise

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2005-2006 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated two fish screen facilities in the Walla Walla River basin in 2005 and early 2006. The Garden City/Lowden screen site was evaluated in April and June 2005 to determine whether the fish screens met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to provide safe passage for juvenile salmonids. Louvers behind the screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway were modified in fall 2005 in an attempt to minimize high approach velocities. PNNL evaluated the effects of those modifications in March 2006. Results of the Garden City/Lowden evaluations indicate the site performs well at varying river levels and canal flows. Approach velocities did not exceed 0.4 feet per second (fps) at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder in March but not in June. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. At Nursery Bridge, results indicate all the approach velocities were below 0.4 fps under the moderate river levels and operational conditions encountered on March 7, 2006. Sweep did not consistently increase toward the fish ladder, but the site generally met the criteria for safe passage of juvenile salmonids. Modifications to the louvers seem to allow more control over the amount of water moving through the screens. We will measure approach velocities when river levels are higher to determine whether the louver modifications can help correct excessive approach velocities under a range of river levels and auxiliary water supply flows.

Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima and Touchet River Basins, 2005-2006 Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to look at the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2005 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 fps. Less than 13% of all approach measurements exceeded the criterion, and these occurred at 10 of the sites. Flat-plate screens had more problems than drum screens with high approach velocities. (2) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (3) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (5) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operate and maintain fish screen facilities in a way that provides safe passage for juvenile fish. (6) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) are not performing their tasks in a way that provides optimum operation of the fish screen facility. New ways need to be found to encourage them to maintain their facilities properly. (7) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each sites logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. This information is available at some of the sites but may be outdated. These data are used to determine if the site is running within design criteria. (8) Modifying use of debris control plates at Gleed helped minimize the extreme fluctuations in flow, but approach velocities are still too high. Other ways to reduce the approach velocities need to be tried, possibly including redesign of the site. (9) Alternatives to a screen site at Taylor should be considered. A lot of effort was spent trying to increase water to the site, but it still was unable to operate within NMFS criteria for most of the year and may be a hazard to juvenile salmonids. We conclude that the conditions at most of the Phase II fish screen facilities we evaluated in 2005 would be expected to provide safe passage for juvenile fish. For those sites where conditions are not always optimum for safe fish passage, PNNL researchers will try to coordinate with the WDFW and USBR in 2006 to find solutions to the problems. Some of those problems are consistently high approach velocities at specific sites, including Congdon, Naches-Selah, Union Gap, and Yakima-Tieton. We would like to be able to monitor changes in velocities as soon as operations and maintenance personnel adjust the louvers or porosity boards at these sites. This will give them immediate feedback on the results of their modifications and allow additional adjustments as necessary until the conditions meet NMFS criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed evaluations at many of these sites over the past 8 years, providing information WDFW and USBR personnel can use to perform their operations and maintenance more effectively. Consequently, overall effectiveness of the screens facilities has improved over time.

Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, C.; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn (PNNL)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Operation Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin : Annual Report 1995 : Volume III - Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Beaver Creek Hatchery is located on the Elochoman River about 10 miles upstream from the river mouth. The Elochoman River is a north bank tributary of the lower Columbia River, just downstream of Cathlamet, Washington. The facility consists of 10 intermediate raceways, 20 raceways, (1) earthen rearing pond, (2) adult holding ponds, and a hatchery building with 60 troughs. It is staffed with 4 FTE`s. Water rights total 16,013 gpm from three sources: Elochoman River, Beaver Creek and a well. Beaver Creek water is gravity flow while the other two sources are pumped. The Elochoman River is used in summer and fall while Beaver Creek water is used from mid-November through mid-May. Filtered well water (1 cfs) is used to incubate eggs and for early rearing of fry. Water use in summer is about 5,800 gpm. Gobar Pond, a 0.93-acre earthen rearing pond located on Gobar Creek (Kalama River tributary), is operated as a satellite facility.

Colville Confederated Tribes; US Fish and Wildlife Service; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Yakama Indian Nation

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Gridded Hourly Precipitation Analysis from High-Density Rain Gauge Network over the Yangtze–Huai Rivers Basin during the 2007 Mei-Yu Season and Comparison with CMORPH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy rainfall hit the Yangtze–Huai Rivers basin (YHRB) of east China several times during the prolonged 2007 mei-yu season, causing the worst flood since 1954. There has been an urgent need for attaining and processing high-quality, kilometer-...

Yali Luo; Weimiao Qian; Renhe Zhang; Da-Lin Zhang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effects of El Niño–Southern Oscillation on the Climate, Water Balance, and Streamflow of the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatic and hydrologic observations and results from a terrestrial ecosystem model coupled to a regional-scale river-routing algorithm are used to document the associations between the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and anomalies ...

Tracy E. Twine; Christopher J. Kucharik; Jonathan A. Foley

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

260

Trapping and Transportation of Adult and Juvenile Salmon in the Lower Umatilla River in Northeast Oregon: Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program, October 1994-September 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from August 26, 1994 to June 27, 1995. A total of 1,531 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 688 adult, 236 jack, and 368 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawvtscha); 984 adult and 62 jack coho (O. kisutch) ; and 388 adult and 108 jack spring chinook (O. tshawvtscha) were collected. All fish were trapped at the east bank facility. Of the fish collected, 971 summer steelhead; 581 adult and 27 jack fall chinook; 500 adult and 22 jack coho; and 363 adult and 61 jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were also 373 summer steelhead; 12 adult, 186 jack and 317 subjack fall chinook; 379 adult and 32 jack coho; and 15 adult and one jack spring chinook released at Threemile Dam. In addition, 154 summer steelhead were hauled to Bonifer and Minthorn for brood. The Westland Canal facility, located near the town of Echo, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The facility operated for a total of 179 days between December 2, 1994 and July 19, 1995. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 137 days and were trapped 42 days. Three steelhead kelts and an estimated 1,560 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from the Westland Canal trap to the Umatilla River boat ramp at rivermile 0.5. Approximately 98% of the fish transported this year were salmonids. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass began operating March 25, 1995 and was closed on June 16, 1995. The juvenile trap was operated by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife research personnel from April 1, 1995 through the summer to monitor juvenile outmigration.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program : Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index Predator Control Fisheries and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin, 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The papers in this document report the results of studies to develop a Columbia River basin-wide program to control northern squawfish predation on juvenile salmonids. Our studies focus on (1) determining where in the basin northern squawfish predation is a problem, (2) conducting various fisheries for northern squawfish, and (3) testing a plan to evaluate how well fisheries are controlling northern squawfish populations. These studies were initiated as part of a basin-wide effort to reduce mortality of juvenile salmonids on their journey from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River basin suggested predation by northern squawfish on juvenile salmonids may account for most of the 10 to 20 percent mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia and Snake river reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982--1988 indicated it is not necessary to eradicate northern squawfish to substantially reduce predation-caused mortality of juvenile salmonids. Instead, if northern squawfish were exploited at a 20 percent rate, reductions in their numbers and restructuring of their populations could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50 percent. We tested three fisheries in 1990, a tribal long-line fishery, a recreational-reward fishery, and a dam hook-and-line fishery.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Investigations into the Early Life-history of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde River Basin, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

We determined migration timing and abundance of juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and juvenile steelhead/rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss using rotary screw traps on four streams in the Grande Ronde River basin during the 2001 migratory year (MY 2001) from 1 July 2000 through 30 June 2001. Based on migration timing and abundance, two distinct life-history strategies of juvenile spring chinook and O. mykiss could be distinguished. An 'early' migrant group left upper rearing areas from 1 July 2000 through 29 January 2001 with a peak in the fall. A 'late' migrant group descended from upper rearing areas from 30 January 2001 through 30 June 2001 with a peak in the spring. The migrant population of juvenile spring chinook salmon in the upper Grande Ronde River in MY 2001 was very low in comparison to previous migratory years. We estimated 51 juvenile spring chinook migrated out of upper rearing areas with approximately 12% of the migrant population leaving as early migrants to overwinter downstream. In the same migratory year, we estimated 16,067 O. mykiss migrants left upper rearing areas with approximately 4% of these fish descending the upper Grande Ronde River as early migrants. At the Catherine Creek trap, we estimated 21,937 juvenile spring chinook migrants in MY 2001. Of these migrants, 87% left upper rearing areas early to overwinter downstream. We also estimated 20,586 O. mykiss migrants in Catherine Creek with 44% leaving upper rearing areas early to overwinter downstream. At the Lostine River trap, we estimated 13,610 juvenile spring chinook migrated out of upper rearing areas with approximately 77% migrating early. We estimated 16,690 O. mykiss migrated out of the Lostine River with approximately 46% descending the river as early migrants. At the Minam River trap, we estimated 28,209 juvenile spring chinook migrated out of the river with 36% migrating early. During the same period, we estimated 28,113 O. mykiss with approximately 14% of these fish leaving as early migrants. Juvenile spring chinook salmon PIT-tagged at trap sites in the fall and in upper rearing areas during winter were used to compare migration timing and survival to Lower Granite Dam of the early and late migrant groups. Juvenile spring chinook tagged on the upper Grande Ronde River were detected at Lower Granite Dam from 4 May to 20 May 2001, with a median passage date of 17 May. Too few fish were collected and tagged to conduct detection rate and survival comparisons between migrant groups. PIT-tagged salmon from Catherine Creek trap were detected at Lower Granite Dam from 27 April to 13 July 2001. Early migrants were detected significantly earlier (median = 10 May) than late migrants (median = 1 June). Also, early migrants from Catherine Creek were detected at a significantly higher rate than fish tagged in upper rearing areas in the winter, suggesting better survival for fish that migrated out of upper rearing areas in the fall. Juvenile spring chinook salmon from the Lostine River were detected at Lower Granite Dam from 2 April through 4 July 2001. Early migrants were detected significantly earlier (median = 27 April) than late migrants (median = 14 May). However, there was no difference in detection rates between early and late migrants. Survival probabilities showed similar patterns as dam detection rates. Juvenile spring chinook salmon from the Minam River were detected at Lower Granite Dam from 8 April through 18 August 2001. Early migrants were detected significantly earlier (median = 28 April) than late migrants (median = 14 May). Late migrants from the Minam River were tagged at the trap in the spring. Spring chinook salmon parr PIT-tagged in summer 2000 on Catherine Creek and the Imnaha, Lostine, and Minam rivers were detected at Lower Granite Dam over an 87 d period from 8 April to 3 July 2001. The migratory period of individual populations ranged from 51 d (Imnaha River) to 67 d (Catherine Creek) in length. Median dates of migration ranged from 30 April (Imnaha River) to 17 May (Catherine Creek). Detection ra

