Sample records for rapid improvement fully

  1. LBNL 59017 JArt 1 Improved Spatial Resolution in Thick, Fully-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 59017 JArt 1 Improved Spatial Resolution in Thick, Fully- Depleted CCDs with Enhanced Red developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Because they can be over-depleted, the LBNL measure an rms diffusion of 3.7 ± 0.2 m. Lateral charge diffusion in LBNL CCDs will meet the SNAP

  2. Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to laser ablation and 3D printing for rapid prototypinglaser ablation, and 3D printing. 2.1 ExperimentalMachining, Laser ablation, 3D printing, Microfluidics, Value

  3. Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improve manufacturing. Keywords: Machining, Laser ablation,manufacturing technology. The first project compared micromilling to laser

  4. Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to laser ablation and 3D printing for rapid prototypingMachining, Laser ablation, 3D printing, Microfluidics, Valuein new ways (e.g. , 3D printing to create products beyond

  5. Applying an improved rapid impact assessment matrix method to strategic environmental assessment of urban planning in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei, E-mail: weili@bnu.edu.cn; Xie, Yuanbo, E-mail: former_007@163.com; Hao, Fanghua, E-mail: fanghua@bnu.edu.cn

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has become an increasingly important decision-support tool for providing information on the environmental implications of a policy, plan, or program. The goal is to safeguard the environment and promote sustainable development at the strategic level. Despite major progress in implementing SEA practices internationally, developing countries, such as China, often lag behind in applying SEA methodology. Lack of available data and time constraints arising from tight schedules create problems. The rapid impact assessment matrix (RIAM) is a potential resource for breaking through such difficulties. Our analysis of RIAM applications suggested that it could become a tool for evaluating strategic alternatives because of its applicability in interdisciplinary settings, its transparency, and its short implementation timeframe. To make it more suitable for the SEA context, we have developed two major improvements to the conventional RIAM process: assignment of weights to assessment indicators and the development of an integrated environmental assessment score (IES). The improved RIAM process was employed in an SEA of the development plan for the Nansha District in Guangzhou, the capital city of Guangdong Province in China. It was used to assess five alternatives for development in Wanqingsha (WQS), a subunit of Nansha, where important ecological resources are located and where industrial development could impact the air quality in the neighboring Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). The evaluation identified WQS-A04 as the preferred alternative. This alternative involved a minimal amount of industrial development – 10% compared with the most intense development alternative – and included important wetland preservation plans. The assessment results have been incorporated into the officially approved development plan for Nansha. The improved RIAM methodology is well adapted to the technical aims of SEA and decision-making structures in China. It offers the potential for delivering timely and quality results to decision-making processes. To achieve the desired efficiency, it is recommended that an SEA procedure take into account findings acquired from an improved RIAM application at an early stage, then, at a later stage, results from more comprehensive assessments conducted using more sophisticated methods should be added, if time and data are available. - Highlights: • RIAM is a potential SEA tool due to its multidisciplinary setting and rapid process. • Weighting index and computing IES are raised for improving RIAM when applied to SEAs. • The improved RIAM boosts SEA effectiveness by timely responding to decision-making. • The improved RIAM is more suitable to an SEA bothered by tight time or data shortage. • The improved RIAM adapts to the technical aims of SEA and decision features in China.

  6. Energy-band engineering for improved charge retention in fully self-aligned double floating-gate single-electron memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaohui Tang; Christophe Krzeminski; Aurélien Lecavelier des Etangs-Levallois; Zhenkun Chen; Emmanuel Dubois; Erich Kasper; Alim Karmous; Nicolas Reckinger; Denis Flandre; Laurent A. Francis; Jean-Pierre Colinge; Jean-Pierre Raskin

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new fully self-aligned single-electron memory with a single pair of nano floating gates, made of different materials (Si and Ge). The energy barrier that prevents stored charge leakage is induced not only by quantum effects but also by the conduction-band offset that arises between Ge and Si. The dimension and position of each floating gate are well defined and controlled. The devices exhibit a long retention time and single-electron injection at room temperature.

  7. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are improvments to a rapid road repair vehicle comprising an improved cleaning device arrangement, two dispensing arrays for filling defects more rapidly and efficiently, an array of pre-heaters to heat the road way surface in order to help the repair material better bond to the repaired surface, a means for detecting, measuring, and computing the number, location and volume of each of the detected surface imperfection, and a computer means schema for controlling the operation of the plurality of vehicle subsystems. The improved vehicle is, therefore, better able to perform its intended function of filling surface imperfections while moving over those surfaces at near normal traffic speeds.

  8. For the last decades, cement technologies encountered a very rapid evolution following the will to always built quicker with more efficient materials. The additional young appearance of ecological trends pushed cement industries to an adaption and improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    For the last decades, cement technologies encountered a very rapid evolution following pushed cement industries to an adaption and improvement of their production methods in order to mini of the cement with supplementary cementitious mate- rials (SCMs) being generally waste from other industries

  9. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsyth, Eric B. (Brookhaven, NY); Muller, Albert C. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: fully certified commercial hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fully certified commercial hydrogen fueling station Linde, Sandia Partnership Looks to Expand Hydrogen Fueling Network On February 26, 2015, in Center for Infrastructure Research...

  11. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, Leo M. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  12. Rapid road repair vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mara, L.M.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find at the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was not heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past. 2 figs.

  13. Rapid automatic NCS identification using heavy-atom substructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid algorithm for identifying NCS in heavy-atom sites is described. An important component of a fully automated system for structure solution and phase improvement through density modification is a capability for identification of non-crystallographic symmetry as early in the process as possible. Algorithms exist for finding NCS in heavy-atom sites, but currently require of the order of N{sup 5} comparisons to be made, where N is the number of sites to be examined, including crystallographically related locations. A method described here based on considering only sets of sites that have common interatomic distances reduces the computational time by several orders of magnitude. Additionally, searches for proper symmetry allow the identification of NCS in cases where only one heavy atom is present per NCS copy.

  14. The inverter in a hybrid or fully

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    The inverter in a hybrid or fully electric vehicle, such as the Toyota Prius, supplies power from Semiconductor (MOS), IGBT and diode devices, for applications in hybrid vehicles and portable power supplies of renewable energy systems, sustainable transport and many other applications. The area of power electronics

  15. Total correlations as fully additive entanglement monotones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardo A. Paz-Silva; John H. Reina

    2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize the strategy presented in Refs. [1, 2], and propose general conditions for a measure of total correlations to be an entanglement monotone using its pure (and mixed) convex-roof extension. In so doing, we derive crucial theorems and propose a concrete candidate for a total correlations measure which is a fully additive entanglement monotone.

  16. CHAPTER NO. FULLY NONLINEAR POTENTIAL FLOW MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    approaches pursued were based on using : (i) linear or nonlinear Shallow Water Wave equations (Carrier approaches. Griffiths et al. 28 1992, compared measurements of internal kinematics of periodic waves shoalingCHAPTER NO. FULLY NONLINEAR POTENTIAL FLOW MODELS USED FOR LONG WAVE RUNUP PREDICTION (S. Grilli

  17. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Sites Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF6) Fully Operational at the...

  18. Advances in rapid prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{trademark} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. Sandia uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype parts in support of a Sandia National Laboratories managed program called FASTCAST. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{trademark} resin and software, they experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible, using this technology, to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable firs article and small lots size production parts. They use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster, with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This presentation will focus on the successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes.

  19. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Use of Laser Engineered Net Shaping for Rapid Manufacturing of Dies with Protective Coatings and Improved Thermal Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brevick, Jerald R. [Ohio State University

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In the high pressure die casting process, molten metal is introduced into a die cavity at high pressure and velocity, enabling castings of thin wall section and complex geometry to be obtained. Traditional die materials have been hot work die steels, commonly H13. Manufacture of the dies involves machining the desired geometry from monolithic blocks of annealed tool steel, heat treating to desired hardness and toughness, and final machining, grinding and polishing. The die is fabricated with internal water cooling passages created by drilling. These materials and fabrication methods have been used for many years, however, there are limitations. Tool steels have relatively low thermal conductivity, and as a result, it takes time to remove the heat from the tool steel via the drilled internal water cooling passages. Furthermore, the low thermal conductivity generates large thermal gradients at the die cavity surfaces, which ultimately leads to thermal fatigue cracking on the surfaces of the die steel. The high die surface temperatures also promote the metallurgical bonding of the aluminum casting alloy to the surface of the die steel (soldering). In terms of process efficiency, these tooling limitations reduce the number of die castings that can be made per unit time by increasing cycle time required for cooling, and increasing downtime and cost to replace tooling which has failed either by soldering or by thermal fatigue cracking (heat checking). The objective of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of designing, fabricating, and testing high pressure die casting tooling having properties equivalent to H13 on the surface in contact with molten casting alloy - for high temperature and high velocity molten metal erosion resistance – but with the ability to conduct heat rapidly to interior water cooling passages. A layered bimetallic tool design was selected, and the design evaluated for thermal and mechanical performance via finite element analysis. H13 was retained as the exterior layer of the tooling, while commercially pure copper was chosen for the interior structure of the tooling. The tooling was fabricated by traditional machining of the copper substrate, and H13 powder was deposited on the copper via the Laser Engineered Net Shape (LENSTM) process. The H13 deposition layer was then final machined by traditional methods. Two tooling components were designed and fabricated; a thermal fatigue test specimen, and a core for a commercial aluminum high pressure die casting tool. The bimetallic thermal fatigue specimen demonstrated promising performance during testing, and the test results were used to improve the design and LENS TM deposition methods for subsequent manufacture of the commercial core. Results of the thermal finite element analysis for the thermal fatigue test specimen indicate that it has the ability to lose heat to the internal water cooling passages, and to external spray cooling, significantly faster than a monolithic H13 thermal fatigue sample. The commercial core is currently in the final stages of fabrication, and will be evaluated in an actual production environment at Shiloh Die casting. In this research, the feasibility of designing and fabricating copper/H13 bimetallic die casting tooling via LENS TM processing, for the purpose of improving die casting process efficiency, is demonstrated.

  20. Design, Analysis, and Learning Control of a Fully Actuated Micro Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    Design, Analysis, and Learning Control of a Fully Actuated Micro Wind Turbine J. Zico Kolter of renewable energy, and improvements to wind turbine design and control can have a significant impact a actuated micro wind turbine intended for research purposes. While most academic work on wind turbine

  1. Fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palastro, J. P.; Ross, J. S.; Pollock, B.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a fully relativistic form factor for Thomson scattering in unmagnetized plasmas valid to all orders in the normalized electron velocity, beta->=v->/c. The form factor is compared to a previously derived expression where the lowest order electron velocity, beta->, corrections are included [J. Sheffield, Plasma Scattering of Electromagnetic Radiation (Academic Press, New York, 1975)]. The beta-> expansion approach is sufficient for electrostatic waves with small phase velocities such as ion-acoustic waves, but for electron-plasma waves the phase velocities can be near luminal. At high phase velocities, the electron motion acquires relativistic corrections including effective electron mass, relative motion of the electrons and electromagnetic wave, and polarization rotation. These relativistic corrections alter the scattered emission of thermal plasma waves, which manifest as changes in both the peak power and width of the observed Thomson-scattered spectra.

  2. Chemical and mechanical analysis of tribofilms from fully formulated oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Pupa Gelsomina De Stasio

    the four major classes of solubilisates which are sludge, sludge precursors, acids and water in engine oilsChemical and mechanical analysis of tribofilms from fully formulated oils Part 1 ­ Films on 52100 a fully formulated oil that is commercially available. Wear increases substantially when using the fully

  3. Squirt flow in fully saturated rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorkin, J.; Mavko, G.; Nur, A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors estimate velocity/frequency dispersion and attenuation in fully saturated rocks by employing the squirt-flow mechanism of solid-fluid interaction. In this model, pore fluid is squeezed from thin soft cracks into the surrounding large pores. Information about the compliance of these soft cracks at low confining pressures is extracted from high-pressure velocity data. The frequency dependence of squirt-induced pressure in the soft cracks is linked with the porosity and permeability of the soft pore space, and the characteristic squirt-flow length. These unknown parameters are combined into one expression that is assumed to be a fundamental rock property that does not depend on frequency. The appropriate value of this expression for a given rock can be found by matching the authors theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements of attenuation or velocity. The low-frequency velocity limits, as given by their model, are identical to those predicted by Gassmann`s formula. The high-frequency limits may significant exceed those given by the Biot theory: the high-frequency frame bulk modulus is close to that measured at high confining pressure. They have applied their model to D`Euville Limestone, Navajo Sandstone, and Westerly Granite. The model realistically predicts the observed velocity/frequency dispersion, and attenuation.

  4. QCD evolution in the fully unintegrated form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Jadach; M. Skrzypek

    2009-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The next-to-leading order (NLO) evolution of the parton distribution functions (PDF's) in QCD is the "industry standard" in the lepton-hadron and hadron-hadron collider data analysis. The standard NLO DGLAP evolution is formulated for inclusive (integrated) PDFs and is done using inclusive NLO kernels. We report here on the ongoing project, called KRKMC, in which NLO DGLAP evolution is performed for the exclusive multiparton (fully unintegrated) distributions (ePDF's) with the help of the exclusive kernels. These kernels are calculated within the two-parton phase space for bremsstrahlung subset of the Feynman diagrams of the non-singlet evolution, using Curci-Furmanski-Petronzio factorization scheme. The multiparton distribution with multiple use of the exclusive NLO kernels is implemented in the Monte Carlo program simulating multi-gluon emission from single quark emitter. With high statistics tests ($\\sim 10^{9}$ events) it is shown that the new scheme works perfectly well in practice and is equivalent at the inclusive level with the traditional inclusive NLO DGLAP evolution. Once completed, this Monte Carlo module is aimed as a building block for the NLO parton shower Monte Carlo, for W/Z production at LHC and for ep scattering, as well as a starting point for other perturbative QCD based Monte Carlo projects.

  5. Towards a Scalable Fully-Implicit Fully-coupled Resistive MHD Formulation with Stabilized FE Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadid, J N; Pawlowski, R P; Banks, J W; Chacon, L; Lin, P T; Tuminaro, R S

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an initial study that is intended to explore the development of a scalable fully-implicit stabilized unstructured finite element (FE) capability for low-Mach-number resistive MHD. The discussion considers the development of the stabilized FE formulation and the underlying fully-coupled preconditioned Newton-Krylov nonlinear iterative solver. To enable robust, scalable and efficient solution of the large-scale sparse linear systems generated by the Newton linearization, fully-coupled algebraic multilevel preconditioners are employed. Verification results demonstrate the expected order-of-acuracy for the stabilized FE discretization of a 2D vector potential form for the steady and transient solution of the resistive MHD system. In addition, this study puts forth a set of challenging prototype problems that include the solution of an MHD Faraday conduction pump, a hydromagnetic Rayleigh-Bernard linear stability calculation, and a magnetic island coalescence problem. Initial results that explore the scaling of the solution methods are presented on up to 4096 processors for problems with up to 64M unknowns on a CrayXT3/4. Additionally, a large-scale proof-of-capability calculation for 1 billion unknowns for the MHD Faraday pump problem on 24,000 cores is presented.

  6. Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 1102 Pen microfluidics: rapid desktop manufacturing of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 1102 Pen microfluidics: rapid desktop manufacturing of sealed microfluidic chips is described. The method enables the realization of fully-sealed microchannels in around one microfluidic devices fabricated following a true desktop manufacturing model suitable for rapid prototyping

  7. Vacancies in fully hydrogenated boron nitride layer: implications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and electronic properties of hydrogen vacancies in a fully hydrogenated boron nitride (fH-BN) layer were...

  8. Design and Control of a Fully Automated Vehicle door

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Kyung-Min

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research was to develop a fully automated vehicle car door that can detect any object obstructing its path during operation. A fully automated door concept has not yet been implemented in the car industry. The door, operated via...

  9. Toward Fully Automated Multicriterial Plan Generation: A Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voet, Peter W.J., E-mail: p.voet@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Fransen, Dennie; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center–Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Groene Hilledijk 301, Rotterdam 3075EA (Netherlands)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To prospectively compare plans generated with iCycle, an in-house-developed algorithm for fully automated multicriterial intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beam profile and beam orientation optimization, with plans manually generated by dosimetrists using the clinical treatment planning system. Methods and Materials: For 20 randomly selected head-and-neck cancer patients with various tumor locations (of whom 13 received sequential boost treatments), we offered the treating physician the choice between an automatically generated iCycle plan and a manually optimized plan using standard clinical procedures. Although iCycle used a fixed “wish list” with hard constraints and prioritized objectives, the dosimetrists manually selected the beam configuration and fine tuned the constraints and objectives for each IMRT plan. Dosimetrists were not informed in advance whether a competing iCycle plan was made. The 2 plans were simultaneously presented to the physician, who then selected the plan to be used for treatment. For the patient group, differences in planning target volume coverage and sparing of critical tissues were quantified. Results: In 32 of 33 plan comparisons, the physician selected the iCycle plan for treatment. This highly consistent preference for the automatically generated plans was mainly caused by the improved sparing for the large majority of critical structures. With iCycle, the normal tissue complication probabilities for the parotid and submandibular glands were reduced by 2.4% ± 4.9% (maximum, 18.5%, P=.001) and 6.5% ± 8.3% (maximum, 27%, P=.005), respectively. The reduction in the mean oral cavity dose was 2.8 ± 2.8 Gy (maximum, 8.1 Gy, P=.005). For the swallowing muscles, the esophagus and larynx, the mean dose reduction was 3.3 ± 1.1 Gy (maximum, 9.2 Gy, P<.001). For 15 of the 20 patients, target coverage was also improved. Conclusions: In 97% of cases, automatically generated plans were selected for treatment because of the superior quality. Apart from the improved plan quality, automatic plan generation is economically attractive because of the reduced workload.

  10. Light disappears rapidly (exponentially)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    #12;#12;#12;#12;Light disappears rapidly (exponentially) with depth At the same time, the color of the light shifts #12;#12;#12;#12;· Euphotic zone ­ plentiful light ­ 0-100 m (about) · Dysphotic zone ­ very, very little light ­ 100-1000 m (about) · Aphotic zone ­ no light ­ below 1000 m #12;Sunlight in Water

  11. Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    775 Fully portable, highly flexible dilution refrigerator systems for neutron scattering P. A systems developed specifically for neutron scattering environ- ments. The refrigerators are completely relatively recently however, the lowest temperatures available in almost all neutron scattering laboratories

  12. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, R.W.

    1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapidly refuelable dual cell of an electrochemical type is described wherein a single anode cooperates with two cathodes and wherein the anode has a fixed position and the cathodes are urged toward opposite faces of the anodes at constant and uniform force. The associated cathodes are automatically retractable to permit the consumed anode remains to be removed from the housing and a new anode inserted between the two cathodes.

  13. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  14. A fully-integrated aptamer-based affinity assay platform for monitoring astronaut health in space.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xianbin (AM Biotechnologies LLC, Houston, TX); Durland, Ross H. (AM Biotechnologies LLC, Houston, TX); Hecht, Ariel H.; Singh, Anup K.; Sommer, Gregory Jon; Hatch, Anson V.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we demonstrate the suitability of robust nucleic acid affinity reagents in an integrated point-of-care diagnostic platform for monitoring proteomic biomarkers indicative of astronaut health in spaceflight applications. A model thioaptamer targeting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) is evaluated in an on-chip electrophoretic gel-shift assay for human serum. Key steps of (i) mixing sample with the aptamer, (ii) buffer exchange, and (iii) preconcentration of sample were successfully integrated upstream of fluorescence-based detection. Challenges due to (i) nonspecific interactions with serum, and (ii) preconcentration at a nanoporous membrane are discussed and successfully resolved to yield a robust, rapid, and fully-integrated diagnostic system.

  15. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  16. Fully Affiliated Members Aero/Astro Austin DiOrio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    Fully Affiliated Members Aero/Astro Austin DiOrio Alpha Phi OmegaAPO Nicole Gagnier ARA Richard) Daniel Chavas East Campus Juliana Wu Eastgate Elliot Greenblatt Economics Dept. Kyle Greenberg Edgerton Center Chaithanya Bandi Parsons Benzhang Zhao Phi Beta Epsilon Daniel Ronde Phi Kappa Sigma (Skullhouse

  17. MAC-EYE: a Tendon Driven Fully Embedded Robot Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannata, Giorgio

    MAC-EYE: a Tendon Driven Fully Embedded Robot Eye Dario Biamino, Giorgio Cannata, Marco Maggiali the possibility of designing a robot eye with kinematics and actuation similar to those of the human eye. In particular, we tried to exploit the spherical shape of the eye and to study the feasibility of a tendon based

  18. FULLY INTEGRATED ONE PHASE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM FOR ORGANIC BOARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FULLY INTEGRATED ONE PHASE LIQUID COOLING SYSTEM FOR ORGANIC BOARDS D. May1 , B. Wunderle1 , F approach: A liquid cooling system has to be cus- tomised to its application. Further, it requires many dis in designing liquid cooling solu- tions are performance, reliability and price. To that end a one-phase liquid

  19. VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF FULLY NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PATH DEPENDENT PDES ZHENJIE REN Abstract, inspired by [3], we define the viscosity solution, by using the nonlinear expectation. The paper contains , that for any bounded viscosity subsolution u1 and Key words and phrases. Path dependent PDEs, Dirichlet problem

  20. Concurrency control in a fully replicated database environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nath, Rajivendra

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the sites has a fully replicated copy of the database managed by a DBMS. The database consists of a number of named data items each having the time-stamp of the last transaction to update it. Att the messages concerned with this algorithm move in one...

  1. A Monolithic, Self-Powered IC with Fully Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    market forecast by applicationTrends of portable electronics: Higher performance Lower cost Smaller size suitable for low power applications Bulky size High cost GEDC Industry Advisory Board, April 2004. © 2004A Monolithic, Self-Powered IC with Fully Integrated Micro-Fuel Cell Min Chen Advisor: Prof. G

  2. FULLY FUNDED DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BIOFUELS RESEARCH INTERNSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildermuth, Mary C

    FULLY FUNDED DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BIOFUELS RESEARCH INTERNSHIP AT PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY Position Description The overall project objective is to utilize marine microalgae for biofuels (i.e., lipids for biodiesel or jet biofuel) production. The student will set up a series

  3. Fully Quantum Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    Refrigerator and Magnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.1.3 Vacuum EnclosureFully Quantum Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment A thesis presented by Brian Carl Odom Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment Abstract This thesis reports a preliminary result for the first

  4. Energy conversion of fully random thermal relaxation times Franois Barriquand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Energy conversion of fully random thermal relaxation times François Barriquand proba5050@hotmail.com ABSTRACT. Thermodynamic random processes in thermal systems are generally associated with one or several relaxation times, the inverse of which are formally homogeneous with energy. Here, we show in a precise way

  5. Rapid prototyping applications for manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in stereolithography and selective laser sintering have had a significant impact on the overall quality of parts produced using these rapid prototyping processes. The development and implementation of 3D System`s QuickCast{sup TM} resin and software for building investment casting patterns have proven to be major steps toward fabricating highly accurate patterns with very good surface finishes. As participants in the Beta test program for QuickCast{sup TM} resin and software, we experienced a steep learning curve and were able to build accurate parts in a short period of time. It is now possible using this technology to produce highly accurate prototype parts as well as acceptable first article and small lot size production parts. We use the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) process to fabricate prototype wax patterns for investment casting. DTM Corporation recently introduced the use of their polycarbonate material for fabricating investment casting patterns. The polycarbonate material is processed significantly faster with improved strength, dimensional stability, and without a support structure during the build process. Sandia is currently changing from investment casting wax to polycarbonate for the fabrication of investment casting patterns using the SLS process. This report will focus on our successes with these new materials from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and post processing. Also presented will be examples of parts manufactured by these processes. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withee, Jon E

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing offshore wind resources for the large scale generation of electricity. Drawing ...

  7. Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Project -- Fully Integrated Linear Detector ArrayStatus Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Roney; Robert Seifert; Bob Pink; Mike Smith

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field-portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography (DRCT) x-ray inspection systems developed for the Project Manager for NonStockpile Chemical Materiel (PMNSCM) over the past 13 years have used linear diode detector arrays from two manufacturers; Thomson and Thales. These two manufacturers no longer produce this type of detector. In the interest of insuring the long term viability of the portable DRCT single munitions inspection systems and to improve the imaging capabilities, this project has been investigating improved, commercially available detectors. During FY-10, detectors were evaluated and one in particular, manufactured by Detection Technologies (DT), Inc, was acquired for possible integration into the DRCT systems. The remainder of this report describes the work performed in FY-11 to complete evaluations and fully integrate the detector onto a representative DRCT platform.

  8. On seismic signatures of rapid variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Houdek; D. O. Gough

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an improved model for an asteroseismic diagnostic contained in the frequency spacing of low-degree acoustic modes. By modelling in a realistic manner regions of rapid variation of dynamically relevant quantities, which we call acoustic glitches, we can derive signatures of the gross properties of those glitches. In particular, we are interested in measuring properties that are related to the helium ionization zones and to the rapid variation in the background state associated with the lower boundary of the convective envelope. The formula for the seismic diagnostic is tested against a sequence of theoretical models of the Sun, and is compared with seismic diagnostics published previously by Monteiro & Thompson (1998, 2005) and by Basu et al. (2004).

  9. Rapid, Low-Cost Conversion from Rice to Improved Pastures.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weihing, Ralph M. (Ralph Martin); Moncrief, James B.

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was broadcast September 29, 1949 in rice at last draining. The *clover was broadcast in the stubble in November 1949. Twelve-inch rice stubble is ob- scured by grass and clover. The plots were mowed March 13 and May 16, 1950. Yields are shown in Table 2...

  10. Improving Robust Rolling Stock Circulation in Rapid Transit Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 31, 2011 ... both solutions, the EDR with respect to the sequential approach is of the ... However, a great EDR compared to the current solution is obtained.

  11. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

  12. General Relativity as a fully singular Lagrange system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some gauge conditions to eliminate all second time derivative terms in the vierbein forms of the ten Einstein equations of general relativity; at the same time, we present the corresponding Lagrangian in which there is not any quadratic term of first time derivative that can leads to those vierbein forms of the Einstein equations without second time derivative term by the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations. General relativity thus becomes a fully singular Lagrange system.

  13. Optimization of a Fully-Passive Flapping-Airfoil Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of a Fully-Passive Flapping-Airfoil Turbine Mémoire Jean-Christophe Veilleux Maîtrise. De telles oscillations pourraient ^etre utilis´ees afin de d´evelopper un nouveau type de turbine Reynolds de 500 000, ce type de turbine est optimis´e et amplement ´etudi´e afin de d´evelopper une

  14. Fully Solution-Processed Copper Chalcopyrite Thin Film Solar Cells: Materials Chemistry, Processing, and Device Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Choong-Heui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    films. Photovoltaic devices with power conversion efficiencyhigh efficiency fully solution-deposited CISS photovoltaic

  15. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  16. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Runaway electrons in a fully and partially ionized nonideal plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Turekhanova, K.M. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, Tole bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a study of electron runaway for a nonideal plasma in an external electric field. Based on pseudopotential models of nonideal fully and partially ionized plasmas, the friction force was derived as a function of electron velocities. Dependences of the electron free path on plasma density and nonideality parameters were obtained. The impact of the relative number of runaway electrons on their velocity and temperature was considered for classical and semiclassical models of a nonideal plasma. It has been shown that for the defined intervals of the coupled plasma parameter, the difference between the relative numbers of runaway electron values is essential for various plasma models.

  18. Capability Improvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement Trinity NERSC-8 Capability Improvement As stated in Section 3.5 of the Technical Requirements, The performance of the ASC and NERSC...

  19. Charmless B -> PPP Decays: the Fully-Symmetric Final State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Imbeault, Maxime; London, David; Rosner, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In charmless B -> PPP decays, where P is a pseudoscalar meson, there are six possibilities for the symmetry of the final state. In this paper, for P=pi,K, we examine the properties of the fully-symmetric final state. We present expressions for all 32 B -> PPP decay amplitudes as a function of both SU(3) reduced matrix elements and diagrams, demonstrating the equivalence of diagrams and SU(3). We also give 25 relations among the amplitudes in the SU(3) limit, as well as those that appear when the diagrams E/A/PA are neglected. In the SU(3) limit, one has the equalities \\sqrt{2} A(B+ -> K+ pi+ pi-)_{FS} = A(B+ -> K+ K+ K-)_{FS} and \\sqrt{2} A(B+ -> pi+ K+ K-)_{FS} = A(B+ -> pi+ pi+ pi-)_{FS}, where FS denotes the fully-symmetric final state. These provide good tests of the standard model that can be carried out now by the LHCb Collaboration.

