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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Rankine cycle system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system uses a receiver with a maximum liquid working fluid level lower than the minimum liquid working fluid level of a sub-cooler of the waste heat recovery system. The receiver may have a position that is physically lower than the sub-cooler's position. A valve controls transfer of fluid between several of the components in the waste heat recovery system, especially from the receiver to the sub-cooler. The system may also have an associated control module.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

2

Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

3

Organic rankine cycle system for use with a reciprocating engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a waste heat recovery system wherein an organic rankine cycle system uses waste heat from the fluids of a reciprocating engine, provision is made to continue operation of the engine even during periods when the organic rankine cycle system is inoperative, by providing an auxiliary pump and a bypass for the refrigerant flow around the turbine. Provision is also made to divert the engine exhaust gases from the evaporator during such periods of operation. In one embodiment, the auxiliary pump is made to operate simultaneously with the primary pump during normal operations, thereby allowing the primary pump to operate at lower speeds with less likelihood of cavitation.

Radcliff, Thomas D.; McCormick, Duane; Brasz, Joost J.

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Energy recovery system using an organic rankine cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermodynamic system for waste heat recovery, using an organic rankine cycle is provided which employs a single organic heat transferring fluid to recover heat energy from two waste heat streams having differing waste heat temperatures. Separate high and low temperature boilers provide high and low pressure vapor streams that are routed into an integrated turbine assembly having dual turbines mounted on a common shaft. Each turbine is appropriately sized for the pressure ratio of each stream.

Ernst, Timothy C

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Potassium Rankine cycle nuclear power systems for spacecraft and lunar-mass surface power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potassium Rankine cycle has high potential for application to nuclear power systems for spacecraft and surface power on the moon and Mars. A substantial effort on the development of Rankine cycle space power systems was carried out in the 1960`s. That effort is summarized and the status of the technology today is presented. Space power systems coupling Rankine cycle power conversion to both the SP-100 reactor and thermionic reactors as a combined power cycle are described in the paper.

Holcomb, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many efforts are currently being pursued to develop and implement new energy technologies aimed at meeting our national energy goals The use of organic Rankine cycle engines to generate power from waste heat provides a near term means to greatly...

Prasad, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Rankine Cycle to extract The theoretical Rankine Cycle efficiency (~R) is energy from low temperature waste heat. By 1968, a defined as: 3.8 megawatt unit using R-11 refrigerant was placed in commercial operation in Japan (2) and currently ?ZR.... Figure 2 compares the theo The basic Organic Rankine Cycle may be described retical Rankine efficiency for several hydrocarbons, using the Pressure-Enthalpy Diagram of a typical fluorocarbons and water within the evaporating working fluid (R-11). (See...

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Application and Operation of a 2-MW Organic Rankine Cycle System on a Refinery FCC Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nation's largest organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system was started up in July 1984 at a West Coast oil refinery. The system includes two hermetically sealed turbine-generator units, each rated at 1070 kW. Each turbine...

Drake, R. L.

9

Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

10

High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on Combustion Engines High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on...

11

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

Reduced gravity Rankine cycle system design and optimization study with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REDUCED GRAVITY RANKINE CYCLE SYSTEM DESIGN AND OPTIMIZATION STUDY WITH PASSIVE VORTEX PHASE SEPARATION A Thesis by KEVIN ROBERT SUPAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... SEPARATION A Thesis by KEVIN ROBERT SUPAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Frederick...

Supak, Kevin Robert

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cost Effective Waste Heat Organic Rankine Cycle Applications and Systems Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conceptually, the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power cycle has been well known to the engineering community for many years. Despite the rapid escalation of energy costs during the past decade, and a concerted, though somewhat belated, effort towards...

Rohrer, J. W.; Bronicki, L. Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Program for Geothermal Power Plant Cycles,'*for a Rankine Cycle Geothermal Power Plant," Proceedings,Design and Optimize Geothermal Power Cycles," presented at

Pope, William L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 2: Comparison of Wet and Dry Rankine Cycle Heat Rejection, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., regarding a system analysis comparing solar parabolic trough plants with wet and dry rankine cycle heat rejection.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Potassium Rankine cycle power conversion systems for lunar-Mars surface power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potassium Rankine cycle has good potential for application to nuclear power systems for surface power on the moon and Mars. A substantial effort on the development of the power conversion was carried out in the 1960`s which demonstrated successful operation of components made of stainless steel at moderate temperatures. This technology could be applied in the near term to produce a 360 kW(e) power system by coupling a stainless steel power conversion system to the SP-100 reactor. Improved performance could be realized in later systems by utilizing niobium or tantalum refractory metal alloys in the reactor and power conversion system. The design characteristics and estimated mass of power systems for each of three technology levels are presented in the paper. 8 refs.

Holcomb, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Rankine bottoming cycle safety analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vector Engineering Inc. conducted a safety and hazards analysis of three Rankine Bottoming Cycle Systems in public utility applications: a Thermo Electron system using Fluorinal-85 (a mixture of 85 mole % trifluoroethanol and 15 mole % water) as the working fluid; a Sundstrand system using toluene as the working fluid; and a Mechanical Technology system using steam and Freon-II as the working fluids. The properties of the working fluids considered are flammability, toxicity, and degradation, and the risks to both plant workers and the community at large are analyzed.

Lewandowski, G.A.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from a Heavy-Duty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rankine systems for automotive applications apply the same principle used worldwide in industry is then cooled by a condenser which transfers heat to an external cold sink. Most Rankine systems are designed to produce elec- tricity via a generator connected to the auxiliary network and/or an energy storage system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Emissions-critical charge cooling using an organic rankine cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides a system including a Rankine power cycle cooling subsystem providing emissions-critical charge cooling of an input charge flow. The system includes a boiler fluidly coupled to the input charge flow, an energy conversion device fluidly coupled to the boiler, a condenser fluidly coupled to the energy conversion device, a pump fluidly coupled to the condenser and the boiler, an adjuster that adjusts at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle subsystem to change a temperature of the input charge exiting the boiler, and a sensor adapted to sense a temperature characteristic of the vaporized input charge. The system includes a controller that can determine a target temperature of the input charge sufficient to meet or exceed predetermined target emissions and cause the adjuster to adjust at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle to achieve the predetermined target emissions.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Organic rankine cycle waste heat applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A machine designed as a centrifugal compressor is applied as an organic rankine cycle turbine by operating the machine in reverse. In order to accommodate the higher pressures when operating as a turbine, a suitable refrigerant is chosen such that the pressures and temperatures are maintained within established limits. Such an adaptation of existing, relatively inexpensive equipment to an application that may be otherwise uneconomical, allows for the convenient and economical use of energy that would be otherwise lost by waste heat to the atmosphere.

Brasz, Joost J.; Biederman, Bruce P.

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Modeling, design and analysis of micro-scale Rankine-based systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the modeling and design of two major types of micro Rankine-cycle-based machines: a single-Rankine-based power system and a waste-heat-driven cooler. As part of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ...

Cui, Ling, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Rankine and Brayton Cycle Cogeneration for Glass Melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparisons are made of the performance and installation costs of Rankine and Brayton power cycles when applied to waste heat recovery from a 350 ton/day container glass furnace. The power cycles investigation included: a) a conventional steam...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Sheth, P. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Design of an Open Rankine-Cycle Industrial Heat Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An open Rankine-cycle heat pump is ideally suited for producing low-pressure industrial process steam. Because steam serves as both the heat pump motive fluid and process fluid, the system achieves a unique simplicity and versatility...

Leibowitz, H. M.; Chaudoir, D. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Selection of Working Fluids for the Organic Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELECTION OF WORKING FLUIDS FOR THE ORGANIC RANKINE CYCLE H. H. West J. M. Patton Energy Analysts, Inc. Engineering Design Group Houston, Texas Tulsa, Oklahoma K. E. Starling The University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma ABSTRACT...

West, H. H.; Patton, J. M.; Starling, K. E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Development of a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes research and development currently underway to place the evaporator of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system directly in the path of a hot exhaust stream produced by a gas turbine engine. The main goal of this research effort is to improve cycle efficiency and cost by eliminating the usual secondary heat transfer loop. The projects technical objective is to eliminate the pumps, heat exchangers and all other added cost and complexity of the secondary loop by developing an evaporator that resides in the waste heat stream, yet virtually eliminates the risk of a working fluid leakage into the gaseous exhaust stream. The research team comprised of Idaho National Laboratory and General Electric Company engineers leverages previous research in advanced ORC technology to develop a new direct evaporator design that will reduce the ORC system cost by up to 15%, enabling the rapid adoption of ORCs for waste heat recovery.

Donna Post Guillen; Helge Klockow; Matthew Lehar; Sebastian Freund; Jennifer Jackson

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

Yoder, JR.G.L.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant (10) to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine (22) fluid inlet state which is substantially in the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line (46).

Pope, William L. (Walnut Creek, CA); Pines, Howard S. (El Cerrito, CA); Doyle, Padraic A. (Oakland, CA); Silvester, Lenard F. (Richmond, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

Ireland, Melissa Kara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Electricity from Geothermal Energy," Brown University,Simulation of Geothermal Energy Cycles), LBL publication-Manager), Economics "Geothermal Energy Conversion and Case

Pope, William L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Waste Heat Recovery by Organic Fluid Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ntry Temperature T 3 -t. cond?'lsotion L.-S Uql.id ctITlpressiCTI 6-7 htating in IiqJid state 7-1 boiling 2OO'C\\ ?-_...,( With fluids whose expansion is ending far from the saturation curve, to obtain good efficiency neces sitates the use of an exchanger-recuperator... been investigated for use in RANKINE Cycles, Many parameters must be ta ken into account in addition to the shape of the saturation curve just mentioned, Included are - chemical stability over the entire operating range. It depends not only...

Verneau, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

141 Open ORC Systemfor Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorof an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermodynamische Auslegung und transiente Simulation eines berkritischen Organic Rankine Cycles fr einen leistungsoptimierten Betrieb (KIT Scientific Reports ; 7674).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Niedertemperaturwrme im Bereich von 100 C - 200 C kann mittels Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC) zur Stromproduktion genutzt werden. Zur Untersuchung von Optimierungsmglichkeiten bei ORC-Prozessen (more)

Vetter, Christian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Rankine cycle condenser pressure control using an energy conversion device bypass valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery system and method in which pressure in a Rankine cycle (RC) system of the WHR system is regulated by diverting working fluid from entering an inlet of an energy conversion device of the RC system. In the system, an inlet of a controllable bypass valve is fluidly coupled to a working fluid path upstream of an energy conversion device of the RC system, and an outlet of the bypass valve is fluidly coupled to the working fluid path upstream of the condenser of the RC system such that working fluid passing through the bypass valve bypasses the energy conversion device and increases the pressure in a condenser. A controller determines the temperature and pressure of the working fluid and controls the bypass valve to regulate pressure in the condenser.

Ernst, Timothy C; Nelson, Christopher R; Zigan, James A

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Method of optimizing performance of Rankine cycle power plants. [US DOE Patent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for efficiently operating a Rankine cycle power plant to maximize fuel utilization efficiency or energy conversion efficiency or minimize costs by selecting a turbine fluid inlet state which is substantially on the area adjacent and including the transposed critical temperature line.

Pope, W.L.; Pines, H.S.; Doyle, P.A.; Silvester, L.F.

1980-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Altheim geothermal Plant for electricity production by Organic Rankine Cycle turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes the plan of the town Altheim in Upper Austria to produce electricity by an Organic Rankine Cycle-turbogenerator in the field of utilization of low temperatured thermal water. The aim of the project is to improve the technical and economic situation of the geothermal plant.

Pernecker, Gerhard; Ruhland, Johannes

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modeling Energy Recovery Using Thermoelectric Conversion Integrated with an Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot engine exhaust represents a resource that is often rejected to the environment without further utilization. This resource is most prevalent in the transportation sector, but stationary engine-generator systems also typically do not utilize this resource. Engine exhaust is a source of high grade thermal energy that can potentially be utilized by various approaches to produce electricity or to drive heating and cooling systems. This paper describes a model system that employs thermoelectric conversion as a topping cycle integrated with an organic Rankine bottoming cycle for waste heat utilization. This approach is being developed to fully utilize the thermal energy contained in hot exhaust streams. The model is composed of a high temperature heat exchanger which extracts thermal energy for driving the thermoelectric conversion elements. However, substantial sensible heat remains in the exhaust stream after emerging from the heat exchanger. The model incorporates a closely integrated bottoming cycle to utilize this remaining thermal energy in the exhaust stream. The model has many interacting parameters that define combined system quantities such as overall output power, efficiency, and total energy utilization factors. In addition, the model identifies a maximum power operating point for the system. That is, the model can identify the optimal amount of heat to remove from the exhaust flow to run through the thermoelectric elements. Removing too much or too little heat from the exhaust stream in this stage will reduce overall cycle performance. The model has been developed such that heat exchanger UAh values, thermal resistances, ZT values, and multiple thermoelectric elements can be investigated in the context of system operation. The model also has the ability to simultaneously determine the effect of each cycle design parameter on the performance of the overall system, thus giving the ability to utilize as much waste heat as possible. Key analysis results are presented showing the impact of critical design parameters on power output, system performance and inter-relationships between design parameters in governing performance.

Miller, Erik W.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Peterson, Richard B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic Rankine cycle waste heat power conversion system. Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat Recovery. Journal ofRankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing Processes.

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Carnot efficiencybetween these temperatures is: This provides an absolute upper limit to the Rankine cycle effi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Rankine cycle effi- ciency. Heat Absorbed from Stream 3 Power Produced by Steam Turbine Required Power a steam cycle alongsidethe gas turbine cycle. LITERATURE CITED Christodoulou,K., Diploma Thesis, N Output of Gas Turbine For the Gas Turbine Cycle Calculated for Case 2, Upper Exhaust Temperature T6

Liu, Y. A.

44

ECONOMICS AND FEASIBILITY OF RANKINE CYCLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), American Electric Company (AEP) and Parsons Energy and Chemical Group to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating coal fired steam power plants, known as Rankine Cycles, equipped with three different combustion systems: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}). Five steam cycles utilizing a wide range of steam conditions were used with these combustion systems. The motivation for this study was to establish through engineering analysis, the most cost-effective performance potential available through improvement in the Rankine Cycle steam conditions and combustion systems while at the same time ensuring that the most stringent emission performance based on CURC (Coal Utilization Research Council) 2010 targets are met: > 98% sulfur removal; < 0.05 lbm/MM-Btu NO{sub x}; < 0.01 lbm/MM-Btu Particulate Matter; and > 90% Hg removal. The final report discusses the results of a coal fired steam power plant project, which is comprised of two parts. The main part of the study is the analysis of ten (10) Greenfield steam power plants employing three different coal combustion technologies: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}) integrated with five different steam cycles. The study explores the technical feasibility, thermal performance, environmental performance, and economic viability of ten power plants that could be deployed currently, in the near, intermediate, and long-term time frame. For the five steam cycles, main steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,292 F and pressures from 2,400 psi to 5,075 psi. Reheat steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,328 F. The number of feedwater heaters varies from 7 to 9 and the associated feedwater temperature varies from 500 F to 626 F. The main part of the study therefore determines the steam cycle parameters and combustion technology that would yield the lowest cost of electricity (COE) for the next generation of coal-fired steam power plants. The second part of the study (Repowering) explores the means of upgrading the efficiency and output of an older existing coal fired steam power plant. There are currently more than 1,400 coal-fired units in operation in the United States generating about 54 percent of the electricity consumed. Many of these are modern units are clean and efficient. Additionally, there are many older units in excellent condition and still in service that could benefit from this repowering technology. The study evaluates the technical feasibility, thermal performance, and economic viability of this repowering concept.

Richard E. Waryasz; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

45

Scaling of Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments for a Space Rankine Cycle and Selection of a Preconceptual Scaled Experiment Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To assist with the development of a space-based Rankine cycle power system using liquid potassium as the working fluid, a study has been conducted on possible scaled experiments with simulant fluids. This report will consider several possible working fluids and describe a scaling methodology to achieve thermal-hydraulic similarity between an actual potassium system and scaled representations of the Rankine cycle boiler or condenser. The most practical scaling approach examined is based on the selection of perfluorohexane (FC-72) as the simulant. Using the scaling methodology, a series of possible solutions have been calculated for the FC-72 boiler and condenser. The possible scaled systems will then be compared and preconceptual specifications and drawings given for the most promising design. The preconceptual design concept will also include integrating the scaled boiler and scaled condenser into a single experimental loop. All the preconceptual system specifications appear practical from a fabrication and experimental standpoint, but further work will be needed to arrive at a final experiment design.

Sulfredge, CD

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Simulation of an Industrial Rankine Cycle Cogeneration Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sophisticated designs of thermal systems may be evaluated, quickly and inexpensively, with the support of computer based system simulation techniques; i.e. CAD for thermal systems. Furthermore, the response of a thermal system to predicted periodic...

Carattie, G.; Wepfer, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Staging Rankine Cycles Using Ammonia for OTEC Power Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent focus on renewable power production has renewed interest in looking into ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Early studies in OTEC applicability indicate that the island of Hawaii offers a potential market for a nominal 40-MWe system. a 40-MWe system represents a large leap in the current state of OTEC technology. Lockheed Martin Inc. is currently pursuing a more realistic goal of developing a 10-MWe system under U.S. Navy funding (Lockheed 2009). It is essential that the potential risks associated with the first-of-its-kind plant should be minimized for the project's success. Every means for reducing costs must also be pursued without increasing risks. With this in mind, the potential for increasing return on the investment is assessed both in terms of effective use of the seawater resource and of reducing equipment costs.

Bharathan, D.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Organic Rankine Cycles for the Petro-Chemical Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and economically convert this type of heat flow into useful power. The system under development by MTI is one based on a conventional fluorocarbon refrigerant to generate a nominal 1000 kW from typical liquid and vapor streams in the process plant. The 220 F...

Rose, R. K.; Colosimo, D. D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Organic fluids in a supercritical Rankine cycle for low temperature power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a performance analysis of a supercritical organic Rankine cycle (SORC) with various working fluids with thermal energy provided from a geothermal energy source. In the present study, a number of pure fluids (R23, R32, R125, R143a, R134a, R218, and R170) are analyzed to identify the most suitable fluids for different operating conditions. The source temperature is varied between 125 C and 200 C, to study its effect on the efficiency of the cycle for fixed and variable pressure ratios. The energy and exergy efficiencies for each working fluid are obtained and the optimum fluid is selected. It is found that thermal efficiencies as high as 21% can be obtained with 200 C source temperature and 10 C cooling water temperature considered in this study. For medium source temperatures (125 150 C), thermal efficiencies higher than 12% are obtained.