Reischauer, Alyssa; Monzyk, Frederick; Van Dyke, Erick

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in July 2010, examines the effect of 13 dams on Willamette tributaries, plus 42 miles of bank upriver on the Middle Fork Willamette River, the land on the right bank is the Wildish property, where

265

Survey of Artificial Production of Anadromous Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, 1981-1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to collect, organize, and summarize data concerning anadromous fish culture stations of the Columbia River system for 1981, 1982, and 1983 and to create a data archive system with a means of making this information available to the public.

Washington, Percy M.

1985-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

Operation Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin : Annual Report 1995, Volume I - Idaho.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clearwater Hatchery is located on the north bank of the North Fork of the Clearwater River, downstream from Dworshak Dam. It is approximately 72 miles from Lower Granite Dam, and 504 miles from the mouth of the Columbia River. Site elevation is approximately 994 feet above sea level. The hatchery is staffed with 8 FTE`s. Clearwater Hatchery has two pipelines from Dworshak Reservoir. One is attached to a floating platform and is capable of providing various temperatures at varying depths. The other is a stationary intake about 245 feet below the top of the dam. All water is gravity fed to the hatchery. An 18-inch intake pipe provides an estimated 10 cfs with temperature remaining constant at approximately 40T. The primary 42-inch intake pipe can draw water from 5 to 45 feet in depth with temperatures ranging from 55{degrees} to 60{degrees}F and 70 cfs of flow. This report describes the operations of the hatchery.

Idaho Department of Fish and Game; US Fish and Wildlife Service; Nez Perce Tribe

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Federal-State Conflicts over the Colorado River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RIVER No MORE: THE COLORADO RIVER AND THE WEST (1981). 3.agricultural use in the Colorado River Basin in California.and California's dispute over Colorado River water, spanning

Kaplan, David

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Assessment of tree toxicity near the F- and H-Area seepage basins of the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Areas of tree mortality, originating in 1979, have been documented downslope of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins. The basins were used as discharge areas for low-level radioactive and nonradioactive waste. Preliminary studies indicated that there are three possible causes of stress: altered hydrology; hazardous chemicals; and nonhazardous chemicals. It was originally hypothesized that the most likely hydrological stressors to Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora were flooding where water levels cover the lenticels for more than 26 percent of the growing season, resulting in low oxygen availability, and toxins produced under anaerobic conditions. In fact, trees began to show stress only flowing a drought year (1977) rather than a wet year. Dry conditions could exacerbate stress by concentrating contaminants, particularly salt. Study of the soil and water chemical parameters in the impacted sites indicated that salt concentrations in the affected areas have produced abnormally high exchangeable sodium percentages. Furthermore, significantly elevated concentrations of heavy metals were found in each impacted site, although no one metal was consistently elevated. Evaluation of the concentrations of various chemicals toxic to Nyssa sylvatica var. biflora revealed that aluminum was probably the most toxic in the F-Area. Manganese, cadmium, and zinc had concentrations great enough to be considered possible causes of tree mortality in the F-Area. Aluminum was the most likely cause of mortality in the H-Area. Controlled experiments testing metal and salt concentration effects on Nyssa sylvatica would be needed to specifically assign cause and effect mortality relationships.

Loehle, C. (ed.) (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Richardson, C.J. (ed.); Greenwood, K.P.; Hane, M.E.; Lander, A.J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Determining Adult Pacific Lamprey Abundance and Spawning Habitat in the Lower Deschutes River Sub-Basin, Oregon, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An adult Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) escapement estimate was generated in the lower Deschutes River during run year 2008. This included a mark-recapture study to determine adult abundance and a tribal subsistence creel. Fish measuring less than 10.5 cm received two marks for the mark-recapture estimate while those measuring greater than 10.5 cm were surgically implanted with radio transmitters to monitor migration upstream of Sherars Falls (rkm 70.4). Radio telemetry was used to determine habitat, focal spawning areas and spawn timing. All fish were collected at the Sherars Falls fish ladder from July-October 2008 using a long handled dip-net. Escapement was generated using a two event mark-recapture experiment. Adult lamprey populations were estimated at 3,471 (95% CI = 2,384-5,041; M = 101; C = 885 R = 25) using Chapman's modification of the Peterson estimate. The relative precision around the estimate was 31.42. Tribal harvest was approximately 806 adult lamprey (95% CI = +/- 74) with a total escapement of 2,669. Fourteen lamprey received radio tags and were released at Lower Blue Hole recreation site (rkm 77.3). Movement was recorded by mobile, fixed site and aerial telemetry methods. Upstream movements of lamprey were documented from July through December 2008 with most lamprey over-wintering in the mainstem Deschutes River.

Fox, Matt; Graham, Jennifer C. [Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation, Oregon

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation of a Fish Passage Site in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2009 Annual Report : September 2008 - August 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the Touchet Consolidated Facility to determine if it is designed, constructed, operated, and maintained to effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage past the diversion and back to the Touchet River. Completed in 2008, the Touchet Consolidated Facility combined two irrigation diversions with an existing intake for the Touchet Acclimation Facility. The consolidated facility includes a separate fish screen and intake for each user, a pool and chute fishway, and an adult fish trap. The fish screens portions of the facility were evaluated on April 20, 2009, using underwater videography, acoustic Doppler velocimeter measurements, and visual observations while water was diverted to the acclimation facility alone and again as water was diverted to the irrigation system and pond together. The facility is in good condition and is well maintained, although water velocities within the site do not meet the criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Approach velocities above 0.4 ft/s at the upstream end of the facility and decreases in sweep velocity toward the bypass are likely caused by the proximity of the upstream screen to the spill over stoplogs that control flow at the upstream end of the forebay. We recommend working with Touchet Acclimation Facility staff to try different configurations and heights of forebay stoplogs while PNNL staff measure water velocities, allowing real-time monitoring of changes in approach and sweep velocities resulting from the configuration changes. It may be possible to bring approach and sweep velocities more in line with the NMFS criteria for juvenile fish screens. We also recommend evaluating the facility later in the year when river levels are low and the irrigation district is the only water user. During the site visit, it was noted that the upstream end of the fishway has relatively closely spaced louvers that point downstream. During higher river levels such as on April 20, the orientation of the louvers causes a headloss of up to 1 ft or more. Fish must maneuver through this hydraulic jump and between the louvers. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is considering alternatives to this configuration; if needed, we would be available to offer technical assistance.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway, Garden City/Lowden II, and Little Walla Walla Sites, 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the Garden City/Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington, and the Little Walla Walla site in Milton-Freewater, Oregon, in the Walla Walla River Basin during 2004. The fish-screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish-protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) (formerly NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. The Little Walla Walla screens were evaluated to determine how a build-up of algae on the screens affected water velocities.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Performance evaluation of interpolation methods for incorporating rain gauge measurements into NEXRAD precipitation data: A case study in the Upper Guadalupe River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High spatial and temporal resolution of precipitation data is critical input for hydrological budget estimation and flash flood modeling. This study evaluated four methods (Bias Adjustment (BA), Simple Kriging with varying Local Means (SKlm), Kriging with External Drift (KED), and Regression Kriging (RK)) for their performances in incorporating gauge rainfall measurements into NEXRAD (Next Generation Weather Radar) Multisensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) (hourly and 4 x 4 km{sup 2}). Measurements from a network of 50 gauges at the Upper Guadalupe River Basin, Central Texas and MPE data for the year 2004 were used in the study. We used three evaluation coefficients Percentage Bias (PB), Coefficient of Determination (R2), and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) to examine the performance of the four methods for preserving regional and local scale characteristics of observed precipitation data. The results show that the two Kriging-based methods (SKlm and RK) are in generally better than BA and KED and that the PB and NSE criteria are better than the R2 criterion in assessing the performance of the four methods. It is also worth noting that the performance of one method at regional scale may be different from its performance at local scale. Critical evaluation of the performance of different methods at local or regional scale should be conducted according to the different purposes. The results obtained in this study are expected to contribute to the development of more accurate spatial rainfall products for hydrologic budget and flash flood modeling.