  20. Charmless B -> PPP Decays: the Fully-Symmetric Final State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhubanjyoti Bhattacharya; Michael Gronau; Maxime Imbeault; David London; Jonathan L. Rosner

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In charmless B -> PPP decays, where P is a pseudoscalar meson, there are six possibilities for the symmetry of the final state. In this paper, for P=pi,K, we examine the properties of the fully-symmetric final state. We present expressions for all 32 B -> PPP decay amplitudes as a function of both SU(3) reduced matrix elements and diagrams, demonstrating the equivalence of diagrams and SU(3). We also give 25 relations among the amplitudes in the SU(3) limit, as well as those that appear when the diagrams E/A/PA are neglected. In the SU(3) limit, one has the equalities \\sqrt{2} A(B+ -> K+ pi+ pi-)_{FS} = A(B+ -> K+ K+ K-)_{FS} and \\sqrt{2} A(B+ -> pi+ K+ K-)_{FS} = A(B+ -> pi+ pi+ pi-)_{FS}, where FS denotes the fully-symmetric final state. These provide good tests of the standard model that can be carried out now by the LHCb Collaboration.

  1. Fully Anisotropic String Cosmologies, Maxwell Fields and Primordial Shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Giovannini

    1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a class of exact cosmological solutions of the low energy string effective action in the presence of a homogeneous magnetic fields. We discuss the physical properties of the obtained (fully anisotropic) cosmologies paying particular attention to their vacuum limit and to the possible isotropization mechanisms. We argue that quadratic curvature corrections are able to isotropize fully anisotropic solutions whose scale factors describe accelerated expansion. Moreover, the degree of isotropization grows with the duration of the string phase. We follow the fate of the shear parameter in a decelerated phase where, dilaton, magnetic fields and radiation fluid are simultaneously present. In the absence of any magnetic field a long string phase immediately followed by radiation is able to erase large anisotropies. Conversely, if a short string phase is followed by a long dilaton dominated phase the anisotropies can be present, in principle, also at later times. The presence of magnetic seeds after the end of the string phase can induce further anisotropies which can be studied within the formalism reported in this paper.

  2. Development of Low Energy Gap and Fully Regioregular Polythienylenevinylene Derivative

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    David, Tanya M. S.; Zhang, Cheng; Sun, Sam-Shajing

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low energy gap and fully regioregular conjugated polymers find its wide use in solar energy conversion applications. This paper will first briefly review this type of polymers and also report synthesis and characterization of a specific example new polymer, a low energy gap, fully regioregular, terminal functionalized, and processable conjugated polymer poly-(3-dodecyloxy-2,5-thienylene vinylene) or PDDTV. The polymer exhibited an optical energy gap of 1.46?eV based on the UV-vis-NIR absorption spectrum. The electrochemically measured highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level is ?4.79?eV, resulting in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of ?3.33?eV based on optical energy gap. The polymer wasmore »synthesized via Horner-Emmons condensation and is fairly soluble in common organic solvents such as tetrahydrofuran and chloroform with gentle heating. DSC showed two endothermic peaks at 67°C and 227°C that can be attributed to transitions between crystalline and liquid states. The polymer is thermally stable up to about 300°C. This polymer appears very promising for cost-effective solar cell applications.« less

  3. Rapid prototyping of green composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peek, Nadya (Nadya Meile)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid prototyping employs digital fabrication techniques to quickly manufacture parts. However, the available materials are not yet suitable for making strong, large or durable objects. Composites are materials which are ...

  4. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  5. RELIABILITY IMPROVEMENT OF BART TRAIN CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, D.B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equipment to resolve equipment reliability problems must bereliability problems was seen to be a mandatory first step in improving equipmentreliability of the Bay Area Rapid Tran- sit district's vehicle-borne Automatic Train Control equipment.

  6. Fully microscopic shell-model calculations with realistic effective hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Coraggio; A. Covello; A. Gargano; N. Itaco; T. T. S. Kuo

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from chiral perturbation theory, as well as the so-called V-low-k approach to the renormalization of the strong short-range repulsion contained in the potentials, have brought renewed interest in realistic shell-model calculations. Here we focus on calculations where a fully microscopic approach is adopted. No phenomenological input is needed in these calculations, because single-particle energies, matrix elements of the two-body interaction, and matrix elements of the electromagnetic multipole operators are derived theoretically. This has been done within the framework of the time-dependent degenerate linked-diagram perturbation theory. We present results for some nuclei in different mass regions. These evidence the ability of realistic effective hamiltonians to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  7. Fully nonlinear excitations of non-Abelian plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishnu M. Bannur

    2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate fully nonlinear, non-Abelian excitations of quark-antiquark plasma, using relativistic fluid theory in cold plasma approximation. There are mainly three important nonlinearities, coming from various sources such as non-Abelian interactions of Yang-Mills (YM) fields, Wong's color dynamics and plasma nonlinearity, in our model. By neglecting nonlinearities due to plasma and color dynamics we get back the earlier results of Blaizot {\\it et. al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3317 (1994). Similarly, by neglecting YM fields nonlinearity and plasma nonlinearity, it reduces to the model of Gupta {\\it et. al.}, Phys. Lett. B498, 223 (2005). Thus we have the most general non-Abelian mode of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Further, our model resembles the problem of propagation of laser beam through relativistic plasma, Physica 9D, 96 (1983). in the absence of all non-Abelian interactions.

  8. First Characterization of a Fully Superconducting RF Photoinjector Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumann, A; Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A N; Quast, T; Rudolph, J; Schubert, S G; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Sekutowicz, J K; Smedley, J; Volkov, V; Weinberg, G

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a first step towards a high brightness, high average current electron source for the BERLinPro ERL a fully superconducting photo-injector was developed by HZB in collaboration with JLab, DESY and the A. Soltan Institute. This cavity-injector ensemble is made up of a 1.6-cell superconducting cavity with a superconducting lead cathode deposited on the half-cell backwall. A superconducting solenoid is used for emittance compensation. This system, including a diagnostics beamline, has been installed in the HoBiCaT facility to serve as a testbed for beam dynamics studies and to test the combination SRF cavity and superconducting solenoid. This paper summarizes the characterization of the cavity in this configuration including Q measurements, dark current tests and field-stability analyses.

  9. Fabrication and Characterization of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Shimoda, Kazuya [Kyoto University, Japan; Montgomery, Fred C [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Hinoki, Tatsuya [Kyoto University, Japan; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current generation of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels, consisting of Tristructural Isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix, is fabricated by hot pressing. Matrix powder feedstock is comprised of alumina - yttria additives thoroughly mixed with silicon carbide nanopowder using polyethyleneimine as a dispersing agent. Fuel compacts are fabricated by hot pressing the powder - fuel particle mixture at a temperature of 1800-1900 C using compaction pressures of 10-20 MPa. Detailed microstructural characterization of the final fuel compacts shows that oxide additives are limited in extent and are distributed uniformly at silicon carbide grain boundaries, at triple joints between silicon carbide grains, and at the fuel particle-matrix interface.

  10. Fully microscopic shell-model calculations with realistic effective hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coraggio, L; Gargano, A; Itaco, N; Kuo, T T S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of nucleon-nucleon potentials derived from chiral perturbation theory, as well as the so-called V-low-k approach to the renormalization of the strong short-range repulsion contained in the potentials, have brought renewed interest in realistic shell-model calculations. Here we focus on calculations where a fully microscopic approach is adopted. No phenomenological input is needed in these calculations, because single-particle energies, matrix elements of the two-body interaction, and matrix elements of the electromagnetic multipole operators are derived theoretically. This has been done within the framework of the time-dependent degenerate linked-diagram perturbation theory. We present results for some nuclei in different mass regions. These evidence the ability of realistic effective hamiltonians to provide an accurate description of nuclear structure properties.

  11. Shape memory properties and microstructural evolution of rapidly solidified CuAlBe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergen, Semra, E-mail: semraergengop@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat 60240 (Turkey); Uzun, Orhan, E-mail: orhan.uzun@beun.edu.tr [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Bülent Ecevit University, Zonguldak 67100 (Turkey); Yilmaz, Fikret, E-mail: fikretyilmaz79@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat 60240 (Turkey); Kiliçaslan, M. Fatih, E-mail: fatihkilicaslan@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Science, Kastamonu University, Kastamonu 66100 (Turkey)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the effects of Be addition on the microstructure and phase transformation temperatures of Cu–12Al–xBe (x = 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 wt.%) shape memory alloys fabricated by using the arc-melting and melt-spinning techniques have been investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the arc-melted alloys consisted of austenitic ?{sub 1}, martensitic ?{sub 1}? and ?{sub 2} precipitate phases, whereas melt-spun ribbons were composed of a fully martensitic phase. The average grain size of martensitic phases in melt-spun ribbons was determined by electron microscopy images, showing a decrease with increasing Beryllium (Be) amount. Moreover, it was found that the Be addition in the arc-melted alloys had a distinct effect on the morphology of the ?{sub 2} precipitate phase. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that the thickness of martensitic plates in the melt-spun ribbons reduced with increasing Be addition. In a differential scanning calorimeter analysis, no martensitic transformation (M{sub s}) peak was observed in arc-melted alloys, but it was clearly detected in melt-spun ribbons, in which M{sub s} decreased dramatically with increasing Be addition. The improvement in the shape memory ability of melt-spun ribbons was explained in terms of the refinement in grain size and martensitic plates. - Highlights: • The CuAlBe SMAs were produced by means of arc-melter and melt-spinner techniques. • MT was directly obtained in melt-spuns without any intermediate process. • The transformation temperatures decreased with increasing Be amount. • The thickness of martensitic plates in the ribbons reduced with increasing Be. • SMP of CuAl was improved by the addition of Be together with rapid solidification.

  12. Biomass Rapid Analysis Network (BRAN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helping the emerging biotechnology industry develop new tools and methods for real-time analysis of biomass feedstocks, process intermediates and The Biomass Rapid Analysis Network is designed to fast track the development of modern tools and methods for biomass analysis to accelerate the development of the emerging industry. The network will be led by industry and organized and coordinated through the National Renewable Energy Lab. The network will provide training and other activities of interest to BRAN members. BRAN members will share the cost and work of rapid analysis method development, validate the new methods, and work together to develop the training for the future biomass conversion workforce.

  13. Rapid prototyping: A paradigm shift in investment casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; Maguire, M.C.; Baldwin, M.D.; Pardo, B.T.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quest for fabricating complex metal parts rapidly and with minimal cost has brought rapid prototyping (RP) processes to the forefront of the investment casting industry. Relatively recent advances in DTM Corporation`s selective laser sintering (SLS) and 3D Systems stereolithography (SL) processes have had a significant impact on the overall quality of patterns produced using these rapid prototyping processes. Sandia National Laboratories uses patterns generated from rapid prototyping processes to reduce the cycle time and cost of fabricating prototype and small lot production parts in support of a program called FASTCAST. The SLS process is used to fabricate patterns from materials such as investment casting wax, polycarbonate, and a new material called TrueForm PM{trademark}. With the timely introduction of each of these materials, the quality of patterns fabricated has improved. The development and implementation of SL QuickCast{trademark} software has enabled this process to produce highly accurate patterns for use in investment casting. This paper focuses on the successes with these new pattern materials and the infrastructure required to cast rapid prototyping patterns successfully. In addition, a brief overview of other applications of rapid prototyping at Sandia will be discussed.

  14. A computational tool for the rapid design and prototyping of propellers for underwater vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Epagnier, Kathryn Port

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open source, MATLABTM-based propeller design code MPVL was improved to include rapid prototyping capabilities as well as other upgrades as part of this effort. The resulting code, OpenPVL is described in this thesis. ...

  15. Results from the BABAR Fully Inclusive Measurement of B? Xs?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen, Norway /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U.

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results from a lepton-tagged fully-inclusive measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} decays, where X{sub s} is any strange hadronic state. Results are based on a BABAR data set of 88.5 million B{bar B} pairs at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We present a reconstructed photon energy spectrum in the {Upsilon}(4S) frame, and partial branching fractions above minimum reconstructed photon energies of 1.9, 2.0, 2.1 and 2.2 GeV. We then convert these to measurements of partial branching fractions and truncated first and second moments of the true photon energy distribution in the B rest frame, above the same minimum photon energy values. The full correlation matrices between the first and second moments are included to allow fitting to any parameterized theoretical calculation. We also measure the direct CP asymmetry {Alpha}{sub CP}(B {yields} X{sub s+d{gamma}}) (based on the charge of the tagging lepton) above a reconstructed photon energy of 2.2 GeV.

  16. Fully nonlinear solitary waves in a dusty electronegative multispecies plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Labany, S. K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science-Damietta, Mansoura University, New Damietta City 34517 (Egypt); Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Shnishin, Kh. A.; El-Tantawy, S. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Shukla, P. K. [RUB International Chair, International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and dynamics of fully nonlinear ion-acoustic solitary waves, which accompany electronegative plasmas composed of positive ions, two-negative ions, isothermal electrons, as well as a fraction of stationary charged (positive or negative) dust impurities are investigated. By using the hydrodynamic and Poisson equations, an energy-integral equation involving a Sagdeev pseudo-potential is derived. Using the latter, we have defined precisely the existence regions of the electrostatic localized pulses. The critical total negative ions concentration {alpha}{sub c} and critical second-negative ion density ratio {nu}{sub c} thresholds, which indicate where the solitary pulses set in, have been determined for various regimes. Numerical calculations reveal that only supersonic pulses can exist. The total negative ions concentration, the second-to-total negative ions density ratio, electrons-to-positive ions temperature ratio, dust impurities concentration, positive-to-negative mass ratio, and Mach number have been investigated on the nonlinear wave profile. It is found that the total negative ion concentration as well as the dust particles concentration play the significant role in deciding the polarity of the propagating pulses. The results could be applied to investigate and predict the behavior of the nonlinear solitary structure in future laboratory plasma experiment having dusty electronegative multispecies plasmas as referred by Ichiki et al.[Phys. Plasmas 8, 4275 (2001)].

  17. The fully connected N-dimensional skeleton: probing the evolution of the cosmic web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Sousbie; S. Colombi; C. Pichon

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method to compute the full hierarchy of the critical subsets of a density field is presented. It is based on a watershed technique and uses a probability propagation scheme to improve the quality of the segmentation by circumventing the discreteness of the sampling. It can be applied within spaces of arbitrary dimensions and geometry. This recursive segmentation of space yields, for a $d$-dimensional space, a $d-1$ succession of $n$-dimensional subspaces that fully characterize the topology of the density field. The final 1D manifold of the hierarchy is the fully connected network of the primary critical lines of the field : the skeleton. It corresponds to the subset of lines linking maxima to saddle points, and provides a definition of the filaments that compose the cosmic web as a precise physical object, which makes it possible to compute any of its properties such as its length, curvature, connectivity etc... When the skeleton extraction is applied to initial conditions of cosmological N-body simulations and their present day non linear counterparts, it is shown that the time evolution of the cosmic web, as traced by the skeleton, is well accounted for by the Zel'dovich approximation. Comparing this skeleton to the initial skeleton undergoing the Zel'dovich mapping shows that two effects are competing during the formation of the cosmic web: a general dilation of the larger filaments that is captured by a simple deformation of the skeleton of the initial conditions on the one hand, and the shrinking, fusion and disappearance of the more numerous smaller filaments on the other hand. Other applications of the N dimensional skeleton and its peak patch hierarchy are discussed.

  18. Fully integrated safeguards and security for reprocessing plant monitoring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duran, Felicia Angelica; Ward, Rebecca; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Middleton, Bobby D.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants contain a wealth of plant monitoring data including material measurements, process monitoring, administrative procedures, and physical protection elements. Future facilities are moving in the direction of highly-integrated plant monitoring systems that make efficient use of the plant data to improve monitoring and reduce costs. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) is an analysis tool that is used for modeling advanced monitoring systems and to determine system response under diversion scenarios. This report both describes the architecture for such a future monitoring system and present results under various diversion scenarios. Improvements made in the past year include the development of statistical tests for detecting material loss, the integration of material balance alarms to improve physical protection, and the integration of administrative procedures. The SSPM has been used to demonstrate how advanced instrumentation (as developed in the Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies campaign) can benefit the overall safeguards system as well as how all instrumentation is tied into the physical protection system. This concept has the potential to greatly improve the probability of detection for both abrupt and protracted diversion of nuclear material.

  19. Rapidity-Dependent Jet Vetoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shireen Gangal; Maximilian Stahlhofen; Frank J. Tackmann

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet vetoes are a prominent part of the signal selection in various analyses at the LHC. We discuss jet vetoes for which the transverse momentum of a jet is weighted by a smooth function of the jet rapidity. With a suitable choice of the rapidity-weighting function, such jet-veto variables can be factorized and resummed allowing for precise theory predictions. They thus provide a complementary way to divide phase space into exclusive jet bins. In particular, they provide a natural and theoretically clean way to implement a tight veto on central jets with the veto constraint getting looser for jets at increasingly forward rapidities. We mainly focus our discussion on the 0-jet case in color-singlet processes, using Higgs production through gluon fusion as a concrete example. For one of our jet-veto variables we compare the resummed theory prediction at NLL'+NLO with the recent differential cross section measurement by the ATLAS experiment in the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ channel, finding good agreement. We also propose that these jet-veto variables can be measured and tested against theory predictions in other SM processes, such as Drell-Yan, diphoton, and weak diboson production.

  20. Quantum Optimization of Fully-Connected Spin Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Venturelli; Salvatore Mandrŕ; Sergey Knysh; Bryan O'Gorman; Rupak Biswas; Vadim Smelyanskiy

    2014-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model with random $\\pm1$ couplings is programmed on the D-Wave Two annealer featuring 509 qubits interacting on a Chimera-type graph. The performance of the optimizer compares and correlates to simulated annealing. When considering the effect of the static noise, which degrades the performance of the annealer, one can estimate an improvement on the comparative scaling of the two methods in favor of the D-Wave machine. The optimal choice of parameters of the embedding on the Chimera graph is shown to be associated to the emergence of the spin-glass critical temperature of the embedded problem.

  1. Rapidity resummation for $B$-meson wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yue-Long Shen; Yu-Ming Wang

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Transverse-momentum dependent (TMD) hadronic wave functions develop light-cone divergences under QCD corrections, which are commonly regularized by the rapidity $\\zeta$ of gauge vector defining the non-light-like Wilson lines. The yielding rapidity logarithms from infrared enhancement need to be resummed for both hadronic wave functions and short-distance functions, to achieve scheme-independent calculations of physical quantities. We briefly review the recent progress on the rapidity resummation for $B$-meson wave functions which are the key ingredients of TMD factorization formulae for radiative-leptonic, semi-leptonic and non-leptonic $B$-meson decays. The crucial observation is that rapidity resummation induces a strong suppression of $B$-meson wave functions at small light-quark momentum, strengthening the applicability of TMD factorization in exclusive $B$-meson decays. The phenomenological consequence of rapidity-resummation improved $B$-meson wave functions is further discussed in the context of $B \\to \\pi$ transition form factors at large hadronic recoil.

  2. A stable, rapidly converging conjugate gradient method for energy minimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watowich, S.J.; Meyer, E.S.; Hagstrom, R.; Josephs, R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply Shanno's conjugate gradient algorithm to the problem of minimizing the potential energy function associated with molecular mechanical calculations. Shanno's algorithm is stable with respect to roundoff errors and inexact line searches and converges rapidly to a minimum. Equally important, this algorithm can improve the rate of convergence to a minimum by a factor of 5 relative to Fletcher-Reeves or Polak-Ribiere minimizers when used within the molecular mechanics package AMBER. Comparable improvements are found for a limited number of simulations when the Polak-Ribiere direction vector is incorporated into the Shanno algorithm. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Rapid thermal processing by stamping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stradins, Pauls; Wang, Qi

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid thermal processing device and methods are provided for thermal processing of samples such as semiconductor wafers. The device has components including a stamp (35) having a stamping surface and a heater or cooler (40) to bring it to a selected processing temperature, a sample holder (20) for holding a sample (10) in position for intimate contact with the stamping surface; and positioning components (25) for moving the stamping surface and the stamp (35) in and away from intimate, substantially non-pressured contact. Methods for using and making such devices are also provided. These devices and methods allow inexpensive, efficient, easily controllable thermal processing.

  4. Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Notices 20 Miles Northwest of Rapid City SD Rapid City SD 57702 Landholding Agency: Agriculture Property Number: 15201410016 Status: Excess Comments: off-site removal only; 55 sq....

  5. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  6. Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-58178 Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities M;Findings from the 2004 Fully Automated Demand Response Tests in Large Facilities September 7, 2005 Mary Ann Manager Dave Michel Contract 500-03-026 Sponsored by the California Energy Commission PIER Demand Response

  7. ABV-A Low Speed Automation Project to Study the Technical Feasibility of Fully Automated Driving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on vehicle automation since many years. From 1987 to 1995 the European Commission funded the 800 million concepts of vehicles designed as fully automated vehicles [1]. Beyond its fully automation ability Automated Highway System Consortium (NAHSC) that demonstrated about 20 automated vehicles in Demo'97 on I-15

  8. Fully corrected estimates of common minke whale abundance in West Greenland in 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    Fully corrected estimates of common minke whale abundance in West Greenland in 2007 M.P. HEIDE West Greenland in August and September 2007. A total of 8,670km of survey effort covered 11 strata SURVEY; SATELLITE TAGGING; WEST GREENLAND minke whales to fully corrected total estimates of abundance

  9. A 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    simulation. A. Transistor Layout Caracterisation The size of the transistor depends on the maximum powerA 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier Sofiane Aloui, Eric Kerhervé IMS-CNRS University of Toulouse Toulouse, France plana@laas.fr Abstract--A 65nm CMOS, 60GHz fully integrated power

  10. FULLY INTEGRATED CURRENT-MODE SUBAPERTURE CENTROID CIRCUITS AND PHASE RECONTRUCTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furth, Paul

    , New Mexico July 2001 #12;ii "Fully Integrated Current-Mode Subaperture Centroid Circuits and Phase: Electrical Engineering (Analog VLSI Circuit Design) #12;vi ABSTRACT FULLY INTEGRATED CURRENT-MODE SUBAPERTUREFULLY INTEGRATED CURRENT-MODE SUBAPERTURE CENTROID CIRCUITS AND PHASE RECONTRUCTOR BY ALUSHULLA

  11. Accelerated Lambda Iteration in Rapidly Expanding Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hoeflich

    2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the current implementation of the ALI method into our HYDrodynamical RAdiation(HYDRA) code for rapidly expanding, low density envelopes commonly found in core collapse and thermonuclear supernovae, novae and WR stars. Due to the low densities, non-thermal excitation by high energy photons (e.g. by radioactive decays) and the time dependence of the problem, large departures from LTE are common throughout the envelope even at large optical depths. ALI is instrumental for both the coupling of the statistical equations and the hydrodynamical equations with the radiation transport (RT). We employ several concepts to improve the stability, and convergence rate/control including the concept of leading elements, the use of net rates, level locking, reconstruction of global photon redistribution functions, equivalent-2-level approach, and predictive corrector methods. For appropriate conditions, the solution of the time-dependent rate equations can be reduced to the time-independent problem plus an analytic solution of an ODE For the 3-D problem, we solve the radiation transport via the moment equations. To construct the Eddington tensor elements, we use a Monte Carlo scheme to determine the deviation of the solution of the RT equation from the diffusion approximation (ALI of second kind). At the example of a thermonuclear supernova (SN99by),we show an analysis of light light curves, flux and polarization spectra and discuss the limitations of our approach.

  12. Improving Direct-Mapped Cache Performance by the Addition of a Small Fully-Associative Cache and Prefetch Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Milo M. K.

    ,a cachemiss on a VAX 1l/780 only costs60%of the averageinstruc- tion execution. Thus even if every instruction) (cycles) (in&r) ------------------------------------------------ vAx11/760 10.0 200 1200 6 .6 WRL Titan 1

  13. Method of producing titanium-modified austenitic steel having improved swelling resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Megusar, Janez (Belmont, MA); Grant, Nicholas J. (Winchester, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for improving the swelling resistance of a titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel that involves a combination of rapid solidification and dynamic compaction techniques.

  14. An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

  15. City of Grand Rapids Building Solar Roof Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeClercq, Mark; Martinez, Imelda

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Grand Rapids, Michigan is striving to reduce it environmental footprint. The municipal government organization has established environmental sustainability policies with the goal of securing 100% of its energy from renewable sources by 2020. This report describes the process by which the City of Grand Rapids evaluated, selected and installed solar panels on the Water/Environmental Services Building. The solar panels are the first to be placed on a municipal building. Its new power monitoring system provides output data to assess energy efficiency and utilization. It is expected to generate enough clean solar energy to power 25 percent of the building. The benefit to the public includes the economic savings from reduced operational costs for the building; an improved environmentally sustainable area in which to live and work; and increased knowledge about the use of solar energy. It will serve as a model for future energy saving applications.

  16. Corps Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Upper Trinity River Basin was mainly from findings in a Corps environmental impact statement (EIS) report in the 1980s, according to Gene Rice, Corps project manager of the Dallas Floodway and Dallas Floodway Extension projects, two of the Trinity River... to mitigate environmental impacts of the proj- ect. The Corps? Fort Worth District and the City of Dallas are using an innovative approach to return floodplain value to the Trinity River, while improving flood damage reduction. Big Fossil Creek Watershed...

  17. he economies of China and India are grow-ing at a rapid clip. But these nations seem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    30 T he economies of China and India are grow- ing at a rapid clip. But these nations seem with a vengeance, given their enormous populations. And their "real" eco- nomic improvements, once the costs

  18. Neuropsychologia xxx (2005) xxxxxx Rapid publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neuropsychologia xxx (2005) xxx­xxx Rapid publication Making sense of another mind: The role. Wexler / Neuropsychologia xxx (2005) xxx­xxx LaBar, Crupain, V

  19. Development and evaluation of fully automated demand response in large facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Sezgen, Osman; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Shockman, Christine; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a research project to develop and evaluate the performance of new Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR) hardware and software technology in large facilities. Demand Response (DR) is a set of activities to reduce or shift electricity use to improve electric grid reliability, manage electricity costs, and ensure that customers receive signals that encourage load reduction during times when the electric grid is near its capacity. The two main drivers for widespread demand responsiveness are the prevention of future electricity crises and the reduction of electricity prices. Additional goals for price responsiveness include equity through cost of service pricing, and customer control of electricity usage and bills. The technology developed and evaluated in this report could be used to support numerous forms of DR programs and tariffs. For the purpose of this report, we have defined three levels of Demand Response automation. Manual Demand Response involves manually turning off lights or equipment; this can be a labor-intensive approach. Semi-Automated Response involves the use of building energy management control systems for load shedding, where a preprogrammed load shedding strategy is initiated by facilities staff. Fully-Automated Demand Response is initiated at a building or facility through receipt of an external communications signal--facility staff set up a pre-programmed load shedding strategy which is automatically initiated by the system without the need for human intervention. We have defined this approach to be Auto-DR. An important concept in Auto-DR is that a facility manager is able to ''opt out'' or ''override'' an individual DR event if it occurs at a time when the reduction in end-use services is not desirable. This project sought to improve the feasibility and nature of Auto-DR strategies in large facilities. The research focused on technology development, testing, characterization, and evaluation relating to Auto-DR. This evaluation also included the related decisionmaking perspectives of the facility owners and managers. Another goal of this project was to develop and test a real-time signal for automated demand response that provided a common communication infrastructure for diverse facilities. The six facilities recruited for this project were selected from the facilities that received CEC funds for new DR technology during California's 2000-2001 electricity crises (AB970 and SB-5X).

  20. CVSys: A Coordination Framework for Dynamic and Fully Distributed Cardiovascular Modeling and Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    CVSys: A Coordination Framework for Dynamic and Fully Distributed Cardiovascular Modeling and dynamic simulation control. This coordination framework uniquely incorporates attributes of open indigenous and a more integrated system representation. Dynamic simulation control serves to interject new

  1. Fully automatic calibration of LIDAR and video streams from a vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bileschi, Stanley M.

    This work describes a fully automatic technique to calibrate a geometric mapping between lidar and video feeds on a mobile ground-based platform. This data association is a crucial first step for any multi-modal scene ...