Vidhi, Rachana [University of South Florida, Tampa; Kuravi, Sarada [University of South Florida, Tampa; Goswami, Yogi D. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Stefanakos, Elias [University of South Florida, Tampa; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

Yoder, G.L.

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

51

APPLICATION OF TURBOMACHINERY IN SOLAR-ASSISTED RANKINE COOLING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F. , jr. S. B. , S. M. Steam Turbines. Second Edition, Tenththe solar-assisted cycle. Steam turbines have been used forin Figure 5. Steam entering the turbine expends a portion of

Leech, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Investigating potential efficiency improvement for light-duty transportation applications through simulation of an organic Rankine cycle for waste-heat recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to heat loss and combustion irreversibility. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, the potential benefits of such a strategy for light-duty applications are unknown due to transient operation, low-load operation at typical driving conditions, and the added mass of the system. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. Results from steady-state and drive-cycle simulations are presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and competition between waste-heat recovery systems, turbochargers, aftertreatment devices, and other systems for the limited thermal resources.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-04briggs.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of a...

54

Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

Donna Post Guillen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Optimized nuclear and solar dynamic organic Rankine cycles for Space Station applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1988) Dana Len Eubanks, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Frederick R. Best In order to better characterize the growth power generation system of the Space Station, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has re... and design the required nuclear, solar dynamic, and thermodynamic components. The solar and nuclear systems are optimized with respect to one of three variables: system mass, volume, or thermodynamic effi- ciency. Having optimized the two power options& a...

Eubanks, Dana Len

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii HIGHBraytonMaterialsEnergySystems on

58

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic Rankine cycle," Renewable Energy, vol. 4, pp. 1196-power cycle driven by renewable energy sources," Energy,geothermal resources," Renewable Energy, vol. 37, pp. 364-

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization," in ASME International Joint Power Generationfor Solar Rankine Power Generation," ASME Journal of SolarBrayton-Cycle Solar Power Towers," ASME Journal of Solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonconventional Fluids," ASME Jour of Engineering for Power,fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles," Applied Thermal Engineering,fluid in waste heat recovery," Applied Thermal Engineering,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine power plant (MORE). Phase IA final report: system design of MORE power plant for industrial energy conservation emphasizing the cement industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Megawatt Organic Rankine Engine (MORE) program is directed towards the development of a large, organic Rankine power plant for energy conservation from moderate temperature industrial heat streams. Organic Rankine power plants are ideally suited for use with heat sources in the temperature range below 1100/sup 0/F. Cement manufacture was selected as the prototype industry for the MORE system because of the range of parameters which can be tested in a cement application. This includes process exit temperatures of 650/sup 0/F to 1110/sup 0/F for suspension preheater and long dry kilns, severe dust loading, multi-megawatt power generation potential, and boiler exhaust gas acid dew point variations. The work performed during the Phase IA System Design contract period is described. The System Design task defines the complete MORE system and its installation to the level necessary to obtain detailed performance maps, equipment specifications, planning of supporting experiments, and credible construction and hardware cost estimates. The MORE power plant design is based upon installation in the Black Mountain Quarry Cement Plant near Victorville, California.

Bair, E.K.; Breindel, B.; Collamore, F.N.; Hodgson, J.N.; Olson, G.K.

1980-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

Economics of Organic Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

condensing if properly selected, and because of high molecular weight and low enthalpy drop in the expansion stage can use a single stage turbine operating at low rotational speeds to accomplish l\\JABINE HeAT SOURCE VAPORIZER PUMP Fig. 1 Simplified... 0 F approach temperature in vaporizer l5 0 F approach temperature in condenser 84% expander efficiency, 95% generator efficiency, 75% pump efficiency Maintenance at 2% of investment per year Freon losses at 5% of inventory/yr, $0.85/lb...

O'Brien, W. J.

63

System studies of open-cycle OTEC components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system model of open Rankine cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) was used to examine the effects of component performance and design on plant cost. Three components are examined in detail: an optional seawater deaeration subsystem, the flash evaporator, and a two-stage direct-contact condenser. Preliminary data quantifying noncondensable gas release in upcomers and a debubbler chamber were used to evaluate the effect of predeaeration (removing the dissolved gases in deaeration chambers before the seawater enters the heat exchangers) on system cost and performance. Little data on the interactions between geometry and performance of vertical spout flash evaporators operating under OTEC conditions are available; therefore, we performed independent parametric variations. For the direct-contact condenser previous numerical studies provide the basis for coupling geometry and performance. Results of these studies are useful in setting research priorities, in defining operating conditions for further seawater experiments, and in updating plant cost estimates.

Parsons, B.K.; Link, H.F.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

INTEGRATED PYROLYSIS COMBINED CYCLE BIOMASS POWER SYSTEM CONCEPT DEFINITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced power systems based on integrated gasification/combined cycles (IGCC) are often presented as a solution to the present shortcomings of biomass as fuel. Although IGCC has been technically demonstrated at full scale, it has not been adopted for commercial power generation. Part of the reason for this situation is the continuing low price for coal. However, another significant barrier to IGCC is the high level of integration of this technology: the gas output from the gasifier must be perfectly matched to the energy demand of the gas turbine cycle. We are developing an alternative to IGCC for biomass power: the integrated (fast) pyrolysis/ combined cycle (IPCC). In this system solid biomass is converted into liquid rather than gaseous fuel. This liquid fuel, called bio-oil, is a mixture of oxygenated organic compounds and water that serves as fuel for a gas turbine topping cycle. Waste heat from the gas turbine provides thermal energy to the steam turbine bottoming cycle. Advantages of the biomass-fueled IPCC system include: combined cycle efficiency exceeding 37 percent efficiency for a system as small as 7.6 MW{sub e}; absence of high pressure thermal reactors; decoupling of fuel processing and power generation; and opportunities for recovering value-added products from the bio-oil. This report provides a technical overview of the system including pyrolyzer design, fuel clean-up strategies, pyrolysate condenser design, opportunities for recovering pyrolysis byproducts, gas turbine cycle design, and Rankine steam cycle. The report also reviews the potential biomass fuel supply in Iowa, provide and economic analysis, and present a summery of benefits from the proposed system.

Eric Sandvig; Gary Walling; Robert C. Brown; Ryan Pletka; Desmond Radlein; Warren Johnson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Organic Rankine Cycle Systems for Waste Heat Recovery in Refineries and Chemical Process Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and turbine inlet temperatures from 170 to 260oF. The machine design has eliminated the need for shaft seals, shaft couplings and the usual lube oil console normally required for turbine-generator units. Results of prototype tests of a 1 MW unit are presented...

Meacher, J. S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle Waste Heat Recovery System for  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652Grow YourPerformance AuditPerformance of aLight

67

Expeditious Data Center Sustainability, Flow, and Temperature Modeling: Life-Cycle Exergy Consumption Combined with a Potential Flow Based, Rankine Vortex Superposed, Predictive Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology iii Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) . . . . . . .Results 6.1 Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) . . . . . 6.1.1Analysis (LCEA) 4. Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) 5. Exergetic

Lettieri, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Control system options and strategies for supercritical CO2 cycles.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising alternative to Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle energy converters for use with Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs), as well as other advanced reactor concepts. The S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle offers higher plant efficiencies than Rankine or recuperated gas Brayton cycles operating at the same liquid metal reactor core outlet temperatures as well as reduced costs or size of key components especially the turbomachinery. A new Plant Dynamics Computer Code has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for simulation of a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous load following liquid metal-cooled fast reactor. The Plant Dynamics code has been applied to investigate the effectiveness of a control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for the STAR-LM 181 MWe (400 MWt) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor. The strategy, which involves a combination of control mechanisms, is found to be effective for controlling the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle over the complete operating range from 0 to 100 % load for a representative set of transient load changes. While the system dynamic analysis of control strategy performance for STARLM is carried out for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle energy converter incorporating an axial flow turbine and compressors, investigations of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle have identified benefits from the use of centrifugal compressors which offer a wider operating range, greater stability near the critical point, and potentially further cost reductions due to fewer stages than axial flow compressors. Models have been developed at Argonne for the conceptual design and performance analysis of centrifugal compressors for use in the SCO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle. Steady state calculations demonstrate the wider operating range of centrifugal compressors versus axial compressors installed in a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle as well as the benefits in expanding the range over which individual control mechanisms are effective for cycle control. However, a combination of mechanisms is still required for control of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle between 0 and 100 % load. An effort is underway to partially validate the Argonne models and codes by means of comparison with data from tests carried out using the small-scale Sandia Brayton Loop (SBL) recuperated gas closed Brayton cycle facility. The centrifugal compressor model has been compared with data from the SBL operating with nitrogen gas and good agreement is obtained between calculations and the measured data for the compressor outlet pressure versus flow rate, although it is necessary to assume values for certain model parameters which require information about the configuration or dimensions of the compressor components that is unavailable. Unfortunately, the compressor efficiency cannot be compared with experiment data due to the lack of outlet temperature data. A radial inflow turbine model has been developed to enable further comparison of calculations with data from the SBL which incorporates both a radial inflow turbine as well as a radial compressor. Preliminary calculations of pressure ratio and efficiency versus flow rate have been carried out using the radial inflow turbine model.

Moisseytsev, A.; Kulesza, K. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Oregon State Univ.

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

69

Phase I-B development of kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, September 1983-December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-ton, and a COP (heating) of 1.8 and COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1989. In this phase, an HVAC systems manufacturer (Borg-Warner) is working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, a piston-type open-shaft refrigeration compressor was selected as the best match for the engine. Both the engine and compressor have been tested and characterized by performance maps, and the experimental heat-pump systems designed, built, and preliminary testing performed. Close agreement with computer model output has been achieved. SPS has continued to focus on improving the Stirling-engine performance and reliability for the gas-heat-pump application.

Monahan, R.E.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Phase 1-supplemental development of a kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat-pump system. Final report, January 1989-June 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas heat pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine that has been under development for over a decade. The engine has been converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10 tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for the mid-1990's. In previous phases, an HVAC-systems manufacturer (York International) had been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Under the program, a number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described. The adaptation and operation of a computer optimization code was accomplished under the program and is reported herein.

Monahan, R.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Problem 6-6: The ideal Rankine cycle uses saturated steam, so it can't be at 1000 o F, since the critical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the thermodynamic cycle calculation for the steam is p1 = 1000 psia T1 = Tsat = 544:75 o F h1 = hg = 1192:4 BTU/lbm s1 = sg = 1:3903 BTU/lbm- o R s2 = s1 = 1:3903 BTU/lbm- o R p2 = 1 psia T2 = Tsat = 101:70 o F 2 = 1:3903 0:1327 1:8453 = 0:6815 = 68% h2 = 69:74 + 0:6815 1036:0 = 775:8 BTU/lbm w1!2 = 1192:4 775:8 = 416

72

THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion and Case Studies," EPRI ER-301, Project 580,at Heber, California," EPRI ER-670, Project 580, prepared byProject Manager-EPRI), "Heber Geothermal Demonstration Power

Pope, William L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rankine-Brayton engine powered solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A Rankine-Brayton hybrid cycle heat engine is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller or other mechanism for enabling sustained free flight. The Rankine-Brayton engine has a thermal battery, preferably containing a lithium-hydride and lithium mixture, operably connected to it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery to a working fluid. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic uncertainty diagrams, which show at a glance combined uncertainty information, section 9.2 has a new set of simpler graphs that show the impact on fuel cycle costs for once through, 1-tier, and 2-tier scenarios as a function of key input parameters.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of Brayton and Rankine alternatives for diesel waste heat exploitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diesel engine may produce exhaust-gas thermal energy in excess of that needed for turbocharging. Alternatives for exploitation of the energy by producing work may be direct expansion through a gas turbine (completing a Brayton cycle that begins with the engine's compression and combustion), or transfer of heat into a Rankine cycle. It is demonstrated that either alternative may have a domain in which it is superior in work done, or in exhaust volume per unit mass of diesel exhaust. Computation models are developed and demonstrated for finding the boundaries along which the Rankine and Brayton alternatives have equal merit in either work or exhaust volume.

Woodward, J.B. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) mahines, Sterling engines,Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system or Sterling Engine (SE)an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system generates electricity

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Variable pressure power cycle and control system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A variable pressure power cycle and control system that is adjustable to a variable heat source is disclosed. The power cycle adjusts itself to the heat source so that a minimal temperature difference is maintained between the heat source fluid and the power cycle working fluid, thereby substantially matching the thermodynamic envelope of the power cycle to the thermodynamic envelope of the heat source. Adjustments are made by sensing the inlet temperature of the heat source fluid and then setting a superheated vapor temperature and pressure to achieve a minimum temperature difference between the heat source fluid and the working fluid.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1984-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

78

Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle. 18 figs.

Jardine, D.M.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Economizer refrigeration cycle space heating and cooling system and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to heating and cooling systems and more particularly to an improved system utilizing a Stirling Cycle engine heat pump in a refrigeration cycle.

Jardine, Douglas M. (Colorado Springs, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Process system optimization for life cycle improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is an analytic tool for quantifying the environmental impacts of all processes used in converting raw materials into a final product. The LCA consists of three parts. Life cycle inventory quantifies all material and energy use, and environmental emissions for the entire product life cycle, while impact assessment evaluates actual and potential environmental and human health consequences of the activities identified in the inventory phase. Most importantly, life cycle improvement aims at reducing the risk of these consequences occurring to make the product more benign. when the LCA is performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic analysis, the total economic and environmental benefits and shortcomings of a product or process can be quantified. A methodology has been developed incorporating process performance, economics, and life cycle inventory data to synthesize process systems, which meet life cycle impact-improvement targets at least cost. The method relies on a systematic description of the product life cycle and utilizes successive Linear Programming to formulate and optimize the non-linear, constrained problem which results. The practicality and power of this approach have been demonstrated by examining options for the reduction of emissions of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} from petroleum-based fuels.

Marano, J.J.; Rogers, S.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Phases I-C, I-D and I-E development of Kinematic Stirling/Rankine commercial gas-fired heat pump system. Final report, January 1986-September 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kinematic Stirling/Rankine gas-heat-pump concept is based on the application of a Stirling engine under development for over a decade. The engine was converted to natural gas and is characterized with many thousand hours of operating experience. The goal of the project is to develop a commercial-size Stirling engine-driven gas heat pump with a cooling capacity of 10-tons, a COP (heating) of 1.8 and a COP (cooling) of 1.1. The project is a multi-phase development with commercialization planned for 1990. In these phases, an HVAC systems manufacturer (York International) has been working with SPS to develop a prototype gas-heat-pump system. To date, two generations of prototype GHP systems have been built and tested and have demonstrated significant operating cost savings over the conventional electric heat pump. Data are presented for environmental laboratory testing of both prototype gas heat pumps as well as durability, reliability, performance, and emission testing of the V160 Stirling engine. A number of design and manufacturing process changes were made to the engine to reduce costs and improve endurance and shaft efficiency and are described.

Monahan, R.E.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Code Snippets Justin A. Roman, Tanisha Rankin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Code Snippets Justin A. Roman, Tanisha Rankin, Grae Cullen, and Paul Wolfgang Fall Semester 2008 coding techniques. Professors will be allowed to assign pre-defined problems which will be listed will save, compile, run, and check the method. Pre-defined test cases will determine the validity

Wolfgang, Paul

83

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems A...

84

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective is to identify and assess advanced improvements to the Brayton Cycle (such as but not limited to firing temperature, pressure ratio, combustion techniques, intercooling, fuel or combustion air augmentation, enhanced blade cooling schemes) that will lead to significant performance improvements in coal based power systems. This assessment is conducted in the context of conceptual design studies (systems studies) that advance state-of-art Brayton cycles and result in coal based efficiencies equivalent to 65% + on natural gas basis (LHV), or approximately an 8% reduction in heat rate of an IGCC plant utilizing the H class steam cooled gas turbine. H class gas turbines are commercially offered by General Electric and Mitsubishi for natural gas based combined cycle applications with 60% efficiency (LHV) and it is expected that such machine will be offered for syngas applications within the next 10 years. The studies are being sufficiently detailed so that third parties will be able to validate portions or all of the studies. The designs and system studies are based on plants for near zero emissions (including CO{sub 2}). Also included in this program is the performance evaluation of other advanced technologies such as advanced compression concepts and the fuel cell based combined cycle. The objective of the fuel cell based combined cycle task is to identify the desired performance characteristics and design basis for a gas turbine that will be integrated with an SOFC in Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) applications. The goal is the conceptualization of near zero emission (including CO{sub 2} capture) integrated gasification power plants producing electricity as the principle product. The capability of such plants to coproduce H{sub 2} is qualitatively addressed. Since a total systems solution is critical to establishing a plant configuration worthy of a comprehensive market interest, a baseline IGCC plant scheme is developed and used to study how alternative process schemes and power cycles might be used and integrated to achieve higher systems efficiency. To achieve these design results, the total systems approach is taken requiring creative integration of the various process units within the plant. Advanced gas turbine based cycles for Integrated gasification Combined cycle (IGCC) applications are identified by a screening analysis and the more promising cycles recommended for detailed systems analysis. In the case of the IGFC task, the main objective is met by developing a steady-state simulation of the entire plant and then using dynamic simulations of the hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)/Gas Turbine sub-system to investigate the turbo-machinery performance. From these investigations the desired performance characteristics and a basis for design of turbo-machinery for use in a fuel cell gas turbine power block is developed.

A.D. Rao; D.J. Francuz; J.D. Maclay; J. Brouwer; A. Verma; M. Li; G.S. Samuelsen

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Thermodynamic cycle in a cavity optomechanical system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cavity optomechanical system is initiated by a radiation pressure of a cavity field onto a mirror element acting as a quantum resonator. This radiation pressure can control the thermodynamic character of the mirror to some extent, such as cooling its effective temperature. Here we show that by properly engineering the spectral density of a thermal heat bath that interacts with a quantum system, the evolution of the quantum system can be effectively turned on and off. Inside a cavity optomechanical system, when the heat bath is realized by a multi-mode oscillator modeling of the mirror, this on-off effect translates to infusion or extraction of heat energy in and out of the cavity field, facilitating a four-stroke thermodynamic cycle.