Xie, Hongjie; Zhang, Xuesong; Yu, Beibei; Sharif, Hatim

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

276

Preliminary study of uranium in Pennsylvanian and lower Permian strata in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, and the Northern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

Persistent and widespread radiometric anomalies occur in Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian strata in the subsurface of the northern Great Plains and the Powder River Basin. The primary host lithology of these anomalies is shale interbedded with sandstone, dolomite, and dolomitic sandstone. Samples from the project area indicate that uranium is responsible for some anomalies. In some samples there seems to be a correlation between high uranium content and high organic-carbon content, which possibly indicates that carbonaceous material acted as a trapping mechanism in some strata. The Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks studied are predominantly marine carbonates and clastics, but there are rocks of fluvial origin in the basal Pennsylvanian of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota and in the Pennsylvanian and Permian deposits on the east flank of the Laramie Mountains. Fine-grained clastic rocks that flank the Chadron arch in western Nebraska are possibly of continental origin. The trend of the Chadron arch approximately parallels the trend of radiometric anomalies in the subsurface Permian-Pennsylvanian section. Possible source areas for uranium in the sediments studied were pre-Pennsylvanian strata of the Canadian Shield and Precambrian igneous rocks of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

Dunagan, J.F. Jr.; Kadish, K.A.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

278

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results for year eleven in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

James Bauder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study timeframe. Future work will involve a final report, which will include data trends, correlations and interpretations of laboratory data.

Millings, M.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

K-Basins.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

282

A 1–10-Day Ensemble Forecasting Scheme for the Major River Basins of Bangladesh: Forecasting Severe Floods of 2003–07  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a fully automated scheme that has provided calibrated 1–10-day ensemble river discharge forecasts and predictions of severe flooding of the Brahmaputra and Ganges Rivers as they flow into Bangladesh; it has been operational ...

Thomas M. Hopson; Peter J. Webster

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Western Gas Sands Project Quarterly Basin Activities Report  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly basin activities report is a summation of three months drilling and testing activities in the Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. Detailed information is given for each study area for the first quarter of 1979.

Atkinson, C H

1979-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVI : Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, the University of Washington developed a new statistical model to analyze the combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged salmon migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine), has been used to estimate survival and transportation effects on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin from 1996 to 2003. Those results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on both a systemwide basis, incorporating all transport dams analyzed, and a dam-specific basis. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 5,000 tagged smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few tagged hatchery steelhead were transported in these years, no transportation effects are estimated for steelhead. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.71% with a standard error (SE) of 0.18% for spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2003, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. For summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin, the estimates of annual SAR averaged 1.15% (SE=0.31%). Only for the release years 1999 and 2000 did the Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for hatchery steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.45% (SE=0.11%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2003. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2003), it was estimated that on average approximately 86% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged hatchery spring and summer Chinook, and 74% for steelhead, occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the systemwide T/I are weighted averages of the dam-specific T/I ratios for each transport dam (with {ge} 5,000 tagged fish transported), weighted by the probabilities of being transported at each dam. The systemwide T/I compares the observed SAR under the existing transportation system with the expected SAR if the transportation system had not been operated. Estimates of 1.0 indicate that the systemwide transportation program has no effect on SAR, while estimates > 1.0 indicate that the transportation program increases SAR. Excluding the 2001 release group, the geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.15 (SE=0.03) for release years 1997 through 2003. The geometric mean of the systemwide T/I estimates for hatchery summer Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin was 1.28 (SE=0.13) for release years 1997 through 2000 and 2003. Estimates were much higher for the 2001 release groups. These estimates reflect transportation from Lower Granite and/or Little Goose for most release years, depending on the number of tagged smolts actually transported at each dam during each release year. Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of post-Bonneville survival to Lower Granite Dam of transported fish to that of nontransported ('inriver') fish. Excluding the 2001 release year, the geometric mean of the D estimates for hatchery spring Chinook salmon from the Snake River Basin

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Proceedings from a Workshop on Ecological Carrying Capacity of Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Measure 7.1A of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program : Report 3 of 4, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the proceedings of a workshop held during 1995 in Portland, Oregon. The objective of the workshop was to assemble a group of experts that could help us define carrying capacity for Columbia River Basin salmonids. The workshop was one activity designed to answer the questions asked in Measure 7.1A of the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program. Based, in part, on the information we learned during the workshop we concluded that the approach inherent in 7.1A will not increase understanding of ecology, carrying capacity, or limiting factors that influence salmon under current conditions. Measure 7.1A requires a definition of carrying capacity and a list of determinants (limiting factors) of capacity. The implication or inference then follows that by asking what we know and do not know about the determinants will lead to research that increases our understanding of what is limiting salmon survival. It is then assumed that research results will point to management actions that can remove or repair the limiting factors. Most ecologists and fisheries scientists that have studied carrying capacity clearly conclude that this approach is an oversimplification of complex ecological processes. To pursue the capacity parameter, that is, a single number or set of numbers that quantify how many salmon the basin or any part of the basin can support, is meaningless by itself and will not provide useful information.

Johnson, Gary E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Mavros, William V.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Powder River 0 20 40 KILOMETERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United The growing significance of the Powder River Basin's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) to United States domestic energy% of gas mostly methane, hence the name Coal Bed Methane (CBM). The types of coal, in increasing order

289

An integrated modelling framework for regulated river systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of regulated water systems has become increasingly complex due to rapid socio-economic growth and environmental changes in river basins over recent decades. This paper introduces the Source Integrated Modelling System (IMS), and describes ... Keywords: Murray-Darling Basin, Rainfall-runoff modelling, River management and operations, River system modelling, Source IMS

Wendy D. Welsh; Jai Vaze; Dushmanta Dutta; David Rassam; Joel M. Rahman; Ian D. Jolly; Peter Wallbrink; Geoffrey M. Podger; Matthew Bethune; Matthew J. Hardy; Jin Teng; Julien Lerat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming. Annual report, October 1, 1994-- September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Because of the great range of API gravities of the oils produced from these reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on understanding the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research will associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the sandstone. The associations of the above with pore geometry will link relative permeability with the dimensions of lithofacies and authigenic mineral facies. Hence, the study is to provide criteria for scaling this parameter on a range of scales, from the laboratory to the basin-wide scale of subfacies distribution. Effects of depositional processes and burial diagenesis will be investigated. Image analysis of pore systems will be done to produce algorithms for estimating relative permeability from petrographic analyses of core and well cuttings. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR, eg., CO{sub 2} flooding. This will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies for the largest potential target reservoir in Wyoming; results will have application to all eolian reservoirs through correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.

Dunn, T.L.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

292

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation is presented of the coring program site identification, and drilling and testing activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project (WGSP). Pertinent information for January, February, and March, 1978 is included for each study area. The areas are the Northern Great Plains Province, the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, and the Uinta Basin.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological “hot spots” in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

295

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Oaks South Croydon East Croydon Streatham Common West Norwood Gipsy Hill Crystal Palace Birkbeck Penge

Delmotte, Nausicaa

296

Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989 : with Listings of Historical Streamflow, Summation of Storage Change and Adjusted Streamflow : Columbia River and Coastal Basins.  

SciTech Connect

The development of irrigation projects since the 1830's and the construction of major dams and reservoirs since the early 1900's have altered substantially the natural streamflow regimen of the Columbia River and its tributaries. As development expanded a multipurpose approach to streamflow regulation evolved to provide flood control, irrigation, hydropower generation, navigation, recreation, water quality enhancement, fish and wildlife, and instream flow maintenance. The responsible agencies use computer programs to determine the effects of various alternative system regulations. This report describes the development of the streamflow data that these computer programs use.

A.G. Crook Company

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Trapping and Transportation of Adult and Juvenile Salmon in the Lower Umatilla River in Northeast Oregon, 1996-1997 : Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program : Annual Progress Report, October 1996-September 1997.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from August 30, 1996 to August 26, 1997. A total of 2,477 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 646 adult, 80 jack, and 606 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 618 adult and 24 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,194 adult and four jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were collected. All fish were trapped at the east bank facility. Of the fish collected, 22 summer steelhead; 18 adult and two jack fall chinook; five adult coho; and 407 adult and three jack spring chinook were hauled upstream from Threemile Dam. There were 2,245 summer steelhead; 70 adult, 51 jack and 520 subjack fall chinook; 593 adult and 24 jack coho; and 1,130 adult spring chinook released at Threemile Dam I In addition, 110 summer steelhead; 551 adult and 25 jack fall chinook; and 600 adult spring chinook were collected for broodstock. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts, The canal was open for a total of 210 days between December 16, 1996 and July 30, 1997. During that period, fish were bypassed back to the river 175 days and were trapped on 35 days, An estimated 1,675 pounds of juvenile fish were transported from Westland to the Umatilla River boat ramp (RM 0.5), Approximately 80% of the juveniles transported were salmonids, No steelhead kelts were hauled from Westland this year. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was operated from October 4 to November 1, 1996 and from March 26 to July 7, 1997. The juvenile trap was not operated this year. 6 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Flow Augmentation and Reservoir Drawdown : Strategies for Recovery of Threatened and Endangered Stocks of Salmon in the Snake River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 2 of 11.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The premise for flow augmentation is based on the argument that increasing water velocity increases smolt migration speed, which in turn improves smolt survival through reservoirs and at ocean entry. The purpose of this document is to examine key technical issues regarding the benefits of flow augmentation as a strategy for improving survival of downstream migrants. Reservoir drawdown, an altemative strategy for increasing water velocity through the mainstream Snake and Columbia rivers will also be examined. Data sets and analyses that pertain to Snake River stocks will be emphasized, particularly those stocks currently listed as threatened or endangered. This document focuses on treating two smolt responses that can be useful in reflecting the effects of flow augmentation, or increased water velocity; travel time or migration speed, and survival. Although there has been recent interest in using migrational timing as a measure of flow effects that response reflects principally the temporal initiation of the migration event and does not provide a performance measure once fish are in transit between two locations.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Annual report, September 15, 1993--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The principal focus of this project is to evaluate the importance of relative permeability anisotropy with respect to other known geologic and engineering production concepts. This research is to provide improved strategies for enhanced oil recovery from the Tensleep Sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. The Tensleep Sandstone contains the largest potential reserves within reservoirs which are candidates for EOR processes in the State of Wyoming. Although this formation has produced billions of barrels of oil, in some fields, as little as one in seven barrels of discovered oil is recoverable by current primary and secondary techniques. Because of the great range of {degree}API gravities of the oils produced from the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs, the proposed study concentrates on establishing an understanding of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability within the Tensleep Sandstone. This research is to associate those spatial distributions and anisotropies with the depositional subfacies and zones of diagenetic alteration found within the Tensleep Sandstone. In addition, these studies are being coupled with geochemical modeling and coreflood experiments to investigate the potential for wellbore scaling and formation damage anticipated during EOR processes (e.g., C0{sub 2} flooding). This multidisciplinary project will provide a regional basis for EOR strategies which can be clearly mapped and efficiently applied to the largest potential target reservoir in the State of Wyoming. Additionally, the results of this study have application to all eolian reservoirs through the correlations of relative permeability variation and anisotropy with eolian depositional lithofacies.