  2. Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L., Jr.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the use of fully coupled aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation tools to perform a loads analysis of a 5-MW offshore wind turbine supported by a barge with moorings, one of many promising floating platform concepts.

  3. A fully microfabricated two-dimensional electrospray array with applications to space propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gassend, Blaise L. P. (Blaise Laurent Patrick), 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design, fabrication and testing of a fully-integrated planar electrospray thruster array, which could lead to more efficient and precise thrusters for space propulsion applications. The same ...

  4. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Valery Trifonov Bratin Saha Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University New Haven, CT 06520­8285 {trifonov, saha, shao}@cs.yale.edu ABSTRACT

  5. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University New Haven, CT 06520­8285 {saha,trifonov,shao}@cs.yale.edu Technical Report

  6. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8285 {saha,trifonov,shao}@cs.yale.edu Technical Report

  7. Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis in Type Erasure Semantics # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trifonov, Valery

    Fully Reflexive Intensional Type Analysis in Type Erasure Semantics # Bratin Saha Valery Trifonov Zhong Shao Department of Computer Science Yale University {saha,trifonov,shao}@cs.yale.edu Abstract

  8. Corps Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H 2 O | pg. 6 O ne of the key federal players in the restoration of the Trinity River Basin is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, whose primary civil mission is developing and managing the nation?s water resources, including projects to reduce... flood damage; improve navigation channels and harbors; protect wetlands; and preserve, safeguard and enhance the environment. The Corps has been involved in the Trinity River Basin for more than 50 years, but the impetus for the current projects...

  9. IMPROVE XRF Analysis TI 301A: LN2 Fill/Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    IMPROVE XRF Analysis TI 301A: LN2 Fill/Calibration Page 1 of 5 TI 301A: LN2 Fills and Detector ................................................................................ 4 #12;IMPROVE XRF Analysis TI 301A: LN2 Fill/Calibration Page 2 of 5 that has been fully trained in the safety hazards of working with liquid nitrogen. #12;IMPROVE XRF

  10. Method for rapidly producing microporous and mesoporous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, P.R.; Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Hopper, R.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, rapid process is provided for making microporous and mesoporous materials, including aerogels and pre-ceramics. A gel or gel precursor is confined in a sealed vessel to prevent structural expansion of the gel during the heating process. This confinement allows the gelation and drying processes to be greatly accelerated, and significantly reduces the time required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods. Drying may be performed either by subcritical drying with a pressurized fluid to expel the liquid from the gel pores or by supercritical drying. The rates of heating and decompression are significantly higher than for conventional methods. 3 figs.

  11. Method for rapidly producing microporous and mesoporous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Hopper, Robert W. (Danville, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, rapid process is provided for making microporous and mesoporous materials, including aerogels and pre-ceramics. A gel or gel precursor is confined in a sealed vessel to prevent structural expansion of the gel during the heating process. This confinement allows the gelation and drying processes to be greatly accelerated, and significantly reduces the time required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods. Drying may be performed either by subcritical drying with a pressurized fluid to expel the liquid from the gel pores or by supercritical drying. The rates of heating and decompression are significantly higher than for conventional methods.

  12. Improved aethalometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hansen, A.D.

    1988-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved aethalometer having a single light source and a single light detector and two light paths from the light source to the light detector. A quartz fiber filter is inserted in the device, the filter having a collection area in one light path and a reference area in the other light path. A gas flow path through the aethalometer housing allows ambient air to flow through the collection area of the filter so that aerosol particles can be collected on the filter. A rotating disk with an opening therethrough allows light for the light source to pass alternately through the two light paths. The voltage output of the detector is applied to a VCO and the VCO pulses for light transmission separately through the two light paths, are counted and compared to determine the absorption coefficient of the collected aerosol particles. 5 figs.

  13. FRACSTIM/I: A Fully Coupled Fluid Flow/Heat Transport and Geomechanical Deformation/Fracture Generation Simulator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This research will develop a fully coupled, fully implicit approach for EGS stimulation and reservoir simulation. Solve all governing equations simultaneously in fully implicit way. Enable massively parallel performance and scalability. Apply state of the art nonlinear PDE solvers: Jacobian Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) method.

  14. Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M. L. Martina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M at absolute zero, (TAE0) of benzene, C6H6, was computed fully ab initio by means of W2h theory as 1306.6 kcal for systems the size of benzene, chemically accurate molecular atomization energies can be obtained from fully

  15. The mean climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in forced SST and fully coupled experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neale, Richard; Richter, Jadwiga; Park, Sungsu; Lauritzen, P. H.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhang, Minghua

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4) was released as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) and is described. The finite volume dynamical core available in CAM3 is now the default due to its superior transport and conservation properties. Deep convection parameterization changes include a dilute plume calculation of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the introduction of a formulation for Convective Momentum Transport (CMT). For the cloud fraction an additional calculation is performed following macrophysical state updates that provides improved thermodynamic condistancy. A freeze-drying modification is further made to the cloud fraction calculation in very dry environments, such as arctic Winter, where cloud fractionand cloud water estimates were often inconsistant in CAM3. In CAM4 the finite volume dynamical core leads to a degradation in the excessive trade-wind simulation, but with an accompanying reduction in zonal stresses at higher latitudes. Plume dilution leads to a moister deep tropics alleviating much of the mid-tropospheric dry biases and reduces the persistant precipitation biases over the Arabian peninsular and the southern Indian ocean during the Indian Monsoon. CMT reduces much of the excessive trade-wind biases in eastern ocean basins. The freeze drying modification alleviates much of the high latitude, winter-time excessive cloud bias and improves the associated surface cloud-related energy budget, but the updated cloud macrophysical calculation generally leads to reduced cloud fraction and cloud forcing away from high latitudes. Although there are marginal improvements in time-averaged, large-scale hydrology there are signficant improvements in regional climate features such as the generation of tropical and propagation of stationary waves from the Pacific into mid-latitudes and in the seasonal frequency of Northern Hemisphere blocking events. A 1? versus 2? horizontal resolution of the finite volume 24 dynamical core exhibits signficiant improvements in model climate. Improvements in the fully coupled mean climate between CAM3 and CAM4 are also much more signficant than in forced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) simulations. Furthermore, improvements in the transient characteristics ofthe model climate, documented elsewhere, are substantial.

  16. Charged particle rapidity distributions at relativistic energies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, ZW; Pal, S.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Zhang, B.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multiphase transport model (AMPT), which includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions, we study the rapidity distributions of charged particles such as protons, antiprotons, pions, and kaons in heavy ion collisions at RHIC...

  17. WVU Personal Rapid Transit Benefit Cost Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    WVU Personal Rapid Transit Benefit Cost Analysis Morgantown, West Virginia Prepared For: West.......................................................................................... 15 Travel Time Value - Understanding Travel Time Costs................................................. 15 Travel Time Value - Understanding Travel Time Costs

  18. Quantum fully homomorphic encryption scheme based on quantum fault-tolerant construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Liang; Li Yang

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully homomorphic encryption is a kind of encryption scheme, which enables arbitrary computation on encrypted data without accessing the data. We present the quantum version of fully homomorphic encryption scheme, which is constructed based on quantum fault-tolerant construction. Two schemes are constructed. The first is a symmetric scheme, and the secret key is the quantum CSS code. In the scheme, when Server performs quantum computation on the encrypted plaintext, some ancillary quantum states should be provided by Client. The second is an asymmetric scheme, which contains the periodical interaction between Client and Server.

  19. Progress report on a fully automatic Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daumeyer, G.J. III

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A plan to develop a fully automatic gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) system that will utilize a vision-sensing computer (which will provide in-process feedback control) is presently in work. Evaluations of different technological aspects and system design requirements continue. This report summaries major activities in the plan`s successful progress. The technological feasibility of producing the fully automated GTAW system has been proven. The goal of this process development project is to provide a production-ready system within the shortest reasonable time frame.

  20. he agricultural sector is rapidly being trans-formed into an industry of major importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    T he agricultural sector is rapidly being trans- formed into an industry of major importance, with superior performance in most cases. To manage the increasing complexity of agricultural systems agri- culture, where the goal is to improve the efficiency of opera- tion of agricultural enterprises

  1. Enhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Venki

    determined by x-ray crystallography except at very high resolution. The scattering of neutrons by hydrogenEnhanced visibility of hydrogen atoms by neutron crystallography on fully deuterated myoglobin Fong and structurally, direct visu- alization of them by using crystallography is difficult. Neutron crys- tallography

  2. Fully Simplified Multivariate Normal Updates in Non-Conjugate Variational Message Passing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wand, Matt

    Fully Simplified Multivariate Normal Updates in Non-Conjugate Variational Message Passing BY M updates in non-conjugate vari- ational message passing approximate inference schemes are obtained factors in variational message passing approximate inference schemes. Dubbed non-conjugate variational

  3. A fully differential BiCMOS OTA for a 10.7MHz bandpass filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Muhammad Imtiaz

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 1993 Major Subject: ElectricaJ Engineering A FULLY DIFFERENTIAL BICMOS OTA FOR A 10. 7MHZ BANDPASS FILTER A Thesis by MUHAMMAD IMTIAZ ALI Approved as to style and content by: g) /4 Edgar Sanchez-Sinencio (Chair of Committee) She f H. K...

  4. Calibration of a Fully Polarimetric Microwave Radiometer Using a Digital Polarimeric Noise Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Calibration of a Fully Polarimetric Microwave Radiometer Using a Digital Polarimeric Noise Source-936-0503 (F), bhlim@umich.edu / cruf@umich.edu (E) Abstract ­ The Correlated Noise Calibration Standard (CNCS polarization mixing calibration equation for AESMIR. Absolute calibration accuracy of AESMIR is estimated

  5. SUCCESSFUL CLIENTS ARE: Fully engaged and committed to work with the team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    SUCCESSFUL CLIENTS ARE: · Fully engaged and committed to work with the team for the duration of their 15-18 month project. · Supportive of the educational goals of the project. The team and client may. · Consistent in providing a single point of contact for the team and timely in response to team members

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Developing and fully developed turbulent flow in ribbed channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thole, Karen A.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Developing and fully developed turbulent flow in ribbed channels Nicholas D features, such as ribs, are often placed along the walls of a channel to increase the convective surface- dence on the Reynolds number. A staggered rib-roughened channel study was performed using time

  7. An Array-Based Test Circuit for Fully Automated Gate Dielectric Breakdown Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chris H.

    An Array-Based Test Circuit for Fully Automated Gate Dielectric Breakdown Characterization John for efficiently characterizing gate dielectric breakdown. Such a design is highly beneficial when studying this statistical process, where up to thousands of samples are needed to create an accurate time to breakdown

  8. Wavelet Analysis of the Conditional Vorticity Budget in Fully Developed Homogeneous Isotropic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    École Normale Supérieure

    Wavelet Analysis of the Conditional Vorticity Budget in Fully Developed Homogeneous Isotropic. This decomposition is achieved by the Coherent Vorticity Extraction based on orthogonal wavelets. The analysis allows wavelet decomposition. Farge et al. [4] proposed a method to extract the coherent structures out

  9. Nuclear Structure and Dynamics from the Fully Unrestricted Skyrme-Hartree-Fock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    and friendly environment in which to study nuclear physics. Special mention goes to my fellow theoristsNuclear Structure and Dynamics from the Fully Unrestricted Skyrme-Hartree-Fock Model A thesis performed for 16 O + 16 O and 28 Si + 16 O collisions at a variety of centre-of-mass energies and impact

  10. A SCALABLE FULLY IMPLICIT COMPRESSIBLE EULER SOLVER FOR MESOSCALE NONHYDROSTATIC SIMULATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    A SCALABLE FULLY IMPLICIT COMPRESSIBLE EULER SOLVER FOR MESOSCALE NONHYDROSTATIC SIMULATION for the mesoscale nonhydrostatic simulation of atmospheric flows governed by the compressible Euler equations is of interest as in mesoscale and cloud-resolving atmospheric simulations, fast and efficient solution

  11. Fully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    University of Technology, France. bouabdal@hds.utc.fr Abstract A mobile ad hoc network (MANET) is a wireless pre-existing in- frastructure; all networking operations (routing, mobility management, and so onFully Distributed Trust Model based on Trust Graph for Mobile Ad hoc Networks Mawloud Omar, Yacine

  12. 650 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 8, AUGUST 2006 Fully Elastic Interconnects on Nanopatterned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    650 IEEE ELECTRON DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 8, AUGUST 2006 Fully Elastic Interconnects interconnects are re- quired for electronic skin. To date, the resistance of such thin-film interconnects has by only 60%, which is in close agreement with purely geometric deformation. Index Terms

  13. Optimal Spacing in an Array of Fully Penetrating Ditches for Subsurface Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    Optimal Spacing in an Array of Fully Penetrating Ditches for Subsurface Drainage Bhagu R. Chahar1 courses, race courses, parks, and other amenities Chahar and Vadodaria 2008 . Subsurface drainage system 1995 . An extensive solu- tion has been obtained by Chahar and Vadodaria 2008 for drain- age from

  14. Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank S. Ryu and the resulting kinematics. In the present paper, the variation of wave amplitude and wave length and minimize wave reflections from the down- stream wall. Nonlinear wave kinematics as a result of nonlinear

  15. NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

  16. Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving School Governance | 1 Improving School Governance A Recommended Code of Governance for Schools: A flexible framework for strategic planning October 2012 Pilot version 1 #12;Improving School Governance | 2 #12;Improving School Governance | 3 This pilot version of the Recommended Code of Governance

  17. Fully digital, phase-domain ?? 3D range image sensor in 130nm CMOS imaging technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Richard John

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional (3D) optical range-imaging is a field experiencing rapid growth, expanding into a wide variety of machine vision applications, most recently including consumer gaming. Time of Flight (ToF) cameras, akin ...

  18. Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small MFI-Type Zeolite Crystals . Bubbling Reactor Technology for Rapid Synthesis of Uniform, Small MFI-Type Zeolite...

  19. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 32483252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    to be that photofragment ions generated at this wavelength are similar to those from low- and high-energy CAD, and are thusRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 3248 of singly protonated peptides at 193 nm investigated with tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry Jeong Hee

  20. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 24812487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    chromophore dissociated efficiently when a suf- ficiently high laser pulse energy was used. Also, the pulseRAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2005; 19: 2481 time-of- flight (TOF) mass spectrometry of ions generated by matrix-assisted laser desorption

  1. RAPID COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION RAPIDE Validation of Sr isotopes in otoliths by laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    RAPID COMMUNICATION / COMMUNICATION RAPIDE Validation of Sr isotopes in otoliths by laser ablation ŕ plasma inductif avec multicollecteur aprčs ablation au laser (LA-MC-ICPMS) et par spectrométrie de ratios using laser abla- tion multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA

  2. Advanced Fuels for LWRs: Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated and Related Concepts FY 2012 Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress in the Deep Burn project at Idaho National Laboratory during the first half of fiscal year 2012 (FY2012). The current focus of this work is on Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel containing low-enriched uranium (LEU) uranium nitride (UN) fuel kernels. UO2 fuel kernels have not been ruled out, and will be examined as later work in FY2012. Reactor physics calculations confirmed that the FCM fuel containing 500 mm diameter kernels of UN fuel has positive MTC with a conventional fuel pellet radius of 4.1 mm. The methodology was put into place and validated against MCNP to perform whole-core calculations using DONJON, which can interpolate cross sections from a library generated using DRAGON. Comparisons to MCNP were performed on the whole core to confirm the accuracy of the DRAGON/DONJON schemes. A thermal fluid coupling scheme was also developed and implemented with DONJON. This is currently able to iterate between diffusion calculations and thermal fluid calculations in order to update fuel temperatures and cross sections in whole-core calculations. Now that the DRAGON/DONJON calculation capability is in place and has been validated against MCNP results, and a thermal-hydraulic capability has been implemented in the DONJON methodology, the work will proceed to more realistic reactor calculations. MTC calculations at the lattice level without the correct burnable poison are inadequate to guarantee zero or negative values in a realistic mode of operation. Using the DONJON calculation methodology described in this report, a startup core with enrichment zoning and burnable poisons will be designed. Larger fuel pins will be evaluated for their ability to (1) alleviate the problem of positive MTC and (2) increase reactivity-limited burnup. Once the critical boron concentration of the startup core is determined, MTC will be calculated to verify a non-positive value. If the value is positive, the design will be changed to require less soluble boron by, for example, increasing the reactivity hold-down by burnable poisons. Then, the whole core analysis will be repeated until an acceptable design is found. Calculations of departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) will be included in the safety evaluation as well. Once a startup core is shown to be viable, subsequent reloads will be simulated by shuffling fuel and introducing fresh fuel. The PASTA code has been updated with material properties of UN fuel from literature and a model for the diffusion and release of volatile fission products from the SiC matrix material . Preliminary simulations have been performed for both normal conditions and elevated temperatures. These results indicated that the fuel performs well and that the SiC matrix has a good retention of the fission products. The path forward for fuel performance work includes improvement of metallic fission product release from the kernel. Results should be considered preliminary and further validation is required.

  3. Integration of rapid prototyping into design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, C.L.; McCarty, G.D.; Pardo, B.T.; Bryce, E.A.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of rapid prototyping machines into the marketplace promises to revolutionize the process of producing prototype parts with production-like quality. In the age of concurrent engineering and agile manufacturing, it is necessary to exploit applicable new technologies as soon as they become available. The driving force behind integrating these evolutionary processes into the design and manufacture of prototype parts is the need to reduce lead times and fabrication costs, improve efficiency, and increase flexibility without sacrificing quality. Sandia utilizes Stereolithography (SL) and Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) capabilities to support internal design and manufacturing efforts. SL is used in the design iteration process to produce proof-of-concept models, hands-on models for design reviews, fit-check models, visual aids for manufacturing, and functional parts in assemblies. SLS is used to produce wax patterns for the lost wax process of investment casting in support of an internal Sandia National Laboratories program called FASTCAST which integrates experimental and computational technologies into the investment casting process. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the SL and SLS processes and address our experiences with these technologies from the standpoints of application, accuracy, surface finish, and feature definition. Also presented will be several examples of prototype parts manufactured by the Stereolithography and Selective Laser Sintering rapid prototyping machines.

  4. The rapid tooling testbed: a distributed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yong

    the manufacturing activity, and that little additional communication between these activities is necessary. UnderThe rapid tooling testbed: a distributed design-for- manufacturing system David W. Rosen Yong Chen Engineer at 3D Systems, Valencia, California, USA. Shiva Sambu is a Manufacturing Engineer at Align

  5. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  6. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  7. High precision, rapid laser hole drilling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jim J.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Comaskey, Brian J.

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system produces a first laser beam for rapidly removing the bulk of material in an area to form a ragged hole. The laser system produces a second laser beam for accurately cleaning up the ragged hole so that the final hole has dimensions of high precision.

  8. RAPID COMMUNICATION Navigational Skills Correlate With Hippocampal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iaria, Giuseppe

    ; topographical orientation; virtual environment; cognitive map INTRODUCTION Evidence from human and non-humanRAPID COMMUNICATION Navigational Skills Correlate With Hippocampal Fractional Anisotropy in Humans animals (O'Keefe and Nadel, 1978; Mellet et al., 2000) has shown that successful orientation within

  9. New Insights into Fully-Depleted SOI Transistor Response During Total-Dose Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURNS,J.A.; DODD,PAUL E.; KEAST,C.L.; SCHWANK,JAMES R.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; WYATT,P.W.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work showed the possible existence of a total-dose latch effect in fully-depleted SOI transistors that could severely limit the radiation hardness of SOI devices. Other work showed that worst-case bias configuration during irradiation was the transmission gate bias configuration. In this work we further explore the effects of total-dose ionizing irradiation on fully-depleted SOI transistors. Closed-geometry and standard transistors fabricated in two fully-depleted processes were irradiated with 10-keV x rays. Our results show no evidence for a total-dose latch effect as proposed by others. Instead, in absence of parasitic trench sidewall leakage, our data suggests that the increase in radiation-induced leakage current is caused by positive charge trapping in the buried oxide inverting the back-channel interface. At moderate levels of trapped charge, the back-channel interface is slightly inverted causing a small leakage current to flow. This leakage current is amplified to considerably higher levels by impact ionization. Because the back-channel interface is in weak inversion, the top-gate bias can modulate the back-channel interface and turn the leakage current off at large, negative voltage levels. At high levels of trapped charge, the back-channel interface is fully inverted and the gate bias has little effect on leakage current. However, it is likely that this current also is amplified by impact ionization. For these transistors, the worst-case bias configuration was determined to be the ''ON'' bias configuration. These results have important implication on hardness assurance.

  10. Quantum phase transitions in fully connected spin models: an entanglement perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Filippone; S. Dusuel; J. Vidal

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a set of fully connected spins models that display first- or second-order transitions and for which we compute the ground-state entanglement in the thermodynamical limit. We analyze several entanglement measures (concurrence, R\\'enyi entropy, and negativity), and show that, in general, discontinuous transitions lead to a jump of these quantities at the transition point. Interestingly, we also find examples where this is not the case.

  11. Quantum phase transitions in fully-connected spin models: an entanglement perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippone, M; Vidal, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a set of fully-connected spins models which display first- or second-order transitions and for which we compute the ground-state entanglement in the thermodynamical limit. We analyze several entanglement measures (concurrence, R\\'enyi entropy, and negativity), and show that, in general, discontinuous transitions leads to a jump of these quantities at the transition point. Interestingly, we also find a puzzling example where it is not the case.

  12. A fully implicit method for 3D quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefert, Christopher; Robinson, Allen Conrad

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the implementation of a prototype fully implicit method for solving three-dimensional quasi-steady state magnetic advection-diffusion problems. This method allows us to solve the magnetic advection diffusion equations in an Eulerian frame with a fixed, user-prescribed velocity field. We have verified the correctness of method and implementation on two standard verification problems, the Solberg-White magnetic shear problem and the Perry-Jones-White rotating cylinder problem.

  13. A 12b, 50 MS/s, Fully Differential Zero-Crossing Based Pipelined ADC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Lane

    Zero-crossing based switch capacitor circuits have been introduced as alternatives to op-amp based circuits for eased design considerations and improved power efficiency. This work further improves the resolution, power ...

  14. Quadratic Program based Control of Fully-Actuated Transfemoral Prosthesis for Flat-Ground and Up-Slope Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ames, Aaron

    Quadratic Program based Control of Fully-Actuated Transfemoral Prosthesis for Flat-Ground and Up to achieve flat-ground and up-slope walking on a fully-actuated above-knee prosthesis. CLF based quadratic--implemented as a feed-forward term--the end result is a prosthesis controller that utilizes only local information while

  15. 1 Plasmodium falciparum SSB Tetramer Binds 2 Single-Stranded DNA Only in a Fully Wrapped Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    1 Plasmodium falciparum SSB Tetramer Binds 2 Single-Stranded DNA Only in a Fully Wrapped Mode 3 with numerous DNA repair and replication proteins. Ec- 24 SSB tetramers can bind ssDNA in multiple DNA binding in fully wrapped complexes with site sizes of 30 52­65 nt/tetramer. Pf-SSB does not transition to the more

  16. Rapid Impedance Spectrum Measurements for Onboard State-of-Health Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; Chinh D. Ho

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid impedance measurements can provide a useful online tool for improved state-of-health estimation. A validation study has been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory for a rapid impedance technique known as Harmonic Compensated Synchronous Detection. This technique enables capturing the impedance spectra over a broad frequency range within about ten seconds. Commercially available lithium-ion cells are being calendar-life aged at 50°C with reference performance tests at 30°C every 32.5 days to gauge degradation The cells have completed the first set of reference performance tests and preliminary results are presented. The spectra change as a function of temperature and depth-of-discharge condition, as expected. The data indicate that the rapid impedance measurement technique is a benign measurement tool that can be successfully used to gauge changes in the corresponding pulse resistance.

  17. Reconsidering Rapid Qubit Purification by Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Wiseman; J. F. Ralph

    2006-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reconsiders the claimed rapidity of a scheme for the purification of the quantum state of a qubit, proposed recently in Jacobs 2003 Phys. Rev. A67 030301(R). The qubit starts in a completely mixed state, and information is obtained by a continuous measurement. Jacobs' rapid purification protocol uses Hamiltonian feedback control to maximise the average purity of the qubit for a given time, with a factor of two increase in the purification rate over the no-feedback protocol. However, by re-examining the latter approach, we show that it mininises the average time taken for a qubit to reach a given purity. In fact, the average time taken for the no-feedback protocol beats that for Jacobs' protocol by a factor of two. We discuss how this is compatible with Jacobs' result, and the usefulness of the different approaches.

  18. On the rapid intensification of typhoons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Charles Richard

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    readings for typhoons typical of type 2 development (Virginia, . June 1957; and Anita, August 1970). Arrow indicates onset of rapid deepening (& 1. 75 mb h 1). s deep typhoons (& 920 mb) and the maximum 24-h pressure fall Central pressure fall rates... of typhoon Betty (12 August 1972) with cloudiness features south of the typhoon depicting outflow into the upper tropospheric easterli. es. 30. ITOS-1 satellite view of. typhoon Anita (20 August 1970) with cloudiress absent equatorward of the typhoon...

  19. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore »present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  20. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  1. EvoFab: A Fully Embodied Evolutionary John Rieffel and Dave Sayles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieffel, John

    prototpying 3-D printers, an increasing number of evolved designs have been fabricated in the real world;2 Rieffel & Sayles were 3D CAD models which could then be printed directly by rapid protyping 3D printers", drew a 3-D model of the antenna. Fitness was determined by measuring the performance of the design

  2. Data bases for rapid response to power reactor problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maskewitz, B.F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The urgency of the TMI-2 incident demanded prompt answers to an imperious situation. In responding to these challenging circumstances, both government and industry recognized deficiencies in both availability of essential retrievable data and calculational capabilities designed to respond immediately to actual abnormal events. Each responded by initiating new programs to provide a remedy for the deficiencies and to generally improve all safety measures in the nuclear power industry. Many data bases and information centers offer generic data and other technology resources which are generally useful in support of nuclear safety programs. A few centers can offer rapid access to calculational methods and associated data and more will make an effort to do so. As a beneficial spin-off from the lessons learned from TMI-2, more technical effort and financial resources will be devoted to the prevention of accidents, and to improvement of safety measures in the immediate future and for long term R and D programs by both government and the nuclear power industry.

  3. Performance of the Fully Digital FPGA-based Front-End Electronics for the GALILEO Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Barrientos; M. Bellato; D. Bazzacco; D. Bortolato; P. Cocconi; A. Gadea; V. González; M. Gulmini; R. Isocrate; D. Mengoni; A. Pullia; F. Recchia; D. Rosso; E. Sanchis; N. Toniolo; C. A. Ur; J. J. Valiente-Dobón

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present the architecture and results of a fully digital Front End Electronics (FEE) read out system developed for the GALILEO array. The FEE system, developed in collaboration with the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) collaboration, is composed of three main blocks: preamplifiers, digitizers and preprocessing electronics. The slow control system contains a custom Linux driver, a dynamic library and a server implementing network services. The digital processing of the data from the GALILEO germanium detectors has demonstrated the capability to achieve an energy resolution of 1.53 per mil at an energy of 1.33 MeV.

  4. Fully-automatic laser welding and micro-sculpting with universal in situ inline coherent imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Paul J L; Ji, Yang; Galbraith, Christopher M; Kinross, Alison W; Van Vlack, Cole; Fraser, James M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though new affordable high power laser technologies make possible many processing applications in science and industry, depth control remains a serious technical challenge. Here we show that inline coherent imaging, with line rates up to 312 kHz and microsecond-duration capture times, is capable of directly measuring laser penetration depth in a process as violent as kW-class keyhole welding. We exploit ICI's high speed, high dynamic range and robustness to interference from other optical sources to achieve fully automatic, adaptive control of laser welding as well as ablation, achieving micron-scale sculpting in vastly different heterogeneous biological materials.