Hou Ian

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

86

Asymptotic Stability of Heteroclinic Cycles in Systems with Symmetry, II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asymptotic Stability of Heteroclinic Cycles in Systems with Symmetry, II Martin Krupa #3; Ian heteroclinic cycles that persist under perturbations that respect the symmetry. In previous work, we began a system- atic investigation into the asymptotic stability of such cycles. In particular, we found a su

87

Rankine-Hugoniot Relations in Relativistic Combustion Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As a foundational element describing relativistic reacting waves of relevance to astrophysical phenomena, the Rankine-Hugoniot relations classifying the various propagation modes of detonation and deflagration are analyzed in the relativistic regime, with the results properly degenerating to the non-relativistic and highlyrelativistic limits. The existence of negative-pressure downstream flows is noted for relativistic shocks, which could be of interest in the understanding of the nature of dark energy. Entropy analysis for relativistic shock waves are also performed for relativistic fluids with different equations of state (EoS), denoting the existence of rarefaction shocks in fluids with adiabatic index \\Gamma < 1 in their EoS. The analysis further shows that weak detonations and strong deflagrations, which are rare phenomena in terrestrial environments, are expected to exist more commonly in astrophysical systems because of the various endothermic reactions present therein. Additional topics of relevanc...

Gao, Yang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Quantum Brayton cycle with coupled systems as working substance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the quantum version of Brayton cycle with a composite system as the working substance. The actual Brayton cycle consists of two adiabatic and two isobaric processes. Two pressures can be defined in our isobaric process, one corresponds to the external magnetic field (characterized by $F_x$) exerted on the system, while the other corresponds to the coupling constant between the subsystems (characterized by $F_y$). As a consequence, we can define two types of quantum Brayton cycle for the composite system. We find that the subsystem experiences a quantum Brayton cycle in one quantum Brayton cycle (characterized by $F_x$), whereas the subsystem's cycle is of quantum Otto in another Brayton cycle (characterized by $F_y$). The efficiency for the composite system equals to that for the subsystem in both cases, but the work done by the total system are usually larger than the sum of work done by the two subsystems. The other interesting finding is that for the cycle characterized by $F_y$, the subsystem can be a refrigerator while the total system is a heat engine. The result in the paper can be generalized to a quantum Brayton cycle with a general coupled system as the working substance.

X. L. Huang; L. C. Wang; X. X. Yi

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Organic Rankine Cycle Turbine for Exhaust Energy Recovery in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Increase Efficiency in Gasoline Powertrains Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies Achieving High Efficiency at 2010 Emissions...

90

Organic Rankine Cycle for Light Duty Passenger Vehicles | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthe U.S.Solar CompanyEngine |

91

Rankine Cycle Working Fluids for CC-OTEC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jung et al., Seoul, Korea 8 R32/R290 Similar efficiency High pressure Smaller volume Good size 2 CC-OTEC plant Boiler, condenser, turbine Initial cost Size of the equipment Working fluids al., Seoul, Korea 6 Efficiency #12;Dongsoo Jung et al., Seoul, Korea 7 Equipment size #12;Dongsoo

92

Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOE TribaltheMyMinutes fromBased|SEI Layer |of

93

Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA:May1.docEx5.docofPotomacJulyModernizing the Grid

94

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A review of test results on parabolic dish solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted rankine engines and for production of process steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of development testing of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies. Most of the tests were at modules and assemblies that used a dish-mounted, organic Rankine cycle turbine for production of electric power. Some tests were also run on equipment for production of process steam or for production of electricity using dish-mounted reciprocating steam engines. These tests indicate that early modules achieve efficiencies of about 18 percent in converting sunlight to electricity (excluding the inverter but including parasitics). A number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other operating experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

Jaffe, L.D.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Supercritical Water Reactor Cycle for Medium Power Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping studies for a power conversion system based on a direct-cycle supercritical water reactor have been conducted. The electric power range of interest is 5-30 MWe with a design point of 20 MWe. The overall design objective is to develop a system that has minimized physical size and performs satisfactorily over a broad range of operating conditions. The design constraints are as follows: Net cycle thermal efficiency {ge}20%; Steam turbine outlet quality {ge}90%; and Pumping power {le}2500 kW (at nominal conditions). Three basic cycle configurations were analyzed. Listed in order of increased plant complexity, they are: (1) Simple supercritical Rankine cycle; (2) All-supercritical Brayton cycle; and (3) Supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating. The sensitivity of these three configurations to various parameters, such as reactor exit temperature, reactor pressure, condenser pressure, etc., was assessed. The Thermoflex software package was used for this task. The results are as follows: (a) The simple supercritical Rankine cycle offers the greatest hardware simplification, but its high reactor temperature rise and reactor outlet temperature may pose serious problems from the viewpoint of thermal stresses, stability and materials in the core. (b) The all-supercritical Brayton cycle is not a contender, due to its poor thermal efficiency. (c) The supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating affords acceptable thermal efficiency with lower reactor temperature rise and outlet temperature. (d) The use of a moisture separator improves the performance of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and allows for a further reduction of the reactor outlet temperature, thus it was selected for the next step. Preliminary engineering design of the supercritical Rankine cycle with feedwater preheating and moisture separation was performed. All major components including the turbine, feedwater heater, feedwater pump, condenser, condenser pump and pipes were modeled with realistic assumptions using the PEACE module of Thermoflex. A three-dimensional layout of the plant was also generated with the SolidEdge software. The results of the engineering design are as follows: (i) The cycle achieves a net thermal efficiency of 24.13% with 350/460 C reactor inlet/outlet temperatures, {approx}250 bar reactor pressure and 0.75 bar condenser pressure. The steam quality at the turbine outlet is 90% and the total electric consumption of the pumps is about 2500 kWe at nominal conditions. (ii) The overall size of the plant is attractively compact and can be further reduced if a printed-circuit-heat-exchanger (vs shell-and-tube) design is used for the feedwater heater, which is currently the largest component by far. Finally, an analysis of the plant performance at off-nominal conditions has revealed good robustness of the design in handling large changes of thermal power and seawater temperature.

BD Middleton; J Buongiorno

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

97

Dilution cycle control for an absorption refrigeration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dilution cycle control system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The control system includes a time delay relay for sensing shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system and for generating a control signal only after expiration of a preselected time period measured from the sensed shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system, during which the absorption refrigeration system is not restarted. A dilution cycle for the absorption refrigeration system is initiated in response to generation of a control signal by the time delay relay. This control system is particularly suitable for use with an absorption refrigeration system which is frequently cycled on and off since the time delay provided by the control system prevents needless dilution of the absorption refrigeration system when the system is turned off for only a short period of time and then is turned back on.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

M. Bahrami ENSC 461 (S 11) Tutorial Rankine Cycle 1 ENSC 461 Tutorial, Week#10 -Rankine Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1) How efficiently the energy stored in the coal can be converted into a heat input to the boilerJ/kg. Assuming that 75 percent of this energy is transferred to the steam in the boiler and that the electric generator has an efficiency of 96 percent, determine: a) the overall plant efficiency (the ratio of net

Bahrami, Majid

99

Dynamic response of Earth's magnetosphere to By reversals K. Kabin, R. Rankin, and R. Marchand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic response of Earth's magnetosphere to By reversals K. Kabin, R. Rankin, and R. Marchand Citation: Kabin, K., R. Rankin, R. Marchand, T. I. Gombosi, C. R. Clauer, A. J. Ridley, V. O. Papitashvili

Michigan, University of

100

The Air or Brayton Cycle Solvent Recovery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduction of the turbine exhaust air temperature. In this manner the system will boot strap itself down to a very low temperature in just a few minutes. I have observed the 8000 CFM system, which will be described a little later, cool from an ambient... condens~ng temperature for many solvents is colder than -50 F. Such low temperatures require relatively complicated freon refri geration systems. This led to development of the Air Cycle System. Fig. 3 shows a simple schematic of the air cycle. A...

Fox, B. J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems - Executive Summary Pump Life Cycle Costs: A Guide to LCC Analysis for Pumping Systems - Executive Summary This...

102

Advanced Open-Cycle Desiccant Cooling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of staged regeneration as means of improving the desiccant cooling system performance is the subject of investigation in this study. In the staged regeneration, the regeneration section of desiccant dehumidifier is divided into two parts...

Ko, Y. J.; Charoensupaya, D.; Lavan, Z.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW POWER CYCLES AND ADVANCED FALLING FILM HEAT EXCHANGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final report for the DOE/UNM grant number DE-FG26-98FT40148 discusses the accomplishments of both the theoretical analysis of advanced power cycles and experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers. This final report also includes the progress report for the third year (period of October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001). Four new cycles were studied and two cycles were analyzed in detail based on the second law of thermodynamics. The first cycle uses a triple combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas), an intermediate cycle (Rankine/steam), and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia). This cycle can produce high efficiency and reduces the irreversibility of the Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSC) of conventional combined power cycles. The effect of important system parameters on the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle under reasonable practical constraints was evaluated. The second cycle is a combined cycle, which consists of a topping cycle (Brayton/gas) and a bottoming cycle (Rankine/ammonia) with integrated compressor inlet air cooling. This innovative cycle can produce high power and efficiency. This cycle is also analyzed and optimized based on the second the second law to obtain the irreversibility distribution of all components in the cycle. The results of the studies have been published in peer reviewed journals and ASME conference proceeding. Experimental investigation of advanced falling film heat exchangers was conducted to find effective additives for steam condensation. Four additives have been selected and tested in a horizontal tube steam condensation facility. It has been observed that heat transfer additives have been shown to be an effective way to increase the efficiency of conventional tube bundle condenser heat exchangers. This increased condensation rate is due to the creation of a disturbance in the liquid condensate surround the film. The heat transfer through such a film has increased due to the onset of Maranogni convection as well as the population of ''dropwise-like'' condensation increased. The results have been published in peer reviewed journals.

Arsalan Razani; Kwang J. Kim

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fossil fuel combined cycle power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for converting fuel energy to electricity includes a reformer for converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one lower molecular weight gas, at least one turbine to produce electricity from expansion of at least one of the lower molecular weight gases, and at least one fuel cell. The system can further include at least one separation device for substantially dividing the lower molecular weight gases into at least two gas streams prior to the electrochemical oxidization step. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon Davidovich; Armstrong, Timothy Robert; Judkins, Roddie Reagan

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

105

TRITIUM SYSTEMS KEYWORDS: tritium fuel cycle, re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUSION REACTORS WILLIAM KUAN and MOHAMED A. ABDOU* University of California at Los Angeles, School in detail by Abdou et al.1 The value Lr is the required tritium breeding ratio ~TBR!, and La a simplified first-order linear system model, which made use of mean tritium residence times*E-mail: abdou

Abdou, Mohamed

106

System strategies in the management of transit systems towards the end of their life cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores and evaluates essential strategies needed for the transit authority/operator to deal with end of life cycle challenges of Rapid Transit Systems (RTS) systems. RTS systems are elaborate systems consisting ...

Kairon, Ajmer Singh

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

System Design and Experimental Development of the Kalina Cycle Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEM DESIGN AND EXPERIMENTAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE KALINA CYCLE TECHNOLOGY A. I. KALINA President AKT Systems, Inc. Hayward, California ABSTRACT For any given heat source, only a portion of the thermal energy may be converted into useful... work. The amount of energy \\~hich may be converted from any form into mechanical energy is referred to as exergy. The ratio of the system's mechanical work to the exergy of the heat source is referred to as exergeti calor thermodynamic efficiency...

Kalina, A. I.; Leibowitz, H. M.

108

High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 microliters of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded. 13 figs.

Hansen, A.D.A.; Jaklevic, J.M.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

109

High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the-circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate microtiter plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 .mu.l of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded.

Hansen, Anthony D. A. (Berkely, CA); Jaklevic, Joseph M. (Lafayette, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Battery energy storage systems life cycle costs case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a comparison of life cycle costs between battery energy storage systems and alternative mature technologies that could serve the same utility-scale applications. Two of the battery energy storage systems presented in this report are located on the supply side, providing spinning reserve and system stability benefits. These systems are compared with the alternative technologies of oil-fired combustion turbines and diesel generators. The other two battery energy storage systems are located on the demand side for use in power quality applications. These are compared with available uninterruptible power supply technologies.

Swaminathan, S.; Miller, N.F.; Sen, R.K. [SENTECH, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Life cycle analysis of energy systems: Methods and experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel-cycle analysis if not the same as life-cycle analysis, although the focus on defining a comprehensive system for analysis leads toward the same path. This approach was the basis of the Brookhaven Reference Energy System. It provided a framework for summing total effects over an explicitly defined fuel cycle. This concept was computerized and coupled with an extensive data base in ESNS -- the Energy Systems Network Simulator. As an example, ESNS was the analytical basis for a comparison of health and environmental effects of several coal conversion technologies. With advances in computer systems and methods, however, ESNS has not been maintained at Brookhaven. The RES approach was one of the bases of the OECD COMPASS Project and the UNEP comparative assessment of environmental impacts of energy sources. An RES model alone has limitations in analyzing complex energy systems, e.g., it is difficult to handle feedback in the network. The most recent version of a series of optimization models is MARKAL, a dynamic linear programming model now used to assess strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy system. MARKAL creates an optimal set of reference energy systems over multiple time periods, automatically incorporating dynamic feedback and allowing fuel switching and end-use conservation to meet useful energy demands.

Morris, S.C.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Life cycle analysis of energy systems: Methods and experience  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel-cycle analysis if not the same as life-cycle analysis, although the focus on defining a comprehensive system for analysis leads toward the same path. This approach was the basis of the Brookhaven Reference Energy System. It provided a framework for summing total effects over an explicitly defined fuel cycle. This concept was computerized and coupled with an extensive data base in ESNS -- the Energy Systems Network Simulator. As an example, ESNS was the analytical basis for a comparison of health and environmental effects of several coal conversion technologies. With advances in computer systems and methods, however, ESNS has not been maintained at Brookhaven. The RES approach was one of the bases of the OECD COMPASS Project and the UNEP comparative assessment of environmental impacts of energy sources. An RES model alone has limitations in analyzing complex energy systems, e.g., it is difficult to handle feedback in the network. The most recent version of a series of optimization models is MARKAL, a dynamic linear programming model now used to assess strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the energy system. MARKAL creates an optimal set of reference energy systems over multiple time periods, automatically incorporating dynamic feedback and allowing fuel switching and end-use conservation to meet useful energy demands.

Morris, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating2011 Abstract A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributedprovided for a steam Rankine cycle heat engine achieving 50%

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Rankin County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosource HistoryRaftRamsey,Rangely, Colorado: EnergyRankin

116

Design and evaluation of a nuclear-electric hybrid power/propulsion system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigating and comparing various closed and open cycles. El ? Genk et al. ' have investiga, ted three different cycles: A potassium Rankine cycle, a. closed and an open Brayton cycle. These systems v'ere optimized for a power level of 160 MWe and compared... with each other. The optimized systems were also analyzed v;hen used for the generation of only 3. 3 MWe. However, since the above mentioned optimization is performed at a power level well above our design point, it can no longer be considered optimal...

Keil, Ralph

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced potassium rankine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

steam directly to the turbine; for this example, the pressure chosen matches the subcritical Rankine Source: Australian National University, Department of Engineering,...

118

Nexant Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plant Systems Analysis; Task 1: Preferred Plant Size, 20 January 2005 - 31 December 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rankine cycles for commercial parabolic trough solar projects range in capacity from 13.5 MWe at the Solar Electric Generating Station I (SEGS I) plant, to a maximum of 89 MWe at the SEGS VIII/IX plants. The series of SEGS projects showed a consistent reduction in the levelized energy cost due to a combination of improvements in collector field technology and economies of scale in both the Rankine cycle and the operation and maintenance costs. Nonetheless, the question of the optimum Rankine cycle capacity remains an open issue. The capacities of the SEGS VIII/IX plants were limited by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act requirements to a maximum net output of 80 MWe. Further improvements in the Rankine cycle efficiency, and economies of scale in both the capital and the operating cost, should be available at larger plant sizes. An analysis was conducted to determine the effect of Rankine cycle capacities greater than 80 MWe on the levelized energy cost. The study was conducted through the following steps: (1) Three gross cycle capacities of 88 MWe, 165 MWe, and 220 MWe were selected. (2) Three Rankine cycle models were developed using the GateCycle program. The models were based on single reheat turbine cycles, with main steam conditions of 1,450 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F, and reheat steam conditions of 239 lb{sub f}/in{sup 2} and 703 F. The feedwater heater system consisted of 5 closed heaters and 1 open deaerating heater. The design condenser pressure was 2.5 in. HgA. (3) The optimization function within Excelergy was used to determine the preferred solar multiple for each plant. Two cases were considered for each plant: (a) a solar-only project without thermal storage, and (b) a solar-fossil hybrid project, with 3 hours of thermal storage and a heat transport fluid heater fired by natural gas. (4) For each of the 6 cases, collector field geometries, heat transport fluid pressure losses, and heat transport pump power requirements were calculated with a field piping optimization model. (5) Annual electric energy outputs, capital costs, and annual operating costs were calculated for each case using the default methods within Excelergy, from which estimates of the levelized energy costs were developed. The plant with the lowest energy cost was considered the optimum.

Kelly, B.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

Peggs, Stephen G. (Port Jefferson, NY); Brennan, J. Michael (East Northport, NY); Tuozzolo, Joseph E. (Sayville, NY); Zaltsman, Alexander (Commack, NY)

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model This presentation by...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rankine Cycle and Stirling Cycle engines for commercial use.1, HEAT ENGINE HWY VEHICLE SYSTEM (DEVELOP STIRLING CYCLE

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Power Systems Life Cycle Analysis Tool (Power L-CAT).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Power Systems L-CAT is a high-level dynamic model that calculates levelized production costs and tracks environmental performance for a range of electricity generation technologies: natural gas combined cycle (using either imported (LNGCC) or domestic natural gas (NGCC)), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC), existing pulverized coal (EXPC), nuclear, and wind. All of the fossil fuel technologies also include an option for including carbon capture and sequestration technologies (CCS). The model allows for quick sensitivity analysis on key technical and financial assumptions, such as: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; taxes; depreciation; and capacity factors. The fossil fuel options are based on detailed life cycle analysis reports conducted by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). For each of these technologies, NETL's detailed LCAs include consideration of five stages associated with energy production: raw material acquisition (RMA), raw material transport (RMT), energy conversion facility (ECF), product transportation and distribution (PT&D), and end user electricity consumption. The goal of the NETL studies is to compare existing and future fossil fuel technology options using a cradle-to-grave analysis. The NETL reports consider constant dollar levelized cost of delivered electricity, total plant costs, greenhouse gas emissions, criteria air pollutants, mercury (Hg) and ammonia (NH3) emissions, water withdrawal and consumption, and land use (acreage).

Andruski, Joel; Drennen, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

ammonia-water trilateral rankine: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: combined cycle concept...