Dunn, T.L.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Predicting the Discharge of Global Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to simulate coupled energy and water fluxes over large continental river basins, in particular streamflow, was largely nonexistent a decade ago. Since then, macroscale hydrological models (MHMs) have been developed, which predict such ...

Bart Nijssen; Greg M. O'Donnell; Dennis P. Lettenmaier; Dag Lohmann; Eric F. Wood

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Hood River Fisheries Program 1: Hood River Fisheries Program EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program SUMMARY This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and wildlife associated with the construction and operation of Federal hydro-power facilities in the Columbia River Basin. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 4, 2008 EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project May 16, 2005 EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project, Hood River County, Oregon Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project

303

Trapping and Transportation of Adult and Juvenile Salmon in the Lower Umatilla River in Northeast Oregon, 1995-1996 : Umatilla River Basin Trap and Haul Program : Annual Progress Report, October 1995-September 1996.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Threemile Falls Dam (Threemile Dam), located near the town of Umatilla, is the major collection and counting point for adult salmonids returning to the Umatilla River. Returning salmon and steelhead were collected at Threemile Dam from September 5, 1995 to July 1, 1996. A total of 2,081 summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss); 603 adult, 288 jack, and 338 subjack fall chinook (O. tshawytscha); 946 adult and 53 jack coho (O. kisutch); and 2,152 adult and 121 jack spring chinook (O. tshawytscha) were collected. All fish were trapped at the east bank facility. The Westland Canal juvenile facility (Westland), located near the town of Echo at rivermile (RM) 27, is the major collection point for outmigrating juvenile salmonids and steelhead kelts. The Threemile Dam west bank juvenile bypass was operated from September 8 to October 13, 1995 and from March 18 to June 30, 1996. The juvenile trap was operated from July 1 to July 11. Daily operations at the facility were conducted by the ODFW Fish Passage Research project to monitor juvenile outmigration.

Zimmerman, Brian C.; Duke, Bill B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia River Basin : Volume V : Evaluation of the 1999 Predictions of the Run-Timing of Wild Migrant Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, and Hatchery Sockeye Salmon in the Snake River Basin using Program RealTime.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program RealTime provided tracking and forecasting of the 1999 inseason outmigration via the internet for stocks of wild PIT-tagged spring/summer chinook salmon. These stocks were ESUs from sixteen release sites above Lower Granite dam, including Bear Valley Creek, Big Creek, Cape Horn Creek, Catherine Creek, Elk Creek, Herd Creek, Imnaha River, Lake Creek, Loon Creek, Lostine River, Marsh Creek, Minam River, South Fork Salmon River, and Secesh River, Sulfur Creek and Valley Creek. Forecasts were also provided for a stock of hatchery-reared PIT-tagged summer-run sockeye salmon from Redfish Lake and for the runs-at-large of Snake River wild yearling chinook salmon, and steelhead trout. The 1999 RealTime project began making forecasts for a new stock of PIT-tagged wild fall subyearling chinook salmon, as a substitute for forecasts of the wild run-at-large, discontinued June 6. Forecasts for the run-at-large were discontinued when a large release of unmarked hatchery fish into the Snake River made identification of wild fish impossible. The 1999 Program RealTime performance was comparable to its performance in previous years with respect to the run-at-large of yearling chinook salmon (whole season MAD=3.7%), and the run of hatchery-reared Redfish Lake sockeye salmon (whole season MAD=6.7%). Season-wide performance of program RealTime predictions for wild Snake River yearling chinook salmon ESUs improved in 1999, with mean MADs from the first half of the outmigrations down from 15.1% in 1998 to 4.5% in 1999. RealTime performance was somewhat worse for the run-at-large of steelhead trout in 1999, compared to 1998, particularly during the last half of the outmigration when the MAD increased from 2.7% in 1998 to 6.1% in 1999. A pattern of over-predictions was observed in half of the yearling chinook salmon ESUs and the steelhead run-at-large during the month of May. Lower-than-average outflows were observed at Lower Granite dam during the first half of May, the only period of low flows in an year with otherwise higher-than-average-flows. The passage distribution of the stock new to the RealTime forecasting project, the PIT tagged stock of fall subyearling chinook salmon, was predicted with very good accuracy (whole season MAD=4.7%), particularly during the last half of the outmigration (MAD=3.6%). The RealTime project reverted to a pre-1998 method of adjusting PIT-tagged smolt counts at Lower Granite Dam because of its superior performance during the last half of the outmigration.

Burgess, Caitlin

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon 3: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund a program designed to prevent the extinction and begin the recovery of spring Chinook salmon stocks in the Grande Ronde River Basin in the Upper Grande Ronde River, Lostine River, and Catherine Creek in Northeastern Oregon. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 18, 2003 EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program

306

River Flow Response to Precipitation and Snow Budget in California during the 1994/95 Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of precipitation and river flow from November 1994 to May 1995 at two California basins is presented. The Hopland watershed of the Russian River in the northern California Coastal Range and the headwater of the North Fork ...

Jinwon Kim; Norman L. Miller; Alexander K. Guetter; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cumulative biophysical impact of small and large hydropower development, Nu River, China Authors biophysical effects of small (China's Nu River basin, and compare effects The hydropower sector currently comprises eighty percent of global capacity for renewable energy generation

Tullos, Desiree

308

River Discharge into the Mediterranean Sea: Climatology and Aspects of the Observed Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River discharge across the Mediterranean catchment basin is investigated by means of an extensive dataset of historical monthly time series to represent at-best discharge into the sea. Results give an annual mean river discharge into the ...

Maria Vittoria Struglia; Annarita Mariotti; Angelo Filograsso

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

DRAFT MAINSTEM AMENDMENTS COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Hanford Reach fall chinook), this plan7 provides an emphasis on protecting and restoring mainstem spawning7 steelhead in the mainstem. This includes, among other things, protecting the8 Hanford Reach fall" while the Council works with the region to determine the most biologically effective level of spillway

310

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council was established pursuant to the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act................................................... 7 Energy Efficiency met most of the new electricity demand in 2010 and 2011 .................... 7 Interest in plug-in cars is growing, and so is their power use

311

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ftp from wahoo.ee.washington.edu. 2A copy of this program, including ac dc FACTS sample sys- tems the continuation power ow program PFLOW 14 , which allows to carry out voltage collapse studies in ac dc FACTS sys and a tutorial, for DOS, Windows and UNIX can be ob- tained from http: iliniza.uwaterloo.ca,or through anonymous

312

The Missouri Basin region's water quality planning strategy. Planning dossier. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

The Missouri Basin Region area includes the watersheds of the Missouri River and the Souris, Red River of the North, and Rainy Rivers. This area comprises all of Nebraska and North Dakota; the majority of Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Kansas, and Missouri; and lesser portions of Colorado, Minnesota, and Iowa. The report describes objectives, evaluation, costs, work schedule, and planning needs. (GRA)

1970-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Atmospheric Water Vapor Transport in NCEP–NCAR Reanalyses: Comparison with River Discharge in the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors extract the water transport produced by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis for a 10-yr period, 1984–93, and compare its convergence into two river basins with an independent dataset, river discharge (...

William J. Gutowski Jr.; Yibin Chen; Zekai Ötles

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

315

Investigation of contamination bearing algae in the Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Recent discussions in the group have given rise to the problem of determining whether the beta contamination found in the Columbia River is carried by the algae which are found in the retention basin. The algae accumulate in the basin and apparently remain there longer than the retained water, and thus may be contaminated to a greater extent than the water itself.

Paas, H.J.

1947-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

316

Climate and the Colorado River: The Limits of Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flooding in the lower basin of the Colorado River during the spring and summer of 1983 led to discussion of the management of the heavy spring runoff from the upper basin. This analysis stresses that the reasons for the flooding go beyond the ...