  5. A beta-type fully implicit reservoir simulator with variable bubble point and dew point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boe, Jarle

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the following equation. V P 5. 617 m g 2 QT 1000 (56) And the R curve can be obtained from the same constant volume Sg depletion by summing up the GPM content of the propane through hep- tanes plus fractions. The B and the R can then be calculated 0 so...A BETA-TYPE FULLY IMPLICIT RESERVOIR SIMULATOR WITH VARIABLE BUBBLE POINT AND DEW POINT A Thesis by JARLE BOE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  6. Noise-amplitude dependence of the invariant density for noisy, fully chaotic one-dimensional maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Seshadri; V. Balakrishnan; S. Lakshmibala

    1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some analytic, non-perturbative results for the invariant density rho(x) for noisy one-dimensional maps at fully developed chaos. Under periodic boundary conditions, the Fourier expansion method is used to show precisely how noise makes rho(x) absolutely continuous and smoothens it out. Simple solvable models are used to illustrate the explicit dependence of rho(x) on the amplitude eta of the noise distribution, all the way from the case of zero noise (eta > 0) to the completely noise-dominated limit (eta=1).

  7. Fully defined saltwater medium for cultivation of and toxicity testing with marine copepod Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusk, K.O.; Wollenberger, L.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine copepod Acartia tonsa and the food organism Rhodomonas salina were cultured in fully defined medium for 8 months without problems. Both organisms were also cultured in natural seawater and in a commercial salt mixture for at least two generations before the sensitivities of A. tonsa to bisphenol A, potassium dichromate, and 3,5-dichlorophenol in the three different media were compared and found to be at the same level. The defined medium may be used for cultivation and testing, thus avoiding unknown background contaminants.

  8. Diphoton production at hadron colliders: a fully-differential QCD calculation at NNLO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Catani; Leandro Cieri; Daniel de Florian; Giancarlo Ferrera; Massimiliano Grazzini

    2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider direct diphoton production in hadron collisions, and we compute the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD radiative corrections at the fully-differential level. Our calculation uses the $q_T$ subtraction formalism and it is implemented in a parton level Monte Carlo program. The program allows the user to apply arbitrary kinematical cuts on the final-state photons and the associated jet activity, and to compute the corresponding distributions in the form of bin histograms. We present selected numerical results related to Higgs boson searches at the LHC and corresponding results at the Tevatron.

  9. Investigation of shear-banding mechanism in fully dense nanocrystalline Ni sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Rongtao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Zhou Jianqiu, E-mail: zhouj@njut.edu.cn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Li Xinbo; Jiang Hua; Ling Xiang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of shear banding in fully dense electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni was successfully monitored by using a digital image correlation technique under a quasi-static uniaxial tensile load. To investigate the microscopic physical mechanism of the shear banding, in-situ tensile testing for the nanocrystalline Ni sample was conducted in a transmission electron microscope and fracture surface of the sample was examined by field emission scanning electron microscope. The results suggest that grain boundary migration based on atomic diffusion is a main carrier of the shear banding.

  10. The Liverpool Telescope: Rapid follow-up observation of Targets of opportunity with a 2 m robotic telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomboc; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; C. G. Mundell; A. M. Newsam; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liverpool Telescope, situated at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Canaries, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. It recently began observations. Among Liverpool Telescope's primary scientific goals is to monitor variable objects on all timescales from seconds to years. An additional benefit of its robotic operation is rapid reaction to unpredictable phenomena and their systematic follow up, simultaneous or coordinated with other facilities. The Target of Opportunity Programme of the Liverpool Telescope includes the prompt search for and observation of GRB and XRF counterparts. A special over-ride mode implemented for GRB/XRF follow-up enables observations commencing less than a minute after the alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the moderate aperture and rapid automated response make the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to help solving the mystery of optically dark GRBs and for the investigation of currently unstudied short bursts and XRFs.

  11. GRB optical and IR rapid follow-up with the 2 m Liverpool Robotic Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomboc; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; C. G. Mundell; A. M. Newsam; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

    2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liverpool Telescope, owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University and situated at Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. We plan to use the LT in conjunction with Gamma Ray Observatories (HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift) to study GRB physics. A special over-ride mode will enable observations commencing less than a minute after the GRB alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. These observations, together with systematic monitoring of the burst through the afterglow, will help to unravel the nature of prompt optical flashes, short bursts, optically dark bursts, redshift distribution, GRB - supernova connection and other questions related to the GRB phenomenon. In particular, the combination of aperture, instrumentation and rapid automated response makes the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to the investigation of optically dark bursts and currently optically unstudied short bursts.

  12. Grain growth in a conventional titanium alloy during rapid, continuous heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semiatin, S.L. (Wright Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)); Soper, J.C. (Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States)); Sukonnik, I.M. (Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present work was to analyze the kinetics of beta grain growth during rapid, continuous heating of a conventional alpha-beta titanium alloy. The analysis was based on approximate, closed-form theoretical expressions derived by Bourell and Kaysser and Soper and Semiatin as well as a fully numerical, computer-based approach. The problem and approach discussed here differs from previous investigations of grain growth during continuous heating and cooling, most of which have been for austenite grain growth in the heat-affected zone during welding of steels. In this regard, the main features of the present work are the very high heating rates involved, the avoidance of the application of complex numerical integration schemes, and the avoidance of using isothermal grain growth kinetic data to fit continuous heating results.

  13. Postsynthesis Crystallinity Improvement of Colloidal CdTe Nanoparticles Using Rapid Thermal Annealing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering, UniVersity of Toronto, 10 Kings College, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G4 Canada, ViVe Nano Incorporated a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. This novel method of detecting a crystalline change in nanoparticles

  14. Quantifying the Improvements in Rapid Prototyping and Product Life Cycle Performance Created by Machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use additional performance indicators (e.g. , consumption ofto calculate the key performance indicators (KP|s). This

  15. Fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow model for nonliner geologic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, R.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single model is presented which describes fully coupled thermal-mechanical-fluid flow behavior of highly nonlinear, dynamic or quasistatic, porous geologic systems. The mathematical formulation for the model utilizes the continuum theory of mixtures to describe the multiphase nature of the system, and incremental linear constitutive theory to describe the path dependency of nonlinear material behavior. The model, incorporated in an explicit finite difference numerical procedure, was implemented in two different computer codes. A special-purpose one-dimensional code, SNEAKY, was written for initial validation of the coupling mechanisms and testing of the coupled model logic. A general purpose commercially available code, STEALTH, developed for modeling dynamic nonlinear thermomechanical processes, was modified to include fluid flow behavior and the coupling constitutive model. The fully explicit approach in the coupled calculation facilitated the inclusion of the coupling mechanisms and complex constitutive behavior. Analytical solutions pertaining to consolidation theory for soils, thermoelasticity for solids, and hydrothermal convection theory provided verification of stress and fluid flow, stress and conductive heat transfer, and heat transfer and fluid flow couplings, respectively, in the coupled model. A limited validation of the adequacy of the coupling constitutive assumptions was also performed by comparison with the physical response from two laboratory tests. Finally, the full potential of the coupled model is illustrated for geotechnical applications in energy-resource related areas. Examples in the areas of nuclear waste isolation and cut-and-fill mining are cited.

  16. DMAPS: a fully depleted monolithic active pixel sensor - analog performance characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroslav Havránek; Tomasz Hemperek; Hans Krüger; Yunan Fu; Leonard Germic; Tetsuichi Kishishita; Theresa Obermann; Norbert Wermes

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) have been developed since the late 1990s based on silicon substrates with a thin epitaxial layer (thickness of 10-15 $\\mu$m) in which charge is collected on an electrode, albeit by disordered and slow diffusion rather than by drift in a directed electric field. As a consequence, the signal is small ($\\approx$ 1000 e$^-$) and the radiation tolerance is much below the LHC requirements by factors of 100 to 1000. In this paper we present the development of a fully Depleted Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (DMAPS) based on a high resistivity substrate allowing the creation of a fully depleted detection volume. This concept overcomes the inherent limitations of charge collection by diffusion in the standard MAPS designs. We present results from a test chip EPCB01 designed in a commercial 150 nm CMOS technology. The technology provides a thin (50 $\\mu$m) high resistivity n-type silicon substrate as well as an additional deep p-well which allows to integrate full CMOS circuitry inside the pixel. Different matrix types with several variants of collection electrodes have been implemented. Measurements of the analog performance of this first implementation of DMAPS pixels will be presented.

  17. Analysis of alternative marketing organizations for improving rice producer income

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillot, Patrick Dale

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Depart nt) (Member) (Member) (Member) (Member) December 1975 ABSTRACT Analysis of Alternative Marketing Organizations for Improving Rice Producer income. (December 1975) Patrick Dale Guillot, B. S. , Louisiana State University Chairman of Advisory... of the Blue Ribbon Rice Mills, Inc. This gives ARI milling and storage facilities. Also, AGA has acquired control and ownership of the MGC facilities. Both of these actions are definite moves toward a fully integrated and producer operated organization...

  18. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Atwood, Clinton L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Jeantette, Francisco P. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Joseph A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schanwald, Lee P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  19. Rapid and robust spin state amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Close; Femi Fadugba; Simon C. Benjamin; Joseph Fitzsimons; Brendon W. Lovett

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron and nuclear spins have been employed in many of the early demonstrations of quantum technology (QT). However applications in real world QT are limited by the difficulty of measuring single spins. Here we show that it is possible to rapidly and robustly amplify a spin state using a lattice of ancillary spins. The model we employ corresponds to an extremely simple experimental system: a homogenous Ising-coupled spin lattice in one, two or three dimensions, driven by a continuous microwave field. We establish that the process can operate at finite temperature (imperfect initial polarisation) and under the effects of various forms of decoherence.

  20. Category:RAPID Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelListsPolitical ActionQuantitativeThisRAPID

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/17 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito, Ecuador: EnergyRAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-h-CO-a

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito, Ecuador:RAPID/Roadmap/19-CO-c <dg <

  3. RRTT - Rapid Response Team for Transmission

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P URFIof Clean EnergyRapid

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b < RAPID‎ |RAPID/Roadmap/Geothermal

  5. Rapid Scan AERI Observations: Benefits and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising funds for a cureEnergy StorageRapid Scan

  6. RAPID/About | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod JumpGeorgia: Energy Resources JumpRAM CapitalRAPID/About

  7. RAPID/Outreach | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation Texas <Field <NewRAPID/Outreach <

  8. RAPID/Overview | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation Texas <Field <NewRAPID/Outreach

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/14 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14 <

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/9 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc < <

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/Coverage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kcFD-i

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/Geo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kcFD-iGeo <

  13. RAPID/Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kcFD-iGeo

  14. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of heat transfer in an annular fuel channel with periodic spacer ribs under a fully developed turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takase, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal-hydraulic characteristics in a spacer-ribbed annular fuel channel for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors were analyzed numerically by three-dimensional computations under a fully developed turbulent flow. The two-equation {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model was applied in the present turbulent analysis, and the turbulence model constants for eddy viscosity and the turbulent Prandtl number were improved from the previous standard values to increase the accuracy of numerical simulations. Consequently, heat transfer coefficients and friction factors in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel were predicted with sufficient accuracy in the range of Reynolds number >3,000. It was clarified quantitatively that the main mechanism for heat transfer augmentation in the spacer-ribbed fuel channel was a combined effect of the turbulence promoter effect by the spacer rib and the velocity acceleration effect by a reduction in the channel cross section.

  15. Method to improve superconductor cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, A.R.

    1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed of making a stranded superconductor cable having improved flexing and bending characteristics. In such method, a plurality of superconductor strands are helically wound around a cylindrical portion of a mandrel which tapers along a transitional portion to a flat end portion. The helically wound strands form a multistrand hollow cable which is partially flattened by pressure rollers as the cable travels along the transitional portion. The partially flattened cable is impacted with repeated hammer blows as the hollow cable travels along the flat end portion. The hammer blows flatten both the internal and the external surfaces of the strands. The cable is fully flattened and compacted by two sets of pressure rollers which engage the flat sides and the edges of the cable after it has traveled away from the flat end portion of the mandrel. The flattened internal surfaces slide easily over one another when the cable is flexed or bent so that there is very little possibility that the cable will be damaged by the necessary flexing and bending required to wind the cable into magnet coils.

  16. Rapid prototyping in early stages of architectural design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simondetti, Alvise

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis shows how architects can use Rapid Prototyping and what the advantages and disadvantages are in different manipulations of the tool. Chapter two attempts to chart a road map of the rapid prototyping media. The ...

  17. CCCG 2009, Vancouver, BC, August 1719, 2009 A Comparison of Two Fully-Dynamic Delaunay Triangulation Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Michael D.

    CCCG 2009, Vancouver, BC, August 17­19, 2009 A Comparison of Two Fully-Dynamic Delaunay and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6, Canada. mdadams

  18. VisualSEEk: a fully automated content-based image query John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    VisualSEEk: a fully automated content-based image query system John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Image Technology for New Media Columbia University New

  19. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Permeability Change in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Qingfeng

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    finite difference method to solve the fluid flow in fractures, a fully coupled displacement discontinuity method to build the global relation of fracture deformation, and the Barton-Bandis model of fracture deformation to build the local relation...

  20. CENTRIFUGAL LABTUBE FOR FULLY AUTOMATED DNA EXTRACTION & LAMP AMPLIFICATION BASED ON AN INTEGRATED, LOW-COST HEATING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoehl, Melanie Margarete

    In this paper, we introduce a disposable battery-driven heating system for loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) inside a centrifugally-driven DNA-extraction platform (LabTube). We demonstrate fully automated, ...

  1. Light curves from rapidly rotating neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numata, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate light curves produced by a hot spot of a rapidly rotating neutron star, assuming that the spot is perturbed by a core $r$-mode, which is destabilized by emitting gravitational waves. To calculate light curves, we take account of relativistic effects such as the Doppler boost due to the rapid rotation and light bending assuming the Schwarzschild metric around the neutron star. We assume that the core $r$-modes penetrate to the surface fluid ocean to have sufficiently large amplitudes to disturb the spot. For a $l'=m$ core $r$-mode, the oscillation frequency $\\omega\\approx2m\\Omega/[l'(l'+1)]$ defined in the co-rotating frame of the star will be detected by a distant observer, where $l'$ and $m$ are respectively the spherical harmonic degree and the azimuthal wave number of the mode, and $\\Omega$ is the spin frequency of the star. In a linear theory of oscillation, using a parameter $A$ we parametrize the mode amplitudes such that ${\\rm max}\\left(|\\xi_\\theta|,|\\xi_\\phi|\\right)/R=A$ at the surface, w...

  2. Characterization of oxygen and nitrogen rapid thermal annealing processes for ultra-low-k SiCOH films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boo, Jin-Hyo

    Characterization of oxygen and nitrogen rapid thermal annealing processes for ultra-low-k Si is suggested and characterized in this work for improvement of SiCOH ultra-low-k (k 2.4) film properties. Low is decreased, and the ultra-low-k films (k

  3. Development of Fully Coupled Aeroelastic and Hydrodynamic Models for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Sclavounos, P. D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aeroelastic simulation tools are routinely used to design and analyze onshore wind turbines, in order to obtain cost effective machines that achieve favorable performance while maintaining structural integrity. These tools employ sophisticated models of wind-inflow; aerodynamic, gravitational, and inertial loading of the rotor, nacelle, and tower; elastic effects within and between components; and mechanical actuation and electrical responses of the generator and of control and protection systems. For offshore wind turbines, additional models of the hydrodynamic loading in regular and irregular seas, the dynamic coupling between the support platform motions and wind turbine motions, and the dynamic characterization of mooring systems for compliant floating platforms are also important. Hydrodynamic loading includes contributions from hydrostatics, wave radiation, and wave scattering, including free surface memory effects. The integration of all of these models into comprehensive simulation tools, capable of modeling the fully coupled aeroelastic and hydrodynamic responses of floating offshore wind turbines, is presented.

  4. Fully relativistic nonlinear cosmological evolution in spherical symmetry using the BSSN formalism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Rekier; Isabel Cordero-Carrion; Andre Fuzfa

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully relativistic numerical method for the study of cosmological problems using the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formalism on a dynamical Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker background. This has many potential applications including the study of the growth of structures beyond the linear regime. We present one such application by reproducing the Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi solution for the collapse of pressureless matter with arbitrary lapse function. The regular and smooth numerical solution at the center of coordinates proceeds in a natural way by relying on the Partially Implicit Runge-Kutta algorithm described in Montero and Cordero-Carri\\'on [arXiv:1211.5930]. We generalize the usual radiative outer boundary condition to the case of a dynamical background and show the stability and convergence properties of the method in the study of pure gauge dynamics on a de Sitter background.

  5. Quantum de Finetti theorem under fully one-way adaptive measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Li; Graeme Smith

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a version of the quantum de Finetti theorem: permutation-invariant quantum states are well approximated as a probabilistic mixture of multi-fold product states. The approximation is measured by distinguishability under fully one-way LOCC (local operations and classical communication) measurements. Our result strengthens Brand\\~{a}o and Harrow's de Finetti theorem where a kind of partially one-way LOCC measurements was used for measuring the approximation, with essentially the same error bound. As main applications, we show (i) a quasipolynomial-time algorithm which detects multipartite entanglement with amount larger than an arbitrarily small constant (measured with a variant of the relative entropy of entanglement), and (ii) a proof that in quantum Merlin-Arthur proof systems, polynomially many provers are not more powerful than a single prover when the verifier is restricted to one-way LOCC operations.

  6. SUSY-P5: Chargino / Neutralino Analysis in the Fully Hadronic Final State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Käfer, Daniela; Suehara, Taikan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fully hadronic final states of two signal processes from an mSUGRA inspired scenario (SUSY-P5) are studied within a full simulation of the LDC' detector model. These are chargino pair and neutralino pair production, i.e. e+e- -> C1C1 -> qq'N1 qq'N1 and e+e- -> N2N2 -> qq'N1 qq'N1. Both processes have to be separated sufficiently from all background to measure the respective production cross sections and extract the masses of the involved bosinos, m(C1), m(N2) and m(LSP)=m(N1). This is achieved by fitting the energy spectra of the reconstructed gauge bosons while taking into account the finite width of the boson mass. From simulation data corresponding to 500/fb of luminosity, a mass resolution of about 0.5 GeV seems to be achievable.

  7. SUSY-P5: Chargino / Neutralino Analysis in the Fully Hadronic Final State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniela Käfer; Jenny List; Taikan Suehara

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The fully hadronic final states of two signal processes from an mSUGRA inspired scenario (SUSY-P5) are studied within a full simulation of the LDC' detector model. These are chargino pair and neutralino pair production, i.e. e+e- -> C1C1 -> qq'N1 qq'N1 and e+e- -> N2N2 -> qq'N1 qq'N1. Both processes have to be separated sufficiently from all background to measure the respective production cross sections and extract the masses of the involved bosinos, m(C1), m(N2) and m(LSP)=m(N1). This is achieved by fitting the energy spectra of the reconstructed gauge bosons while taking into account the finite width of the boson mass. From simulation data corresponding to 500/fb of luminosity, a mass resolution of about 0.5 GeV seems to be achievable.

  8. A new type of surface waves in a fully degenerate quantum plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuriy Tyshetskiy; Roman Kompaneets; Sergey V. Vladimirov

    2014-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the response of a semi-bounded one-component fully degenerate electron plasma to an initial perturbation in the electrostatic limit. We show that the part of the electric potential corresponding to surface waves in such plasma can be represented, at large times, as the sum of two terms, one term corresponding to "conventional" (Langmuir) surface waves and the other term representing a new type of surface waves resulting from specific analytic properties of degenerate plasma's dielectric response function. These two terms are characterized by different oscillation frequencies (for a given wave number), and, while the "conventional" term's amplitude decays exponentially with time, the new term is characterized by a slower, power-law decay of the oscillation amplitude and is therefore dominant at large times.

  9. cuInspiral: prototype gravitational waves detection pipeline fully coded on GPU using CUDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leone B. Bosi

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the prototype of the first coalescing binary detection pipeline fully implemented on NVIDIA GPU hardware accelerators. The code has been embedded in a GPU library, called cuInspiral and has been developed under CUDA framework. The library contains for example a PN gravitational wave signal generator, matched filtering/FFT and detection algorithms that have been profiled and compared with the corresponding CPU code with dedicated benchmark in order to provide gain factor respect to the standard CPU implementation. In the paper we present performances and accuracy results about some of the main important elements of the pipeline, demonstrating the feasibility and the chance of obtain an impressive computing gain from these new many-core architectures in the perspective of the second and third generations of gravitational wave detectors.

  10. Assessing the Vulnerability of Large Critical Infrastructure Using Fully-Coupled Blast Effects Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, L D; Noble, C R; Margraf, J D; Glascoe, L G

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural failures, such as the MacArthur Maze I-880 overpass in Oakland, California and the I-35 bridge in Minneapolis, Minnesota, are recent examples of our national infrastructure's fragility and serve as an important reminder of such infrastructure in our everyday lives. These two failures, as well as the World Trade Center's collapse and the levee failures in New Orleans, highlight the national importance of protecting our infrastructure as much as possible against acts of terrorism and natural hazards. This paper describes a process for evaluating the vulnerability of critical infrastructure to large blast loads using a fully-coupled finite element approach. A description of the finite element software and modeling technique is discussed along with the experimental validation of the numerical tools. We discuss how such an approach can be used for specific problems such as modeling the progressive collapse of a building.

  11. Characterizing the effects of free carriers in fully-etched, dielectric-clad silicon waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rajat; Lin, Hung-Hsi; Vallini, Felipe; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically characterize the free-carrier plasma dispersion effect in fully-etched silicon waveguides, with various dielectric material claddings, due to fixed and interface charges at the silicon-dielectric interfaces. The values used for these charges are obtained from the measured capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of SiO2, SiNx, and Al2O3 thin films deposited on silicon substrates. The effect of the charges on the properties of silicon waveguides is then calculated using the semiconductor physics tool Silvaco in combination with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method solver Lumerical. Our results show that, in addition to being a critical factor in the analysis of such active devices as capacitively-driven silicon modulators, this effect should also be taken into account when considering the propagation losses of passive silicon waveguides.

  12. Quantum de Finetti theorem under fully-one-way adaptive measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Li; Graeme Smith

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove a version of the quantum de Finetti theorem: permutation-invariant quantum states are well approximated as a probabilistic mixture of multi-fold product states. The approximation is measured by distinguishability under fully one-way LOCC (local operations and classical communication) measurements. Our result strengthens Brand\\~{a}o and Harrow's de Finetti theorem where a kind of partially one-way LOCC measurements was used for measuring the approximation, with essentially the same error bound. As main applications, we show (i) a quasipolynomial-time algorithm which detects multipartite entanglement with amount larger than an arbitrarily small constant (measured with a variant of the relative entropy of entanglement), and (ii) a proof that in quantum Merlin-Arthur proof systems, polynomially many provers are not more powerful than a single prover when the verifier is restricted to one-way LOCC operations.

  13. Fully reversible transition from Wenzel to Cassie-Baxter states on corrugated superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Vrancken; H. Kusumaatmaja; K. Hermans; A. M. Prenen; O. Pierre-Louis; C. W. M. Bastiaansen; D. J. Broer

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid drops on textured surfaces show different dynamical behaviors depending on their wetting states. They are extremely mobile when they are supported by composite solid-liquid-air interfaces (Cassie-Baxter state) and immobile when they fully wet the textured surfaces (Wenzel state). By reversibly switching between these two states, it will be possible to achieve large control over the fluid dynamics. Unfortunately, these wetting transitions are usually prevented by surface energy barriers. We demonstrate here a new and simple design paradigm, consisting of parallel grooves of appropriate aspect ratio, that allows for a controlled, barrierless, and reversible switching of the wetting states upon the application of electrowetting. We report a direct observation of the barrierless dynamical pathway for the reversible transitions between the Wenzel (collapsed) and the Cassie-Baxter (suspended) states and present a theory that accounts for these transitions, including detailed lattice-Boltzmann simulations.

  14. Fully reversible transition from Wenzel to Cassie-Baxter states on corrugated superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrancken, R J; Hermans, K; Prenen, A M; Pierre-Louis, O; Bastiaansen, C W M; Broer, D J

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid drops on textured surfaces show different dynamical behaviors depending on their wetting states. They are extremely mobile when they are supported by composite solid-liquid-air interfaces (Cassie-Baxter state) and immobile when they fully wet the textured surfaces (Wenzel state). By reversibly switching between these two states, it will be possible to achieve large control over the fluid dynamics. Unfortunately, these wetting transitions are usually prevented by surface energy barriers. We demonstrate here a new and simple design paradigm, consisting of parallel grooves of appropriate aspect ratio, that allows for a controlled, barrierless, and reversible switching of the wetting states upon the application of electrowetting. We report a direct observation of the barrierless dynamical pathway for the reversible transitions between the Wenzel (collapsed) and the Cassie-Baxter (suspended) states and present a theory that accounts for these transitions, including detailed lattice-Boltzmann simulations.

  15. Fracturing technology poised for rapid advancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Flatern, R.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the advances and current status of hydraulic fracturing and the industry's ability to design and predict the results. Although modeling techniques have improved over the years, there still is no model which can be considered very reliable. The paper considers alternatives to help improve the reliability of these models such as on-site quality control. This quality control aspect entails the site-specific tailoring of a fracturing fluid to be better suited for the target fracturing zone environment and adjusting the fluid properties accordingly. It also entails various methods for fluid injection and placement of propping agents. Some future trends in hydraulic fracturing are also discussed.

  16. The worldwide NORM production and a fully automated gamma-ray spectrometer for their characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Xhixha; GP. Bezzon; C. Broggini; GP. Buso; A. Caciolli; I. Callegari; S. De Bianchi; G. Fiorentini; E. Guastaldi; M. Kaçeli Xhixha; F. Mantovani; G. Massa; R. Menegazzo; L. Mou; A. Pasquini; C. Rossi Alvarez; M. Shyti

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials containing radionuclides of natural origin, which is modified by human made processes and being subject to regulation because of their radioactivity are known as NORM. We present a brief review of the main categories of non-nuclear industries together with the levels of activity concentration in feed raw materials, products and waste, including mechanisms of radioisotope enrichments. The global management of NORM shows a high level of complexity, mainly due to different degrees of radioactivity enhancement and the huge amount of worldwide waste production. The future tendency of guidelines concerning environmental protection will require both a systematic monitoring based on the ever-increasing sampling and high performance of gamma ray spectroscopy. On the ground of these requirements a new low background fully automated high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer MCA_Rad has been developed. The design of Pb and Cu shielding allowed to reach a background reduction of two order of magnitude with respect to laboratory radioactivity. A severe lowering of manpower cost is obtained through a fully automation system, which enables up to 24 samples to be measured without any human attendance. Two coupled HPGe detectors increase the detection efficiency, performing accurate measurements on sample volume (180 cc) with a reduction of sample transport cost of material. Details of the instrument calibration method are presented. MCA_Rad system can measure in less than one hour a typical NORM sample enriched in U and Th with some hundreds of Bq/kg, with an overall uncertainty less than 5%. Quality control of this method has been tested. Measurements of certified reference materials RGK-1, RGU-2 and RGTh-1 containing concentrations of K, U and Th comparable to NORM have been performed, resulting an overall relative discrepancy of 5% among central values within the reported uncertainty.

  17. A Simple Representation Technique to Improve GA Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's performance by allowing a more rapid search through the hypothesis space. This is achieved by the prior be very different than their parents, thus increasing the speed in which the hypothesis space is searchedA Simple Representation Technique to Improve GA Performance Steven L. Keast Department of Computer

  18. Estimated Farm Level Benefits of Improved Irrigation Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Ellis, John R.; Reneau, Duane R.

    1984-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    for Texas from 668 thousand acres in 1958 to 2.2 million acres in 1979 (Texas Department of Water Resources). With the rapid rise in the relative price of energy during the 1970's, the emphasis of improving sprinkler efficiency has focused on both reducing...

  19. Economic Improvement Districts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A legislative body may adopt an ordinance establishing an economic improvement district and an Economic Improvement Board to manage development in a respective district. The Board can choose to...