124

Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at the manufacturers site (Barber-Nichols Inc.) and installed and operated at Sandia. A sufficiently detailed description of the loop is provided in this report along with the design characteristics of the turbo-alternator-compressor set to allow other researchers to compare their results with those measured in the Sandia test-loop. The third task consisted of a validation effort. In this task the test loop was operated and compared with the modeled results to develop a more complete understanding of this electrically heated closed power generation system and to validate the model. The measured and predicted system temperatures and pressures are in good agreement, indicating that the model is a reasonable representation of the test loop. Typical deviations between the model and the hardware results are less than 10%. Additional tests were performed to assess the capability of the Brayton engine to continue to remove decay heat after the reactor/heater is shutdown, to develop safe and effective control strategies, and to access the effectiveness of gas inventory control as an alternative means to provide load following. In one test the heater power was turned off to simulate a rapid reactor shutdown, and the turbomachinery was driven solely by the sensible heat stored in the heater for over 71 minutes without external power input. This is an important safety feature for CBC systems as it means that the closed Brayton loop will keep cooling the reactor without the need for auxiliary power (other than that needed to circulate the waste heat rejection coolant) provided the heat sink is available.

Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Sanchez, Travis

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the systems high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilsons Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOEs targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilsons Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOEs instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOEs gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

Anderson, Bruce

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Automatic Control Strategy Development for the Supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton Cycle for LFR Autonomous Load Following  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is a promising advanced alternative to the Rankine saturated steam cycle and ideal gas Brayton cycle for the energy converters of specific reactor concepts belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. A new plant dynamics analysis computer code has been developed for simulation of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to an autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The plant dynamics code was used to develop an automatic control strategy for the whole plant in response to changes in the demand from the electrical grid. The specific features of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle that result in limitations on the control range and speed of specific control mechanisms are discussed. Calculations of whole-plant responses to plant operational transients involving step and continuous changes in grid demand are demonstrated. (authors)

Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Virtual Community Life Cycle: a Model to Develop Systems with Fluid Requirements Christo El Morr1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Virtual Community Life Cycle: a Model to Develop Systems with Fluid Requirements Christo El Morr1 into the life cycle model needed to develop information systems for group of people with fluid requirements development life cycles can be followed when developing any virtual community. Though, in a fluid environment

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

128

Modeling of a second-generation solar-driven Rankine air conditioner. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten configurations of a second-generation (2G), solar-powered, Rankine-driven air conditioner were simulated and the data presented for use in companion studies. The results of the analysis show that the boiling-in-collector (BIC) configuration generates more power per collector area than the other configurations. The models used to simulate the configuration are presented in this report. The generated data are also presented. Experimental work was done under this study to both improve a novel refrigerant and oil lubrication system for the centrifugal compressor and investigate the aerodynamic unloading characteristics of the centrifugal compressor. The information generated was used to define possible turbo-gearbox configurations for use in the second generation computer simulation.

Denius, M.W.; Batton, W.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. Examples of systems in this class include the small modular reactors being considered internationally; e.g. 4S [Tsuboi 2009], Hyperion Power Module [Deal 2010], ARC-100 [Wade 2010], and SSTAR [Smith 2008]. (2) Systems for Resource Utilization - In recent years, interest has developed in the use of advanced nuclear designs for the effective utilization of fuel resources. Systems under this class have generally utilized the breed and burn concept in which fissile material is bred and used in situ in the reactor core. Due to the favorable breeding that is possible with fast neutrons, these systems have tended to be fast spectrum systems. In the once-through concepts (as opposed to the traditional multirecycle approach typically considered for fast reactors), an ignition (or starter) zone contains driver fuel which is fissile material. This zone is designed to last a long time period to allow the breeding of sufficient fissile material in the adjoining blanket zone. The blanket zone is initially made of fertile depleted uranium fuel. This zone could also be made of fertile thorium fuel or recovered uranium from fuel reprocessing or natural uranium. However, given the bulk of depleted uranium and the potentially large inventory of recovered uranium, it is unlikely that the use of thorium is required in the near term in the U.S. Following the breeding of plutonium or fissile U-233 in the blanket, this zone or assembly then carries a larger fraction of the power generation in the reactor. These systems tend to also have a long cycle length (or core life) and they could be with or without fuel shuffling. When fuel is shuffled, the incoming fuel is generally depleted uranium (or thorium) fuel. In any case, fuel is burned once and then discharged. Examples of systems in this class include the CANDLE concept [Sekimoto 2001], the traveling wave reactor (TWR) concept of TerraPower [Ellis 2010], the ultra-long life fast reactor (ULFR) by ANL [Kim 2010], and the BNL fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) concept [Fisher 1979]. (3) Thermal systems for resource extensio

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

System dynamics based models for selecting HVAC systems for office buildings: a life cycle assessment from carbon emissions perspective.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study aims to explore the life cycle environmental impacts of typical heating ventilation and air condition (HVAC) systems including variable air volume (VAV) system, (more)

Chen, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems for Industrial Waste Heat Recovery. c DanielCycle for Cement Kiln Waste Heat Recovery Power Plants. and high temperature waste heat reclamation and solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research will characterize and evaluate advanced S-CO2 Brayton cycle power generation with a modular power tower CSP system.

Ma, Z.; Turchi, C. S.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System by Michael Supervisory Committee Incorporating Life Cycle Assessment into the LEED Green Building Rating System and regional product criteria within the LEED Green Building rating system are not based on comprehensive

Victoria, University of

135

Life Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case of vertical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste Water Treatment Plant (Renou, 2006) and wastewater sanitation systems (Doka, 2007). ApplicationLife Cycle environmental Assessment (LCA) of sanitation systems including sewerage: Case The article presents the application of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to a complete sanitation system including

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

136

System Losses Study - FIT (Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This team aimed to understand the broad implications of changes of operating performance and parameters of a fuel cycle component on the entire system. In particular, this report documents the study of the impact of changing the loss of fission products into recycled fuel and the loss of actinides into waste. When the effort started in spring 2009, an over-simplified statement of the objective was the number of nines how would the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, and waste management change as the number of nines of separation efficiency changed. The intent was to determine the optimum losses of TRU into waste for the single system that had been the focus of the Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP), namely sustained recycle in burner fast reactors, fed by transuranic (TRU) material recovered from used LWR UOX-51 fuel. That objective proved to be neither possible (insufficient details or attention to the former GNEP options, change in national waste management strategy from a Yucca Mountain focus) nor appropriate given the 2009-2010 change to a science-based program considering a wider range of options. Indeed, the definition of losses itself changed from the loss of TRU into waste to a generic definition that a loss is any material that ends up where it is undesired. All streams from either separation or fuel fabrication are products; fuel feed streams must lead to fuels with tolerable impurities and waste streams must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for one or more disposal sites. And, these losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of TRU into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. The effort has provided a mechanism for connecting these three Campaigns at a technical level that had not previously occurred asking smarter and smarter questions, sometimes answering them, discussing assumptions, identifying R&D needs, and gaining new insights. The FIT model has been a forcing function, helping the team in this endeavor. Models dont like TBD as an input, forcing us to make assumptions and see if they matter. A major addition in FY 2010 was exploratory analysis of modified open fuel cycles, employing minimum fuel treatment as opposed to full aqueous or electrochemical separation treatment. This increased complexity in our analysis and analytical tool development because equilibrium conditions do not appear sustainable in minimum fuel treatment cases, as was assumed in FY 2009 work with conventional aqueous and electrochemical separation. It is no longer reasonable to assume an equilibrium situation exists in all cases.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert S. Cherry; Denia Djokic; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Novel Power Cycle for Combined-Cycle Systems and Utility Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wi th the Wes t inghouse SOlD gas turb ',ne, but also compared to combined-cycle sys terns wi th the advanced gas turbi ie 700lF of General Electric, despite qhe fact that the efficiency of the 7001.F gas turbine per se is higher than...

Kalina, A. L.

138

Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Full fuel-cycle comparison of forklift propulsion systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen has received considerable attention as an alternative to fossil fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) investigates the technical and economic feasibility of promising new technologies, such as hydrogen fuel cells. A recent report for DOE identified three near-term markets for fuel cells: (1) Emergency power for state and local emergency response agencies, (2) Forklifts in warehousing and distribution centers, and (3) Airport ground support equipment markets. This report examines forklift propulsion systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell propulsion for existing technologies based on batteries and fossil fuels. Industry data and the Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources, back to the primary feedstocks for fuel production. Also considered are other environmental concerns at work locations. The benefits derived from using fuel-cell propulsion are determined by the sources of electricity and hydrogen. In particular, fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen made from the reforming of natural gas had lower impacts than those using hydrogen from electrolysis.

Gaines, L. L.; Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Description of Transmutation Library for Fuel Cycle System Analyses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the Transmutation Library that is used in Fuel Cycle System Analyses. This version replaces the 2008 version.[Piet2008] The Transmutation Library has the following objectives: Assemble past and future transmutation cases for system analyses. For each case, assemble descriptive information such as where the case was documented, the purpose of the calculation, the codes used, source of feed material, transmutation parameters, and the name of files that contain raw or source data. Group chemical elements so that masses in separation and waste processes as calculated in dynamic simulations or spreadsheets reflect current thinking of those processes. For example, the CsSr waste form option actually includes all Group 1A and 2A elements. Provide mass fractions at input (charge) and output (discharge) for each case. Eliminate the need for either fission product other or actinide other while conserving mass. Assessments of waste and separation cannot use fission product other or actinide other as their chemical behavior is undefined. Catalog other isotope-specific information in one place, e.g., heat and dose conversion factors for individual isotopes. Describe the correlations for how input and output compositions change as a function of UOX burnup (for LWR UOX fuel) or fast reactor (FR) transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) for either FR-metal or FR-oxide. This document therefore includes the following sections: Explanation of the data set information, i.e., the data that describes each case. In no case are all of the data presented in the Library included in previous documents. In assembling the Library, we return to raw data files to extract the case and isotopic data, into the specified format. Explanation of which isotopes and elements are tracked. For example, the transition metals are tracked via the following: two Zr isotopes, Zr-other, Tc99, Tc-other, two Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd isotopes, Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd-other, four other specific TM isotopes, and TM-other. Mo-Ru-Rh-Pd are separated because their content constrains the loading of waste in glass, so we have to know the mass of those elements independent of others. Rules for collapsing long lists of isotopes (~1000) to the 81 items in the library. For each tracked isotope, we define which short-lived isotopes mass (at t=0) is included with the mass of the tracked isotope at t=0, which short-lived radioactive progeny must be accounted for when the tracked isotope decays, and to which of the other 80 items the mass of the tracked isotope goes when it decays. Explanation of where raw data files can be found on the fuel cycle data portal. Explanation of generic cross section sets Explanation of isotope-specific parameters such as heat and dose conversion factors Explanation of the LWR UOX burnup and FR TRU CR correlations.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Edward A. Hoffman

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

APPLICATION OF TURBOMACHINERY IN SOLAR-ASSISTED RANKINE COOLING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and capacities for the centrifugal compressor in the aira double inlet to the centrifugal compressor or axial flowgreater than 70%) centrifugal compressors can be utilized

Leech, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle impacts and costs of photovoltaic systems: currentcosts: 2004early 2005 status. Progress in Photovoltaicphotovoltaic systems often do not consider panel installation, even though it is a major component of their financial cost.

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Programs understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear powers cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Total Quality Commissioning for HVAC Systems to Assure High Performance Throughout the Whole Life Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL QUALITY COMMISSIONING FOR HVAC SYSTEMS TO ASSURE HIGH PERFORMANCE THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE LIFE CYCLE By: Grahame E. Maisey, P.E., and Beverly Milestone, LEED AP Building Services Consultants INTRODUCTION Current HVAC systems... are not coming close to approaching life cycle performance expectations for energy, operation and maintenance, occupant comfort and productivity and longevity. HVAC systems in buildings claiming to be sustainable, with integrated, energy conscious design...

Maisey, G.; Milestone, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquidreplacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0 #12;Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0 Texas A...............................................................................................................................24 #12;Texas A&M IT Project Management Office System Development Life Cycle Template Guide V1.0 Texas

149

Dynamic response of the supercritical C0? Brayton recompression cycle to various system transients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supercritical carbon dioxide (SC0?) power conversion system has been suggested for use with many of the Generation IV nuclear reactors. The SC0? cycle is highly attractive because of its low operating temperatures and ...

Trinh, Tri Q. (Tri Quang)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Simplified thermoeconomic approach to cost allocation in acombined cycle cogeneration and district energy system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1997 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering SIMPLIFIED THERMOECONOMIC APPROACH TO COST ALLOCATION IN A COMBINED CYCLE COGENERATION AND DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEM A Thesis By JASON GRAHAM FLEMING... (Member) Jerald Caton (Head of Department) May 1997 lviajor Sui&ject: lviechanical Engineering ABSTRACT Simplified Thermoeconomic Approach to Cost Allocation in a Combined Cycle Cogeneration and District Energy System. (May 1997) Jason Graham...

Fleming, Jason Graham

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Composite turbine blade design options for Claude (open) cycle OTEC power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-scale turbine rotors made from composites offer several technical advantages for a Claude (open) cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system. Westinghouse Electric Corporation has designed a composite turbine rotor/disk using state-of-the-art analysis methods for large-scale (100-MW/sub e/) open cycle OTEC applications. Near-term demonstrations using conventional low-pressure turbine blade shapes with composite material would achieve feasibility and modern credibility of the open cycle OTEC power system. Application of composite blades for low-pressure turbo-machinery potentially improves the reliability of conventional metal blades affected by stress corrosion.

Penney, T.R.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

ARTICLE IN PRESS Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the BRC system, pyrophosphate (PPi) molecules are released during biopolymerization and are counted

Lee, Thomas H.

153

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combined heat and power systems. ASME Conference Proceedingsfor combined heat and power applications. ASME ConferenceRankine combined heat and power technology. ASME Conference

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Stability of Hybrid System Limit Cycles: Application to the Compass Gait Biped Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stability of Hybrid System Limit Cycles: Application to the Compass Gait Biped Robot Ian A. Hiskens a diverse range of application areas. Examples include power systems [1], robotics [2, 3], manufacturing [4 are illustrated using a com- pass gait biped robot example. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems are characterized

Hiskens, Ian A.

155

OPTIMAL DESIGN AND OPERATION OF HELIUM REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS USING THE GANNI CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The constant pressure ratio process, as implemented in the floating pressure - Ganni cycle, is a new variation to prior cryogenic refrigeration and liquefaction cycle designs that allows for optimal operation and design of helium refrigeration systems. This cycle is based upon the traditional equipment used for helium refrigeration system designs, i.e., constant volume displacement compression and critical flow expansion devices. It takes advantage of the fact that for a given load, the expander sets the compressor discharge pressure and the compressor sets its own suction pressure. This cycle not only provides an essentially constant system Carnot efficiency over a wide load range, but invalidates the traditional philosophy that the (TS) design condition is the optimal operating condition for a given load using the as-built hardware. As such, the Floating Pressure- Ganni Cycle is a solution to reduce the energy consumption while increasing the reliability, flexibility and stability of these systems over a wide operating range and different operating modes and is applicable to most of the existing plants. This paper explains the basic theory behind this cycle operation and contrasts it to the traditional operational philosophies presently used.

Venkatarao Ganni, Peter Knudsen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Metabolic Futile Cycles and Their Functions: A Systems Analysis of Energy and Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has long been hypothesized that futile cycles in cellular metabolism are involved in the regulation of biochemical pathways. Following the work of Newsholme and Crabtree, we develop a quantitative theory for this idea based on open-system thermodynamics and metabolic control analysis. It is shown that the {\\it stoichiometric sensitivity} of an intermediary metabolite concentration with respect to changes in steady-state flux is governed by the effective equilibrium constant of the intermediate formation, and the equilibrium can be regulated by a futile cycle. The direction of the shift in the effective equilibrium constant depends on the direction of operation of the futile cycle. High stoichiometric sensitivity corresponds to ultrasensitivity of an intermediate concentration to net flow through a pathway; low stoichiometric sensitivity corresponds to super-robustness of concentration with respect to changes in flux. Both cases potentially play important roles in metabolic regulation. Futile cycles actively shift the effective equilibrium by expending energy; the magnitude of changes in effective equilibria and sensitivities is a function of the amount of energy used by a futile cycle. This proposed mechanism for control by futile cycles works remarkably similarly to kinetic proofreading in biosynthesis. The sensitivity of the system is also intimately related to the rate of concentration fluctuations of intermediate metabolites. The possibly different roles of the two major mechanisms for cellular biochemical regulation, namely reversible chemical modifications via futile cycles and shifting equilibrium by macromolecular binding, are discussed.

Hong Qian; Daniel A. Beard

2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

157

annual cycle energy system: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

energy consumption and component stresses and instabilities. 1. FOREWORDS The micro-gas turbine based energy conversion systems represent one of the most recently developed...

158

Heat pump system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

Swenson, Paul F. (Cleveland, OH); Moore, Paul B. (Fedhaurn, FL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Thermodynamic Analysis of Combined Cycle District Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation systems that include a 10 MW Solar combustion gas turbine, a 4-MW steam turbine, a 100,000 pph heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), three 125,000 pph package boilers, and auxiliary equipment. In the analysis, actual system data is used to assess...

Suresh, S.; Gopalakrishnan, H.; Kosanovic, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

THE SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE (SDLC) Shirley Radack, Editor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to protect information and information systems is to integrate security into every step of the system process that starts with the initiation, analysis, design, and implementation, and continues through general guide that helps organizations plan for and implement security throughout the SDLC. The revised

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column.

Swerdlow, Harold P. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wittwer, Carl T. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

On-line DNA analysis system with rapid thermal cycling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This application describes an apparatus particularly suited for subjecting biological samples to any necessary sample preparation tasks, subjecting the sample to rapid thermal cycling, and then subjecting the sample to subsequent on-line analysis using one or more of a number of analytical techniques. The apparatus includes a chromatography device including an injection means, a chromatography pump, and a chromatography column. In addition, the apparatus also contains a capillary electrophoresis device consisting of a capillary electrophoresis column with an inlet and outlet end, a means of injection, and means of applying a high voltage to cause the differential migration of species of interest through the capillary column. Effluent from the liquid chromatography column passes over the inlet end of the capillary electrophoresis column through a tee structure and when the loading of the capillary electrophoresis column is desired, a voltage supply is activated at a precise voltage and polarity over a specific duration to cause sample species to be diverted from the flowing stream to the capillary electrophoresis column. A laser induced fluorescence detector preferably is used to analyze the products separated while in the electrophoresis column. 6 figs.