Steven L. Rhodes; Daniel Ely; John A. Dracup

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

319

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

320

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Rapid River Hatchery - Spring Chinook, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Rapid River Hatchery (Spring Chinook). The hatchery is located in the lower Snake River basin near Riggins Idaho. The hatchery is used for adult collection, egg incubation, and rearing of spring chinook. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Watson, M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Estimate of Precipitation Enhancement Potential for the Duero Basin of Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field investigations for the Precipitation Enhancement Project (PEP) were undertaken during the winter months of 1979–1981 in the upper Duero River Basin of Spain. The purpose of these studies was to examine what potential might exist for the ...

Gabor Vali; L. Randall Koenig; Thomas C. Yoksas

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Accumulation and Pooling of Drainage Flows in a Large Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a sequence of tethersonde and solar measurements showing the effects of the pooling of cold air drainages in a basin located along the Colorado River below the Brush drainage. Results obtained during periods of weak ambient winds show ...

W. D. Neff; C. W. King

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Monsoon variation and vegetative drought patterns in the Luni Basin in the rain-shadow zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drought has a significant impact on agricultural, ecological and socio-economic spheres. Poor and delayed monsoon, high temperature and insufficient water resources lead to recurrent drought in the Luni River basin located in the rain-shadow zone of ...

C. Bhuiyan; F. N. Kogan

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Interannual Variability and Ensemble Forecast of Upper Blue Nile Basin Kiremt Season Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethiopian agriculture and Nile River flows are heavily dependent upon the Kiremt season (June–September) precipitation in the upper Blue Nile basin, as a means of rain-fed irrigation and streamflow contribution, respectively. Climate diagnostics ...

Paul Block; Balaji Rajagopalan

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A Basin- to Channel-Scale Unstructured Grid Hurricane Storm Surge Model Applied to Southern Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Southern Louisiana is characterized by low-lying topography and an extensive network of sounds, bays, marshes, lakes, rivers, and inlets that permit widespread inundation during hurricanes. A basin- to channel-scale implementation of the Advanced ...

Joannes J. Westerink; Richard A. Luettich; Jesse C. Feyen; John H. Atkinson; Clint Dawson; Hugh J. Roberts; Mark D. Powell; Jason P. Dunion; Ethan J. Kubatko; Hasan Pourtaheri

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Okanogan Basin Spring Spawner Report for 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Okanogan Basin Monitoring and Evaluation Program collected data related to spring spawning anadromous salmonid stocks across the entire Okanogan River basin. Data were collected using redd surveys, traps, underwater video, and PIT-tag technology then summarized and analyzed using simple estimate models. From these efforts we estimated that 1,266 summer steelhead spawned in the Okanogan River basin and constructed 552 redds;152 of these fish where of natural origin. Of these, 121 summer steelhead, including 29 of natural origin, created an estimated 70 redds in the Canadian portion of the Okanagan basin. We estimated summer steelhead spawner escapement into each sub-watershed along with the number from natural origin and the number and density of redds. We documented redd desiccation in Loup Loup Creek, habitat utilization in Salmon Creek as a result of a new water lease program, and 10 spring Chinook returning to Omak Creek. High water through most of the redd survey period resulted in development of new modeling techniques and allowed us to survey additional tributaries including the observation of summer steelhead spawning in Wanacut Creek. These 2007 data provide additional support that redd surveys conducted within the United States are well founded and provide essential information for tracking the recovery of listed summer steelhead. Conversely, redd surveys do not appear to be the best approach for enumerating steelhead spawners or there distribution within Canada. We also identified that spawning distributions within the Okanogan River basin vary widely and stocking location may play an over riding roll in this variability.

Colville Tribes, Department of Fish & Wildlife

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume VIII; New Model for Estimating Survival Probabilities and Residualization from a Release-Recapture Study of Fall Chinook Salmon Smolts in the Snake River, 1995 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

Standard release-recapture analysis using Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) models to estimate survival probabilities between hydroelectric facilities for Snake River fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) ignore the possibility of individual fish residualizing and completing their migration in the year following tagging.

Lowther, Alan B.; Skalski, John R. (University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Fisheries Research Institute, Seattle, WA)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Rappahannock County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6762327°, -78.1564432° 6762327°, -78.1564432° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6762327,"lon":-78.1564432,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

332

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

333

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

334

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 11, 2009 August 11, 2009 CX-000513: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cone Penetration Test sampling at ECODS (Early Construction and Operational Disposal Sites) B3 and B5 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/11/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Isolation of Domestic Water Line, 782-4G CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Removal and Chipping at P-Area Ash Basin and R-Area Ash Basin and P-007 Outfall Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

335

Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

Hopkins, William A.

336

Comparative risk analysis of development of the lignite basins in Serbian part of the Danube region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of the global business risks and risks in the mining development in the Kolubara and Kostolac lignite basins in the area of the Danube river in Serbia. An identification of main risks is undertaken by application of a comprehensive ... Keywords: danube region, lignite basin, mining and energetics, strategic business risks, sustainable development

Slavka Zekovi?; Tamara Mari?i?

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

339

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin. Volume III, Experiment Designs and Statistical Models to Estimate the Effect of Transportation on Survival of Columbia River System Salmonids.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiment designs to estimate the effect of transportation on survival and return rates of Columbia River system salmonids are discussed along with statistical modeling techniques. Besides transportation, river flow and dam spill are necessary components in the design and analysis, otherwise questions as to the effects of reservoir drawdowns and increased dam spill may never be satisfactorily answered. Four criteria for comparing different experiment designs are: (1) feasibility; (2) clarity of results; (3) scope of inference; and (4) time to learn. A controlled experiment with treatments that are a combination of transport status (transported or left in-river), river flow level, and dam spill level should provide the clearest results of transport effect. The potential for bias due to interactions between year effects and the treatments is minimized by running as many treatments as possible within a single outmigration year. Relatedly, the most rapid learning will occur if several different treatments are implemented at randomly chosen time periods within thesame outmigration season. If the range of flow and dam manipulation includes scenarios of interest to managers, the scope of inference should be satisfactory. On the other hand these designs may be the least feasible; trying to manage the river system under a sequence of deliberately chosen flow regimes within a single season, for example, may be quite impractical. At the other end of the spectrum are designs that simply have two treatment combinations, transportation and being left in-river, and the influence of flow and spill are controlled for, if possible, in after-the-fact statistical analysis. Because of possible confounding influences of flow and spill on the transportation effect, these designs could yield the most ambiguous results and require the most years of experimentation to learn. If flows and spill are not manipulated in a planned, well defined, and impartial manner the scope and quality of inference may not be satisfactory. On the other hand, these designs are the simplest to implement. Implementation issues are: (1) The nature of flow and spill level manipulations will need clear definition, either in absolute terms, cfs, or relative terms, such as spilling 10% of the water. (2) Relatedly, system wide implementation of flow and spill levels will provide simpler interpretation of results than will mixing spill rates, for instance, between dams. Transporting fish from just one location will also simplify interpretation. (3) Tagging of experimental fish should be done well upstream of the dams with random assignment to transport or in-river groups done later, near the dams, to minimize biases from delayed tagging mortality. (4) Tagging with PIT tags and CWTs in combination will provide evidence of any potential homing problems. (5) High PIT tag retention rates are important to minimizing potential analysis problems (thus on-going research to improve retention is vital). (6) Approximate sample sizes to achieve a desired level of precision can be calculated fairly easily using formulas provided in the report.

Newman, Ken

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

SciTech Connect

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

343

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

344

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River and Salmon River Drainages, Idaho, 2009 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata have received little attention in fishery science until recently, even though abundance has declined significantly along with other anadromous fish species in Idaho. Pacific lamprey in Idaho have to navigate over eight lower Snake River and Columbia River hydroelectric facilities for migration downstream as juveniles to the Pacific Ocean and again as adults migrating upstream to their freshwater spawning grounds in Idaho. The number of adult Pacific lamprey annually entering the Snake River basin at Ice Harbor Dam has declined from an average of over 18,000 during 1962-1969 to fewer than 600 during 1998-2006. Based on potential accessible streams and adult escapement over Lower Granite Dam on the lower Snake River, we estimate that no more than 200 Pacific lamprey adult spawners annually utilize the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho for spawning. We utilized electrofishing in 2000-2006 to capture, enumerate, and obtain biological information regarding rearing Pacific lamprey ammocoetes and macropthalmia to determine the distribution and status of the species in the Clearwater River drainage, Idaho. Present distribution in the Clearwater River drainage is limited to the lower sections of the Lochsa and Selway rivers, the Middle Fork Clearwater River, the mainstem Clearwater River, the South Fork Clearwater River, and the lower 7.5 km of the Red River. In 2006, younger age classes were absent from the Red River.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher [Idaho Department of Fish and Game

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; clastic sediments; economic geology; exploration; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravel; ground methods; Idaho; isothermal remanent magnetization; magnetic anomalies; magnetic methods; magnetic properties; magnetic susceptibility; magnetization; paleomagnetism; Raft River basin; remanent magnetization; sediments; surveys; United States Author(s): Anderson, L.A.; Mabey, D.R. Published: Abstracts - Society of Exploration Geophysicists International

346

The Influence of ENSO in the Flows of the Upper Paraná River of South America over the Past 100 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Paraná River is the main tributary of the La Plata River basin, the second largest in South America, contributing with an annual mean flow of 12 000 m3 s?1 to more than one-half of the total water flowing in the La Plata River system. ...