  20. RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN SEAWATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in seawater samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium and yttrium isotopes in seawater samples for measurement. The new SRNL method employs a novel and effective pre-concentration step that utilizes a blend of calcium phosphate with iron hydroxide to collect both strontium and yttrium rapidly from the seawater matrix with enhanced chemical yields. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with rapid Sr Resin and DGA Resin cartridge separation options using vacuum box technology, allow seawater samples up to 10 liters to be analyzed. The total {sup 89}Sr + {sup 90}Sr activity may be determined by gas flow proportional counting and recounted after ingrowth of {sup 90}Y to differentiate {sup 89}Sr from {sup 90}Sr. Gas flow proportional counting provides a lower method detection limit than liquid scintillation or Cerenkov counting and allows simultaneous counting of samples. Simultaneous counting allows for longer count times and lower method detection limits without handling very large aliquots of seawater. Seawater samples up to 6 liters may be analyzed using Sr Resin for {sup 89}Sr and {sup 90}Sr with a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of 1-10 mBq/L, depending on count times. Seawater samples up to 10 liters may be analyzed for {sup 90}Sr using a DGA Resin method via collection and purification of {sup 90}Y only. If {sup 89}Sr and other fission products are present, then {sup 91}Y (beta energy 1.55 MeV, 58.5 day half-life) is also likely to be present. {sup 91}Y interferes with attempts to collect {sup 90}Y directly from the seawater sample without initial purification of Sr isotopes first and {sup 90}Y ingrowth. The DGA Resin option can be used to determine {sup 90}Sr, and if {sup 91}Y is also present, an ingrowth option with using DGA Resin again to collect {sup 90}Y can be performed. An MDA for {sup 90}Sr of <1 mBq/L for an 8 hour count may be obtained using 10 liter seawater sample aliquots.

  1. Acoustic oscillations in rapidly rotating polytropic stars I. Effects of the centrifugal distortion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord; D. Reese

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A new non-perturbative method to compute accurate oscillation modes in rapidly rotating stars is presented. In this paper, the effect of the centrifugal force is fully taken into account while the Coriolis force is neglected. This assumption is valid when the time scale of the oscillation is much shorter than the inverse of the rotation rate and is expected to be suitable for high radial order p-modes of $\\delta$ Scuti stars. Axisymmetric p-modes have been computed in uniformly rotating polytropic models of stars. In the frequency and rotation range considered, we found that as rotation increases (i) the asymptotic structure of the non-rotating frequency spectrum is first destroyed then replaced by a new form of organization (ii) the mode amplitude tends to concentrate near the equator (iii) differences with perturbative methods become significant as soon as the rotation rate exceeds about fifteen percent of the Keplerian limit. The implications for the seismology of rapidly rotating stars are then discussed.

  2. Thermonuclear Burning on Rapidly Accreting Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten

    1997-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars in mass-transferring binaries are accreting the hydrogen and helium rich matter from the surfaces of their companions. This article simply explains the physics associated with how that material eventually fuses to form heavier nuclei and the observations of the time dependent phenomena (such as Type I X-ray bursts) associated with the thermally unstable thermonuclear reactions. We explain how the outcome depends on the composition of the accreting matter, the accretion rate and the mass, radius and thermal state of the neutron star. We also introduce many new analytic relations that are convenient for comparisons to both observations and computational results. After explaining nuclear burning for spherically symmetric accretion onto neutron stars, we discuss the possibility of asymmetric burning. In particular, we discuss some of the mysteries from EXOSAT observations of Type I X-Ray bursts and how the solution to these puzzles may lie in considering the lateral propagation of nuclear burning fronts around the star. Fully understanding this problem requires knowledge of parameters previously neglected such as the distribution of fresh fuel on the star, the magnetic field strength, and the stellar rotation. Recent RXTE observations of bursters may finally tell us some of these parameters.

  3. Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

  4. Rapidly Moving Divertor Plates In A Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Zweben

    2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It may be possible to replace conventional actively cooled tokamak divertor plates with a set of rapidly moving, passively cooled divertor plates on rails. These plates would absorb the plasma heat flux with their thermal inertia for ~10-30 sec, and would then be removed from the vessel for processing. When outside the tokamak, these plates could be cooled, cleaned, recoated, inspected, and then returned to the vessel in an automated loop. This scheme could provide nearoptimal divertor surfaces at all times, and avoid the need to stop machine operation for repair of damaged or eroded plates. We describe various possible divertor plate designs and access geometries, and discuss an initial design for a movable and removable divertor module for NSTX-U.

  5. Methods for improved preconcentrators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Okandan, Murat (Edgewood, NM)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to chemical analysis (e.g. by gas chromatography), and in particular to a compact chemical preconcentrator formed on a substrate with a heatable sorptive membrane that can be used to accumulate and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest over time and then rapidly release the concentrated chemical species upon demand for chemical analysis.

  6. Improving scrap tire processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Astafan, C.G. [Columbus McKinnon Corp., Sarasota, FL (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for tire-derived materials is growing rapidly, with the largest market being tire-derived fuels. There is therefore a growing demand for higher quality products. This paper describes the processing and removal of steel from scrap tires.

  7. Fully Three-dimensional Simulation and Modeling of a Dense Plasma Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meehan, B T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is a pulsed-power machine that electromagnetically accelerates and cylindrically compresses a shocked plasma in a Z-pinch. The pinch results in a brief (about 100 nanosecond) pulse of X-rays, and, for some working gases, also a pulse of neutrons. A great deal of experimental research has been done into the physics of DPF reactions, and there exist mathematical models describing its behavior during the different time phases of the reaction. Two of the phases, known as the inverse pinch and the rundown, are approximately governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and there are a number of well-established codes for simulating these phases in two dimensions or in three dimensions under the assumption of axial symmetry. There has been little success, however, in developing fully three-dimensional simulations. In this work we present three-dimensional simulations of DPF reactions and demonstrate that 3D simulations predict qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior than their 2D counterp...

  8. A Prototype Two-Decade Fully-Coupled Fine-Resolution CCSM Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClean, Julie L. [Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Bader, David C [ORNL; Bryan, Frank O. [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Maltrud, Matthew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dennis, John [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Mirin, Arthur A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jones, Philip W [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Ivanova, Detelina P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Kim, Yoo Yin [Scripps Institute of Oceanography; Boyle, James S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Jacob, Robert L. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Norton, Nancy [IBM and National Center for Atmospheric Research; Craig, Anthony [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Worley, Patrick H [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully coupled global simulation using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) was configured using grid resolutions of 0.1{sup o} for the ocean and sea-ice, and 0.25{sup o} for the atmosphere and land, and was run under present-day greenhouse gas conditions for 20 years. It represents one of the first efforts to simulate the planetary system at such high horizontal resolution. The climatology of the circulation of the atmosphere and the upper ocean were compared with observational data and reanalysis products to identify persistent mean climate biases. Intensified and contracted polar vortices, and too cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the subpolar and mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere were the dominant biases produced by the model. Intense category 4 cyclones formed spontaneously in the tropical North Pacific. A case study of the ocean response to one such event shows the realistic formation of a cold SST wake, mixed layer deepening, and warming below the mixed layer. Too many tropical cyclones formed in the North Pacific however, due to too high SSTs in the tropical eastern Pacific. In the North Atlantic anomalously low SSTs lead to a dearth of hurricanes. Agulhas eddy pathways are more realistic than in equivalent stand-alone ocean simulations forced with atmospheric reanalysis.

  9. FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, C/Via Lactea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Schmidt, W.; Berkefeld, T. [Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, Schoeneckstrasse 6, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Del Toro Iniesta, J. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de AndalucIa (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Domingo, V. [Grupo de AstronomIa y Ciencias del Espacio, Universidad de Valencia, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Knoelker, M. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Title, A. M., E-mail: lagg@mps.mpg.d [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

  10. Fully Nonlinear Edge Gyrokinetic Simulations of Kinetic Geodesic-Acoustic Modes and Boundary Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X Q; Belli, E; Bodi, K; Candy, J; Chang, C S; Cohen, B I; Cohen, R H; Colella, P; Dimits, A M; Dorr, M R; Gao, Z; Hittinger, J A; Ko, S; Krasheninnikov, S; McKee, G R; Nevins, W M; Rognlien, T D; Snyder, P B; Suh, J; Umansky, M V

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present edge gyrokinetic neoclassical simulations of tokamak plasmas using the fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. A nonlinear Boltzmann model is used for the electrons. The electric field is obtained by solving the 2D gyrokinetic Poisson Equation. We demonstrate the following: (1) High harmonic resonances (n > 2) significantly enhance geodesic-acoustic mode (GAM) damping at high-q (tokamak safety factor), and are necessary to explain both the damping observed in our TEMPEST q-scans and experimental measurements of the scaling of the GAM amplitude with edge q{sub 95} in the absence of obvious evidence that there is a strong q dependence of the turbulent drive and damping of the GAM. (2) The kinetic GAM exists in the edge for steep density and temperature gradients in the form of outgoing waves, its radial scale is set by the ion temperature profile, and ion temperature inhomogeneity is necessary for GAM radial propagation. (3) The development of the neoclassical electric field evolves through different phases of relaxation, including GAMs, their radial propagation, and their long-time collisional decay. (4) Natural consequences of orbits in the pedestal and scrape-off layer region in divertor geometry are substantial non-Maxwellian ion distributions and flow characteristics qualitatively like those observed in experiments.

  11. Multidimensional fully-coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical response of reactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of multidimensional modeling is presented which describes coupled thermals chemical and mechanical response of reactive and nonreactive materials. This modeling addresses cookoff of energetic material (EM) prior to the onset of ignition. Cookoff, lasting from seconds to days, sensitizes the EM whereupon combustion of confined, degraded material determines the level of violence. Such processes are dynamic, occurring over time scales of millisecond to microsecond, and thus more amenable for shock physics analysis. This work provides preignition state estimates such as the amount of decomposition, morphological changes, and quasistatic stress states for subsequent dynamic analysis. To demonstrate a fully-coupled thermal/chemical/quasistatic mechanical capability, several example simulations have been performed: (1) the one-dimensional time-to-explosion experiments, (2) the Naval Air Weapon Center`s (NAWC) small scale cookoff bomb, (3) a small hot cell experiment and (4) a rigid, highly porous, closed-cell polyurethane foam. Predictions compared adequately to available data. Deficiencies in the model and future directions are discussed.

  12. RAPID DYNAMICAL CHAOS IN AN EXOPLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deck, Katherine M.; Winn, Joshua N. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Holman, Matthew J.; Carter, Joshua A.; Ragozzine, Darin [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the long-term dynamical evolution of the two-planet Kepler-36 system, which consists of a super-Earth and a sub-Neptune in a tightly packed orbital configuration. The orbits of the planets, which we studied through numerical integrations of initial conditions that are consistent with observations of the system, are chaotic with a Lyapunov time of only {approx}10 years. The chaos is a consequence of a particular set of orbital resonances, with the inner planet orbiting 34 times for every 29 orbits of the outer planet. The rapidity of the chaos is due to the interaction of the 29:34 resonance with the nearby first-order 6:7 resonance, in contrast to the usual case in which secular terms in the Hamiltonian play a dominant role. Only one contiguous region of phase space, accounting for {approx}4.5% of the sample of initial conditions studied, corresponds to planetary orbits that do not show large-scale orbital instabilities on the timescale of our integrations ({approx}200 million years). Restricting the orbits to this long-lived region allows a refinement of estimates of the masses and radii of the planets. We find that the long-lived region consists of the initial conditions that satisfy the Hill stability criterion by the largest margin. Any successful theory for the formation of this system will need to account for why its current state is so close to unstable regions of phase space.

  13. Rapid Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Characterization of Drill Core and Cutting Mineralogy using Infrared Spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid...

  14. area rapid transit: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AWARD FOR RAPID TRANSITION (BSTART) (R03) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Engineering Websites Summary: Services, National Institutes of...

  15. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals....

  16. Rapid Modeling of Power Electronics Thermal Management Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.; Kelly, K.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes a method of rapidly evaluating trade-offs associated with alternative packaging configurations and thermal management technologies for power electronics packaging.

  17. City of Grand Rapids- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2006, the City of Grand Rapids approved a resolution detailing the city's sustainability policy for public buildings. The resolution directed city personnel to implement the principles...

  18. Rapid characterization of drill core and cutting mineralogy using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    characterization of drill core and cutting mineralogy using infrared spectroscopy Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rapid...

  19. Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Cities with Data Scarcity Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Urban Development Priorities - Development of a Rapid Assessment Tool for...

  20. An improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14 March 2012. [1] We present an improved time-domain model of the lightning electromagnetic pulse. Introduction [2] Lightning discharges produce both an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), due to the rapid lightningAn improved model of the lightning electromagnetic field interaction with the D-region ionosphere R

  1. Participation through Automation: Fully Automated Critical PeakPricing in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote,Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    California electric utilities have been exploring the use of dynamic critical peak prices (CPP) and other demand response programs to help reduce peaks in customer electric loads. CPP is a tariff design to promote demand response. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows: Manual Demand Response involves a potentially labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. They refer to this as Auto-DR. This paper describes the development, testing, and results from automated CPP (Auto-CPP) as part of a utility project in California. The paper presents the project description and test methodology. This is followed by a discussion of Auto-DR strategies used in the field test buildings. They present a sample Auto-CPP load shape case study, and a selection of the Auto-CPP response data from September 29, 2005. If all twelve sites reached their maximum saving simultaneously, a total of approximately 2 MW of DR is available from these twelve sites that represent about two million ft{sup 2}. The average DR was about half that value, at about 1 MW. These savings translate to about 0.5 to 1.0 W/ft{sup 2} of demand reduction. They are continuing field demonstrations and economic evaluations to pursue increasing penetrations of automated DR that has demonstrated ability to provide a valuable DR resource for California.

  2. Testing and Modeling of a 3-MW Wind Turbine Using Fully Coupled Simulation Codes (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCava, W.; Guo, Y.; Van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Casanovas, C.; Cugat, C.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster describes the NREL/Alstom Wind testing and model verification of the Alstom 3-MW wind turbine located at NREL's National Wind Technology Center. NREL,in collaboration with ALSTOM Wind, is studying a 3-MW wind turbine installed at the National Wind Technology Center(NWTC). The project analyzes the turbine design using a state-of-the-art simulation code validated with detailed test data. This poster describes the testing and the model validation effort, and provides conclusions about the performance of the unique drive train configuration used in this wind turbine. The 3-MW machine has been operating at the NWTC since March 2011, and drive train measurements will be collected through the spring of 2012. The NWTC testing site has particularly turbulent wind patterns that allow for the measurement of large transient loads and the resulting turbine response. This poster describes the 3-MW turbine test project, the instrumentation installed, and the load cases captured. The design of a reliable wind turbine drive train increasingly relies on the use of advanced simulation to predict structural responses in a varying wind field. This poster presents a fully coupled, aero-elastic and dynamic model of the wind turbine. It also shows the methodology used to validate the model, including the use of measured tower modes, model-to-model comparisons of the power curve, and mainshaft bending predictions for various load cases. The drivetrain is designed to only transmit torque to the gearbox, eliminating non-torque moments that are known to cause gear misalignment. Preliminary results show that the drivetrain is able to divert bending loads in extreme loading cases, and that a significantly smaller bending moment is induced on the mainshaft compared to a three-point mounting design.

  3. The dusty MOCASSIN: fully self-consistent 3D photoionisation and dust radiative transfer models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ercolano; M. J. Barlow; P. J. Storey

    2005-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first 3D Monte Carlo (MC) photoionisation code to include a fully self-consistent treatment of dust radiative transfer (RT) within a photoionised region. This is the latest development (Version 2.0) of the gas-only photoionisation code MOCASSIN (Ercolano et al., 2003a), and employs a stochastic approach to the transport of radiation, allowing both the primary and secondary components of the radiation field to be treated self-consistently, whilst accounting for the scattering of radiation by dust grains mixed with the gas, as well as the absorption and emission of radiation by both the gas and the dust components. A set of rigorous benchmark tests have been carried out for dust-only spherically symmetric geometries and 2D disk configurations. MOCASSIN's results are found to be in agreement with those obtained by well established dust-only RT codes that employ various approaches to the solution of the RT problem. A model of the dust and of the photoionised gas components of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 3918 is also presented as a means of testing the correct functioning of the RT procedures in a case where both gas and dust opacities are present. The two components are coupled via the heating of dust grains by the absorption of both UV continuum photons and resonance line photons emitted by the gas. The MOCASSIN results show agreement with those of a 1D dust and gas model of this nebula published previously, showing the reliability of the new code, which can be applied to a variety of astrophysical environments.

  4. Neutronics studies of uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated fuel for PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, N. M.; Maldonado, I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); Terrani, K.; Godfrey, A.; Gehin, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics using uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR assembly designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle-based elements are expected to achieve higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software used to model the assembly designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities; however, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used for lattice calculations due to the long run times associated with the SCALE DH capability. In order to understand the impact on reactivity and reactor operating cycle length, a parametric study was performed by varying TRISO particle design features, such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fraction. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were studied. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher compound density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO{sub 2} rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime and temperature coefficients of reactivity, as well as pin cell and assembly peaking factors. (authors)

  5. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  6. Hydrocarbon characterization experiments in fully turbulent fires : results and data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. The model for the fuel evaporation rate in a liquid fuel pool fire is significant because in well-ventilated fires the evaporation rate largely controls the total heat release rate from the fire. This report describes a set of fuel regression rates experiments to provide data for the development and validation of models. The experiments were performed with fires in the fully turbulent scale range (> 1 m diameter) and with a number of hydrocarbon fuels ranging from lightly sooting to heavily sooting. The importance of spectral absorption in the liquid fuels and the vapor dome above the pool was investigated and the total heat flux to the pool surface was measured. The importance of convection within the liquid fuel was assessed by restricting large scale liquid motion in some tests. These data sets provide a sound, experimentally proven basis for assessing how much of the liquid fuel needs to be modeled to enable a predictive simulation of a fuel fire given the couplings between evaporation of fuel from the pool and the heat release from the fire which drives the evaporation.

  7. Force-controlled absorption in a fully-nonlinear numerical wave tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spinneken, Johannes, E-mail: j.spinneken@imperial.ac.uk; Christou, Marios; Swan, Chris

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An active control methodology for the absorption of water waves in a numerical wave tank is introduced. This methodology is based upon a force-feedback technique which has previously been shown to be very effective in physical wave tanks. Unlike other methods, an a-priori knowledge of the wave conditions in the tank is not required; the absorption controller being designed to automatically respond to a wide range of wave conditions. In comparison to numerical sponge layers, effective wave absorption is achieved on the boundary, thereby minimising the spatial extent of the numerical wave tank. In contrast to the imposition of radiation conditions, the scheme is inherently capable of absorbing irregular waves. Most importantly, simultaneous generation and absorption can be achieved. This is an important advance when considering inclusion of reflective bodies within the numerical wave tank. In designing the absorption controller, an infinite impulse response filter is adopted, thereby eliminating the problem of non-causality in the controller optimisation. Two alternative controllers are considered, both implemented in a fully-nonlinear wave tank based on a multiple-flux boundary element scheme. To simplify the problem under consideration, the present analysis is limited to water waves propagating in a two-dimensional domain. The paper presents an extensive numerical validation which demonstrates the success of the method for a wide range of wave conditions including regular, focused and random waves. The numerical investigation also highlights some of the limitations of the method, particularly in simultaneously generating and absorbing large amplitude or highly-nonlinear waves. The findings of the present numerical study are directly applicable to related fields where optimum absorption is sought; these include physical wavemaking, wave power absorption and a wide range of numerical wave tank schemes.

  8. Genome Improvement at JGI-HAGSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimwood, Jane: Schmutz, Jeremy, J.: Myers, Richard, M.

    2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the completion of the sequencing of the human genome, the JGI has rapidly expanded its scientific goals in several DOE mission-relevant areas. At the JGI-HAGSC, we have kept pace with this rapid expansion of projects with our focus on assessing, assembling, improving and finishing eukaryotic whole genome shotgun (WGS) projects for which the shotgun sequence is generated at the Production Genomic Facility (JGI-PGF). We follow this by combining the draft WGS with genomic resources generated at JGI-HAGSC or in collaborator laboratories (including BAC end sequences, genetic maps and FLcDNA sequences) to produce an improved draft sequence. For eukaryotic genomes important to the DOE mission, we then add further information from directed experiments to produce reference genomic sequences that are publicly available for any scientific researcher. Also, we have continued our program for producing BAC-based finished sequence, both for adding information to JGI genome projects and for small BAC-based sequencing projects proposed through any of the JGI sequencing programs. We have now built our computational expertise in WGS assembly and analysis and have moved eukaryotic genome assembly from the JGI-PGF to JGI-HAGSC. We have concentrated our assembly development work on large plant genomes and complex fungal and algal genomes.

  9. Fully Integrated Lignocellulosic Biorefinery with Onsite Production of Enzymes and Yeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoj Kumar, PhD

    2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant, least expensive renewable natural biological resource for the production of biobased products and bioenergy is important for the sustainable development of human civilization in 21st century. For making the fermentable sugars from lignocellulosic biomass, a reduction in cellulase production cost, an improvement in cellulase performance, and an increase in sugar yields are all vital to reduce the processing costs of biorefineries. Improvements in specific cellulase activities for non-complexed cellulase mixtures can be implemented through cellulase engineering based on rational design or directed evolution for each cellulase component enzyme, as well as on the reconstitution of cellulase components. In this paper, we will provide DSM's efforts in cellulase research and developments and focus on limitations. Cellulase improvement strategies based on directed evolution using screening on relevant substrates, screening for higher thermal tolerance based on activity screening approaches such as continuous culture using insoluble cellulosic substrates as a powerful selection tool for enriching beneficial cellulase mutants from the large library. We will illustrate why and how thermostable cellulases are vital for economic delivery of bioproducts from cellulosic biomass using biochemical conversion approach.

  10. A Fully Data Parallel WFST-based Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition on a Graphics Processing Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    A Fully Data Parallel WFST-based Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition on a Graphics process for large vocabulary continuous speech recog- nition (LVCSR) have been considered by many to transform their algorithms to fit the data parallel model. This can be challenging for algorithms that don

  11. MAC-EYE: a Tendon Driven Fully Embedded Robot Eye Dario Biamino, Giorgio Cannata, Marco Maggiali and Alessandro Piazza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cannata, Giorgio

    MAC-EYE: a Tendon Driven Fully Embedded Robot Eye Dario Biamino, Giorgio Cannata, Marco Maggiali}@dist.unige.it Abstract-- This paper presents a new tendon driven robotic eye. The system has been designed to emulate the actual saccadic and smooth pursuit movements performed by human eyes. The system consists of a sphere

  12. A high-speed, low-power analog-to-digital converter in fully depleted silicon-on-insulator technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundberg, Kent Howard

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates a one-volt, high-speed, ultra-low-power, six-bit flash analog-to-digital converter fabricated in a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology. Silicon-on-insulator CMOS technology provides ...

  13. IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 3, MARCH 2002 371 Fully Integrated CMOS Power Amplifier Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 37, NO. 3, MARCH 2002 371 Fully Integrated CMOS Power-chip impedance matching and power- combining method, the distributed active transformer is presented. It combines output power while maintaining a 50- match. It also uses virtual ac grounds and magnetic couplings

  14. Fully Dynamic Secret Sharing Schemes \\Lambda Carlo Blundo, 1 Antonella Cresti, 2 Alfredo De Santis, 1 and Ugo Vaccaro 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    Fully Dynamic Secret Sharing Schemes \\Lambda Carlo Blundo, 1 Antonella Cresti, 2 Alfredo De Santis'', 00198 Roma, Italy Abstract We consider secret sharing schemes in which the dealer is able (after the participants to reconstruct different secrets (in different time instants) by sending them the same broadcast

  15. 2012 IEEE 30th VLSI Test Symposium (VTS) Towards a Fully Stand-Alone Analog/RF BIST: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makris, Yiorgos

    -effective analog/RF BIST solution must rely on low-cost measurements obtained through on-chip sensors, along to achieve a fully stand-alone analog/RF BIST solution that can be used for low-cost production test as well in the low-cost measure- ment multi-dimensional space. To investigate this approach, we have designed

  16. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanmugavel, T., E-mail: shanmugavelnano@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Paavai Engineering College, Namakkal -637018 (India); Raj, S. Gokul [Department of Physics, Vel Tech University, Avadi, Chennai - 600 062 (India); Rajarajan, G. [Department of Physics, Mahendra Engineering College, Mallasamudram -637503 (India); Kumar, G. Ramesh [Department of Physics, University College of Engineering, Anna University Chennai, Arni- 632317 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  17. Productive Economy InternetMobilephonesBudgetanalysisGreeneconomyRapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    manufacturing work 1990s A new process, `Selective Laser Sintering', paves way for rapid manufacture of productsProductive Economy InternetMobilephonesBudgetanalysisGreeneconomyRapid manufacturing 1967 UK computer design files ­ using plastic lays foundation for new low-cost, low- waste manufacturing techniques

  18. Photogrammetry Assisted Rapid Measurement of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Photogrammetry Assisted Rapid Measurement of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Fei Dai, PhD Hong for rapidly measuring structural damage induced in tall buildings by seismic events such as earthquakes) sustained at key floors along the edge of a damaged building. The measured drift can then be used to compute

  19. Rapid Scan Humidified Growth Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Kok; Athanasios Nenes

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focused on enhancements to the streamwise thermal gradient cloud condensation nuclei counter to support the rapid scan mode and to enhance the capability for aerosol humidified growth measurements. The research identified the needs for flow system modifications and range of capability for operating the conventional instrument in the rapid scan and humidified growth modes.

  20. Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators Alison G) A central role for phenotypic plasticity in adaptive evolution is often posited yet lacks empirical support of preexisting developmental pathways, producing rapid adaptive change. We examined the role of plasticity

  1. NEUTRONICS STUDIES OF URANIUM-BASED FULLY CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL FOR PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics that result from employing uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR bundle designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle based elements, are expected to safely reach higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software employed to model these designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities. For cases evaluated with the NESTLE full-core three-dimensional nodal simulator, because the feature to perform DH lattice physics branches with the SCALE/TRITON sequence is not yet available, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used as workaround to support the full core analyses. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In addition, a parametric study was performed by varying the various TRISO particle design features; such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fractions. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, Zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were perturbed. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime, temperature coefficients of reactivity, as well as pin cell and assembly peaking factors. Key Words: FCM, TRISO, Uranium Mononitride, PWR

  2. Towards Fully Integrated High Temperature Wireless Sensors Using GaN-based HEMT Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Islam, Syed K [ORNL; Huque, Mohammad A [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless sensors which are capable of working at extreme environments can significantly improve the efficiency and performance of industrial processes by facilitating better control systems. GaN, a widely researched wide bandgap material, has the potential to be used both as a sensing material and to fabricate control electronics, making it a prime candidate for high temperature integrated wireless sensor fabrication. In this paper we are presenting an experimental study on AlGaN/GaN HEMT's performance at higher temperature (up to 300 C). From test results, DC and microwave parameters at different temperatures were extracted.

  3. Improving Fired Heater Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shriver, J. E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1982. 2, Fehervari, Willi, "Gas Measurement and Control for Pipeline Systems," The Foxboro Company. 3. Shriver, James, "CO/02 Boiler Control: Point Is Vi tal," POWER, October 1982. Set 1\\. Dukelow, Samuel, "Improving Boiler Efficiency...

  4. Recent Improvements in DDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, D.J.

    1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will report new developments and recent improvements to DDT. "Window DDT" now will remember undefined symbols and define them on a later command. Using sequence breaks, it can change the contents of memory while ...

  5. Abuse Tolerance Improvements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    additive shows some improvement in flammability compared to the control electrolyte (EC:EMC (2:8)). Metal Phosphate-Coated Cathodes (PSI): Delivered 2 kg of LiMPO4-coated...

  6. Improved Dragline Utilization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, K. J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause of energy conservation can be served by increasing the efficiency of large draglines used in surface coal mining. The topic is the application of a training simulator, computer instrumentation and computer simulation to improve dragline...

  7. Managing Energy Efficiency Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almaguer, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results has been the utilization of Six Sigma methodology to identify and seize opportunities to improve our performance and to better meet customer needs. Since its implementation in 1999, Six Sigma has proven to be a breakthrough process that can... take Dow to the next level of performance for all our key stakeholders. The Six Sigma methodology has been especially successful in improving energy efficiency and reducing energy costs and is the primary methodology used by technology center...

  8. Rapidity gaps in jet events at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Abolins, M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Acharya, B.S. [Delhi Univ. (India)] [and others; D0 Collaboration

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results from the D0 experiment on jet production with rapidity gaps in p{anti p} collisions are presented. A class of dijet events with a forward rapidity gap is observed at center-of-mass energies {radical}s = 1800 GeV and 630 GeV. The number of events with rapidity gaps at both center-of-mass energies is significantly greater than the expectation from multiplicity fluctuations and is consistent with a hard diffractive process. A class of events with two forward gaps and central dijets is also observed at 1800 GeV. This topology is consistent with hard double pomeron exchange.