Swerdlow, H.P.; Wittwer, C.T.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Proceedings: 2003 Workshop on Life Cycle Management Planning for Systems, Structures, and Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings of the 2003 EPRI Life Cycle Management Workshop provide nuclear plant owners with an overview of the state of development of methods and tools for performing long-term planning for maintenance, aging management, and obsolescence management of systems, structures, and components important to a plant's long-term safety, power production, and value in a market-driven industry. The proceedings summarize the results of applying life cycle management at several plants.

None

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery Johan Peralez steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition engine, focusing in particular results on a steam process for SI engines, [3] on generic control issues and [4] which provides a comp

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

Mobile DNA can drive lineage extinction in prokaryotic populations D. J. RANKIN* , M. BICHSEL* & A. WAGNER*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile DNA can drive lineage extinction in prokaryotic populations D. J. RANKIN* , M. BICHSEL* & A of Bioinformatics, Quartier Sorge Ba^timent Ge´nopode, Lausanne, Switzerland Introduction Mobile genetic elements the individual or the population. Mobile genetic elements illustrate this principle well, because they can self

Rankin, Daniel

166

Assessment of dynamic energy conversion systems for radioisotope heat sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of dynamic conversion systems to convert the heat generated in a 7500 W(t) 90 Sr radioisotopic heat source to electricity is examined. The systems studies were Stirling; Brayton Cycle; three organic Rankines (ORCs) (Barber-Nichols/ORMAT, Sundstrand, and TRW); and an organic Rankine plus thermoelectrics. The systems were ranked for a North Warning System mission using a Los Alamos Multiattribute Decision Theory code. Three different heat source designs were used: case I with a beginning of life (BOL) source temperature of 640 C, case II with a BOL source temperature of 745/sup 0/C, and case III with a BOL source temperature of 945/sup 0/C. The Stirling engine system was the top-ranked system of cases I and II, closely followed by the ORC systems in case I and ORC plus thermoelectrics in case II. The Brayton cycle system was top-ranked for case III, with the Stirling engine system a close second. The use of /sup 238/Pu in heat source sizes of 7500 W(t) was examined and found to be questionable because of cost and material availability and because of additional requirements for analysis of safeguards and critical mass.

Thayer, G.R.; Mangeng, C.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and cycle time analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A medical device company challenged a research team to reduce the manufacturing floor space required for an occlusion system product by one third. The team first cataloged equipment location and size, detailed the processes ...

Peterson, Jennifer J. (Jennifer Jeanne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reduced gravity rankine cycle design and optimization with passive vortex phase separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Potential drawbacks to the technology in a reduced gravity environment include two-phase fluid management processes such as liquid-vapor phase separation. The most critical location for phase separation is at the boiler exit where only vapor must be sent...

Supak, Kevin Robert

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Optimisation criteria of a Rankine steam cycle powered by thorium HTR / Steven Cronier van Niekerk.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??HOLCIM has various cement production plants across India. These plants struggle to produce the projected amount of cement due to electricity shortages. Although coal is (more)

Van Niekerk, Steven Cronier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced rankine cycle Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

two-tank molten... C. Figure 6. Temperature-entropy diagram for a reheat-regenerative subcritical ... Source: Australian National University, Department of Engineering, Solar...

171

Organic Rankine Cycle Turbine for Exhaust Energy Recovery in a Heavy Truck  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthe U.S.Solar CompanyEngine | Department

172

Waste Heat-to-Power Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradley Nickell02-03 AUDITMotionWhen LifeDRAFT

173

Exhaust Heat Driven Rankine Cycle for a Heavy Duty Diesel Engine |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOEExhaust energy recovery2010

174

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

OPTIMIZATION WITH ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF PV BATTERY STAND-ALONE SYSTEMS OVER THE ENTIRE LIFE CYCLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of both the installed PV power and storage capacity (lead-acid battery technology for purposes). Keywords: Battery storage and control, Lifetime simulation, PV system. 1. INTRODUCTION Given the sizableOPTIMIZATION WITH ENERGY MANAGEMENT OF PV BATTERY STAND-ALONE SYSTEMS OVER THE ENTIRE LIFE CYCLE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

176

Brayton-cycle heat recovery-system characterization program. Subatmospheric-system test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The turbine tests and results for the Brayton cycle subatmospheric system (SAS) are summarized. A scaled model turbine was operated in the same environment as that which a full-scale SAS machine would experience from the hot effluent flue gas from a glass container furnace. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the effects of a simulated furnace flue gas stream on the turbine nozzles and blades. The following specific areas were evaluated: erosion of the turbine nozzles and blades from the dust in the flue gas, hot corrosion from alkali metal salts in the dust and acid vapor (sulfur trioxide and hydrogen chloride) in the flue gas, and fouling and flow blockage due to deposition and/or condensation from the flue gas constituents.

Burgmeier, L.; Leung, S.

1981-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Open-Cycle Vapor Compression Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the desired pressure level for process use. The compressor is driven by a gas turbine or gas engine prime mover. To enhance the system performance, the prime mover exhaust and/or cooling jacket heat is recovered to generate additional process steam or hot...

Pasquinelli, D. M.; Becker, F. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Reducing Life Cycle Cost By Energy Saving in Pump Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% by the available NPSH. The system should provide the highest NPSHA that is cost effective. Losses in the pump suction line are therefore even more wasteful of energy than those on the discharge ? Suction pipes should avoid restrictions which can cause gas...

Bower, J. R.

179

Towards Energy and Resource Efficient Manufacturing: A Processes and Systems Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the organic rankine cycle (ORC). In this case an organic ?temperature applications the ORC has more bene?ts than the117] demonstrated that the ORC-process can use the exhaust

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Solar's combined-cycle system utilizes novel steam-generator concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As escalating fuel costs force equipment users to seek more efficient prime movers, the combined-cycle system will become increasingly attractive because it retains the advantages of simple-cycle gas turbines - low installation costs, high availability, low maintenance, and low emission levels - while adding 40% power output from the steam-based system operated on the turbine exhaust. Solar Turbines International has sought to develop an automated, remote-control combined-cycle system that can be easily retrofitted to existing simple-cycle power stations. The key component giving the system its advantages over the hazardous, complex steam-drum-type boiler systems is a once-through dual-pressure steam-generator device that eliminates the need for drums and elaborate control mechanisms. Forty identical parallel tube circuits suspended from a single frame are connected to common inlet and discharge manifolds; the individual circuits are made of dual high- and low-pressure bundles, with each bundle having economizer, vaporizer, and superheating sections. The 40 circuits comprise one complete steam-generator module core matrix. By injecting the superheated low-pressure steam into the latter stages of the steam turbine, the dual-pressure feature improves the heat recovery by more than 12% over conventional devices. The only water treatment that the corrosion-resistant tube material requires is the removal of dissolved solids.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Development of alternate extractant systems for fast reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the limitations of TBP in processing of high burn-up, Pu-rich fast reactor fuels, there is a need to develop alternate extractants for fast reactor fuel processing. In this context, our Centre has been examining the suitability of alternate tri-alkyl phosphates. Third phase formation in the extraction of Th(IV) by TBP, tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) and tri-2-methyl-butyl phosphate (T2MBP) from nitric acid media has been investigated under various conditions to derive conclusions on their application for extraction of Pu at macro levels. The chemical and radiolytic degradation of tri-n-amyl-phosphate (TAP) diluted in normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) in the presence of nitric acid has been investigated by the measurement of plutonium retention in organic phase. The potential application of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been explored. Extraction of uranium (VI) and palladium (II) from nitric acid medium by commercially available RTIL and tri-n-butyl phosphate solution in RTIL have been studied and the feasibility of electrodeposition of uranium as uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and palladium (II) as metallic palladium from the loaded organic phase have been demonstrated. This paper describes results of the above studies and discusses the suitability of the systems for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. (authors)

Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Suresh, A.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603 102 (India)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Statistical Characterization of School Bus Drive Cycles Collected via Onboard Logging Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to characterize the dynamics typical of school bus operation, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers set out to gather in-use duty cycle data from school bus fleets operating across the country. Employing a combination of Isaac Instruments GPS/CAN data loggers in conjunction with existing onboard telemetric systems resulted in the capture of operating information for more than 200 individual vehicles in three geographically unique domestic locations. In total, over 1,500 individual operational route shifts from Washington, New York, and Colorado were collected. Upon completing the collection of in-use field data using either NREL-installed data acquisition devices or existing onboard telemetry systems, large-scale duty-cycle statistical analyses were performed to examine underlying vehicle dynamics trends within the data and to explore vehicle operation variations between fleet locations. Based on the results of these analyses, high, low, and average vehicle dynamics requirements were determined, resulting in the selection of representative standard chassis dynamometer test cycles for each condition. In this paper, the methodology and accompanying results of the large-scale duty-cycle statistical analysis are presented, including graphical and tabular representations of a number of relationships between key duty-cycle metrics observed within the larger data set. In addition to presenting the results of this analysis, conclusions are drawn and presented regarding potential applications of advanced vehicle technology as it relates specifically to school buses.

Duran, A.; Walkowicz, K.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Life Cycle Inventory of CO2 in an Enhanced Oil Recovery System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Inventory of CO2 in an Enhanced Oil Recovery System P A U L I N A J A R A M I L L O manuscript received August 27, 2009. Accepted September 14, 2009. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been into an oil reservoir to reduce oil viscosity,reduceinterfacialtension,andcauseoilswellingwhich improves oil

Jaramillo, Paulina

184

A review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Advanced" (or second generation) biofuels Bioethanol (E100, E85, E10, ETBE) from lignocellu- losicA review of life-cycle analysis studies on liquid biofuel systems for the transport sector Eric D interest in biofuels for climate change mitigation. This article reviews the rich literature of published

185

Cycle Evaluations of Reversible Chemical Reactions for Solar Thermochemical Energy Storage in Support of Concentrating Solar Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production and storage of thermochemical energy is a possible route to increase capacity factors and reduce the Levelized Cost of Electricity from concentrated solar power generation systems. In this paper, we present the results of cycle evaluations for various thermochemical cycles, including a well-documented ammonia closed-cycle along with open- and closed-cycle versions of hydrocarbon chemical reactions. Among the available reversible hydrocarbon chemical reactions, catalytic reforming-methanation cycles are considered; specifically, various methane-steam reforming cycles are compared to the ammonia cycle. In some cases, the production of an intermediate chemical, methanol, is also included with some benefit being realized. The best case, based on overall power generation efficiency and overall plant capacity factor, was found to be an open cycle including methane-steam reforming, using concentrated solar energy to increase the chemical energy content of the reacting stream, followed by combustion to generate heat for the heat engine.

Krishnan, Shankar; Palo, Daniel R.; Wegeng, Robert S.

2010-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Effective hydrogen generation and resource circulation based on sulfur cycle system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the effective hydrogen generation from H{sub 2}S, it should be compatible that the increscent of the photocatalytic (or electrochemical) activities and the development of effective utilization method of by-products (poly sulfide ion). In this study, system integration to construct the sulfur cycle system, which is compatible with the increscent of the hydrogen and or electron energy generation ratio and resource circulation, is investigated. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation rate can be enhanced by using stratified photocatalysts. Photo excited electron can be transpired to electrode to convert the electron energy to hydrogen energy. Poly sulfide ion as the by-products can be transferred into elemental sulfur and/or industrial materials such as rubber. Moreover, elemental sulfur can be transferred into H{sub 2}S which is the original materials for hydrogen generation. By using this system integration, the sulfur cycle system for the new energy generation can be constructed.

Takahashi, Hideyuki; Mabuchi, Takashi; Hayashi, Tsugumi; Yokoyama, Shun; Tohji, Kazuyuki [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University 6-6-20, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF SYSTEM CYCLING, EVAPORATOR AIRFLOW, AND CONDENSER COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... COIL FOULING ON THE PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL SPLIT-SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS A Thesis by JEFFREY BRANDON DOOLEY Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nuclear Systems Enhanced Performance Program, Maintenance Cycle Extension in Advanced Light Water Reactor Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A renewed interest in new nuclear power generation in the US has spurred interest in developing advanced reactors with features which will address the public's concerns regarding nuclear generation. However, it is economic performance which will dictate whether any new orders for these plants will materialize. Economic performance is, to a great extent, improved by maximizing the time that the plant is on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Indeed, the strategy for the advanced light water reactor plant IRIS (International Reactor, Innovative and Secure) is to utilize an eight year operating cycle. This report describes a formalized strategy to address, during the design phase, the maintenance-related barriers to an extended operating cycle. The top-level objective of this investigation was to develop a methodology for injecting component and system maintainability issues into the reactor plant design process to overcome these barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the IRIS design. The first step in meeting the top-level objective was to determine the types of operating cycle length barriers that the IRIS design team is likely to face. Evaluation of previously identified regulatory and investment protection surveillance program barriers preventing a candidate operating PWR from achieving an extended (48 month) cycle was conducted in the context of the IRIS design. From this analysis, 54 known IRIS operating cycle length barriers were identified. The resolution methodology was applied to each of these barriers to generate design solution alternatives for consideration in the IRIS design. The methodology developed has been demonstrated to narrow the design space to feasible design solutions which enable a desired operating cycle length, yet is general enough to have broad applicability. Feedback from the IRIS design team indicates that the proposed solutions to the investigated operating cycle length barriers are both feasible and consistent with sound design practice.

Professor Neill Todreas

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Modular symbols for reductive groups and p-adic Rankin-Selberg convolutions over number fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a construction of a wide class of modular symbols attached to reductive groups. As an application we construct a p-adic distribution interpolating the special values of the twisted Rankin-Selberg L-function attached to cuspidal automorphic representations of GL(n) and GL(n-1) over number fields. If the representations are ordinary at p, our distribution is bounded and gives rise to a p-adic L-function.

Januszewski, Fabian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dornfeld, Chair Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a powerful1 Introduction Life cycle assessment (LCA) aids consumers inDefinition Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a holistic method

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

An Indigenous Application for Estimating Carbon footprint of academia library systems based on life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a thorough Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of all the componentsWarming Potential (GWP), Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), Carbonbe calculated using a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) method, or

Garg, Saurabh; David Dornfeld

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Energy and Society (ER100/PP184/ER200/PP284) Fall 2013 Topics: Thermodynamics of energy systems; Power Loss; Peak Oil; Energy economics. Problem Set #3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

newly built generators (940 Mwe total) are combined cycle (Brayton and Rankine cycles), whereas the difference between the Brayton Cycle and Combined Cycle and label all components. In thermodynamic terms the combined cycle generators. Assume that the performance of the gas turbines in these generators is the same

Kammen, Daniel M.

193

A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production cost and air emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind emissions impacts of coal cycling in power systems with large-scale wind penetration David Luke Oates, and SO2 emissions as well as for the profitability of coal plants, as calculated by our dispatch model

Jaramillo, Paulina

195

The Role of Modeling in Clinical Information System Development Life-Cycle Mor Peleg, Department of Information Systems, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Role of Modeling in Clinical Information System Development Life-Cycle Mor Peleg, Department different stake holders. Conceptual modeling can play important roles in the development life-cycle. If these requirements are identified early in the development life-cycle then it is easier and more cost

Peleg, Mor

196

Apparatus and methods for supplying auxiliary steam in a combined cycle system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

To provide auxiliary steam, a low pressure valve is opened in a combined cycle system to divert low pressure steam from the heat recovery steam generator to a header for supplying steam to a second combined cycle's steam turbine seals, sparging devices and cooling steam for the steam turbine if the steam turbine and gas turbine lie on a common shaft with the generator. Cooling steam is supplied the gas turbine in the combined cycle system from the high pressure steam turbine. Spent gas turbine cooling steam may augment the low pressure steam supplied to the header by opening a high pressure valve whereby high and low pressure steam flows are combined. An attemperator is used to reduce the temperature of the combined steam in response to auxiliary steam flows above a predetermined flow and a steam header temperature above a predetermined temperature. The auxiliary steam may be used to start additional combined cycle units or to provide a host unit with steam turbine cooling and sealing steam during full-speed no-load operation after a load rejection.