Guillermo J. Berri; Marcela A. Ghietto; Norberto O. García

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Kinematic model for postorogenic Basin and Range extension Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River extensional shear zone is exposed in the Albion-Raft River-Grouse Creek metamorphic core complex. Several studies of ductile deformation have shown that it accommodated crustal stretching in Tertiary time during late orogenic collapse of the thickened Cordilleran crust. Progressive deformation that results from mixed pure and simple shear produces a complex strain pattern along the shear zone. The authors propose a numerical kinematic model that relates strain variations in the shear zone to the different amounts of extension between the brittlely

348

River Steamboats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Steamboats River Steamboats Nature Bulletin No. 628-A February 12, 1977 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation RIVER STEAMBOATS The westward migration of the pioneer settlers and the rapid growth of agriculture, commerce and industry in the Middle West is in large part the story of water transportation on our inland waterways. The two main water routes were the chain of Great Lakes on the north and the Ohio River on the south. Sailing vessels carrying hundreds of tons were able to navigate on the Great Lakes almost as freely as on the ocean. Also, on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers heavy loads could be floated downstream from Pittsburgh to New Orleans -- almost 2000 miles. But boats had to be hauled back upstream by manpower -- grueling labor, stretching over weeks or months to move a few tons a few hundred miles. The coming of the steamboat a century and a half ago changed all this.

349

Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting for the Tennessee and Cumberland River Watersheds Using the NCEP Regional Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A limited-area spectral model—the Regional Spectral Model—developed at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction is used to prepare daily quantitative precipitation forecasts out to 48 h for the Tennessee and Cumberland River basins in ...

Qi Mao; Stephen F. Mueller; Hann-Ming Henry Juang

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy and Water Cycles in a High-Latitude, North-Flowing River System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MacKenzie Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Study, Phase 1, seeks to improve understanding of energy and water cycling in the Mackenzie River basin (MRB) and to initiate and test atmospheric, hydrologic, and coupled models that ...

W. R. Rouse; E. M. Blyth; R. W. Crawford; J. R. Gyakum; J. R. Janowicz; B. Kochtubajda; H. G. Leighton; P. Marsh; L. Martz; A. Pietroniro; H. Ritchie; W. M. Schertzer; E. D. Soulis; R. E. Stewart; G. S. Strong; M. K. Woo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Views from the River Front: Rio Grande Decision Makers Rank Water Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication details the results of a survey of elected city officials and water managers in the Rio Grande River Basin of Texas and New Mexico. The participants ranked water conservation strategies for their communities.

Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Simulations of Historical and Future Trends in Snowfall and Groundwater Recharge for Basins Draining to Long Island Sound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional watershed model was developed for watersheds contributing to Long Island Sound, including the Connecticut River basin. The study region covers approximately 40 900 km2, extending from a moderate coastal climate zone in the south to a ...

David M. Bjerklie; Thomas J. Trombley; Roland J. Viger

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Changes in Spring Snowpack for Selected Basins in the United States for Different Climate-Change Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spring snowpack is an important water resource in many river basins in the United States in areas where snowmelt comprises a large part of the annual runoff. Increasing temperatures will likely reduce snowpacks in the future, resulting in more ...

Mark C. Mastin; Katherine J. Chase; R. W. Dudley

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program;  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; 495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington EIS-0495: Walla Walla Basin Spring Chinook Hatchery Program; Milton-Freewater, Oregon, and Dayton, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation to construct and operate a hatchery for spring Chinook salmon in the Walla Walla River basin. Additional information is available at the project website: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/WallaWallaHatchery/. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILALE FOR DOWNLOAD March 28, 2013 EIS-0495: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

355

Repository site definition in basalt: Pasco Basin, Washington  

SciTech Connect

Discussion of the regional setting, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the Pasco Basin are included in this report. Pasco basin is a structural and topographic basin of approximately 2000 mi/sup 2/ (5180 km/sup 2/) located within the Yakima Fold Belt Subprovince of the Columbia Plateau. The stratigraphic sequence within the basin consists of an undetermined thickness of lower Miocene and younger flood basalts with interbedded and overlying sedimentary units. This sequence rests upon a basement of probably diverse rock types that may range in age from precambrian through early Tertiary. Although a large amount of information is available on the hydrology of the unconfined aquifer system, ground-water flow within the basin is, in general, poorly understood. Recharge areas for the Mabton interbed and the Saddle Mountains Formation are the highlands surrounding the basin with the flow for these units toward Gable Butte - Gable Mountain and Lake Wallula. Gable Butte - Gable Mountain probably is a ground-water sink, although the vertical flow direction in this zone is uncertain. The amount of upward vertical leakage from the Saddle Mountains Formation into the overlying sediments or to the Columbia River is unknown. Units underlying the Mabton interbed may have a flow scheme similar to those higher units or a flow scheme dominated by interbasin flow. Upward vertical leakage either throughout the basin, dominantly to the Columbia River, or dominantly to Lake Wallula has been proposed for the discharge of the lower units. None of these proposals is verified. The lateral and vertical distribution of major and minor ions in solution, Eh and pH, and ion exchange between basalt and ground-water are not well defined for the basin. Changes in the redox potential from the level of the subsurface facility to the higher stratigraphic levels along with the numerous other factors influencing K/sub d/, result in a poor understanding of the retardation process.

Guzowski, R.V.; Nimick, F.B.; Muller, A.B.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

357

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 12. Stable isotopic evaluation of thermal water occurrences in the Weiser and Little Salmon River drainage basins and adjacent areas, west-central Idaho with attendant gravity and magnetic data on the Weiser area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fifteen thermal springs, two thermal wells, and eight cold springs in the Weiser and Little Salmon river drainages were sampled for deuterium and oxygen-18 analysis during the fall of 1981. The straight-line fit of delta D and delta /sup 18/O versus latitude and longitude observed in the data is what would be expected if the recharge areas for the thermal and non-thermal waters were in close proximity to their respective discharge points. The discrete values of delta D and delta /sup 18/O for each thermal discharge suggest that none of the sampled thermal systems have common sources. The depleted deuterium and oxygen-18 contents of most thermal relative to non-thermal waters sampled suggests that the thermal waters might be Pleistocene age precipitation. The isotopic data suggest little or no evidence for mixing of thermal and non-thermal water for the sampled discharges. Thermal waters from Weiser, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, and White Licks hot springs show enrichment in oxygen-18 suggesting that these waters have been at elevated temperatures relative to other sampled thermal discharges in the area. Gravity and magnetic data gathered by the Idaho State University Geology Department in the Weiser Hot Springs area suggest that southeastward plunging synclinal-anticlinal couples, which underlie the hot springs, are cut south of the springs by a northeast trending boundary fault.

Mitchell, J.C.; Bideganeta, K.; Palmer, M.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Closure of the R Reactor Disassembly Basin at the SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) at the Savannah River Site is engaged in planning the deactivation/closure of three of the site's five reactor disassembly basins. Activities are currently underway at R-Reactor Disassembly Basin and will continue with the P and C disassembly basins. The basins still contain the cooling and shielding water that was present when operations ceased. Low concentrations of radionuclides are present, with tritium, Cs-137, and Sr-90 being the major contributors. Although there is no evidence that any of the basins have leaked, the 50-year-old facilities will eventually contaminate the surrounding groundwaters. The FDD is pursuing a pro-active solution to close the basins in-place and prevent a release to the groundwater. In-situ ion exchange is currently underway at the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin to reduce the Cs and Sr concentrations to levels that would allow release of the treated water to previously used on-site cooling ponds or to prevent ground water impact. The closure will be accomplished under CERCLA.

Austin, W.E.

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Oquirrh basin revisited  

SciTech Connect

The upper Paleozoic succession in the Oquirrh basin in unusually thick, up to 9300 m, and consists mainly of a Pennsylvanian-middle Permian miogeocline of northwestern Utah. Previous workers have suggested a tectonic origin for the Oquirrh basin that is incompatible with the basin location in both time and space. There is no evidence for Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian tectonism in the middle of the miogeocline. Thermal evidence from the Mississippian Mission Canyon shale does no support the implied deep burial of the crustal sag models of basin formation. Stratigraphic and facies evidence indicates a growth fault origin for the basin. Regional isopach maps and facies maps are powerful tools in interpreting depositional environments and in reconstructing fold-and-thrust belts. However, the location of measured sections relative to the location of the growth fault basin. The Charleston-Nebo thrust may have essentially reversed the movement on a growth fault. Thick Oquirrh basin sedimentary rocks may not be required to balance structural sections across this thrust fault. A thin-skinned, extensional growth fault origin for the Oquirrh basin implies that the Cordilleran miogeocline did not participate in the Pennsylvanian north-vergent uplifts of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

Erskine, M.C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

K Basin safety analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Reconstructed streamflow for Citarum River, Java, Indonesia: linkages to tropical climate dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconstructed streamflow for Citarum River, Java, Indonesia: linkages to tropical climate dynamics Abstract The Citarum river basin of western Java, Indonesia, which supplies water to 10 million residents in drought and flood prone regions of the globe (e.g. Boer 2007). In Indonesia, integrated action is needed

Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

363

Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project, Phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Implementation of the Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project -- Phase 2 would significantly improve the production of anadromous fish in the Yakima River system. The project would provide offsite mitigation and help to compensate for lower Columbia River hydroelectric fishery losses. The Phase 2 screens would allow greater numbers of juvenile anadromous fish to survive. As a consequence, there would be higher returns of adult salmon and steelhead to the Yakima River. The proposed action would play an integral part in the overall Yakima River anadromous fish enhancement program (fish passage improvement, habitat enhancement, hatchery production increases, and harvest management). These would be environmental benefits associated with implementation of the Fish Passage and Protective Facilities Phase 2 Project. Based on the evaluation presented in this assessment, there would be no significant adverse environmental impacts if the proposed action was carried forward. No significant adverse environmental effects have been identified from construction and operation of the Yakima Phase 2 fish passage project. Proper design and implementation of the project will ensure no adverse effects will occur. Based on the information in this environmental analysis, BPA's and Reclamation's proposal to construct these facilities does not constitute a major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

HydroTrend v.3.0: A climate-driven hydrological transport model that simulates discharge and sediment load leaving a river system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HydroTrend v.3.0 is a climate-driven hydrological water balance and transport model that simulates water discharge and sediment load at a river outlet, by incorporating drainage basin properties (river networks, hypsometry, relief, reservoirs) together ... Keywords: Human impacts, Modeling distributary channels, River model, Sediment concentration, Sediment discharge

Albert J. Kettner; James P. M. Syvitski

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

STATUS REPORT NO. 4 ON CLINCH RIVER STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The status of radioactive contamination of the Clinch and Tennessee River systems from Nov. 1961 to April 1962 is reviewed. Data are included from studies on the fate of radioactive materials discharged to the Clinch River by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the mechanisms of dispersion of radionuclides released to the river, the direct and indirect hazards of waste disposal practices during the period, an evaluation of the over-all usefulness of this river for radioactive disposal purposes, and an evaluation of long-term monitoring procedures. The management of liquid wastes at ORNL is discussed and results are reported from studies on the accumulation and movement of radionuclides in White Oak Creek basin, the contamination of river biota, hydrologic measurements and analyses, measurements of radioactivity in the river system and in community water systems downstream from the Clinch River, and calculation of estimated radiation dosages from drinking Clinch River and Tennessee River water or immersion in the water at various downstream points. Results are included from a preimpoundment study of ecological conditions of Melton Hill Lake and estimates of the effects of Melton Hill Lake and power releases from Melton Hill Dam on hydrologic conditions in the river system. (C.H.)

Morton, R.J. ed.

1963-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

366

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 31, 2013 July 31, 2013 CX-010844: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subcontractor Repair of Leak Over Entry Door #1 at 703-B CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/31/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 30, 2013 CX-010846: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Stud, Shims, and Nut in the L-Basin 70-Ton Cask Lid Support Structure CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 07/30/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 23, 2013 CX-010850: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Well Pump into the F-Tank Farm Catch Tank FL-241901-WTS-TK-1 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/23/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office July 23, 2013 CX-010849: Categorical Exclusion Determination

367

Red River Compact (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Red River Compact Commission administers the Red River Compact to ensure that Texas receives its equitable share of quality water from the Red River and its tributaries as apportioned by the...

368

SWAT-Based Streamflow Estimation and Its Responses to Climate Change in the Kadongjia River Watershed, Southern Tibet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runoff estimation and its response to climate change in ungauged or poorly gauged basins based on hydrological models are frontier research issues of the hydrological cycle. For the Kadongjia River watershed (KRW), a poorly gauged watershed ...

Rui Sun; Xueqin Zhang; Yang Sun; Du Zheng; Klaus Fraedrich

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

SWAT-based streamflow estimation and its responses to climate change in Kadongjia River Watershed, South Tibet, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Runoff estimation and its response to climate change in ungauged or poorly gauged basins based on hydrological models are frontier research issues of the hydrological cycle. For Kadongjia River Watershed (KRW), a poorly gauged watershed located in ...

Rui Sun; Xueqin Zhang; Yang Sun; Du Zheng; Klaus Fraedrich

370

Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River, Annual Report 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted primarily in 1997 and 1998. This report communicates significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin.

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Connor, William P.; Burge, Howard L.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

373

Groundwater quality assessment/corrective action feasibility plan: New TNX Seepage Basin  

SciTech Connect

The New TNX Seepage Basin is located across River Road east of the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site. Currently the basin is out of service and is awaiting closure in accordance with the Consent Decree settled under Civil Act No. 1:85-2583. Groundwater monitoring data from the detection monitoring network around the New TNX Seepage Basin was recently analyzed using South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations R.61-79.264.92 methods to determine if groundwater downgradient of the New TNX Seepage Basin had been impacted. Results from the data analysis indicate that the groundwater has been impacted by inorganic constituents with no associated health risks. The impacts resulting from elevated levels of inorganic constituents, such as Mn, Na, and Total PO{sub 4} in the water table, do not pose a threat to human health and the environment.

Nichols, R.L.

1989-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

Compendium of basins for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geological and hydrological feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed formations in the San Juan, Powder River, Greater Green River, Piceance, Black Warrior, Appalachian and Michigan basins. Results from the surveys indicated that geology dominated research efforts for many of the basins. Limited information exists on the hydrology and water quality of the basins. All of the basins contain some potential for the use of Jack McIntyre`s patented production process. This process is designed specifically to separate produced water and produced gas in a downhole environment and may allow for more efficient and economical development of coalbed methane resources in this area.

Reed, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Maine Rivers Policy (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Maine Rivers Policy accompanies the Maine Waterway Development and Conservation Act and provides additional protection for some river and stream segments, which are designated as “outstanding...

376

Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Phase II Cooperative Agreement, 1992 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anadromous salmon in the Columbia River Basin are presently far below historic level of production, due to the impacts of development in the basin. To halt the downward trend in production and ultimately increase returns, the Northwest Power Planning Council developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The Program outlines a coordinated plan for restoring anadromous salmonid runs to the basin. The goals and objectives outlined in the Program require addressing a complex set of problems that encompass a broad range of social, political, economic and biological issues. Resolution of these problems will require the efforts of a number of federal, state, and tribal agencies that have regulatory authority over activities that either directly or indirectly affect anadromous salmonids in the basin. Resource managers have realized the need for coordination in these efforts. The Coordinated Information System is designed to share information critical to Program development and evaluation efficiently among the numerous participants in the restoration process.

Roger, Phillip B. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1998-2002 Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (UBNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and shows how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. This chapter also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Umatilla River Basin. (Figure 1-1, Tables 1-1 and 1-2). Data and reports from this and previous efforts are available on the CTUIR website http://www.umatilla.nsn.us. This project was one of several subprojects of the Umatilla River Basin Fisheries Restoration Master Plan (CTUIR 1984, ODFW 1986) orchestrated to rehabilitate salmon and steelhead runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Subprojects in additions to this project include: Watershed Enhancement and Rehabilitation; Hatchery Construction and Operation; Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation; Satellite Facility Construction and Operations for Juvenile Acclimation and Adult Holding and Spawning; Fish Passage Construction and Operation; Juvenile and Adult Passage Facility Evaluations; Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, and Flow Augmentation to Increase Stream Flows below Irrigation Diversions.

Contor, Craig R. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

379

The ecology of Barataria Basin, Louisiana: An estuarine profile  

SciTech Connect

The Barataria Basin lies entirely in Louisiana between the natural levees of the active Mississippi River and the abandoned Bayou Lafourche distributary. It is characterized by a network of interconnecting water bodies which allows transport of water, materials, and migrating organisms throughout the basin. Natural and artificial levees and barrier islands are the only high, well-drained ground in the basin, which is otherwise characterized by extensive swamp forests and fresh, brackish, and salt marshes. These wetlands and water bodies are extremely productive biologically and provide valuable nursery habitat for a number of commercial and recreational fish and shellfish, as well as habitat for wintering waterfowl and furbearers. The basin is a dynamic system undergoing constant change because of geologic and human processes. The network of bays, lakes, and bayous has gradually enlarged over time due to natural subsidence and erosion. Superimposed on these natural processes has been the construction of levees for flood control and network of canals constructed for oil and gas exploration and extraction. These human activities have altered natural hydrologic patterns in the basin and may directly or indirectly contribute to wetland losses. Controlling wetland deterioration in the basin is a major management concern.

Conner, W.H.; Day, J.W. Jr. (eds.)

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River Geothermal Area, Idaho-Utah Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This study covers about 1000 mi2 (2600 km2) of the southern Raft River drainage basin in south-central Idaho and northwest Utah. The main area of interest, approximately 200 mi2 (520 km2) of semiarid agricultural and rangeland in the southern Raft River Valley that includes the known Geothermal Resource Area near Bridge, Idaho, was modelled numerically to evaluate the hydrodynamics of the unconfined aquifer. Computed and estimated transmissivity values range from 1200 feet squared per day (110

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rappahannock river basin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation; 1992-1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project from September 30, 1992 to September 29, 1993. Examinations of historical flow and water temperature records and current physical habitat, indicate that the streams in the Umatilla River Basin vary in condition from extremely poor to good. Reduced flows and high water temperatures prevented salmonid production in the lower Umatilla River below river mile 75 during the summer and early fall. This was also true in the lower reaches of many tributaries. Isolated springs provided limited refuges in the mid Umatilla River and lower Meacham Creek. Suitable habitat for salmonids was found in the upper reaches of the mainstem and tributaries.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation of information is presented on geology and drilling activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project. The areas of interest are the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, the Uinta Basin, and the Northern Great Plains Province. Drilling activity is discussed for the months of October, November, and December, 1977, with the major emphasis on wells located in low permeability sandstone areas, having significant gas production and utilizing hydraulic fracturing treatments. The drilling information was obtained primarily from ''The Rocky Mountain Region Report'' published by Petroleum Information Corporation on a daily basis. Another source of information was the ''Montana Oil and Gas Journal'' which is released weekly.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

Matthews, R. A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers recently cleaned up a second basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). About $24 million from the Recovery Act funded the environmental restoration project, allowing SRS to complete the project at least five years ahead of schedule. The work is part of a larger Recovery Act cleanup of the P Area scheduled for completion by the end of September 2011. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin Recovery Act Workers Add Time Capsule Before Sealing Reactor for Hundreds

386

Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

THE NATIONAL BASIN DELINEATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Basin Delineation Project (NBDP) was undertaken by the National Severe Storms Laboratory to define flash-flood-scale basin boundaries for the country in support of the National Weather Service (NWS) Flash Flood Monitoring and ...