  9. Development and Validation of a Simple Protocol To Rapidly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the data results in 12 points on the elimination capacity vs load curve which is sufficient to fully to be conducted. Typically, for each pollutant, a complete curve for the elimination capacity of the biofilter as a function of the pollutant loading as shown in Figure 1 is desired. The pollutant elimination capacity

  10. Photochemistry and Photobiology, 2006, 82: 13851390 Rapid Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roegner, Matthias

    Hydrogen is one of the most promising energy carriers among environmentally friendly and clean energy systems or for the construction of semiartificial or fully artificial model systems. Among the energy converting processes in nature, light-driven water splitting photosynthesis of microalgae and higher plants

  11. Algorithmically scalable block preconditioner for fully implicit shallow water equations in CAM-SE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, P Aaron [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Woodward, Carol [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Evans, Katherine J [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performing accurate and efficient numerical simulation of global atmospheric climate models is challenging due to the disparate length and time scales over which physical processes interact. Implicit solvers enable the physical system to be integrated with a time step commensurate with processes being studied. The dominant cost of an implicit time step is the ancillary linear system solves, so we have developed a preconditioner aimed at improving the efficiency of these linear system solves. Our preconditioner is based on an approximate block factorization of the linearized shallow-water equations and has been implemented within the spectral element dynamical core within the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM-SE). In this paper we discuss the development and scalability of the preconditioner for a suite of test cases with the implicit shallow-water solver within CAM-SE.

  12. Fully 3D Multiple Beam Dynamics Processes Simulation for the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, E.; Amundson, J.; Spentzouris, P; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Tevatron has been, until 2010, the premier high-energy physics collider in the world. The data collected over the last decade by high-energy physics experiments running at the Tevatron have been analyzed to make important measurements in fundamental areas such as B meson masses and flavor oscillation, searches for the Higgs boson, and supersymmetry. Collecting these data at the limits of detectability has required the Tevatron to operate reliably at high beam intensities to maximize the number of collisions to analyze. This impressive achievement has been assisted by the use of HPC resources and software provided through the SciDAC program. This paper describes the enhancements to the BeamBeam3d code to realistically simulate the Tevatron, the validation of these simulations, and the improvement in equipment reliability and personal safety achieved with the aid of simulations.

  13. The Gell-Mann -- Okubo mass relation among baryons from fully-dynamical mixed-action lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silas R. Beane; Kostas Orginos; Martin J. Savage

    2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the Gell-Mann--Okubo mass relation among the octet baryons using fully-dynamical, mixed-action (domain-wall on rooted-staggered) lattice QCD calculations at a lattice spacing of b ~ 0.125 fm and pion masses of m_pi ~ 290 MeV, 350 MeV, 490 MeV and 590 MeV. Deviations from the Gell-Mann--Okubo mass relation are found to be small at each quark mass.

  14. Fully-coupled engineering and mesoscale simulations of thermal conductivity in UO2 fuel using an implicit multiscale approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Tonks; Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; Paul Millett; Glen Hansen; Chris Newman

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactor fuel performance is sensitive to microstructure changes during irradiation (such as fission gas and pore formation). This study proposes an approach to capture microstructural changes in the fuel by a two-way coupling of a mesoscale phase field irradiation model to an engineering scale, finite element calculation. This work solves the multiphysics equation system at the engineering-scale in a parallel, fully-coupled, fully-implicit manner using a preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton Krylov method (JFNK). A sampling of the temperature at the Gauss points of the coarse scale is passed to a parallel sequence of mesoscale calculations within the JFNK function evaluation phase of the calculation. The mesoscale thermal conductivity is calculated in parallel, and the result is passed back to the engineering-scale calculation. As this algorithm is fully contained within the JFNK function evaluation, the mesoscale calculation is nonlinearly consistent with the engineering-scale calculation. Further, the action of the Jacobian is also consistent, so the composite algorithm provides the strong nonlinear convergence properties of Newton's method. The coupled model using INL's \\bison\\ code demonstrates quadratic nonlinear convergence and good parallel scalability. Initial results predict the formation of large pores in the hotter center of the pellet, but few pores on the outer circumference. Thus, the thermal conductivity is is reduced in the center of the pellet, leading to a higher internal temperature than that in an unirradiated pellet.

  15. METHOD Open Access Rapid haplotype inference for nuclear families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gifford, David K.

    METHOD Open Access Rapid haplotype inference for nuclear families Amy L Williams1* , David E-recombinant and maximum likelihood haplotypes. When applied to a dataset con- taining 103 families, Hapi performs 3

  16. Growth in metals production for rapid photovoltaics deployment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavlak, Goksin

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. We quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of annual metals production. If a ...

  17. Update on Breakout Sessions: Rapid City & Oklahoma City

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers an update on the Rapid City and Oklahoma breakout sessions and is given at the FUPWG 2006 Spring meeting, held on May 3-4, 2006 in Atlanta, Georgia.

  18. Title of dissertation: TURBULENT SHEAR FLOW IN A RAPIDLY ROTATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: TURBULENT SHEAR FLOW IN A RAPIDLY ROTATING SPHERICAL ANNULUS Daniel S. Zimmerman, Doctor of Philosophy, 2010 Dissertation directed by: Professor Daniel P. Lathrop Department of Physics This dissertation presents experimental measurements of torque, wall shear stress

  19. Rapid screening of novel nanoporous materials for carbon capture separations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mangano, Enzo

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the experimental results from the rapid screening and ranking of a wide range of novel adsorbents for carbon capture are presented. The samples were tested using the Zero Length Column (ZLC) method which has ...

  20. Production of jets at forward rapidities in hadronic collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hautmann

    2009-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss high-pT production processes at forward rapidities in hadron-hadron collisions, and describe recent results from using QCD high-energy factorization in forward jet production at the LHC.

  1. Discreteness and resolution effects in rapidly rotating turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourouiba, Lydia

    Rotating turbulence is characterized by the nondimensional Rossby number Ro, which is a measure of the strength of the Coriolis term relative to that of the nonlinear term. For rapid rotation (Ro?0), nonlinear interactions ...

  2. Rapidity evolution of gluon TMD from low to moderate x

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Balitsky; A. Tarasov

    2015-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how the rapidity evolution of gluon transverse momentum dependent distribution changes from nonlinear evolution at small $x \\ll 1$ to linear evolution at moderate $x \\sim 1$.

  3. Rapid Replication of High Aspect Ratio Molds for UV Embossing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Yehai

    This paper describes a promising fabrication technique for rapid replication of high aspect ratio microstructured molds for UV embossing. The process involves casting silicone rubber on a microstructured master, replicating ...

  4. City of Grand Rapids- Green Power Purchasing Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2005, the City of Grand Rapids established a goal of purchasing 20% of its municipal power demand from renewable energy by 2008. In November 2007, the city signed a three-year agreement with a...

  5. Development of an advanced nanocalorimetry system for rapid material characterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yen-Shan

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a versatile system capable of providing rapid, portable, and inexpensive detection of explosives and energetic compounds is needed critically to offer an enhanced level of protection against current and future threats to homeland...

  6. RAPID DETERMINATION OF {sup 210} PO IN WATER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that can be used for emergency response or routine water analyses. If a radiological dispersive device (RDD) event or a radiological attack associated with drinking water supplies occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of water samples, including drinking water, ground water and other water effluents. Current analytical methods for the assay of {sup 210}Po in water samples have typically involved spontaneous auto-deposition of {sup 210}Po onto silver or other metal disks followed by counting by alpha spectrometry. The auto-deposition times range from 90 minutes to 24 hours or more, at times with yields that may be less than desirable. If sample interferences are present, decreased yields and degraded alpha spectrums can occur due to unpredictable thickening in the deposited layer. Separation methods have focused on the use of Sr Resin?, often in combination with 210Pb analysis. A new rapid method for {sup 210}Po in water samples has been developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that utilizes a rapid calcium phosphate co-precipitation method, separation using DGA Resin? (N,N,N?,N? tetraoctyldiglycolamide extractant-coated resin, Eichrom Technologies or Triskem-International), followed by rapid microprecipitation of {sup 210}Po using bismuth phosphate for counting by alpha spectrometry. This new method can be performed quickly with excellent removal of interferences, high chemical yields and very good alpha peak resolution, eliminating any potential problems with the alpha source preparation for emergency or routine samples. A rapid sequential separation method to separate {sup 210} Po and actinide isotopes was also developed. This new approach, rapid separation with DGA Resin plus microprecipitation for alpha source preparation, is a significant advance in radiochemistry for the rapid determination of {sup 210}Po.

  7. IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason M. Keith

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

  8. Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

    2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

  9. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, Cole A [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is an investigation of the utilization of Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) particle-based fuel designs for the recycling of transuranic (TRU) wastes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Though numerous studies have evaluated the recycling of TRU in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing TRU-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a SiC matrix and formed into pellets that can be loaded into standard 17 x 17 fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of TRU recycling and, by virtue of the TRISO particle design, will allow for greater burnup (i.e., removal of the need for UO2 mixing) and improved fuel reliability. In this study, a variety of assembly layouts and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the feasibility of TRU-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core design herein reported are a work in progress, so they still require some fine-tuning to further flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, TRU-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing TRU production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in PWRs.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  11. Bisphenol-A rapidly enhanced passive avoidance memory and phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunits in hippocampus of young rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxh63@zjnu.cn; Li Tao; Luo Qingqing; Hong Xing; Xie Lingdan; Tian Dong

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor, is found to influence development of brain and behaviors in rodents. The previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to BPA impaired learning-memory and inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) subunits expressions in hippocampus during the postnatal development in rats; and in cultured hippocampal neurons, BPA rapidly promotes dynamic changes in dendritic morphology through estrogen receptor-mediated pathway by concomitant phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit NR2B. In the present study, we examined the rapid effect of BPA on passive avoidance memory and NMDAR in the developing hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of postnatal day 18. The results showed that BPA or estradiol benzoate (EB) rapidly extended the latency to step down from the platform 1 h after footshock and increased the phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, and mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in hippocampus within 1 h. While 24 h after BPA or EB treatment, the improved memory and the increased phosphorylation levels of NR1, NR2B, ERK disappeared. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an estrogen receptors (ERs) antagonist, ICI182,780, or an ERK-activating kinase inhibitor, U0126, significantly attenuated EB- or BPA-induced phosphorylations of NR1, NR2B, and ERK within 1 h. These data suggest that BPA rapidly enhanced short-term passive avoidance memory in the developing rats. A non-genomic effect via ERs may mediate the modulation of the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunits NR1 and NR2B through ERK signaling pathway. - Highlights: > BPA rapidly extended the latency to step down from platform 1 h after footshock. > BPA rapidly increased pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK in hippocampus within 1 h. > ERs antagonist or MEK inhibitor attenuated BPA-induced pNR1, pNR2B, and pERK.

  12. Extended-length power sections improve PDM drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moles, H. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since being introduced in the 1960s, downhole positive displacement motors (PDMs) have evolved steadily from early applications. Initially considered only for high-speed, medium-torque, initial directional kickoffs; and short, corrective directional operations, these tools were not expected to operate for more than a few hours at a time. Progressive improvements have led to tools that are capable of extended runs in a variety of configurations. Current generation PDMs have a broad range of applications and include fully steerable systems for directional or horizontal drilling, and instrumented motors incorporating formation evaluation measurement-while-drilling (FEMWD) systems for geological steering and reservoir navigation. Design improvements also expanded PDM applications to include hole sections traditionally drilled with conventional rotary-driven bottomhole assemblies (BHAs). This paper reviews these new motor designs and provides case histories of their performance.

  13. Well-Balanced Central-Upwind Scheme for a Fully Coupled Shallow Water System Modeling Flows over Erodible Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurganov, Alexander

    on fixed-bed conditions have been developed, see, e.g., [5, 6, 7, 43, 46, 58, 59]. In order to evaluate Erodible Bed Xin Liua, , Abdolmajid Mohammadiana , Alexander Kurganovb , Julio Angel Infante Sedanoa, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, 70118, USA Abstract Intense sediment transport and rapid bed

  14. arXiv:cond-mat/0410750v128Oct2004 A fully fermionic mean field theory of the cuprate superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Xiao-Gang

    fermion) and a holon (a spin-0 charged boson). The spin-charge separation phenomenon corresponds to the rapid decay of an electron excitation into a spinon and a holon, leading to the lack of quasiparticle points means that, in this k-space region, the spinon and the holon form a bound state. [12, 13] Within

  15. Improved solar heating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schreyer, J.M.; Dorsey, G.F.

    1980-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved solar heating system is described in which the incident radiation of the sun is absorbed on collector panels, transferred to a storage unit and then distributed as heat for a building and the like. The improvement is obtained by utilizing a storage unit comprising separate compartments containing an array of materials having different melting points ranging from 75 to 180/sup 0/F. The materials in the storage system are melted in accordance with the amount of heat absorbed from the sun and then transferred to the storage system. An efficient low volume storage system is provided by utilizing the latent heat of fusion of the materials as they change states in storing ad releasing heat for distribution.

  16. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  17. Improving haul truck productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews developments in payload management and cycle times. These were discussed at a roundtable held at the Haulage and Loading 2007 conference held in May in Phoenix, AZ, USA. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) explaind what their companies were doing to improve cycle times for trucks, shovels and excavators used in surface coal mining. Quotations are given from Dion Domaschenz of Liebherr and Steve Plott of Cat Global Mining. 4 figs.

  18. Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, K. R.; Levine, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop (RAPID) Toolkit combines the former Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Database, and other resources into a Web-based tool that gives the regulatory and utility-scale geothermal developer communities rapid and easy access to permitting information. RAPID currently comprises five tools - Permitting Atlas, Regulatory Roadmap, Resource Library, NEPA Database, and Best Practices. A beta release of an additional tool, the Permitting Wizard, is scheduled for late 2014. Because of the huge amount of information involved, RAPID was developed in a wiki platform to allow industry and regulatory agencies to maintain the content in the future so that it continues to provide relevant and accurate information to users. In 2014, the content was expanded to include regulatory requirements for utility-scale solar and bulk transmission development projects. Going forward, development of the RAPID Toolkit will focus on expanding the capabilities of current tools, developing additional tools, including additional technologies, and continuing to increase stakeholder involvement.

  19. Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

  20. MODULAR AND FULL SIZE SIMPLIFIED BOILING WATER REACTOR DESIGN WITH FULLY PASSIVE SAFETY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Ishii; S. T. Revankar; T. Downar; Y. Xu, H. J. Yoon; D. Tinkler; U. S. Rohatgi

    2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The overall goal of this three-year research project was to develop a new scientific design of a compact modular 200 MWe and a full size 1200 MWe simplified boiling water reactors (SBWR). Specific objectives of this research were: (1) to perform scientific designs of the core neutronics and core thermal-hydraulics for a small capacity and full size simplified boiling water reactor, (2) to develop a passive safety system design, (3) improve and validate safety analysis code, (4) demonstrate experimentally and analytically all design functions of the safety systems for the design basis accidents (DBA) and (5) to develop the final scientific design of both SBWR systems, 200 MWe (SBWR-200) and 1200 MWe (SBWR-1200). The SBWR combines the advantages of design simplicity and completely passive safety systems. These advantages fit well within the objectives of NERI and the Department of Energy's focus on the development of Generation III and IV nuclear power. The 3-year research program was structured around seven tasks. Task 1 was to perform the preliminary thermal-hydraulic design. Task 2 was to perform the core neutronic design analysis. Task 3 was to perform a detailed scaling study and obtain corresponding PUMA conditions from an integral test. Task 4 was to perform integral tests and code evaluation for the DBA. Task 5 was to perform a safety analysis for the DBA. Task 6 was to perform a BWR stability analysis. Task 7 was to perform a final scientific design of the compact modular SBWR-200 and the full size SBWR-1200. A no cost extension for the third year was requested and the request was granted and all the project tasks were completed by April 2003. The design activities in tasks 1, 2, and 3 were completed as planned. The existing thermal-hydraulic information, core physics, and fuel lattice information was collected on the existing design of the simplified boiling water reactor. The thermal-hydraulic design were developed. Based on a detailed integral system scaling analysis, design parameters were obtained and designs of the compact modular 200 MWe SBWR and the full size 1200 MWe SBWR were developed. These reactors are provided with passive safety systems. A new passive vacuum breaker check valve was designed to replace the mechanical vacuum beaker check valve. The new vacuum breaker check valve was based on a hydrostatic head, and was fail safe. The performance of this new valve was evaluated both by the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and by the experiments in a scaled SBWR facility, PUMA. In the core neutronic design a core depletion model was implemented to PARCS code. A lattice design for the SBWR fuel assemblies was performed. Design improvements were made to the neutronics/thermal-hydraulics models of SBWR-200 and SBWR-1200, and design analyses of these reactors were performed. The design base accident analysis and evaluation of all the passive safety systems were completed as scheduled in tasks 4 and 5. Initial conditions for the small break loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) and large break LOCA using REALP5 code were obtained. Small and large break LOCA tests were performed and the data was analyzed. An anticipated transient with scram was simulated using the RELAP5 code for SBWR-200. The transient considered was an accidental closure of the main steam isolation valve (MSIV), which was considered to be the most significant transient. The evaluation of the RELAP5 code against experimental data for SBWR-1200 was completed. In task 6, the instability analysis for the three SBWR designs (SBWR-1200, SBWR-600 and SBWR-200) were simulated for start-up transients and the results were similar. Neither the geysering instability, nor the loop type instability was predicted by RAMONA-4B in the startup simulation following the recommended procedure by GE. The density wave oscillation was not observed at all because the power level used in the simulation was not high enough. A study was made of the potential instabilities by imposing an unrealistically high power ramp in a short time period, as suggested by GE. RAMON

  1. Material Performance of Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel under Selected LWR Design Basis Scenarios: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Boer; R. S. Sen; M. A. Pope; A. M. Ougouag

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extension to LWRs of the use of Deep-Burn coated particle fuel envisaged for HTRs has been investigated. TRISO coated fuel particles are used in Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel within a SiC matrix rather than the graphite of HTRs. TRISO particles are well characterized for uranium-fueled HTRs. However, operating conditions of LWRs are different from those of HTRs (temperature, neutron energy spectrum, fast fluence levels, power density). Furthermore, the time scales of transient core behavior during accidents are usually much shorter and thus more severe in LWRs. The PASTA code was updated for analysis of stresses in coated particle FCM fuel. The code extensions enable the automatic use of neutronic data (burnup, fast fluence as a function of irradiation time) obtained using the DRAGON neutronics code. An input option for automatic evaluation of temperature rise during anticipated transients was also added. A new thermal model for FCM was incorporated into the code; so-were updated correlations (for pyrocarbon coating layers) suitable to estimating dimensional changes at the high fluence levels attained in LWR DB fuel. Analyses of the FCM fuel using the updated PASTA code under nominal and accident conditions show: (1) Stress levels in SiC-coatings are low for low fission gas release (FGR) fractions of several percent, as based on data of fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2} kernels. However, the high burnup level of LWR-DB fuel implies that the FGR fraction is more likely to be in the range of 50-100%, similar to Inert Matrix Fuels (IMFs). For this range the predicted stresses and failure fractions of the SiC coating are high for the reference particle design (500 {micro}mm kernel diameter, 100 {micro}mm buffer, 35 {micro}mm IPyC, 35 {micro}mm SiC, 40 {micro}mm OPyC). A conservative case, assuming 100% FGR, 900K fuel temperature and 705 MWd/kg (77% FIMA) fuel burnup, results in a 8.0 x 10{sup -2} failure probability. For a 'best-estimate' FGR fraction of 50% and a more modest burnup target level of 500 MWd/kg ,the failure probability drops below 2.0 x 10{sup -5}, the typical performance of TRISO fuel made under the German HTR research program. An optimization study on particle design shows improved performance if the buffer size is increased from 100 to 120 {micro}mm while reducing the OPyC layer. The presence of the latter layer does not provide much benefit at high burnup levels (and fast fluence levels). Normally the shrinkage of the OPyC would result in a beneficial compressive force on the SiC coating. However, at high fluence levels the shrinkage is expected to turn into swelling, resulting in the opposite effect. However, this situation is different when the SiC-matrix, in which the particles are embedded, is also considered: the OPyC swelling can result in a beneficial compressive force on the SiC coating since outward displacement of the OPyC outer surface is inhibited by the presence of the also-swelling SiC matrix. Taking some credit for this effect by adopting a 5 {micro}mm SiC-matrix layer, the optimized particle (100 {micro}mm buffer and 10 {micro}mm OPyC), gives a failure probability of 1.9 x 10{sup -4} for conservative conditions. During a LOCA transient, assuming core re-flood in 30 seconds, the temperature of the coated particle can be expected to be about 200K higher than nominal temperature (900K). For this event the particle failure fraction for a conservative case is 1.0 x 10{sup -2}, for the optimized particle design. For a FGR-fraction of 50% this value reduces to 6.4 x 10{sup -4}.

  2. Methods and systems for rapid prototyping of high density circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, Jeremy A. (Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM); Chavez, Bart D. (Albuquerque, NM); Gallegos, Phillip L. (Albuquerque, NM); Wicker, Ryan B. (El Paso, TX); Medina, Francisco R. (El Paso, TX)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A preferred embodiment provides, for example, a system and method of integrating fluid media dispensing technology such as direct-write (DW) technologies with rapid prototyping (RP) technologies such as stereolithography (SL) to provide increased micro-fabrication and micro-stereolithography. A preferred embodiment of the present invention also provides, for example, a system and method for Rapid Prototyping High Density Circuit (RPHDC) manufacturing of solderless connectors and pilot devices with terminal geometries that are compatible with DW mechanisms and reduce contact resistance where the electrical system is encapsulated within structural members and manual electrical connections are eliminated in favor of automated DW traces. A preferred embodiment further provides, for example, a method of rapid prototyping comprising: fabricating a part layer using stereolithography and depositing thermally curable media onto the part layer using a fluid dispensing apparatus.

  3. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  4. Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

  5. Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

  6. Supernova Seismology: Gravitational Wave Signatures of Rapidly Rotating Core Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Jim; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gravitational waves (GW) generated during a core-collapse supernova open a window into the heart of the explosion. At core bounce, progenitors with rapid core rotation rates exhibit a characteristic GW signal which can be used to constrain the properties of the core of the progenitor star. We investigate the dynamics of rapidly rotating core collapse, focusing on hydrodynamic waves generated by the core bounce and the GW spectrum they produce. The centrifugal distortion of the rapidly rotating proto-neutron star (PNS) leads to the generation of axisymmetric quadrupolar oscillations within the PNS and surrounding envelope. Using linear perturbation theory, we estimate the frequencies, amplitudes, damping times, and GW spectra of the oscillations. Our analysis provides a qualitative explanation for several features of the GW spectrum and shows reasonable agreement with nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations, although a few discrepancies due to non-linear/rotational effects are evident. The dominant early postbounce...

  7. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve (see Figure 1).

  8. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formationmore »of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  9. Rapidity gap survival in the black-disk regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonid Frankfurt; Charles Hyde; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize how the approach to the black-disk regime (BDR) of strong interactions at TeV energies influences rapidity gap survival in exclusive hard diffraction pp -> p + H + p (H = dijet, Qbar Q, Higgs). Employing a recently developed partonic description of such processes, we discuss (a) the suppression of diffraction at small impact parameters by soft spectator interactions in the BDR; (b) further suppression by inelastic interactions of hard spectator partons in the BDR; (c) correlations between hard and soft interactions. Hard spectator interactions substantially reduce the rapidity gap survival probability at LHC energies compared to previously reported estimates.

  10. Property:RAPID/Contact/ID8/Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/Organization RAPID/Contact/ID8/Position RAPID/Contact/ID8/Name

  11. REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING USING A PARALLEL FULLY-COUPLED SIMULATOR BASED ON PRECONDITIONED JACOBIAN-FREE NEWTON-KRYLOV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luanjing Guo; Chuan Lu; Hai Huang; Derek R. Gaston

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems of multicomponent reactive transport in porous media that are large, highly nonlinear, and tightly coupled due to complex nonlinear reactions and strong solution-media interactions are often described by a system of coupled nonlinear partial differential algebraic equations (PDAEs). A preconditioned Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) solution approach is applied to solve the PDAEs in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner. The advantage of the JFNK method is that it avoids explicitly computing and storing the Jacobian matrix during Newton nonlinear iterations for computational efficiency considerations. This solution approach is also enhanced by physics-based blocking preconditioning and multigrid algorithm for efficient inversion of preconditioners. Based on the solution approach, we have developed a reactive transport simulator named RAT. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency and massive scalability of the simulator for reactive transport problems involving strong solution-mineral interactions and fast kinetics. It has been applied to study the highly nonlinearly coupled reactive transport system of a promising in situ environmental remediation that involves urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation.

  12. Improved ion detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  13. Improved cycling cryopump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is designed to achieve continuous high efficiency cryopumping of a vacuum vessel by improving upon and combining in a novel way the cryopumping in a novel way the cryopumping methods. The invention consists of a continuous operation cryopump, with movable louvres, with a high efficiency pumping apparatus. The pumping apparatus includes three cryogenic tubes. They are constructed of a substance of high thermal conductivity, such as aluminum and their exterior surfaces are cryogenic condensing surfaces. Through their interior liquid or gaseous helium from two reservoirs can be made to flow, alternately promoting extreme cooling or allowing some warming.

  14. Improved Dark Energy Constraints

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in graphene byI _Improved Dark

  15. Improved proton computed tomography by dual modality image reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, David C., E-mail: dch@ki.au.dk; Bassler, Niels [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)] [Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Petersen, Jřrgen Breede Baltzer [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)] [Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Sřrensen, Thomas Sangild [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)] [Computer Science, Aarhus University, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark and Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, 8200 Aarhus N (Denmark)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Proton computed tomography (CT) is a promising image modality for improving the stopping power estimates and dose calculations for particle therapy. However, the finite range of about 33 cm of water of most commercial proton therapy systems limits the sites that can be scanned from a full 360° rotation. In this paper the authors propose a method to overcome the problem using a dual modality reconstruction (DMR) combining the proton data with a cone-beam x-ray prior. Methods: A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned using a cone beam x-ray CT scanner. A digital replica of the phantom was created in the Monte Carlo code Geant4 and a 360° proton CT scan was simulated, storing the entrance and exit position and momentum vector of every proton. Proton CT images were reconstructed using a varying number of angles from the scan. The proton CT images were reconstructed using a constrained nonlinear conjugate gradient algorithm, minimizing total variation and the x-ray CT prior while remaining consistent with the proton projection data. The proton histories were reconstructed along curved cubic-spline paths. Results: The spatial resolution of the cone beam CT prior was retained for the fully sampled case and the 90° interval case, with the MTF = 0.5 (modulation transfer function) ranging from 5.22 to 5.65?linepairs/cm. In the 45° interval case, the MTF = 0.5 dropped to 3.91?linepairs/cm For the fully sampled DMR, the maximal root mean square (RMS) error was 0.006 in units of relative stopping power. For the limited angle cases the maximal RMS error was 0.18, an almost five-fold improvement over the cone beam CT estimate. Conclusions: Dual modality reconstruction yields the high spatial resolution of cone beam x-ray CT while maintaining the improved stopping power estimation of proton CT. In the case of limited angles, the use of prior image proton CT greatly improves the resolution and stopping power estimate, but does not fully achieve the quality of a 360° proton CT scan.

  16. The interrelationship between environmental goals, productivity improvement, and increased energy efficiency in integrated paper and steel plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an investigation into the interrelationships between plant-level productivity, energy efficiency, and environmental improvements for integrated pulp and paper mills and integrated steel mills in the US. Integrated paper and steel plants are defined as those facilities that use some form of onsite raw material to produce final products (for example, paper and paperboard or finished steel). Fully integrated pulp and paper mills produce onsite the pulp used to manufacture paper from virgin wood fiber, secondary fiber, or nonwood fiber. Fully integrated steel mills process steel from coal, iron ore, and scrap inputs and have onsite coke oven facilities.

  17. Lake Improvement District Law and County Lake Improvement Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lake Improvement Districts may be established by county boards in order to “improve the quality of water in lakes; provide for reasonable assurance of water quantity in lakes, where feasible and...

  18. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Frail, Dale A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, Washington, DC 20008 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (?0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (?0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ?10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  19. A proposed second harmonic acceleration system for the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Rapid Cycling Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.; Rauchas, A.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2-2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at about 3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. With the present good performance in mind, accelerator improvements are being directed at increasing beam intensities for neutron science, lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation, and gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. On the basis of preliminary measurements, the authors are now proposing a third cavity for the RF system which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses.