Gorman, William G. (Ballston Spa, NY); Carberg, William George (Ballston Spa, NY); Jones, Charles Michael (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Conceptual design and techno-economic assessment of integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct steam generation (DSG) in parabolic trough collectors causes an increase to competitiveness of solar thermal power plants (STPP) by substitution of oil with direct steam generation that results in lower investment and operating costs. In this study the integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology is introduced and techno-economic assessment of this plant is reported compared with two conventional cases. Three considered cases are: an integrated solar combined cycle system with DSG technology (ISCCS-DSG), a solar electric generating system (SEGS), and an integrated solar combined cycle system with HTF (heat transfer fluid) technology (ISCCS-HTF). This study shows that levelized energy cost (LEC) for the ISCCS-DSG is lower than the two other cases due to reducing O and M costs and also due to increasing the heat to electricity net efficiency of the power plant. Among the three STPPs, SEGS has the lowest CO{sub 2} emissions, but it will operate during daytime only. (author)

Nezammahalleh, H.; Farhadi, F.; Tanhaemami, M. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, No 593 Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect from CO2 emission resulting from the combustion of fossil fuels in utility power plants and the use of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, which is currently thought to affect depletion of the ozone layer. The ban on fluorocarbon fluids has been...LIFE CYCLE COST ANALYSIS OF WASTE HEAT OPERATED ABSORPTION COOLING SYSTEMS FOR BUILDING HVAC APPLICATIONS V. Murugavel and R. Saravanan Refrigeration and Air conditioning Laboratory Department of Mechanical Engineering, Anna University...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Reducing the Carbon Footprint of Commercial Refrigeration Systems Using Life Cycle Climate Performance Analysis: From System Design to Refrigerant Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) analysis is used to estimate lifetime direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent gas emissions of various refrigerant options and commercial refrigeration system designs, including the multiplex DX system with various hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants, the HFC/R744 cascade system incorporating a medium-temperature R744 secondary loop, and the transcritical R744 booster system. The results of the LCCP analysis are presented, including the direct and indirect carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for each refrigeration system and refrigerant option. Based on the results of the LCCP analysis, recommendations are given for the selection of low GWP replacement refrigerants for use in existing commercial refrigeration systems, as well as for the selection of commercial refrigeration system designs with low carbon dioxide equivalent emissions, suitable for new installations.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE MONOCRYSTALLINE SILICON PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS: ENERGY performance, energy rating, c-Si, cost reduction 1 INTRODUCTION Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) is a framework PAYBACK TIMES AND NET ENERGY PRODUCTION VALUE Vasilis Fthenakis1,2 , Rick Betita2 , Mark Shields3 , Rob

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201

Marine geochemical data assimilation in an efficient Earth System Model of global biogeochemical cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract. We have extended the 3-D ocean based Grid ENabled Integrated Earth system model (GENIE-1) to help understand the role of ocean biogeochemistry and marine sediments in the long-term (?100 to 100 000 year) regulation of atmospheric CO2, and the importance of feedbacks between CO2 and climate. Here we describe the ocean carbon cycle, which in its first incarnation is based around a simple single nutrient (phosphate) control on biological productivity. The addition of calcium carbonate preservation in deep-sea sediments and its role in regulating atmospheric CO2 is presented elsewhere (Ridgwell and Hargreaves, 2007). We have calibrated the model parameters controlling ocean carbon cycling in GENIE-1 by assimilating 3-D observational datasets of phosphate and alkalinity using an ensemble Kalman filter method. The calibrated (mean) model predicts

A. Ridgwell; J. C. Hargreaves; N. R. Edwards; J. D. Annan; T. M. Lenton; R. Marsh; A. Yool; A. Watson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Life cycle assessment of base-load heat sources for district heating system options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose There has been an increased interest in utilizing renewable energy sources in district heating systems. District heating systems are centralized systems that provide heat for residential and commercial buildings in a community. While various renewable and conventional energy sources can be used in such systems, many stakeholders are interested in choosing the feasible option with the least environmental impacts. This paper evaluates and compares environmental burdens of alternative energy source options for the base load of a district heating center in Vancouver, British Columbia (BC) using the life cycle assessment method. The considered energy sources include natural gas, wood pellet, sewer heat, and ground heat. Methods The life cycle stages considered in the LCA model cover all stages from fuel production, fuel transmission/transportation, construction, operation, and finally demolition of the district heating system. The impact categories were analyzed based on the IMPACT 2002+ method. Results and discussion On a life-cycle basis, the global warming effect of renewable energy options were at least 200 kgeqCO2 less than that of the natural gas option per MWh of heat produced by the base load system. It was concluded that less than 25% of the upstream global warming impact associated with the wood pellet energy source option was due to transportation activities and about 50% of that was resulted from wood pellet production processes. In comparison with other energy options, the wood pellets option has higher impacts on respiratory of inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, acidification, and nutrification categories. Among renewable options, the global warming impact of heat pump options in the studied case in Vancouver, BC, were lower than the wood pellet option due to BC's low carbon electricity generation profile. Ozone layer depletion and mineral extraction were the highest for the heat pump options due to extensive construction required for these options. Conclusions Natural gas utilization as the primary heat source for district heat production implies environmental complications beyond just the global warming impacts. Diffusing renewable energy sources for generating the base load district heat would reduce human toxicity, ecosystem quality degradation, global warming, and resource depletion compared to the case of natural gas. Reducing fossil fuel dependency in various stages of wood pellet production can remarkably reduce the upstream global warming impact of using wood pellets for district heat generation.

Ghafghazi, Saeed [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. A summary of results of Phase I is given in this volume. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance improvement options for the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is under development at Argonne National Laboratory as an advanced power conversion technology for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) as well as other Generation IV advanced reactors as an alternative to the traditional Rankine steam cycle. For SFRs, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle eliminates the need to consider sodium-water reactions in the licensing and safety evaluation, reduces the capital cost of the SFR plant, and increases the SFR plant efficiency. Even though the S-CO{sub 2} cycle has been under development for some time and optimal sets of operating parameters have been determined, those earlier development and optimization studies have largely been directed at applications to other systems such as gas-cooled reactors which have higher operating temperatures than SFRs. In addition, little analysis has been carried out to investigate cycle configurations deviating from the selected 'recompression' S-CO{sub 2} cycle configuration. In this work, several possible ways to improve S-CO{sub 2} cycle performance for SFR applications have been identified and analyzed. One set of options incorporates optimization approaches investigated previously, such as variations in the maximum and minimum cycle pressure and minimum cycle temperature, as well as a tradeoff between the component sizes and the cycle performance. In addition, the present investigation also covers options which have received little or no attention in the previous studies. Specific options include a 'multiple-recompression' cycle configuration, intercooling and reheating, as well as liquid-phase CO{sub 2} compression (pumping) either by CO{sub 2} condensation or by a direct transition from the supercritical to the liquid phase. Some of the options considered did not improve the cycle efficiency as could be anticipated beforehand. Those options include: a double recompression cycle, intercooling between the compressor stages, and reheating between the turbine stages. Analyses carried out as part of the current investigation confirm the possibilities of improving the cycle efficiency that have been identified in previous investigations. The options in this group include: increasing the heat exchanger and turbomachinery sizes, raising of the cycle high end pressure (although the improvement potential of this option is very limited), and optimization of the low end temperature and/or pressure to operate as close to the (pseudo) critical point as possible. Analyses carried out for the present investigation show that significant cycle performance improvement can sometimes be realized if the cycle operates below the critical temperature at its low end. Such operation, however, requires the availability of a heat sink with a temperature lower than 30 C for which applicability of this configuration is dependent upon the climate conditions where the plant is constructed (i.e., potential performance improvements are site specific). Overall, it is shown that the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle efficiency can potentially be increased to 45 %, if a low temperature heat sink is available and incorporation of larger components (e.g.., heat exchangers or turbomachinery) having greater component efficiencies does not significantly increase the overall plant cost.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Model Development Development of a system emulating the global carbon cycle in Earth system models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed a loosely coupled model (LCM) which can represent the outputs of a GCMbased Earth system model

K. Tachiiri; J. C. Hargreaves; J. D. Annan; A. Oka; A. Abe-ouchi; M. Kawamiya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar CHP system supplying arbitrary heat and power outputs.e Electrical power output of system Q Solar CHP to PV yearlysolar Rankine CHP system, sized equally in terms of peak power output,

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method and system to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and method to estimate variables in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system includes a sensor suite to measure respective plant input and output variables. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) receives sensed plant input variables and includes a dynamic model to generate a plurality of plant state estimates and a covariance matrix for the state estimates. A preemptive-constraining processor is configured to preemptively constrain the state estimates and covariance matrix to be free of constraint violations. A measurement-correction processor may be configured to correct constrained state estimates and a constrained covariance matrix based on processing of sensed plant output variables. The measurement-correction processor is coupled to update the dynamic model with corrected state estimates and a corrected covariance matrix. The updated dynamic model may be configured to estimate values for at least one plant variable not originally sensed by the sensor suite.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

210

Methods, systems and apparatus for adjusting duty cycle of pulse width modulated (PWM) waveforms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Embodiments of the present invention relate to methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of a multi-phase machine in a vector controlled motor drive system when the multi-phase machine operates in an overmodulation region. The disclosed embodiments provide a mechanism for adjusting a duty cycle of PWM waveforms so that the correct phase voltage command signals are applied at the angle transitions. This can reduce variations/errors in the phase voltage command signals applied to the multi-phase machine so that phase current may be properly regulated thus reducing current/torque oscillation, which can in turn improve machine efficiency and performance, as well as utilization of the DC voltage source.

Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Kinoshita, Michael H; Ransom, Ray M; Perisic, Milun

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Life Cycle Analysis System to Support D and D, Pollution Prevention, and Asset Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a life cycle analysis system (LCAS) developed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) decision-making regarding deactivation and decommissioning (D and D), pollution prevention (P2), and asset recovery, and its deployment to analyze the disposition of facilities and capital assets. Originally developed for use at the Oak Ridge East Tennessee Technology Park, this approach has been refined through application at Ohio Operations Office sites and is now being deployed at a number of DOE sites. Programs such as National Metals Recycle, the D and D Focus Area, P2, and Asset Utilization are successfully using the system to make better decisions resulting in lower cost to the taxpayer and improved environmental quality. The LCAS consists of a user-friendly, cost-effective, and analytically-sound decision-aiding process and a complementary suite of automated tools to handle data administration and multiple criteria life cycle analysis (LCA). LCA is a systematic and comprehensive process for identifying, assessing, and comparing alternatives for D and D, P2, and asset recovery at government sites, and for selecting and documenting a preferred alternative. An LCA includes all of the impacts (benefits and costs) that result from a course of action over the entire period of time affected by the action. The system also includes visualizations that aid communication and help make decision-making transparent. The LCAS has three major components related to data collection, decision alternative assessment, and making the decisions. Each component is discussed in-depth using the example of deployment of the LCAS to support asset recovery.

Bishop, L.; Tonn, B.E.; Yuracko, K.L.

1999-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Preliminary results of a dynamic system model for a closed-loop Brayton cycle coupled to a nuclear reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes preliminary results of a dynamic system model for a closed-loop Brayton-cycle that is coupled to a nuclear reactor. The current model assumes direct coupling between the reactor and the Brayton-cycle, however only minor additions are required to couple the Brayton-cycle through a heat exchanger to either a heat pipe reactor or a liquid metal cooled reactor. Few reactors have ever been coupled to closed Brayton-cycle systems. As such their behavior under dynamically varying loads, startup and shut down conditions, and requirements for safe and autonomous operation are largely unknown. Sandia National Laboratories has developed steady-state and dynamic models for closed-loop turbo-compressor systems (for space and terrestrial applications). These models are expected to provide a basic understanding of the dynamic behavior and stability of the coupled reactor and power generation loop. The model described in this paper is a lumped parameter model of the reactor, turbine, compressor, recuperator, radiator/waste-heat-rejection system and generator. More detailed models that remove the lumped parameter simplifications are also being developed but are not presented here. The initial results of the model indicate stable operation of the reactor-driven Brayton-cycle system and its ability to load-follow. However, the model also indicates some counter-intuitive behavior for the complete coupled system. This behavior will require the use of a reactor control system to select an appropriate reactor operating temperature that will optimize the performance of the complete spacecraft system. We expect this model and subsequent versions of it to provide crucial information in developing procedures for safe start up, shut down, safe-standby, and other autonomous operating modes. Ultimately, Sandia hopes to validate these models and to perform nuclear ground tests of reactor-driven closed Brayton-cycle systems in our nuclear research facilities.

Wright, Steven Alan

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c,e Low-Intermediate Gas turbine exhaust, boiler exhaust,cycles for micro-gas turbines," Applied Thermal Engineering,Tiba, "Optimization of gas-turbine combined cycles for solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Rankine thermodynamics matches Californiaconsidered, using average California solar insolation dataelectricity. Solar Rankine thermodynamics matches California

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen toLeveraging National Laboratories toPower Systems |vii

218

Thermionic-combustor combined-cycle system. Volume III. A thermionic converter design for gas-turbine combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermionic converter design is strongly influenced by the configuration of the heat source and heat sink. These two externally imposed conditions are of major importance in arriving at a viable converter design. In addition to these two factors, the economical and reliable transfer of energy internally within the converter is another major item in the design. The effects of the engineering trade-offs made in arriving at the design chosen for the Gas Turbine Combined Cycle combustor are reviewed.

Fitzpatrick, G.O.; Britt, E.J.; Dick, R.S. Jr.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

System study of an MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. HTGL report No. 134  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consisted of an MHD plant with a gas turbine bottoming plant, and required no cooling water. The gas turbine plant uses only air as its working fluid and receives its energy input from the MHD exhaust gases by means of metal tube heat exchangers. In addition to the base case systems, vapor cycle variation systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems required a small amount of cooling water. The MHD/gas turbine systems were modeled with sufficient detail, using realistic component specifications and costs, so that the thermal and economic performance of the system could be accurately determined. Three cases of MHD/gas turbine systems were studied, with Case I being similar to an MHD/steam system so that a direct comparison of the performances could be made, with Case II being representative of a second generation MHD system, and with Case III considering oxygen enrichment for early commercial applications. The systems are nominally 800 MW/sub e/ to 1000 MW/sub e/ in size. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine system has very good thermal and economic performances while requiring either little or no cooling water. Compared to the MHD/steam system which has a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW, the Base Case I MHD/gas turbine system has a heat rate which is 13% higher and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher while requiring no cooling water. Case II results show that an improved performance can be expected from second generation MHD/gas turbine systems. Case III results show that an oxygen enriched MHD/gas turbine system may be attractive for early commercial applications in dry regions of the country.

Annen, K.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nuclear Power and Its Fuel Cycle No technological system more dramatically illustrates the central themes of this book-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

109 7 Nuclear Power and Its Fuel Cycle No technological system more dramatically illustrates of ignoring the social, political, and environmental dimensions of innovation - than nuclear power. Once widely seen as an energy source of almost unlimited potential, nuclear power is today expanding in just

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transient Accident Analysis of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Converter Coupled to an Autonomous Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Supercritical Carbon Dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton Cycle is a promising advanced alternative to the Rankine saturated steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle for the energy converters of specific reactor concepts belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. A new plant dynamics analysis computer code has been developed for simulation of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to an autonomous, natural circulation Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The plant dynamics code was used to simulate the whole-plant response to accident conditions. The specific design features of the reactor concept influencing passive safety are discussed and accident scenarios are identified for analysis. Results of calculations of the whole-plant response to loss-of-heat sink, loss-of-load, and pipe break accidents are demonstrated. The passive safety performance of the reactor concept is confirmed by the results of the plant dynamics code calculations for the selected accident scenarios. (authors)

Moisseytsev, Anton; Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Transient accident analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to an autonomous lead-cooled fast reactor.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle is a promising advanced alternative to the Rankine steam cycle and recuperated gas Brayton cycle for the energy converters of specific reactor concepts belonging to the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. A new plant dynamics analysis computer code has been developed for simulation of the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to an autonomous, natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The plant dynamics code was used to simulate the whole-plant response to accident conditions. The specific design features of the reactor concept influencing passive safety are discussed and accident scenarios are identified for analysis. Results of calculations of the whole-plant response to loss-of-heat sink, loss-of-load, and pipe break accidents are demonstrated. The passive safety performance of the reactor concept is confirmed by the results of the plant dynamics code calculations for the selected accident scenarios.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartment ofof

224

Comparative Fuel Cycle Analysis of Critical and Subcritical Fast Reactor Transmutation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle analyses are performed to evaluate the impacts of further transmutation of spent nuclear fuel on high-level and low-level waste mass flows into repositories, on the composition and toxicity of the high-level waste, on the capacity of high-level waste repositories, and on the proliferation resistance of the high-level waste. Storage intact of light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel, a single recycle in a LWR of the plutonium as mixed-oxide fuel, and the repeated recycle of the transuranics in critical and subcritical fast reactors are compared with the focus on the waste management performance of these systems. Other considerations such as cost and technological challenges were beyond the scope of this study. The overall conclusion of the studies is that repeated recycling of the transuranics from spent nuclear fuel would significantly increase the capacity of high-level waste repositories per unit of nuclear energy produced, significantly increase the nuclear energy production per unit mass of uranium ore mined, significantly reduce the radiotoxicity of the waste streams per unit of nuclear energy produced, and significantly enhance the proliferation resistance of the material stored in high-level waste repositories.

Hoffman, Edward A.; Stacey, Weston M. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Photovoltaics Life Cycle Analysis Vasilis Fthenakis Center of Life Cycle Analysis Earth & Environmental Engineering Department Columbia University and National Photovoltaic (PV) EHS Research Center (air, water, solid) M, Q E PV array Photovoltaic modules Balance of System (BOS) (Inverters

226

Sustainable Management of Biogeochemical Cycles in Soils Amended with Bio-Resources from Livestock, Bioenergy, and Urban Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES IN SOILS AMENDED WITH BIO-RESOURCES FROM LIVESTOCK, BIOENERGY, AND URBAN SYSTEMS A Dissertation by RONNIE WAYNE SCHNELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...-RESOURCES FROM LIVESTOCK, BIOENERGY, AND URBAN SYSTEMS A Dissertation by RONNIE WAYNE SCHNELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

Schnell, Ronnie Wayne

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Simple uniaxial pressure device for ac-susceptibility measurements suitable for closed cycle refrigerator system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple design of the uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of ac-susceptibility at low temperatures using closed cycle refrigerator system is presented for the first time. This device consists of disc micrometer, spring holder attachment, uniaxial pressure cell, and the ac-susceptibility coil wound on stycast bobbin. It can work under pressure till 0.5 GPa and at the temperature range of 30-300 K. The performance of the system at ambient pressure is tested and calibrated with standard paramagnetic salts [Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Fe(NH{sub 4}SO{sub 4}){sub 2}6H{sub 2}O], Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Gd metal, Dy metal, superconductor (YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}), manganite (La{sub 1.85}Ba{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3}), and spin glass material (Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3}). The performance of the uniaxial pressure device is demonstrated by investigating the uniaxial pressure dependence of La{sub 1.85}Ba{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} single crystal with P parallel c axis. The Curie temperature (T{sub c}) decreases as a function of pressure with P parallel c axis (dT{sub c}/dP{sub parallelcaxis}=-11.65 K/GPa) up to 46 MPa. The design is simple, is user friendly, and does not require pressure calibration. Measurement can even be made on thin and small size oriented crystals. The failure of the coil is remote under uniaxial pressure. The present setup can be used as a multipurpose uniaxial pressure device for the measurement of Hall effect and thermoelectric power with a small modification in the pressure cell.

Arumugam, S.; Manivannan, N.; Murugeswari, A. [High Pressure Low Temperature Lab, School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024 (India)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultimate goal of this program is to identify the power block cycle conditions and/or configurations which could increase the overall thermal efficiency of the Baseline IGCC by about 8% on a relative basis (i.e., 8% on a heat rate basis). This document presents the cycle conditions and/or the configurations for evaluation in an initial screening analysis. These cycle conditions and/or configurations for investigation in the screening analysis are identified by literature searches and brain storming sessions. The screening analysis in turn narrows down the number of promising cases for detailed analysis.

A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient HD Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbocompounding Rankine Cycle Low Friction components Lube system Cooling system VVA + turbo match VVA Turbo optimization 2900bar capability Comb match Increased PCP Optimum...

230

22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

231

22.251 / 22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

232

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Closed- Brayton-Cycle Solar Power Towers," ASME Journal ofNaF-NaBF4) cooled solar power tower plant is presented;high temperature solar power tower designs to date.

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Life cycle assessment of UK pig production systems: the impact of dietary protein source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was developed to evaluate the environmental impacts of producing 1 kg pig live weight. A comparison was made between dietary protein sources, i.e. imported soybean meal with the UK protein ...