Ami T. Arthur; Gina M. Cox; Nathan R. Kuhnert; David L. Slayter; Kenneth W. Howard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer modeling systems that simulate the storage, flow, and diversion of water in a system of reservoirs and river reaches. Generalized means that a computer modeling system is designed for application to a range of concerns dealing with river basin systems of various configurations and locations, rather than being site-specific customized to a particular system. User-oriented implies the modeling system is designed for use by professional practitioners (model-users) other than the original model developers and is thoroughly tested and well documented. User-oriented generalized modeling systems should be convenient to obtain, understand, and use and should work correctly, completely, and efficiently. Modeling applications often involve a system of several simulation models, utility software products, and databases used in combination. A reservoir/river system model is itself a modeling system, which often serves as a component of a larger modeling system that may include watershed hydrology and river hydraulics models, water quality models, databases and various software tools for managing time series, spatial, and other types of data. Reservoir/river system models are based on volume-balance accounting procedures for tracking the movement of water through a system of reservoirs and river reaches. The model computes reservoir storage contents, evaporation, water supply withdrawals, hydroelectric energy generation, and river flows for specified system operating rules and input sequences of stream inflows and net evaporation rates. The hydrologic period-of-analysis and computational time step may vary greatly depending on the application. Storage and flow hydrograph ordinates for a flood event occurring over a few days may be determined at intervals of an hour or less. Water supply capabilities may be modeled with a monthly time step and several decade long period-of-analysis capturing the full range of fluctuating wet and dry periods including extended drought. Stream inflows are usually generated outside of the reservoir/river system model and provided as input to the model. However, reservoir/river system models may also include capabilities for modeling watershed precipitation-runoff processes to generate inflows to the river/reservoir system. Some reservoir/river system models simulate water quality constituents along with water quantities. Some models include features for economic evaluation of system performance based on cost and benefit functions expressed as a function of flow and storage.

Wurbs, Ralph A.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Grande Ronde Basin Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, 1995-2002 Summary Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde Basin once supported large runs of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and estimated peak escapements in excess of 10,000 occurred as recently as the late 1950's (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 1975). Natural escapement declines in the Grande Ronde Basin have been severe and parallel those of other Snake River populations. Reduced productivity has primarily been attributed to increased mortality associated with downstream and upstream migration past eight dams and reservoirs in the Snake and Columbia rivers. Reduced spawner numbers, combined with human manipulation of previously important spawning and rearing habitat in the Grande Ronde Basin, have resulted in decreased spawning distribution and population fragmentation of chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde Basin (Figure 1; Table 1). Escapement of spring/summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin included 1,799 adults in 1995, less than half of the previous record low of 3,913 adults in 1994. Catherine Creek, Grande Ronde River and Lostine River were historically three of the most productive populations in the Grande Ronde Basin (Carmichael and Boyce 1986). However, productivity of these populations has been poor for recent brood years. Escapement (based on total redd counts) in Catherine Creek and Grande Ronde and Lostine rivers dropped to alarmingly low levels in 1994 and 1995. A total of 11, 3 and 16 redds were observed in 1994 in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River, respectively, and 14, 6 and 11 redds were observed in those same streams in 1995. In contrast, the maximum number of redds observed in the past was 505 in Catherine Creek (1971), 304 in the Grande Ronde River (1968) and 261 in 1956 in the Lostine River (Tranquilli et al 2003). Redd counts for index count areas (a standardized portion of the total stream) have also decreased dramatically for most Grande Ronde Basin streams from 1964-2002, dropping to as low as 37 redds in the 119.5 km in the index survey areas in 1995 from as high as 1,205 redds in the same area in 1969 (Table 1). All streams reached low points (0-6 redds in the index areas) in the 1990's, except those in which no redds were found for several years and surveys were discontinued, such as Spring, Sheep and Indian creeks which had a total of 109 redds in 1969. The Minam and Wenaha rivers are tributaries of the Grande Ronde River located primarily in wilderness areas. Chinook salmon numbers in these two streams (based on redd counts) also decreased dramatically beginning in the early 1970's (Table 1). Since then there have been a few years of increasing numbers of redds but counts have generally been 25-40% of the number seen in the 1960's. No hatchery fish have been released into either of these streams and we monitor them during spawning ground surveys for the presence of hatchery strays. These populations will be used as a type of control for evaluating our supplementation efforts in Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River and Lostine River. In this way, we can attempt to filter out the effects of downstream variables, over which we have no control, when we interpret the results of the captive broodstock program as the F1 and F2 generations spawn and complete their life cycles in the wild. The Grande Ronde Basin Captive Broodstock Program was initiated because these chinook salmon populations had reached critical levels where dramatic and unprecedented efforts were needed to prevent extinction and preserve any future options for use of endemic fish for artificial propagation programs for recovery and mitigation. This program was designed to quickly increase numbers of returning adults, while maintaining the genetic integrity of each endemic population.

Hoffnagle, Timothy; Carmichael, Richard; Noll, William

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hydrogeochemistry of the Antrim Shale (Devonian) in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Antrim shale has been the focus of active exploration and production in the Michigan Basin since 1987. The producing trend is presently located along the northern rim of the basin, but new ventures are expanding into the southern part of the basin and a predictive model for gas generation and production is greatly needed. The authors have undertaken a geochemical investigation of the waters co-produced with gases in the Antrim shale. There is unusual regional variability in the water chemistry. For example, salinity ranges from near potable water to nearly 10 times the salinity of ocean water within a distance of 80 km. Understanding the origin of solutes, waters and natural gas being produced from the Antrim Shale will aid in developing a model for natural gas generation and migration within the basin. The chemical and isotopic compositions of Antrim waters suggest that there are two sources of water and salinity within the reservoir: (1) saline, high-bromide basinal brine moving updip into the producing areas, and (2) ancient, dilute glacial melt water. Either of these waters can gain additional NaCl from dissolving Br-poor halite located within the updip pinch-out of the Detroit River Salt. When plotted geographically, variations in these components exhibit distinct regional patterns and may ultimately highlight major water and gas migration avenues. In addition to variable water salinity, the authors' preliminary results suggest that complexities in natural gas chemistry are reflected in the composition of coexisting waters.

Martini, A.M.; Walter, L.M.; Richards, J.A.; Budai, J.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Introduction The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) or remain relatively productive (e.g., Hanford Reach fall chinook). Accordingly, this plan emphasizes, and migrating salmon and steelhead in the mainstem. This includes, among other things, protecting the Hanford included in these amendments to be "interim" while the Council works with the region to determine the most

393

Microsoft Word - Powder River Basin 1_6_06.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

natural gas demand has placed on our aging, and vulnerable, domestic natural gas exploration, production, processing, and transportation infrastructure. Natural gas...

394

Coalbed Methane Resources in the Powder River Basin: Lithologic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Wyoming and North Dakota. Specifically, the analysis looked at: total gas desorbed, coal quality, and high-pressure methane adsorption isotherm data from 963 cored coal samples...

395

"2. Laramie River Station","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

the World","Other Renewables","Duke Energy Top Of the World WindPower",200 "7. Wyoming Wind Energy Center","Other Renewables","FPL Energy Wyoming Wind LLC",144 "8....

396

POWDER RIVER BASIN COALBED METHANE DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCED WATER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recoverable PRB CBM Resources, by Partition . . 3-3 3.4 Estimating Gas and Water Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 4.0 COSTS OF...

397

The Jordan River Basin : culture in resource management and conflict.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is a case study of the impact of culture on the management of water resources and the conflict over their usage by opposing… (more)

Ritzler, Jacob

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mosquito populations in the Powder River basin, Wyoming.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal bed natural gas development in northeastern Wyoming has increased surface water in ranching and agricultural areas over undeveloped land. This increase of water increases… (more)

Doherty, Melissa Kuckler.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

2000 Columbia river Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Hydroelectric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Energy Commission FINAL COMMISSION REPORT RENEWABLES PORTFOLIO STANDARD 2007 COMMISSION Edmund G. Brown, Jr., Governor #12;CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION Robert B. Weisenmiller Chairman ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The Renewables Portfolio Standard 2007 Procurement Verification Final Commission Report

400

Homogeneity of Gridded Precipitation Datasets for the Colorado River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inhomogeneity in gridded meteorological data may arise from the inclusion of inhomogeneous station data or from aspects of the gridding procedure itself. However, the homogeneity of gridded datasets is rarely questioned, even though an analysis ...

Galina Guentchev; Joseph J. Barsugli; Jon Eischeid

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10