  20. OVERVIEW OF DEVELOPMENT OF P-CARES: PROBABILISTIC COMPUTER ANALYSIS FOR RAPID EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIE,J.; XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; THOMAS, V.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook an effort to revise the CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) program under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The CARES program provided the NRC staff a capability to quickly check the validity and/or accuracy of the soil-structure interaction (SSI) models and associated data received from various applicants. The aim of the current revision was to implement various probabilistic simulation algorithms in CARES (referred hereinafter as P-CARES [1]) for performing the probabilistic site response and soil-structure interaction (SSI) analyses. This paper provides an overview of the development process of P-CARES, including the various probabilistic simulation techniques used to incorporate the effect of site soil uncertainties into the seismic site response and SSI analyses and an improved graphical user interface (GUI).

  1. Rapid Re-Housing and Short-Term Rental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Rapid Re-Housing and Short-Term Rental Vouchers for Homeless Families: Summary Report of a Pilot of numerous reports and publications, such as Bridges and Barriers to Housing for Chronically Homeless Street Dwellers; Accessing Housing: Exploring the Impact of Medical and Substance Abuse Services; The First Two

  2. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 031801(R) (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmich, Alex

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for long-term light storage. The differential ac Stark shift of the ground-level microwave transition usedRAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 031801(R) (2013) Light storage on the time scale, Georgia 30332-0430, USA (Received 20 December 2012; published 6 March 2013) Light storage on the minute

  3. Nursery Practices and Planting Stock: Aiming Towards Rapid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    low ­ Rapid pathogen buildup during storage at temps above 37F #12;Seedling handling: Cold storage. ­ Cold storage with careful handling and no desiccation reduced RGP by 18%; adding desiccation reduced in storage. #12;Seedling handling review: cold storage · Carbohydrates deplete over time, accelerated by heat

  4. Rapid location of mount points JONATHAN M. SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­­ ­­ Rapid location of mount points JONATHAN M. SMITH Computer Science Department, Columbia ``core'' is ``/u2/smith/core''. The current directory is a directory­valued variable. It is an implied traversal; the root contains itself. This scheme is extensible across multiple media through mount points

  5. Icosahedral phase formation in rapidly quenched aluminum-ruthenium alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Icosahedral phase formation in rapidly quenched aluminum- ruthenium alloys Steven M. Anlagea phases as a function of composition. We have chosen the aluminum-ruthenium alloy system because. %. The solidified alloys have been studied by electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction to determine

  6. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 121410(R) (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 121410(R) (2011) Pairing in graphene: A quantum Monte superconductivity in graphene, we perform a systematic quantum Monte Carlo study of the pairing correlation in the t.10.Fd, 74.70.Wz, 74.20.Mn, 74.20.Rp Recently, graphene has attracted the attention of experimen- talists

  7. Rapid mapping of protein functional epitopes by combinatorial alanine scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gregory A.

    Rapid mapping of protein functional epitopes by combinatorial alanine scanning Gregory A. Weiss for review March 2, 2000) A combinatorial alanine-scanning strategy was used to determine simultaneously previously determined by conventional alanine-scanning mutagenesis and suggest that this technology should

  8. A Rapid Scanning Inspection Method for Insulated Ferromagnetic Tubing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, G. M.; Milewits, M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until the present there has been no effective way to rapidly scan thermally insulated refinery or process piping for corrosion or thin wall. Such defects, if left unattended, can lead to wasteful losses of time, energy and money. To date the most...

  9. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

  10. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  11. Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes Daniel Patel Thesis, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, Eduard Gr¨oller The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D of Seismic Data Published in: Vision, Modelling and Visualization (VMV) 2007 Authors: Daniel Patel

  12. China's rapid deployment of SO2 scrubbers Robert H. Williamsb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at coal power plants in 2006 and 2007. Scrubbers were installed in each of these years at plants with more emissions control at coal power plants. This paper describes and seeks to understand China's recent rapid deployment of SO2 scrubbers at coal power plants. For perspective this activity in China is compared

  13. Early Events in Protein Folding Explored by Rapid Mixing Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Heinrich

    15 Early Events in Protein Folding Explored by Rapid Mixing Methods Heinrich Roder, Kosuke Maki for Understanding Protein Folding As with any complex reaction, time-resolved data are essential for elucidating the mechanism of protein folding. Even in cases where the whole process of folding occurs in a single step

  14. Rapid Communications Strong piezoelectricity in individual GaN nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Rapid Communications Strong piezoelectricity in individual GaN nanowires Majid Minary@northwestern.edu (Received 12 July 2011; accepted 15 September 2011) Abstract GaN nanowires are promising building blocks piezoelectricity in individual single-crystal GaN nanowires revealed by direct measurement of the piezoelectric

  15. Rapid Determination Of Radiostrontium In Large Soil Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Shaw, Patrick J.

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

  16. Rapid Recolonisation of Agricultural Soil by Microarthropods After Steam Disinfestation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucco, Marco

    Rapid Recolonisation of Agricultural Soil by Microarthropods After Steam Disinfestation Stefano Fenoglio Paolo Gay Giorgio Malacarne Marco Cucco ABSTRACT. Steam disinfestation of soil is attracting. In this study, we assessed the effect of steam applica- tion on the microarthropod community, a fundamental

  17. Rapid and Efficient Detection of Distributed Anomalous Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetherall, David

    be halted and require administrative action, e.g., consider the consequences of a DDoS attack launched via case of normal behavior. In this paper, we study the problem of rapid and efficient detection quickly and with orders of magnitude lower communication overhead than periodic queries in the common case

  18. Materials physics and device development for improved efficiency of GaN HEMT high power amplifiers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Steven Ross; Follstaedt, David Martin; Wright, Alan Francis; Baca, Albert G.; Briggs, Ronald D.; Provencio, Paula Polyak; Missert, Nancy A.; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Marsh, Phil F.; Koleske, Daniel David; Lee, Stephen Roger; Shul, Randy John; Seager, Carleton Hoover; Tigges, Christopher P.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN-based microwave power amplifiers have been identified as critical components in Sandia's next generation micro-Synthetic-Aperture-Radar (SAR) operating at X-band and Ku-band (10-18 GHz). To miniaturize SAR, GaN-based amplifiers are necessary to replace bulky traveling wave tubes. Specifically, for micro-SAR development, highly reliable GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), which have delivered a factor of 10 times improvement in power performance compared to GaAs, need to be developed. Despite the great promise of GaN HEMTs, problems associated with nitride materials growth currently limit gain, linearity, power-added-efficiency, reproducibility, and reliability. These material quality issues are primarily due to heteroepitaxial growth of GaN on lattice mismatched substrates. Because SiC provides the best lattice match and thermal conductivity, SiC is currently the substrate of choice for GaN-based microwave amplifiers. Obviously for GaN-based HEMTs to fully realize their tremendous promise, several challenges related to GaN heteroepitaxy on SiC must be solved. For this LDRD, we conducted a concerted effort to resolve materials issues through in-depth research on GaN/AlGaN growth on SiC. Repeatable growth processes were developed which enabled basic studies of these device layers as well as full fabrication of microwave amplifiers. Detailed studies of the GaN and AlGaN growth of SiC were conducted and techniques to measure the structural and electrical properties of the layers were developed. Problems that limit device performance were investigated, including electron traps, dislocations, the quality of semi-insulating GaN, the GaN/AlGaN interface roughness, and surface pinning of the AlGaN gate. Surface charge was reduced by developing silicon nitride passivation. Constant feedback between material properties, physical understanding, and device performance enabled rapid progress which eventually led to the successful fabrication of state of the art HEMT transistors and amplifiers.

  19. Efforts towards the synthesis of fully N-differentiated heparin-like glycosaminoglycans; and, Investigations into the mechanism of inactivation of RTPR by gemcitabine triphosphate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohman, Gregory J. S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts towards the Synthesis of Fully N-Differentiated Heparin-like Glycosaminoglycans. Heparin-like glycosaminoglycans (HLGAGs) are complex information-carrying biopolymers and are an important component of the coagulation ...

  20. A search for rapid pulsations among 9 luminous Ap stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Freyhammer; D. W. Kurtz; M. S. Cunha; G. Mathys; V. G. Elkin; J. D. Riley

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly oscillating Ap stars are of importance for studying the atmospheric structure of stars where the process of chemical element diffusion is significant. We have performed a survey for rapid oscillations in a sample of 9 luminous Ap stars, selected from their location in the colour-magnitude diagram as more evolved main-sequence Ap stars that are inside the instability strip for rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars. Until recently this region was devoid of stars with observed rapid pulsations. We used the VLT UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) to obtain high time resolution spectroscopy to make the first systematic spectroscopic search for rapid oscillations in this region of the roAp instability strip. We report 9 null-detections with upper limits for radial-velocity amplitudes of 20 - 65 m/s and precisions of 7 - 20 m/s for combinations of Nd and Pr lines. Cross-correlations confirm these null-results. At least six stars are magnetic and we provide magnetic field measurements for four of them, of which three are newly discovered magnetic stars. It is found that four stars have magnetic fields smaller than ~ 2 kG, which according to theoretical predictions might be insufficient for suppressing envelope convection around the magnetic poles for more evolved Ap stars. Suppression of convection is expected to be essential for the opacity mechanism acting in the hydrogen ionisation zone to drive the high-overtone roAp pulsations efficiently. Our null-results suggest that the more evolved roAp stars may require particularly strong magnetic fields to pulsate. Three of the studied stars do, however, have magnetic fields stronger than 5 kG.

  1. Potential improvements in SiGe radioisotope thermoelectric generator performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mowery, A.L. [4 Myrtle Bank Lane, Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, 29926-2650 (United States)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with NASA{close_quote}s slogan: {open_quotes}Better, Cheaper, Faster,{close_quotes} this paper will address potential improvements to SiGe RTG technology to make them Better. RTGs are doubtless cheaper than {open_quotes}paper designs{close_quotes} which are better and cheaper until development, performance and safety test costs are considered. RTGs have the advantage of being fully developed and tested in the rigors of space for over twenty years. Further, unless a new system can be accelerated tested, as were the RTGs, they cannot be deployed reliably unless a number of systems have succeeded for test periods exceeding the mission lifetime. Two potential developments are discussed that can improve the basic RTG performance by 10 to 40{sup +}{percent} depending on the mission profile. These improvements could be demonstrated in years. Accelerated testing could also be performed in this period to preserve existing RTG reliability. Data from a qualification tested RTG will be displayed, while not definitive, to support the conclusions. Finally, it is anticipated that other investigators will be encouraged to suggest further modifications to the basic RTG design to improve its performance. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  3. Comply. Improve. Transform. IBM Rational solutions for compliance-driven development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to: · Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance management · Automate and document improvement · Remain flexible and responsive in a rapidly changing business climate Establish a sustainable framework for regulatory compliance Changes in regulatory policy can have sweeping effects on how your

  4. Improved Lattice Radial Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard C. Brower; Michael Cheng; George T. Fleming

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Lattice radial quantization was proposed in a recent paper by Brower, Fleming and Neuberger[1] as a nonperturbative method especially suited to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories. The lessons learned from the lattice radial quantization of the 3D Ising model on a longitudinal cylinder with 2D Icosahedral cross-section suggested the need for an improved discretization. We consider here the use of the Finite Element Methods(FEM) to descretize the universally-equivalent $\\phi^4$ Lagrangian on $\\mathbb R \\times \\mathbb S^2$. It is argued that this lattice regularization will approach the exact conformal theory at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum. Numerical tests are underway to support this conjecture.

  5. Deceleration Orbit Improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, M.

    1991-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    During the accelerator studies period of 12/90-1/91 much study time was dedicated to improving the E760 deceleration ramps. 4 general goals were in mind: (1) Reduce the relative orbit deviations from the nominal reference orbit as much as possible. This reduces the potential error in the orbit length calculation - which is the primary source of error in the beam energy calculation. (2) Maximize the transverse apertures. This minimizes beam loss during deceleration and during accidental beam blow-ups. (3) Measure and correct lattice parameters. Knowledge of {gamma}{sub T}, {eta}, Q{sub h}, Q{sub v}, and the dispersion in the straight sections allows for a more accurate energy calculation and reliable SYNCH calculations. (4) Minimize the coupling. This allows one to discern between horizontal and vertical tunes.

  6. Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Carl

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) engaged in numerous projects outlined under the scope of work discussed in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) grant number DE-FC26-04NT15456 awarded to the IOGCC. Numerous projects were completed that were extremely valuable to state oil and gas agencies as a result of work performed utilizing resources provided by the grant. There are numerous areas in which state agencies still need assistance. This additional assistance will need to be addressed under future scopes of work submitted annually to DOE's Project Officer for this grant. This report discusses the progress of the projects outlined under the grant scope of work for the 2005-2006 areas of interest, which are as follows: Area of Interest No. 1--Regulatory Streamlining and Improvement: This area of interest continues to support IOGCC's regulatory streamlining efforts that include the identification and elimination of unnecessary duplications of efforts between and among state and federal programs dealing with exploration and production on public lands. Area of Interest No. 2--Technology: This area of interest seeks to improve efficiency in states through the identification of technologies that can reduce costs. Area of Interest No. 3--Training and Education: This area of interest is vital to upgrading the skills of regulators and industry alike. Within the National Energy Policy, there are many appropriate training and education opportunities. Education was strongly endorsed by the President's National Energy Policy Development group. Acting through the governors offices, states are very effective conduits for the dissemination of energy education information. While the IOGCC favors the development of a comprehensive, long-term energy education plan, states are also supportive of immediate action on important concerns, such as energy prices, availability and conservation. Area of Interest No. 4--Resource Assessment and Development: This area of interest relates directly to helping maximize production of domestic oil and natural gas resources, including areas that are under explored or have not been adequately defined.

  7. Study of fully developed, liquid-metal, open-channel flow in a nearly coplanar magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, N.B.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully developed, gravity-driven flow in an open channel of arbitrary electrical conductance and orientation to an applied magnetic field is investigated. The formulation of the model equations and the numerical solution methodology are described in detail. Numerical solutions of the model equations for the flow velocity profile, induced magnetic field profile, and the uniform film height as a function of Hartmann number, field angle, flow rate, and channel conductivity are presented and discussed. The parameter ranges explored are those most representative of tokamak divertor surface protection schemes, where the field is predominantly coplanar in orientation. The formation of jets in velocity and the occurrence of abrupt jumps in uniform film height are seen as the wall conductance increases. Regimes where the flow is dominated by the smaller transverse field component instead of the larger coplanar field are also observed. Simple analytic relations predicting the film height are given for the different flow regimes. 13 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  8. A fully second order implicit/explicit time integration technique for hydrodynamics plus nonlinear heat conduction problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadioglu, Samet Y. [Multiphysics Methods Group, Reactor Physics Analysis and Design, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 3840, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)], E-mail: Samet.Kadioglu@inl.gov; Knoll, Dana A. [Multiphysics Methods Group, Reactor Physics Analysis and Design, Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 3840, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)], E-mail: dana.knoll@inl.gov

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fully second order implicit/explicit time integration technique for solving hydrodynamics coupled with nonlinear heat conduction problems. The idea is to hybridize an implicit and an explicit discretization in such a way to achieve second order time convergent calculations. In this scope, the hydrodynamics equations are discretized explicitly making use of the capability of well-understood explicit schemes. On the other hand, the nonlinear heat conduction is solved implicitly. Such methods are often referred to as IMEX methods. The Jacobian-Free Newton Krylov (JFNK) method (e.g. ) is applied to the problem in such a way as to render a nonlinearly iterated IMEX method. We solve three test problems in order to validate the numerical order of the scheme. For each test, we established second order time convergence. We support these numerical results with a modified equation analysis (MEA). The set of equations studied here constitute a base model for radiation hydrodynamics.

  9. Vector Boson Production at Hadron Colliders: A Fully Exclusive QCD Calculation at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catani, Stefano; Ferrera, Giancarlo; Grazzini, Massimiliano [INFN, Sezione di Firenze and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Cieri, Leandro; Florian, Daniel de [Departamento de Fisica, FCEYN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, (1428) Pabellon 1 Ciudad Universitaria, Capital Federal (Argentina)

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider QCD radiative corrections to the production of W and Z bosons in hadron collisions. We present a fully exclusive calculation up to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in QCD perturbation theory. To perform this NNLO computation, we use a recently proposed version of the subtraction formalism. The calculation includes the gamma-Z interference, finite-width effects, the leptonic decay of the vector bosons, and the corresponding spin correlations. Our calculation is implemented in a parton level Monte Carlo program. The program allows the user to apply arbitrary kinematical cuts on the final-state leptons and the associated jet activity and to compute the corresponding distributions in the form of bin histograms. We show selected numerical results at the Fermilab Tevatron and the LHC.

  10. A Fully Automated Method for CT-on-Rails-Guided Online Adaptive Planning for Prostate Cancer Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Pan, Xiaoning [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Tyler, Texas (United States); Zhou, Yin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wang, Xiaochun [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Du, Weiliang [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This study was designed to validate a fully automated adaptive planning (AAP) method which integrates automated recontouring and automated replanning to account for interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer patients receiving adaptive intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on daily repeated computed tomography (CT)-on-rails images. Methods and Materials: Nine prostate cancer patients treated at our institution were randomly selected. For the AAP method, contours on each repeat CT image were automatically generated by mapping the contours from the simulation CT image using deformable image registration. An in-house automated planning tool incorporated into the Pinnacle treatment planning system was used to generate the original and the adapted IMRT plans. The cumulative dose–volume histograms (DVHs) of the target and critical structures were calculated based on the manual contours for all plans and compared with those of plans generated by the conventional method, that is, shifting the isocenters by aligning the images based on the center of the volume (COV) of prostate (prostate COV-aligned). Results: The target coverage from our AAP method for every patient was acceptable, while 1 of the 9 patients showed target underdosing from prostate COV-aligned plans. The normalized volume receiving at least 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), and the mean dose of the rectum and bladder were reduced by 8.9%, 6.4 Gy and 4.3%, 5.3 Gy, respectively, for the AAP method compared with the values obtained from prostate COV-aligned plans. Conclusions: The AAP method, which is fully automated, is effective for online replanning to compensate for target dose deficits and critical organ overdosing caused by interfractional anatomical changes in prostate cancer.

  11. RAPID DETERMINATION OF RA-226 IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for emergency response or routine sample analyses. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device or Improvised Nuclear Device event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. {sup 226}Ra (T1/2 = 1,620 years) is one of the most toxic of the long-lived alpha-emitters present in the environment due to its long life and its tendency to concentrate in bones, which increases the internal radiation dose of individuals. The new method to determine {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method for solid samples, calcium carbonate precipitation to preconcentrate Ra, and rapid column separation steps to remove interferences. The column separation process uses cation exchange resin to remove large amounts of calcium, Sr Resin to remove barium and Ln Resin as a final purification step to remove {sup 225}Ac and potential interferences. The purified {sup 226}Ra sample test sources are prepared using barium sulfate microprecipitation in the presence of isopropanol for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed good chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The determination of {sup 226}Ra in environmental samples can be performed in less than 16 h for vegetation, concrete, brick, soil, and air filter samples with excellent quality for emergency or routine analyses. The sample preparation work takes less than 6 h. {sup 225}Ra (T1/2 = 14.9 day) tracer is used and the {sup 225}Ra progeny {sup 217}At is used to determine chemical yield via alpha spectrometry. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory radium particles are effectively digested. The preconcentration and column separation steps can also be applied to aqueous samples with good results.

  12. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate, (3) using partially formed gels, (4) using combinations of high and low molecular weight (Mw) polymers, (5) using secondary crosslinking reactions, (6) injecting un-hydrated polymer particles, and (7) incorporating particulates. All of these methods showed promise in some aspects, but required performance improvements in other aspects. All materials investigated to date showed significant performance variations with fracture width. High pressure gradients and limited distance of penetration are common problems in tight fractures. Gravity segregation and low resistance to breaching are common problems in wide fractures. These will be key issues to address in future work. Although gels can exhibit disproportionate permeability reduction in fractures, the levels of permeability reduction for oil flow are too high to allow practical exploitation in most circumstances. In contrast, disproportionate permeability reduction provided by gels that form in porous rock (adjacent to the fractures) has considerable potential in fractured systems.

  13. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as resins. The Coking Indexes focus on the amount of these intermediate polarity species since coke formation begins when these are depleted. Currently the Coking Indexes are determined by either titration or solubility measurements which must be performed in a laboratory. In the current work, various spectral, microscopic, and thermal techniques possibly leading to on-line analysis were explored for measuring the Coking Indexes.

  14. Dark matter transport properties and rapidly rotating neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Horowitz

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars are attractive places to look for dark matter because their high densities allow repeated interactions. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) may scatter efficiently in the core or in the crust of a neutron star. In this paper we focus on WIMP contributions to transport properties, such as shear viscosity or thermal conductivity, because these can be greatly enhanced by long mean free paths. We speculate that WIMPs increase the shear viscosity of neutron star matter and help stabilize r-mode oscillations. These are collective oscillations where the restoring force is the Coriolis force. At present r-modes are thought to be unstable in many observed rapidly rotating stars. If WIMPs stabilize the r-modes, this would allow neutron stars to spin rapidly. This likely requires WIMP-nucleon cross sections near present experimental limits and an appropriate density of WIMPs in neutron stars.

  15. Local thermodynamic equilibrium in rapidly heated high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslanyan, V.; Tallents, G. J. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission spectra and the dynamics of high energy density plasmas created by optical and Free Electron Lasers (FELs) depend on the populations of atomic levels. Calculations of plasma emission and ionization may be simplified by assuming Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), where populations are given by the Saha-Boltzmann equation. LTE can be achieved at high densities when collisional processes are much more significant than radiative processes, but may not be valid if plasma conditions change rapidly. A collisional-radiative model has been used to calculate the times taken by carbon and iron plasmas to reach LTE at varying densities and heating rates. The effect of different energy deposition methods, as well as Ionization Potential Depression are explored. This work shows regimes in rapidly changing plasmas, such as those created by optical lasers and FELs, where the use of LTE is justified, because timescales for plasma changes are significantly longer than the times needed to achieve an LTE ionization balance.

  16. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peggs, Stephen G. (Port Jefferson, NY); Brennan, J. Michael (East Northport, NY); Tuozzolo, Joseph E. (Sayville, NY); Zaltsman, Alexander (Commack, NY)

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  17. Rapidly rotating neutron stars in $R$-squared gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S; Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $f(R)$ theories of gravity are one of the most popular alternative explanations for dark energy and therefore studying the possible astrophysical implications of these theories is an important task. In the present paper we make a substantial advance in this direction by considering rapidly rotating neutron stars in $R^2$ gravity. The results are obtained numerically and the method we use is non-perturbative and self-consistent. The neutron star properties, such as mass, radius and moment of inertia, are studied in detail and the results show that rotation magnifies the deviations from general relativity and the maximum mass and moment of inertia can reach very high values. This observation is similar to previous studies of rapidly rotating neutron stars in other alternative theories of gravity, such as the scalar-tensor theories, and it can potentially lead to strong astrophysical manifestations.

  18. Rapid mapping tool : an ArcMap extension /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linger, S. P. (Steve P.); Rich, P. M. (Paul M.); Walther, D. (Douglas); Witkowski, M. S. (Marc S.); Jones, M. A. (Marcia A.); Khalsa, H. S. (Hari S.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cartographic production laboratories produce large volumes of maps for diverse customers. Turnaround time and consistency are key concerns. The Rapid Mapping Tool is an ArcMap based tool that enables rapid creation of maps to meet customer needs. This tool was constructed using VB/VBA, ArcObjects, and ArcGIS templates. The core capability of ArcMap is extended for custom map production by storing specifications associated with a map or template in a companion XML document. These specifications include settings and preferences used to create custom maps. The tool was developed as a component of an enterprise GIS, which enables spatial data management and delivery using ArcSDE, ArcIMS, Oracle, and a web-based request tracking system.

  19. Mold susceptibility of rapidly renewable materials used in wall construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Aaron McGill

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................................................................................................................................70 viii viii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Mold remediation work following Hurricane Katrina (Szabo, 2006). ............... 6 Figure 2. Mushroom/perlite composite insulation growing in a dish (Chua, 2007)........ 14 Figure 3... & Sterling, 1997; Pugliese, 2006). Rapidly renewable products, due to their high cellulose and carbohydrate content, are highly susceptible to mold when exposed to moisture. Therefore, these materials may not be a part of a good long-term solution...

  20. Rapid consumption of bromine oxidants in river and estuarine waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworske, D.A.; Helz, G.R.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluvial and estuarine waters possess a substantial reductive capacity that rapidly destroys strong oxidants introduced from natural or anthropogenic sources. The rapid reduction of bromine oxidants, which in marine waters are intermediates in the decomposition of both chlorine and ozone, has been studied electrochemically in the field and the laboratory with a rotating ring disk electrode. Patuxent estuary water was found to contain about 10/sup -5/ M of substances that reacted extremely rapidly with bromine. Estimated second-order rate constants were on the order of 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ or higher. Bromine consumption did not correlate with salinity, nor was it altered by addition of 10/sup -4/ M ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or by ultrafiltration. However, destruction of organic matter by UV photolysis eliminated bromine consumption on the 10/sup -2/ s time scale of the experiments. Likewise, the bromine-consuming components could be titrated away with HOBr, indicating that they are not catalysts. Commercially available humic acid behaved qualitatively in a similar fashion to the natural reductants.

  1. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY AIR FILTER SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Noyes, G.; Culligan, B.

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in air filter results were reported in {approx}4 hours with excellent quality.

  2. The design evaluation of inductive power-transformer for personal rapid transit by measuring impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Kyung-Hee [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electricity and Signaling, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang, Kyonggi 437-050 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Song [Department of Electricity and Signaling, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang, Kyonggi 437-050 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Soo-Hyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contact-less inductive power transformer (IPT) uses the principle of electromagnetic induction. The concept of the IPT for vehicles such as the personal rapid transit (PRT) system is proposed and some suggestions for power collector design of IPT to improve power transfer performance are presented in this paper. The aim of this paper is to recommend the concept of IPT for vehicles such as the PRT system and also to present some propositions for the power collector design of the IPT, which is to improve the power transfer performance. Generally, there are diverse methods to evaluate transfer performance of the traditional transformers. Although the principle of IPT is similar to that of the general transformer, it is impossible to apply the methods directly because of large air gap. The system must be compensated by resonant circuit due to the large air gap. Consequently, it is difficult to apply numerical formulas to the magnetic design of IPT systems. This paper investigates the magnetic design of a PRT system using three-dimensional magnetic modeling and measurements of the pick-up coupling coefficient and its impedances. In addition, how the use of Litz wire and leakage inductance is related will be observed through experiment and simulation.

  3. Improved Fischer-Tropsch Slurry Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons or alcohols involves highly exothermic reactions. Temperature control is a critical issue in these reactors for a number of reasons. Runaway reactions can be a serious safety issue, even raising the possibility of an explosion. Catalyst deactivation rates tend to increase with temperature, particularly of there are hot spots in the reactor. For alcohol synthesis, temperature control is essential because it has a large effect on the selectivity of the catalysts toward desired products. For example, for molybdenum disulfide catalysts unwanted side products such as methane, ethane, and propane are produced in much greater quantities if the temperature increases outside an ideal range. Slurry reactors are widely regarded as an efficient design for these reactions. In a slurry reactor a solid catalyst is suspended in an inert hydrocarbon liquid, synthesis gas is sparged into the bottom of the reactor, un-reacted synthesis gas and light boiling range products are removed as a gas stream, and heavy boiling range products are removed as a liquid stream. This configuration has several positive effects for synthesis gas reactions including: essentially isothermal operation, small catalyst particles to reduce heat and mass transfer effects, capability to remove heat rapidly through liquid vaporization, and improved flexibility on catalyst design through physical mixtures in addition to use of compositions that cannot be pelletized. Disadvantages include additional mass transfer resistance, potential for significant back-mixing on both the liquid and gas phases, and bubble coalescence. In 2001 a multiyear project was proposed to develop improved FT slurry reactors. The planned focus of the work was to improve the reactors by improving mass transfer while considering heat transfer issues. During the first year of the project the work was started and several concepts were developed to prepare for bench-scale testing. PowerEnerCat was unable to raise their cash contribution for the project, and the work was stopped. This report summarizes some of the progress of the project and the concepts that were intended for experimental tests.