Stephen, Katie Louise

2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

234

Impact of Charge Degradation on the Life Cycle Climate Performance of a Residential Air-Conditioning System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor compression systems continuously leak a small fraction of their refrigerant charge to the environment, whether during operation or servicing. As a result of the slow leak rate occurring during operation, the refrigerant charge decreases until the system is serviced and recharged. This charge degradation, after a certain limit, begins to have a detrimental effect on system capacity, energy consumption, and coefficient of performance (COP). This paper presents a literature review and a summary of previous experimental work on the effect of undercharging or charge degradation of different vapor compression systems, especially those without a receiver. These systems include residential air conditioning and heat pump systems utilizing different components and refrigerants, and water chiller systems. Most of these studies show similar trends for the effect of charge degradation on system performance. However, it is found that although much experimental work exists on the effect of charge degradation on system performance, no correlation or comparison between charge degradation and system performance yet exists. Thus, based on the literature review, three different correlations that characterize the effect of charge on system capacity and energy consumption are developed for different systems as follows: one for air-conditioning systems, one for vapor compression water-to-water chiller systems, and one for heat pumps. These correlations can be implemented in vapor compression cycle simulation tools to obtain a better prediction of the system performance throughout its lifetime. In this paper, these correlations are implemented in an open source tool for life cycle climate performance (LCCP) based design of vapor compression systems. The LCCP of a residential air-source heat pump is evaluated using the tool and the effect of charge degradation on the results is studied. The heat pump is simulated using a validated component-based vapor compression system model and the LCCP results obtained using the three charge degradation correlations are compared.

Beshr, Mohamed [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems. An evaluation based on life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the environmental results, integrated with those arising from mass and energy balances, of a research project on the comparative analysis of strategies for material and energy recovery from waste, funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research. The project, involving the cooperation of five University research groups, was devoted to the optimisation of material and energy recovery activities within integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems. Four scenarios of separate collection (overall value of 35%, 50% without the collection of food waste, 50% including the collection of food waste, 65%) were defined for the implementation of energetic, environmental and economic balances. Two sizes of integrated MSW management system (IWMS) were considered: a metropolitan area, with a gross MSW production of 750,000 t/year and an average province, with a gross MSW production of 150,000 t/year. The environmental analysis was conducted using Life Cycle Assessment methodology (LCA), for both material and energy recovery activities. In order to avoid allocation we have used the technique of the expansion of the system boundaries. This means taking into consideration the impact on the environment related to the waste management activities in comparison with the avoided impacts related to the saving of raw materials and primary energy. Under the hypotheses of the study, both for the large and for the small IWMS, the energetic and environmental benefits are higher than the energetic and environmental impacts for all the scenarios analysed in terms of all the indicators considered: the scenario with 50% separate collection in a drop-off scheme excluding food waste shows the most promising perspectives, mainly arising from the highest collection (and recycling) of all the packaging materials, which is the activity giving the biggest energetic and environmental benefits. Main conclusions of the study in the general field of the assessment of the environmental performance of any integrated waste management scheme address the importance of properly defining, beyond the design value assumed for the separate collection as a whole, also the yields of each material recovered; particular significance is finally related to the amount of residues deriving from material recovery activities, resulting on average in the order of 20% of the collected materials.

Giugliano, Michele; Cernuschi, Stefano [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Grosso, Mario, E-mail: mario.grosso@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano - DIIAR, Environmental Section, P.zza Leonardo da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development and Utilization of mathematical Optimization in Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past sixty years, a wide variety of nuclear power technologies have been theorized, investigated and tested to various degrees. These technologies, if properly applied, could provide a stable, long-term, economical source of CO2-free electric power. However, the recycling of nuclear fuel introduces a degree of coupling between reactor systems which must be accounted for when making long term strategic plans. This work investigates the use of a simulated annealing optimization algorithm coupled together with the VISION fuel cycle simulation model in order to identify attractive strategies from economic, evironmental, non-proliferation and waste-disposal perspectives, which each have associated an objective function. The simulated annealing optimization algorithm works by perturbing the fraction of new reactor capacity allocated to each available reactor type (using a set of heuristic rules) then evaluating the resulting deployment scenario outcomes using the VISION model and the chosen objective functions. These new scenarios, which are either accepted or rejected according the the Metropolis Criterion, are then used as the basis for further perturbations. By repeating this process several thousand times, a family of near-optimal solutions are obtained. Preliminary results from this work using a two-step, Once-through LWR to Full-recycle/FRburner deployment scenario with exponentially increasing electric demand indicate that the algorithm is capable of #12;nding reactor deployment pro#12;les that reduce the long-term-heat waste disposal burden relative to an initial reference scenario. Further work is under way to re#12;ne the current results and to extend them to include the other objective functions and to examine the optimization trade-o#11;s that exist between these di#11;erent objectives.

Turinsky, Paul; Hays, Ross

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

Improvement actions in waste management systems at the provincial scale based on a life cycle assessment evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: LCA was used for evaluating the performance of four provincial waste management systems. Milano, Bergamo, Pavia and Mantova (Italy) are the provinces selected for the analysis. Most of the data used to model the systems are primary. Significant differences were found among the provinces located in the same Region. LCA was used as a decision-supporting tool by Regione Lombardia. - Abstract: This paper reports some of the findings of the GERLA project: GEstione Rifiuti in Lombardia Analisi del ciclo di vita (Waste management in Lombardia Life cycle assessment). The project was devoted to support Lombardia Region in the drafting of the new waste management plan by applying a life cycle thinking perspective. The present paper mainly focuses on four Provinces in the Region, which were selected based on their peculiarities. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was adopted as the methodology to assess the current performance of the integrated waste management systems, to discuss strengths and weaknesses of each of them and to design their perspective evolution as of year 2020. Results show that despite a usual business approach that is beneficial to all the provinces, the introduction of technological and management improvements to the system provides in general additional energy and environmental benefits for all four provinces. The same improvements can be easily extended to the whole Region, leading to increased environmental benefits from the waste management sector, in line with the targets set by the European Union for 2020.

Rigamonti, L., E-mail: lucia.rigamonti@polimi.it; Falbo, A.; Grosso, M.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Energetic performance optimization of a capacitive deionization system operating with transient cycles and brackish water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

face economic water shortage [4], meaning that effective steps have to be taken, in terms of increasing cycles and brackish water Onur N. Demirer, Rachel M. Naylor, Carlos A. Rios Perez, Ellen Wilkes, Carlos analysis Water desalination using capacitive deionization (CDI) has been a recent topic of intense research

Hidrovo, Carlos H.

240

The stellar wind cycles and planetary radio emission of the Tau Boo system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tau Boo is an intriguing planet-host star that is believed to undergo magnetic cycles similar to the Sun, but with a duration that is about one order of magnitude smaller than that of the solar cycle. With the use of observationally derived surface magnetic field maps, we simulate the magnetic stellar wind of Tau Boo by means of three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations. As the properties of the stellar wind depend on the particular characteristics of the stellar magnetic field, we show that the wind varies during the observed epochs of the cycle. Although the mass loss-rates we find (~2.7e-12 Msun/yr) vary less than 3 per cent during the observed epochs of the cycle, our derived angular momentum loss-rates vary from 1.1 to 2.2e32erg. The spin-down times associated to magnetic braking range between 39 and 78Gyr. We also compute the emission measure from the (quiescent) closed corona and show that it remains approximately constant through these epochs at a value of ~10^{50.6} cm^{-3}. This suggests that a ma...

Vidotto, A A; Jardine, M; Donati, J F; Opher, M; Moutou, C; Catala, C; Gombosi, T I

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle System Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Modeling the Performance, Emissions, and Cost of an Entrained-Flow Gasification Combined Cycle Carolina State University ABSTRACT Gasification is a globally emerging technology in commercial markets for the conversion of a variety of feedstocks, including coal, heavy residue oil, biomass, solid waste, and others

Frey, H. Christopher

242

A Life Cycle for the Development of Autonomic Systems: The e-Mobility Showcase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concepts and their semantics, ASCENS wraps this into a holistic ensemble development life cycle (EDLC a practitioner's approach and demon- strate the application of the EDLC on the development of one of the key is structured as follows: Section II describes the e-Mobility case study and Section III outlines the EDLC

243

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Diesel Cycle: Since we use a Closed System, the work and heat transfers are calculated from changes in internal energy u  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Cycle: Since we use a Closed System, the work and heat transfers are calculated from changes of Diesels (and therefore potential th) are likely to be much higher, because rather than worrying about pre-ignition, we are counting on self-ignition! 1 #12;On top of that, Diesel cycles have no throttling losses, so

245

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

246

Dynamics of a relativistic Rankine vortex for a two-constituent superfluid in a weak perturbation of cylindrical symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a recent study of a stationary cylindrical solution for a relativistic two-constituent superfluid at low temperature limit, we propose to specify this solution under the form of a relativistic generalisation of a Rankine vortex (Potential vortex whose the core has a solid body rotation).Then we establish the dynamics of the central line of this vortex by supposing that the deviation from the cylindrical configuration is weak in the neighbourhood of the core of the vortex. In "stiff" material the Nambu-Goto equations are obtained.

B. Boisseau

1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

A review of "Secrets and Knowledge in Medicine and Science, 1500-1800" edited by Elaine Leong and Alisha Rankin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the view of musicians in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries that do not necessarily re#24; ect a historical development. Elaine Leong and Alisha Rankin, eds. Secrets and Knowledge in Medicine and Science, 1500-1800. Farnham, England and Burlington..., VT: Ashgate, 2011. ix + 247 pp. + 1 illus. $104.95. Review by #4; #5;#30; #18;. #31;#3;#15;#6;#3; , #5; #4;#3; #2; #6;#11; #14;#19; #2;#6;. #6;#7;#14;#20;#18;#2;, #7;#14; #2;#6;#14;#5;. We all have secrets. Individuals, institutions and nations...

Kelter, Irving A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The giant star of the symbiotic system YY Her: Rotation, Tidal wave, Solar-type cycle and Spots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the historical light curve of the symbiotic star YY Her, from 1890 up to December 2005. A secular declining trend is detected, at a rate of ~.01 magn in 1000 d, suggesting that the system could belong to the sub-class of symbiotic novae. Several outburst events are superposed on this slow decline. Three independent periodicities are identified in the light curve. A quasi-periodicity of 4650.7 d is detected for the outburst occurrence. We suggest that it is a signature of a solar-type magnetic dynamo cycle in the giant component. A period of 593.2 d modulates the quiescent light curve and it is identified as the binary period of the system. During outburst events the system shows a stable periodic oscillation of 551.4 d. We suggest that it is the rotation period of the giant.The secondary minima detected at some epochs of quiescence are probably due to dark spots on the surface of the rotating giant. The difference between the frequencies of these two last periods is the frequency of a tidal wave in the outer layers of the giant. A period which is a beat between the magnetic cycle and the tidal wave period is also apparent in the light curve. YY Her is a third symbiotic system exhibiting these cycles in their light curve, suggesting that a magnetic dynamo process is prevalent in the giant components of symbiotic stars, playing an important role in the outburst mechanism of some of these systems.

Liliana Formiggini; Elia M. Leibowitz

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

249

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Long-term soil warming and Carbon Cycle Feedbacks to the Climate System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the proposed research was to quantify and explain the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem. The research was done at an established soil warming experiment at the Harvard Forest in central Massachusetts Barre Woods site established in 2001. In the field, a series of plant and soil measurements were made to quantify changes in C storage in the ecosystem and to provide insights into the possible relationships between C-storage changes and nitrogen (N) cycling changes in the warmed plots. Field measurements included: 1) annual woody increment; 2) litterfall; 3) carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux from the soil surface; 4) root biomass and respiration; 5) microbial biomass; and 6) net N mineralization and net nitrification rates. This research was designed to increase our understanding of how global warming will affect the capacity of temperate forest ecosystems to store C. The work explored how soil warming changes the interactions between the C and N cycles, and how these changes affect land-atmosphere feedbacks. This core research question framed the project What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5oC soil temperature increase on net carbon (C) storage in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem? A second critical question was addressed in this research What are the effects of a sustained in situ 5{degrees}C soil temperature increase on nitrogen (N) cycling in a northeastern deciduous forest ecosystem?

Melillo, Jerry M.

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the UREX+3c fuel cycle and the Alternative Fuel Cycle (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Ultrafast and efficient coherence creation in ?-like atomic systems driven by nonlinearly chirped few-cycle pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report an ultrafast and efficient way to create the maximum coherence between the two lower states in a -like atomic systems, driven by two nonlinearly chirped few-cycle pulses. The phenomenon of coherent population trapping and electromagnetically induced population transfer are investigated by solving the appropriate density matrix equations without invoking the rotating wave approximation. The robustness of the scheme for maximum coherence against the variation of the laser parameters are tested numerically. We also demonstrate that the proposed scheme could be used to obtain complete population transfer to an initially empty ground state.

Amarendra K. Sarma; Parvendra Kumar

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Case study of verification, validation, and testing in the Automated Data Processing (ADP) system development life cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Staff of the Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Division of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) studies the role played by the organizational participants in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) that conduct verification, validation, and testing (VV T) activities at various stages in the automated data processing (ADP) system development life cycle (SDLC). A case-study methodology was used to assess the effectiveness of VV T activities (tasks) and products (inputs and outputs). The case selected for the study was a project designed to interface the compensation and pension (C P) benefits systems with the centralized accounts receivable system (CARS). Argonne developed an organizational SDLC VV T model and checklists to help collect information from C P/CARS participants on VV T procedures and activities, and these were then evaluated against VV T standards.

Riemer, C.A.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system: Theoretical considerations for nucleic acid quantification assays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In the BRC system, pyrophosphate (PPi) molecules are released during biopolymerization and are counted

Hassibi, Arjang

256

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 3.0:Life-Cycle Database for Wind Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The benefits of wind energy had previously been captured in the literature at an overview level with relatively low transparency or ability to understand the basis for that information. This has limited improvement and decision-making to larger questions such as wind versus other electrical sources (such as coal-fired plants). This research project has established a substantially different approach which is to add modular, high granularity life cycle inventory (lci) information that can be used by a wide range of decision-makers, seeking environmental improvement. Results from this project have expanded the understanding and evaluation of the underlying factors that can improve both manufacturing processes and specifically wind generators. The use of life cycle inventory techniques has provided a uniform framework to understand and compare the full range of environmental improvement in manufacturing, hence the concept of green manufacturing. In this project, the focus is on 1. the manufacturing steps that transform materials and chemicals into functioning products 2. the supply chain and end-of-life influences of materials and chemicals used in industry Results have been applied to wind generators, but also impact the larger U.S. product manufacturing base. For chemicals and materials, this project has provided a standard format for each lci that contains an overview and description, a process flow diagram, detailed mass balances, detailed energy of unit processes, and an executive summary. This is suitable for integration into other life cycle databases (such as that at NREL), so that broad use can be achieved. The use of representative processes allows unrestricted use of project results. With the framework refined in this project, information gathering was initiated for chemicals and materials in wind generation. Since manufacturing is one of the most significant parts of the environmental domain for wind generation improvement, this project research has developed a fundamental approach. The emphasis was place on individual unit processes as an organizing framework to understand the life cycle of manufactured products. The rearrangement of unit processes provides an efficient and versatile means of understanding improved manufactured products such as wind generators. The taxonomy and structure of unit process lci were developed in this project. A series of ten unit process lci were developed to sample the major segments of the manufacturing unit process taxonomy. Technical and economic effectiveness has been a focus of the project research in Task three. The use of repeatable modules for the organization of information on environmental improvement has a long term impact. The information developed can be used and reused in a variety of manufacturing plants and for a range of wind generator sizes and designs. Such a modular approach will lower the cost of life cycle analysis, that is often asked questions of carbon footprint, environmental impact, and sustainability. The use of a website for dissemination, linked to NREL, adds to the economic benefit as more users have access to the lci information. Benefit to the public has been achieved by a well-attended WSU conference, as well as presentations for the Kansas Wind Energy Commission. Attendees represented public interests, land owners, wind farm developers, those interested in green jobs, and industry. Another benefit to the public is the start of information flow from manufacturers that can inform individuals about products.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [K Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems inK Lovegrove and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: A life-cycle costing approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > The study aims at assessing economic performance of alternative scenarios of MSW. > The approach is the life-cycle costing (LCC). > Waste technologies must be considered as complementary into an integrated strategy. - Abstract: A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

Massarutto, Antonio [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Carli, Alessandro de, E-mail: alessandro.decarli@unibocconi.it [IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy); Graffi, Matteo [University of Udine, Udine (Italy); IEFE, Bocconi University, Milan (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1997. [15] R DiPippo, Geothermal Power Plants: Principles,Kalina, "New Binary Geothermal Power System," in ProceedingsConference on Geothermal Power Engineering, Sochi, Russia,

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

installed power from photovoltaic systems worldwide fromBest research photovoltaic efficiencies (Kazmerski,as a function of time for numerous types of photovoltaic

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Estimating changes in urban ozone concentrations due to life cycle emissions from hydrogen transportation systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production with gaseous hydrogen pipeline delivery, and2) central hydrogen production with pipeline delivery; and (Central hydrogen production with pipeline delivery systems

Wang, Guihua; Ogden, Joan M; Chang, Daniel P.Y.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

An Indigenous Application for Estimating Carbon footprint of academia library systems based on life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR ESTIMATING CARBON FOOTPRINT OF ACADEMIA LIBRARY SYSTEMSacross the world. A carbon footprint is a measure of thethat can calculate the carbon footprint of a library system

Garg, Saurabh; David Dornfeld

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system functional life, and energy mix consumed duringlocation influences the energy mix consumed duringlocation influences the energy mix offset by the output of

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Multi-Megawatt Power System Trade Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a larger task, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) was tasked to perform a trade study comparing liquid-metal cooled reactors having Rankine power conversion systems with gas-cooled reactors having Brayton power conversion systems. This report summarizes the approach, the methodology, and the results of that trade study. Findings suggest that either approach has the possibility to approach the target specific mass of 3-5 kg/kWe for the power system, though it appears either will require improvements to achieve that. Higher reactor temperatures have the most potential for reducing the specific mass of gas-cooled reactors but do not necessarily have a similar effect for liquid-cooled Rankine systems. Fuels development will be the key to higher reactor operating temperatures. Higher temperature turbines will be important for Brayton systems. Both replacing lithium coolant in the primary circuit with gallium and replacing potassium with sodium in the power loop for liquid systems increase system specific mass. Changing the feed pump turbine to an electric motor in Rankine systems has little effect. Key technologies in reducing specific mass are high reactor and radiator operating temperatures, low radiator areal density, and low turbine/generator system masses. Turbine/generator mass tends to dominate overall power system mass for Rankine systems. Radiator mass was dominant for Brayton systems.