  4. Ca{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Ge, a new fully ordered ternary Laves phase structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doverbratt, Isa, E-mail: isa.doverbratt@polymat.lth.se [Centre for Analysis and Synthesis, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Ponou, Simeon; Lidin, Sven [Centre for Analysis and Synthesis, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compound, Ca{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Ge, was prepared as a part of a systematic investigation of the Ca-Pd-Ge ternary phase diagram. The structure was determined and refined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It is a new fully ordered ternary Laves phase with the space group R-3m, Z=3, a=5.6191 (5) A, c=12.1674 (7) A, wR{sub 2}=0.054 (all data) and is isostructural to Mg{sub 2}Ni{sub 3}Si (Noreus et al., 1985 [17]) but due to the larger size of all elements in Ca{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Ge, the cell axes are approximately 10% longer. The compound may formally be considered as a Zintl compound, with [Pd{sub 3}Ge]{sup 4-} forming a poly-anionic network and divalent Ca cations located in truncated tetrahedral interstices. The electronic structure and chemical bonding of Ca{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Ge is discussed in terms of LMTO band structure calculations and compared with CaPd{sub 2} (MgCu{sub 2}-type). - Graphical abstract: The title compound, Ca{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Ge is a new fully ordered ternary Laves phase which may formally be considered as a Zintl compound, with [Pd{sub 3}Ge]{sup 4-} forming a poly-anionic network and divalent Ca cations located in truncated tetrahedral interstices. The structure is composed of Kagome net layers, consisting of Pd atoms only, which are stacked in an ABC sequence. Band structure calculations show that the Fermi level is located at a local minimum of the DOS (pseudo-gap) indicating that the charge is roughly optimized in the structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Site specific segregation in a Laves phase that is also a Zintl phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pseudo-gap at the Fermi level in a Laves phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distorted Frank-Kasper polyhedron.

  5. HCCI Load Expansion Opportunities Using a Fully Variable HVA Research Engine to Guide Developments of a Production Intent Cam-Based VVA Engine: The Low Load Limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weall, Adam J [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi; Moore, Wayne [Delphi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000rpm. Using different injection strategies, including the NVO pilot injection approach, the single-cylinder engine is operated over a load range from 160-390 kPa net IMEP at 2000 rpm. Changes to valve opening duration on the single-cylinder HVA engine illustrate opportunities for load expansion and efficiency improvement at certain conditions. For instance, the low load limit can be extended on the HVA engine by reducing breathing and operating closer to a stoichiometric air fuel ratio (AFR) by using valve deactivation. The naturally aspirated engine used here without external EGR confirmed that as operating load increases the emissions of NOx increases due to combustion temperature. NOx emissions are found to be one limitation to the maximum load limitation, the other being high pressure rise rate. It is found that the configuration of the production intent cam-based system represents a good compromise between valve lift and duration in the low to medium load region. Changing the extent of charge motion and breathing via valve deactivation prove beneficial at moderating the pressure rise rate and combustion stability and extending the low load limit at 2000rpm on the HVA engine. It also confirms that strategies using a pilot fuel injection are beneficial at low operating loads but that as operating load is increased, the benefits of multiple injection diminish to the point where a single injection offers the best performance.

  6. HCCI Load Expansion Opportunities using a Fully Variable HVA Research Engine to Guide Development of a Production Intent Cam-based VVA Engine: The Low Load Limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weall, Adam J [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL] [ORNL; Foster, Matthew [Delphi] [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi] [Delphi; Moore, Wayne [Delphi] [Delphi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the potential emissions and efficiency benefits of HCCI combustion are well known, realizing the potentials on a production intent engine presents numerous challenges. In this study we focus on identifying challenges and opportunities associated with a production intent cam-based variable valve actuation (VVA) system on a multi-cylinder engine in comparison to a fully flexible, naturally aspirated, hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) system on a single-cylinder engine, with both platforms sharing the same GDI fueling system and engine geometry. The multi-cylinder production intent VVA system uses a 2-step cam technology with wide authority cam phasing, allowing adjustments to be made to the negative valve overlap (NVO) duration but not the valve opening durations. On the single cylinder HVA engine, the valve opening duration and lift are variable in addition to the NVO duration. The content of this paper is limited to the low-medium operating load region at 2000rpm. Using different injection strategies, including the NVO pilot injection approach, the single-cylinder engine is operated over a load range from 160-390 kPa net IMEP at 2000 rpm. Changes to valve opening duration on the single-cylinder HVA engine illustrate opportunities for load expansion and efficiency improvement at certain conditions. For instance, the low load limit can be extended on the HVA engine by reducing breathing and operating closer to a stoichiometric air fuel ratio (AFR) by using valve deactivation. The naturally aspirated engine used here without external EGR confirmed that as operating load increases the emissions of NOx increases due to combustion temperature. NOx emissions are found to be one limitation to the maximum load limitation, the other being high pressure rise rate. It is found that the configuration of the production intent cam-based system represents a good compromise between valve lift and duration in the low to medium load region. Changing the extent of charge motion and breathing via valve deactivation prove beneficial at moderating the pressure rise rate and combustion stability and extending the low load limit at 2000rpm on the HVA engine. It also confirms that strategies using a pilot fuel injection are beneficial at low operating loads but that as operating load is increased, the benefits of multiple injection diminish to the point where a single injection offers the best performance.

  7. Black Carbon and Kerosene Lighting: An Opportunity for Rapid Action on Climate Change and Clean Energy for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Arne [Humboldt State Univ., MN (United States). Schatz Energy Research Center; Bond, Tami C. [Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lam, Nicholoas L. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health Sciences; Hultman, Nathan [The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing inefficient kerosene lighting with electric lighting or other clean alternatives can rapidly achieve development and energy access goals, save money and reduce climate warming. Many of the 250 million households that lack reliable access to electricity rely on inefficient and dangerous simple wick lamps and other kerosene-fueled light sources, using 4 to 25 billion liters of kerosene annually to meet basic lighting needs. Kerosene costs can be a significant household expense and subsidies are expensive. New information on kerosene lamp emissions reveals that their climate impacts are substantial. Eliminating current annual black carbon emissions would provide a climate benefit equivalent to 5 gigatons of carbon dioxide reductions over the next 20 years. Robust and low-cost technologies for supplanting simple wick and other kerosene-fueled lamps exist and are easily distributed and scalable. Improving household lighting offers a low-cost opportunity to improve development, cool the climate and reduce costs.

  8. Rapidity losses in heavy-ion collisions from AGS to RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. C. Zhou; Z. B. Yin; D. C. Zhou

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the rapidity losses in central heavy-ion collisions from AGS to RHIC energies with the mean rapidity determined from the projectile net-baryon distribution after collisions. The projectile net-baryon distribution in the full rapidity range was obtained by removing the target contribution phenomenologically at forward rapidity region from the experimental net-baryon measurements and taking into account the projectile contribution at backward rapidity region. Based on the full projectile net-baryon distributions, calculation results show that the rapidity loss stops increasing from the SPS top energy to RHIC energies, indicating that baryon transport does not depend strongly on energy at high energies.

  9. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  10. Improve Your Boiler's Combustion Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on boiler combustion efficiency provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  11. Improving Solar-Cell Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Improving Solar Cell Efficiency October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share The two-dimensional grazing...

  12. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  13. Rapid Radiochemical Analyses in Support of Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 13196

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Building 735-B, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples [1, 2]. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90}Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation [3, 4]. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ?0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the ± 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA [5, 6, 7] Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples [8]. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. [9, 10] Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid te

  14. RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing need to develop faster analytical methods for emergency response, including emergency soil and air filter samples. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed analyses on samples received from Japan in April, 2011 as part of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to provide assistance to the government of Japan, following the nuclear event at Fukushima Daiichi, resulting from the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Of particular concern was whether it was safe to plant rice in certain areas (prefectures) near Fukushima. The primary objectives of the sample collection, sample analysis, and data assessment teams were to evaluate personnel exposure hazards, identify the nuclear power plant radiological source term and plume deposition, and assist the government of Japan in assessing any environmental and agricultural impacts associated with the nuclear event. SRNL analyzed approximately 250 samples and reported approximately 500 analytical method determinations. Samples included soil from farmland surrounding the Fukushima reactors and air monitoring samples of national interest, including those collected at the U.S. Embassy and American military bases. Samples were analyzed for a wide range of radionuclides, including strontium-89, strontium-90, gamma-emitting radionuclides, and plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes. Technical aspects of the rapid soil and air filter analyses will be described. The extent of radiostrontium contamination was a significant concern. For {sup 89,90}Sr analyses on soil samples, a rapid fusion technique using 1.5 gram soil aliquots to enable a Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of <1 pCi {sup 89,90} Sr /g of soil was employed. This sequential technique has been published recently by this laboratory for actinides and radiostrontium in soil and vegetation. It consists of a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion, pre-concentration steps using iron hydroxide and calcium fluoride precipitations, followed by Sr-Resin separation and gas flow proportional counting. To achieve a lower detection limit for analysis of some of the Japanese soil samples, a 10 gram aliquot of soil was taken, acid-leached and processed with similar preconcentration chemistry. The MDA using this approach was ~0.03 pCi/g (1.1 mBq/g)/, which is less than the 0.05-0.10 pCi/g {sup 90}Sr levels found in soil as a result of global fallout. The chemical yields observed for the Japanese soil samples was typically 75-80% and the laboratory control sample (LCS) and matrix spike (MS) results looked very good for this work Individual QC results were well within the ± 25% acceptable range and the average of these results does not show significant bias. Additional data for a radiostrontium in soil method for 50 gram samples will also be presented, which appears to be a significant step forward based on looking at the current literature, with higher chemical yields for even larger sample aliquots and lower MDA. Hou et al surveyed a wide range of separation methods for Pu in waters and environmental solid samples. While there are many actinide methods in the scientific literature, few would be considered rapid due to the tedious and time-consuming steps involved. For actinide analyses in soil, a new rapid method for the determination of actinide isotopes in soil samples using both alpha spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry was employed. The new rapid soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using these two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates were used to reduce analytical time. Challenges associated with the mineral content in the volcanic soil will be discussed. Air filter samples were reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The r

  15. Fully automated dual-frequency three-pulse-echo 2DIR spectrometer accessing spectral range from 800 to 4000 wavenumbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leger, Joel D.; Nyby, Clara M.; Varner, Clyde; Tang, Jianan; Rubtsova, Natalia I.; Yue, Yuankai; Kireev, Victor V.; Burtsev, Viacheslav D.; Qasim, Layla N.; Rubtsov, Igor V., E-mail: irubtsov@tulane.edu [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Rubtsov, Grigory I. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel dual-frequency two-dimensional infrared instrument is designed and built that permits three-pulse heterodyned echo measurements of any cross-peak within a spectral range from 800 to 4000 cm{sup ?1} to be performed in a fully automated fashion. The superior sensitivity of the instrument is achieved by a combination of spectral interferometry, phase cycling, and closed-loop phase stabilization accurate to ?70 as. The anharmonicity of smaller than 10{sup ?4} cm{sup ?1} was recorded for strong carbonyl stretching modes using 800 laser shot accumulations. The novel design of the phase stabilization scheme permits tuning polarizations of the mid-infrared (m-IR) pulses, thus supporting measurements of the angles between vibrational transition dipoles. The automatic frequency tuning is achieved by implementing beam direction stabilization schemes for each m-IR beam, providing better than 50 ?rad beam stability, and novel scheme for setting the phase-matching geometry for the m-IR beams at the sample. The errors in the cross-peak amplitudes associated with imperfect phase matching conditions and alignment are found to be at the level of 20%. The instrument can be used by non-specialists in ultrafast spectroscopy.

  16. Transmission grid extensions during the build-up of a fully renewable pan-European electricity supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatio-temporal generation patterns for wind and solar photovoltaic power in Europe are used to investigate the future rise in transmission needs with an increasing penetration of these variable renewable energy sources (VRES) on the pan-European electricity system. VRES growth predictions according to the official National Renewable Energy Action Plans of the EU countries are used and extrapolated logistically up to a fully VRES-supplied power system. We find that keeping today's international net transfer capacities (NTCs) fixed over the next forty years reduces the final need for backup energy by 13% when compared to the situation with no NTCs. An overall doubling of today's NTCs will lead to a 26% reduction, and an overall quadrupling to a 33% reduction. The remaining need for backup energy is due to correlations in the generation patterns, and cannot be further reduced by transmission. The main investments in transmission lines are due during the ramp-up of VRES from 15% (as planned for 2020) to 80%. Add...

  17. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Zeyer, Timo; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin; Jacobson, Mark Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind and solar PV generation data for the entire contiguous US are calculated, on the basis of 32 years of weather data with temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of 40x40km$^2$, assuming site-suitability-based as well as stochastic wind and solar PV capacity distributions throughout the country. These data are used to investigate a fully renewable electricity system, resting primarily upon wind and solar PV power. We find that the seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar PV comes at around 80% solar PV share, owing to the US summer load peak. By picking this mix, long-term storage requirements can be more than halved compared to a wind only mix. The daily optimal mix lies at about 80% wind share due to the nightly gap in solar PV production. Picking this mix instead of solar only reduces backup energy needs by about 50%. Furthermore, we calculate shifts in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to their differing resour...

  18. Fully quantum mechanical description of proteins in solution. Combining linear scaling quantum mechanical methodologies with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogonea, V.; Merz, K.M. Jr. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the authors report a method for solving the Schroedinger equation for large molecules in solution which involved merging a linear scaling divide and conquer (D and C) semiempirical algorithm with the Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation. They then assess the performance of their self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) approach by comparing the D and C-PB calculations for a set of 29 neutral and 36 charged molecules with those obtained by ab initio GVB and DFT (B3LYP) methods, Cramer and Truhlar`s semiempirical generalized-Born SM5 model, and with the experimental solvation free energies. Furthermore, the authors show that their SCRF method can be used to perform fully quantum mechanical calculations of proteins in solution in a reasonable amount of time on a modern workstation. They believe that all electrostatic interactions in biological systems require a quantum mechanical description in order to obtain an accurate representation. Thus, their new SCRF method should have an impact on the computational study of physical and chemical phenomena occurring in proteins and nuclei acids, which are, in general, strongly influenced by electrostatic interactions. Moreover, this may lead to novel insights into classic problems like protein folding or drug design.

  19. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  20. Initial comparison of leach behavior between fully radioactive and simulated nuclear waste glasses through long-term testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of glass reactivity between radioactive sludge based and simulated nuclear waste glasses has been made through long-term testing of both glass types for SRL 165, SRL 131, and SRL 200 frit compositions. The data demonstrate that for time periods through 280 days, differences in elemental release to solution up to 400% are observed. However, in general, differences in glass reactivity as measured by the release of boron, lithium, and sodium are less than a factor of two. The differences in reactivity are not large enough to alter the order of glass durability for the different compositions or to change the controlling glass dissolution mechanism. A radiation effect exists, mainly in the influence on the leachate pH, which in turn affects the glass reaction mechanism and rate. The differences in reactivity between fully radioactive and the simulated glasses can be reasonably explained if the controlling reaction mechanism is accounted for. Those differences are glass composition and leaching mechanism dependent. Lithium is found to have the highest elemental release in an ion-exchange dominated glass reaction process, while lithium has a lower release than boron and sodium in a matrix dissolution dominated process, where boron and sodium are usually among the most concentrated solution species.

  1. Solution-borne colloids from drip tests using actinide-doped and fully-radioactive waste glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortner, J.A.; Wolf, S.F.; Buck, E.C.; Mertz, C.J.; Bates, J.K.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Drip tests designed to replicate the synergistic interactions between waste glass, repository groundwater, water vapor, and sensitized 304L stainless steel in the potential Yucca Mountain Repository have been ongoing in our laboratory for over ten years. Results will be presented from three sets of these drip tests: two with actinide-doped glasses, and one with a fully-radioactive glass. Periodic sampling of these tests have revealed trends in actinide release behavior that are consistent with their entrainment in colloidal material when as-cast glass is reacted. Results from vapor hydrated glass show that initially the actinides are completely dissolved in solution, but as the reaction proceeds, the actinides become suspended in solution. Sequential filtering and alpha spectroscopy of colloid-bearing leachate solutions indicate that more than 80 percent of the plutonium and americium are bound to particles that are captured by a 0. 1 gm filter, while less than 10 percent of the neptunium is stopped by a 0. 1 gm filter. Analytical transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine particles from leachate solutions and to identify several actinide-bearing phases which are responsible for the majority of actinide release during glass corrosion.

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 52, NO. 4, AUGUST 2005 839 RX64DTH --A Fully Integrated 64-Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramello, Luciano

    radiology (contrast improve- ment, dose reduction) [1]­[5]. Manuscript received November 14, 2004; revised 64-Channel ASIC for a Digital X-ray Imaging System With Energy Window Selection P. Grybos, A. E diagnostic applications such as dual energy mammography and angiography. Index Terms--ASIC, digital X

  3. A rapid solvothermal synthesis of cerium oxide hollow spheres and characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempaiah Devaraju, Murukanahally, E-mail: devarajumk@rediffmail.com [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Liu, Xiangwen; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)] [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An easy and size controlled solvothermal synthesis of CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres is still a challenge in the area of materials synthesis. Here, CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres have been synthesized using PVA500 as a surfactant via solvothermal reaction followed by calcinations. The size of CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres could be controlled from 500 to 150 nm by changing the amounts of Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O and PVA500. The possible growth mechanism of CeO{sub 2} hollow sphere was explained. The CO oxidation catalytic activity of the CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres were superior to that of the commercial CeO{sub 2} powder due to the high specific surface area and small crystallite size. - Graphical abstract: A rapid and easy way to prepare CeO{sub 2} hollow sphere with 150-500 nm in diameter was successfully achieved by solvothermal reaction. The prepared particles showed hollowness due to Ostwald ripening process. An improved catalytic activity was observed and discussed. Highlights: A rapid synthesis of CeO{sub 2} hollow spheres with diameter size from 15 to 500 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cheap surfactant was used to prepare hollow spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of temperature and surfactant ratio were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematic characterization by XRD, FESEM, TEM, TG, FTIR and UV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CO oxidation analysis results showed better catalytic activity.

  4. Rapid Risk Assessment: FY05 Annual Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Millard, W. David; Gelston, Gariann M.; Pelton, Mitch A.; Yang, Zhaoqing; Strenge, Dennis L.; Lee, Cheegwan; Sivaraman, Chitra; Simpson, Mary J.; Young, Joan K.; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Downing, Timothy R.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Hachmeister, Lon E.

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing decision support tools that will assist in the transition of incident information into Protective Action Recommendations (PARs) that are understandable and can be executed in a real-world, operational environment. During emergencies, responders must rapidly assess risks and decide on the best course of action—all within minutes to hours. PNNL is blending existing modeling and decision support technology to develop new methods for transitioning science-based threat assessment to PARs. The rapid risk assessment tool will be both understandable and applicable to the emergency management community and would be a valuable tool during any water security-related incident. In 2005, PNNL demonstrated the integration of the multi-thematic modeling with emergency management decision support tools to create a Rapid Risk Assessment (RRA) tool that will transition risk to PARs that assist in responding to or mitigating the direct and indirect impacts of the incident(s). The RRA tool does this by aligning multi-thematic modeling capabilities with real-world response zones established by emergency and site operations managers. The RRA tool uses the risk assessment tool to drive prognostic models that use the type of incident, time of impact, severity of impact, and duration of impact to select the most appropriate PAR. Because PARs (and the thresholds by which they are selected) are jointly established by the technologists and the emergency management and operations decision makers, the science-based risk assessment can transition into a recommendation that can be understood and executed by people in the field.

  5. The azimuthal decorrelation of jets widely separated in rapidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B.; D0 Collaboration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the azimuthal decorrelation between jets with pseudorapidity separation up to six units. The data were accumulated using the D0 detector during the 1994-1995 collider run of the Fermilab Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The data are compared to two parton shower Monte Carlos (HERWIG and PYTHIA) and an analytical prediction using the leading logarithmic BFKL resummation. The final state jets as predicted by the parton showering Monte Carlos describe the data over the entire pseudorapidity range studied. The prediction based on the leading logarithmic BFKL resummation shows more decorrelation than the data as the rapidity interval increases.

  6. Rapid Proton Transfer Mediated by a Strong Laser Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markevitch, Alexei N.; Levis, Robert J. [Department of Chemistry, Center for Advanced Photonics Research, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Romanov, Dmitri A. [Department of Physics, Center for Advanced Photonics Research, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Smith, Stanley M. [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic energy distributions of H{sup +} ejected from a polyatomic molecule, anthraquinone, subjected to 60 fs, 800 nm laser pulses of intensity between 0.2 and 4.0x10{sup 14} W{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, reveal field-driven restructuring of the molecule prior to Coulomb explosion. Calculations demonstrate fast intramolecular proton migration into a field-dressed metastable potential energy minimum. The proton migration occurs in the direction perpendicular to the polarization of the laser field. Rapid field-mediated isomerization is an important new phenomenon in coupling of polyatomic molecules with intense lasers.

  7. Rapid automatic keyword extraction for information retrieval and analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Stuart J (Richland, WA); Cowley,; Wendy E (Richland, WA); Crow, Vernon L (Richland, WA); Cramer, Nicholas O (Richland, WA)

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for rapid automatic keyword extraction for information retrieval and analysis. Embodiments can include parsing words in an individual document by delimiters, stop words, or both in order to identify candidate keywords. Word scores for each word within the candidate keywords are then calculated based on a function of co-occurrence degree, co-occurrence frequency, or both. Based on a function of the word scores for words within the candidate keyword, a keyword score is calculated for each of the candidate keywords. A portion of the candidate keywords are then extracted as keywords based, at least in part, on the candidate keywords having the highest keyword scores.

  8. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Instrumentation for Rapid Aerial Photo System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research will proposed a new kind of relatively low cost autonomous UAV that will enable farmers to make just in time mosaics of aerial photo of their crop. These mosaics of aerial photo should be able to be produced with relatively low cost and within the 24 hours of acquisition constraint. The autonomous UAV will be equipped with payload management system specifically developed for rapid aerial mapping. As mentioned before turn around time is the key factor, so accuracy is not the main focus (not orthorectified aerial mapping). This system will also be equipped with special software to post process the aerial photos to produce the mosaic aerial photo map

  9. Medial-Axis Biased Rapidly-Exploring Random Trees 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greco, Evan

    2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1998, 1998. [3] S. A. Wilmarth, N. M. Amato, and P. F. Stiller, MAPRM: A probabilistic roadmap planner with sampling on the medial axis of the free space. In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom. (ICRA), vol. 2, pp. 1024{1031, 1999. [4] J. J. Ku?ner and S.... M. LaValle, RRT-Connect: An eĆcient approach to single- query path planning. In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Robot. Autom. (ICRA), pp. 995{1001, 2000. [5] S. Rodriguez, X. Tang, J. M. Lien, and N. M. Amato, An obstacle-based rapidly- exploring random tree...

  10. Rapid heating and cooling in two-dimensional Yukawa systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan Feng; Bin Liu; J. Goree

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations are reported to investigate solid superheating and liquid supercooling of two-dimensional (2D) systems with a Yukawa interparticle potential. Motivated by experiments where a dusty plasma is heated and then cooled suddenly, we track particle motion using a simulation with Langevin dynamics. Hysteresis is observed when the temperature is varied rapidly in a heating and cooling cycle. As in the experiment, transient solid superheating, but not liquid supercooling, is observed. Solid superheating, which is characterized by solid structure above the melting point, is found to be promoted by a higher rate of temperature increase.

  11. Rapid transport of East Asian pollution to the deep tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashfold, M. J.; Pyle, J. A.; Robinson, A. D.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Phang, S. M.; Samah, A. A.; Ong, S.; Ung, H. E.; Peng, L. K.; Yong, S. E.; Harris, N. R. P.

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2003; Hudman et al., 2004). East Asian pollution has also been shown to affect atmospheric composition further afield,25 in both western North America (Cooper et al., 2010) and Hawaii (Lin et al., 2014). 30707 ACPD 14, 30705–30726, 2014 Rapid transport... – 2010, doi:10.1029/95JD00025, 1996. 30707 Aschmann, J., Sinnhuber, B.-M., Atlas, E. L., and Schauffler, S. M.: Modeling the transport of very short-lived substances into the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere,10 Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 9237...

  12. Rapid substitution of gold for aluminum metallization on integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasopoulos, A.V. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Li, J.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid procedure for substitution of gold for aluminum metallization on integrated solid-state circuits, such as solid-state chemical multisensor chips, has been developed. The final product consists of original aluminum overlaid with nickel and gold, both deposited by an electroless process. The final metallization is chemically inert and the resistance of the contacts remains ohmic and unchanged from the original value. The substitution can be performed either at the wafer or at the chip level. After the plasma etching, the metallization process takes only 25 min.

  13. File:RAPID Toolkit Flyer.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  14. File:RAPID Toolkit Flyer.pdf | Open Energy Information

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  15. Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-h | Open Energy Information

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  1. RAPID/Roadmap/19-TX-d | Open Energy Information

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  4. RAPID/Roadmap/3-FD-e | Open Energy Information

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  5. RAPID/Roadmap/3-TX-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. RAPID/Roadmap/3-TX-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. RAPID/Roadmap/8 (1) | Open Energy Information

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  8. RAPID/Roadmap/8-TX-f | Open Energy Information

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  9. RAPID/Roadmap/9 (1) | Open Energy Information

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  10. RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Getting Started | Open Energy Information

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  11. RAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory andb

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-a | Open Energy Information

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  19. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-b | Open Energy Information

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  20. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-c | Open Energy Information

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  1. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-e | Open Energy Information

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  2. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Rapid Deployment Shelter System | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnicalPurchase, Delivery,Assistance ProgramLivingstonRandallRapid

  4. East Grand Rapids, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  5. Rapid Solar Mirror Characterization with Fringe Reflection Techniques -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Cedar Rapids, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  7. Working with SRNL - Our Facilities- Rapid Fabrication Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Texas | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation Texas < RAPID‎RAPID/Geothermal/Water

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/12-FD-i | Open Energy Information

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  10. RAPID/Roadmap/14-AK-c | Open Energy Information

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  11. RAPID/Roadmap/14-AK-d | Open Energy Information

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  12. RAPID/Roadmap/14-AZ-b | Open Energy Information

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  13. RAPID/Roadmap/14-CA-a | Open Energy Information

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  14. RAPID/Roadmap/14-CA-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. RAPID/Roadmap/14-CO-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14a <db

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-CO-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14a

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/14-CO-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14ad <

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/14-FD-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14ad

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/14-FD-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14adFD-c

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/14-HI-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14adFD-ca

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/14-HI-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a <RAPID/Roadmap/14adFD-cad

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d <

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d <a

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d <ae

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d <aec

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NM-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc <

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc <d

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/14-NV-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc <de

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/14-OR-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dc

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/14-OR-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dcd <

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/14-OR-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dcd <f

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/14-TX-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-aRAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-dcd

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ |g <RAPID/Roadmap/19-WA-c

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-g <

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-h | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-g <h

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-i | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-g

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎ |

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/7-HI-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎ |b

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/7-ID-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎ |bc

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/7-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/7-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎c

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/7-OR-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎cb

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/7-OR-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k < RAPID‎cbd

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/7-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/7-TX-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-c <

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/7-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-c <WA-a

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/8-AZ-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-c

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/8-CA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-ca <

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/8-CA-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-ca <d

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/8-CA-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-ca <df

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/8-CO-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-ca <dfa

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/8-CO-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-ca <dfac

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/8-FD-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-ca

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/8-HI-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-a <

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/8-ID-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-a

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aa

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aac

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aacd

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aacdf

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NV-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aacdfc

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NV-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/8-OR-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc < RAPID‎ |

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/8-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc < RAPID‎

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/8-UT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc < RAPID‎a

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/8-UT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc < RAPID‎ac

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/8-WA-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc <

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc <

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-kc

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-i | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-j | Open Energy Information

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  12. RAPID/Roadmap/9-FD-k | Open Energy Information

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  13. RAPID/Roadmap/9-HI-a | Open Energy Information

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  14. RAPID/Roadmap/9-ID-a | Open Energy Information

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  15. RAPID/Roadmap/9-OR-a | Open Energy Information

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  16. RAPID/Roadmap/9-WA-a | Open Energy Information

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  17. RAPID/Roadmap/9-WA-b | Open Energy Information

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  18. RAPID/Roadmap/9-WA-c | Open Energy Information

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  19. RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Sections | Open Energy Information

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  20. RAPID/Solar/Environment/California | Open Energy Information

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