Longhurst, Glen Reed; Schnitzler, Bruce Gordon; Parks, Benjamin Travis

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Cyclus fuel cycle simulation capabilities with the CYDER disposal system model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An algorithm and supporting database for rapid thermal repository loading calculation was implemented in CYDER. This algorithm employs a Specific Temperature Change (STC) method and has resulted from combining detailed spent nuclear fuel composition data with a detailed thermal repository performance analysis tool from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign. By abstraction of and benchmarking against these detailed thermal models, CYDER captures the dominant physics of thermal phenomena affecting repository capacity in various geologic media and as a function of spent fuel composition. Abstraction based on detailed computational thermal repository performance calculations with the LLNL semi-analytic model has resulted in implementation of the STC estimation algorithm and a supporting reference dataset. This method is capable of rapid estimation of temperature increase near emplacement tunnels as a function of waste composition, limiting radius, waste package spacing, near field thermal conductivity and near field thermal diffusivity. The sensitivity analyses and validation efforts conducted in this work demonstrate the capability of the CYDER tool to provide repository capacity and performance metrics in the context of dynamic fuel cycle.

Huff, K.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Space reactor/Stirling cycle systems for high power Lunar applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NASA`s Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has proposed the use of high power nuclear power systems on the lunar surface as a necessary alternative to solar power. Because of the long lunar night ({approximately} 14 earth days) solar powered systems with the requisite energy storage in the form of regenerative fuel cells or batteries becomes prohibitively heavy at high power levels ({approximately} 100 kWe). At these high power levels nuclear power systems become an enabling technology for variety of missions. One way of producing power on the lunar surface is with an SP-100 class reactor coupled with Stirling power converters. In this study, analysis and characterization of the SP-100 class reactor coupled with Free Piston Stirling Power Conversion (FPSPC) system will be performed. Comparison of results with previous studies of other systems, particularly Brayton and Thermionic, are made.

Schmitz, P.D. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Mason, L.S. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Feasibility of using power steering pumps in small-scale solar thermal electric power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of this study was to determine performance curves for a variety of positive displacement pumps in order to select an efficient and low cost option for use as a boiler feed pump in a 1-kWe organic Rankine cycle ...

Lin, Cynthia, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Integrated supercritical water gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems for improved performance and reduced operating costs in existing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A revolutionary hydrothermal heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is being developed to produce clean fuels for gas turbines from slurries and emulsions of opportunity fuels. Water can be above 80% by weight and solids below 20%, including coal fines, coal water fuels, biomass, composted municipal refuse, sewage sludge and bitumen/Orimulsion. The patented HRSG tubes use a commercial method of particle scrubbing to improve heat transfer and prevent corrosion and deposition on heat transfer surfaces. A continuous-flow pilot plant is planned to test the HRSG over a wide range of operating conditions, including the supercritical conditions of water, above 221 bar (3,205 psia) and 374 C (705 F). Bench scale data shows, that supercritical water gasification below 580 C (1,076 F) and low residence time without catalysts or an oxidizer can produce a char product that can contain carbon up to the amount of fixed carbon in the proximate analysis of the solids in the feed. This char can be burned with coal in an existing combustion system to provide the heat required for gasification. The new HRSG tubes can be retrofitted into existing power plant boilers for repowering of existing plants for improved performance and reduced costs. A special condensing turbine allows final low-temperature cleaning and maintains quality and combustibility of the fuel vapor for modern gas turbine in the new Vapor Transmission Cycle (VTC). Increased power output and efficiency can be provided for existing plants, while reducing fuel costs. A preliminary computer-based process simulation model has been prepared that includes material and energy balances that simulate commercial-scale operations of the VTC on sewage sludge and coal. Results predict over 40% HHV thermal efficiency to electric power from sewage sludge at more than 83% water by weight. The system appears to become autothermal (no supplemental fuel required) at about 35% fixed carbon in the feed. Thus, bituminous and lignite coal slurries could be gasified at less than 25% coal and more than 75% water. Preliminary life cycle cost analyses indicate that disposal fees for sewage sludge improve operating economics over fuel that must be purchased, the cost and schedule advantages of natural gas-fired combined cycle systems are preserved. Sensitivity analyses show that increasing capital costs by 50% can be offset by an increase in sewage sludge disposal fees of $10/metric ton.

Tolman, R.; Parkinson, W.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dual-temperature Kalina cycle for geothermal-solar hybrid power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis analyzes the thermodynamics of a power system coupling two renewable heat sources: low-temperature geothermal and a high-temperature solar. The process, referred to as a dual-temperature geothermal-solar Kalina ...

Boghossian, John G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Stochastic Life-cycle Analysis of Deteriorating Infrastructure Systems and an Application to Reinforced Concrete Bridges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigates the effect of seismic degradation on the reliability of reinforced concrete (RC) bridges. For this purpose, we model the seismic degradation process in the RC bridge columns which are the primary lateral load resisting system in a bridge...

Ramesh Kumar, 1982-

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Producer-Focused Life Cycle Assessment of Thin-Film Silicon Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at operational TF-Si PV plants. Hot UPW (T 85 C) is notPlants: Annual and Cumulative In- stalled Power Output Capacity. PVPV system may be much higher than for the coal-fired power plant.

Zhang, Teresa Weirui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Biological and environmental efficiency of high producing dairy systems through application of life cycle analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dairy production systems are an important global contributor to anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions including methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Due to the role GHG play in climate ...

Ross, Stephen Alexander

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Use of Tracers to Investigate Phosphate Cycling in SoilPlant Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of available P, excessive P inputs in other agro-ecosystems result in the pollution of surface waters (Frossard), making up virtually 100% of the total P on earth, and seven radioactive isotopes. Only two radioactive are introduced at extremely low rates in natural systems from the atmosphere (Benitez-Nelson and Buesseler 1999

Gilli, Adrian

278

Quantification and Reduction of Critical Uncertainties Associated with Carbon Cycle-Climate System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and function, and associated climate changes. The processes thought to dominate the sign and magnitude that changes in climate over the next several centuries will de- pend in part on anthropogenic emissions change is complicated by the existence of multiple climate system feedback loops connecting atmos- pheric

279

Web-based feedback system: the life cycle management as continuous maintenance of apartment facility information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to make it efficient. A database requires a database management system (DBMS), a set of computer programs for organizing the information in a database, to manage its structure and control access to the data stored in the database [9]. A DBMS supports... the structuring of the database in a standard format and provides tools for data input, verification, storage, retrieval, query, and manipulation. According to Ramakishman [26], DBMS is software, designed to assist in maintaining and utilizing large collection...

Jeong, Jin Su

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Global Impact of the Systemic Economies and MENA Business Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, and Spain. The time series data for the GCC block and the Euro Area block are constructed as cross-sectionally weighted averages of the domestic variables (described in detail below), using Purchasing Power... Systemic Countries Other Oil Exporters Algeria#3; China Canada GCC Countries Euro Area Ecuador#3; Bahrain#3; Austria Indonesia Kuwait#3; Belgium Mexico Oman#3; Finland Nigeria#3; Qatar#3; France Norway Saudi Arabia Germany Venezuela#3; UAE#3; Italy Iran#3...

Cashin, Paul; Mohaddes, Kamiar; Raissi, Mehdi

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Technology verification phase. Dynamic isotope power system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase I requirements of the Kilowatt Isotope Power System (KIPS) program were to make a detailed Flight System Conceptual Design (FSCD) for an isotope fueled organic Rankine cycle power system and to build and test a Ground Demonstration System (GDS) which simulated as closely as possible the operational characteristics of the FSCD. The activities and results of Phase II, the Technology Verification Phase, of the program are reported. The objectives of this phase were to increase system efficiency to 18.1% by component development, to demonstrate system reliability by a 5000 h endurance test and to update the flight system design. During Phase II, system performance was improved from 15.1% to 16.6%, an endurance test of 2000 h was performed while the flight design analysis was limited to a study of the General Purpose Heat Source, a study of the regenerator manufacturing technique and analysis of the hardness of the system to a laser threat. It was concluded from these tests that the GDS is basically prototypic of a flight design; all components necessary for satisfactory operation were demonstrated successfully at the system level; over 11,000 total h of operation without any component failure attested to the inherent reliability of this type of system; and some further development is required, specifically in the area of performance. (LCL)

Halsey, D.G.

1982-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

283

Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen toLeveraging National Laboratories toPower Systems |

284

Assessment of solar options for small power systems applications. Volume II. Identification and characterization of concepts for analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to provide DOE with an independent, objective assessment of the principal solar thermal conversion concepts that have the potential for achieving commercial success as small electric power sytems in the 1- to 10-MWe range. Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered in this study. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). These collectors can be combined with energy transport, energy storage, and power conversion subsystems in a wide variety of ways to formulate conceptual systems for electric power generation. In this study, attention was restricted to configurations that are potentially suitable for development as small power systems (1 to 10 MWe) in the long term (1990 to 2000), with initial commercialization by the mid-1980s. Cogeneration and total energy systems were beyond the scope of this study. All seven types of collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. Because they can operate at particularly high concentration ratios, two of the collectors (the Point Focus Central Receiver and the Point Focus Distributed Receiver) were also analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines. In addition, the latter of the two was analyzed with Stirling-cycle engines. With these engine options, 10 conceptual systems were formulated for analysis. Results are presented in detail. (WHK)

Laity, W.W.; Aase, D.T.; Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Drost, M.K.; Williams, T.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Preliminary studies on the heat exchanger option for S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle coupled to water cooled SMR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For more than a half century, the steam Rankine cycle had been the major power conversion cycle for a nuclear power plant. However, as the interest on the next generation reactors grows, a variety of alternative power conversion systems have been studied. Among them, the S-CO{sub 2} cycle (Supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle) is considered as a promising candidate due to several benefits such as 1) Relatively high thermal efficiency at relatively low turbine inlet temperature, 2) High efficiency with simple lay-out 3) Compactness of turbo-machineries. 4) Compactness of total cycle combined with PCHE (Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger). According to the conventional classification of heat exchangers (HE), there are three kind of HE, 1) Tubular HEs, 2) Plate-type HEs, 3) Extended surface HEs. So far, the researcher has mostly assumed PCHE type HE for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle due to its compactness with reasonably low pressure drop. However, PCHE is currently one of the most expensive components in the cycle, which can have a negative effect on the economics of the cycle. Therefore, an alternative for the HE should be seriously investigated. By comparing the operating condition (pressure and temperature) there are three kind of HE in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, 1) IHX (Intermediate Heat exchanger) 2) Recuperator and 3) Pre-cooler. In each heat exchanger, hot side and cold side coolants are different, i.e. reactor coolant to S-CO{sub 2} (IHX), S-CO{sub 2} to S-CO{sub 2}(Recuperator), S-CO{sub 2} to water (Pre-cooler). By considering all the attributes mentioned above, all existing types of heat exchangers are compared to find a possible alternative to PCHE. The comparing factors are 1) Size(volume), 2) Cost. Plate fin type HEs are considered to be the most competitive heat exchanger regarding the size and the cost after some improvements on the design limit are made. (authors)

Ahn, Y.; Lee, J. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. I. [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa Univ. of Science, Technology and Research (KUSTAR), P.O.Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Advanced thermochemical hydrogen cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to contribute to the development of practical thermochemical cycles for the production of hydrogen from water. Specific goals are: investigate and evaluate the technical and economic viability of thermochemical cycles as an advanced technology for producing hydrogen from water; investigate and evaluate the engineering principles involved in interfacing individual thermochemical cycles with the different thermal energy sources (high temperature fission, solar, and fusion); and conduct a continuing research and development effort to evaluate the use of solid sulfates, oxides and other compounds as potentially advanced cycles and as alternates to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ based cycles. Basic thermochemistry studies have been completed for two different steps in the decomposition of bismuth sulfate. Two different bismuth sulfate cycles have been defined for different sulfuric acid strengths. The eventual best cycle will depend on energy required to form sulfuric acid at different concentrations. A solids decomposition facility has been constructed and practical studies of solid decompositions are being conducted. The facility includes a rotary kiln system and a dual-particle fluidized bed system. Evaluation of different types of cycles for coupling with different heat sources is continuing.

Hollabaugh, C.M.; Bowman, M.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Analysis of Biomass/Coal Co-Gasification for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems with Carbon Capture.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In recent years, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Technology (IGCC) has become more common in clean coal power operations with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). (more)

Long, Henry A, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

System Evaluations and Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of system evaluations and lifecycle cost analyses performed for several different commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) hydrogen production concepts. The concepts presented in this report rely on grid electricity and non-nuclear high-temperature process heat sources for the required energy inputs. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate both central plant designs for large-scale hydrogen production (50,000 kg/day or larger) and forecourt plant designs for distributed production and delivery at about 1,500 kg/day. The HYSYS software inherently ensures mass and energy balances across all components and it includes thermodynamic data for all chemical species. The optimized designs described in this report are based on analyses of process flow diagrams that included realistic representations of fluid conditions and component efficiencies and operating parameters for each of the HTE hydrogen production configurations analyzed. As with previous HTE system analyses performed at the INL, a custom electrolyzer model was incorporated into the overall process flow sheet. This electrolyzer model allows for the determination of the average Nernst potential, cell operating voltage, gas outlet temperatures, and electrolyzer efficiency for any specified inlet steam, hydrogen, and sweep-gas flow rates, current density, cell active area, and external heat loss or gain. The lifecycle cost analyses were performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. There are standard default sets of assumptions that the methodology uses to ensure consistency when comparing the cost of different production or plant design options. However, these assumptions may also be varied within the spreadsheets when better information is available or to allow the performance of sensitivity studies. The selected reference plant design for this study was a 1500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant operating in the thermal-neutral mode. The plant utilized industrial natural gas-fired heaters to provide process heat, and grid electricity to supply power to the electrolyzer modules and system components. Modifications to the reference design included replacing the gas-fired heaters with electric resistance heaters, changing the operating mode of the electrolyzer (to operate below the thermal-neutral voltage), and considering a larger 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant design. Total H2A-calculated hydrogen production costs for the reference 1,500 kg/day forecourt hydrogen production plant were $3.42/kg. The all-electric plant design using electric resistance heaters for process heat, and the reference design operating below the thermal-neutral voltage had calculated lifecycle hydrogen productions costs of $3.55/kg and $5.29/kg, respectively. Because of its larger size and associated economies of scale, the 50,000 kg/day central hydrogen production plant was able to produce hydrogen at a cost of only $2.89/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by electron beam and pulsed laser deposition systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of this study establish a framework for evaluation of the cost impact of many performance parameters in coated conductor manufacturing systems. Since the cost and concepts are based on early developmental results and engineering judgment, the study should be updated periodically based on latest data to enhance its usefulness. The study should be expanded to include other promising processes under consideration or development for manufacture of coated conductors. Review of this study by as wide a group of experts from industry, national laboratories and universities as possible is desirable to facilitate improving accuracy of the estimates and communication on the issues involved. The results for the case of achieving the $10/kA-m goal at a J{sub c} of 10{sup 5} a/cm{sup 2} applicable to applications requiring a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of current flow may be viewed as somewhat discouraging. However, there is ample margin for improvement due to continued development and engineering that could enable meeting the goal of $10/kA-m.

Chapman, J.N.

1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

290

Systems Analyses of Advanced Brayton Cycles For High Efficiency Zero Emission Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Table 1 shows that the systems efficiency, coal (HHV) to power, is 35%. Table 2 summarizes the auxiliary power consumption within the plant. Thermoflex was used to simulate the power block and Aspen Plus the balance of plant. The overall block flow diagram is presented in Figure A1.3-1 and the key unit process flow diagrams are shown in subsequent figures. Stream data are given in Table A1.3-1. Equipment function specifications are provided in Tables A1.3-2 through 17. The overall plant scheme consists of a cryogenic air separation unit supplying 95% purity O{sub 2} to GE type high pressure (HP) total quench gasifiers. The raw gas after scrubbing is treated in a sour shift unit to react the CO with H{sub 2}O to form H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}. The gas is further treated to remove Hg in a sulfided activated carbon bed. The syngas is desulfurized and decarbonized in a Selexol acid gas removal unit and the decarbonized syngas after humidification and preheat is fired in GE 7H type steam cooled gas turbines. Intermediate pressure (IP) N{sub 2} from the ASU is also supplied to the combustors of the gas turbines as additional diluent for NOx control. A portion of the air required by the ASU is extracted from the gas turbines. The plant consists of the following major process units: (1) Air Separation Unit (ASU); (2) Gasification Unit; (3) CO Shift/Low Temperature Gas Cooling (LTGC) Unit; (4) Acid Gas Removal Unit (AGR) Unit; (5) Fuel Gas Humidification Unit; (6) Carbon Dioxide Compression/Dehydration Unit; (7) Claus Sulfur Recovery/Tail Gas Treating Unit (SRU/TGTU); and (8) Power Block.

A. D. Rao; J. Francuz; H. Liao; A. Verma; G. S. Samuelsen

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A novel power block for CSP systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) and in particular parabolic trough, is a proven large-scale solar power technology. However, CSP cost is not yet competitive with conventional alternatives unless subsidized. Current CSP plants typically include a condensing steam cycle power block which was preferably designed for a continuous operation and higher operating conditions and therefore, limits the overall plant cost effectiveness and deployment. The drawbacks of this power block are as follows: (i) no power generation during low insolation periods (ii) expensive, large condenser (typically water cooled) due to the poor extracted steam properties (high specific volume, sub-atmospheric pressure) and (iii) high installation and operation costs. In the current study, a different power block scheme is proposed to eliminate these obstacles. This power block includes a top Rankine cycle with a back pressure steam turbine and a bottoming Kalina cycle comprising another back pressure turbine and using ammonia-water mixture as a working fluid. The bottoming (moderate temperature) cycle allows power production during low insolation periods. Because of the superior ammonia-water vapor properties, the condensing system requirements are much less demanding and the operation costs are lowered. Accordingly, air cooled condensers can be used with lower economical penalty. Another advantage is that back pressure steam turbines have a less complex design than condensing steam turbines which make their costs lower. All of these improvements could make the combined cycle unit more cost effective. This unit can be applicable in both parabolic trough and central receiver (solar tower) plants. The potential advantage of the new power block is illustrated by a detailed techno-economical analysis of two 50 MW parabolic trough power plants, comparing between the standard and the novel power block. The results indicate that the proposed plant suggests a 4-11% electricity cost saving. (author)

Mittelman, Gur [ASP Ltd., Advanced Solar Power, Industrial Zone, Be'er Tuviyya (Israel); Epstein, Michael [Solar Research Facilities Unit, Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Processes controlling a volcaniclastic turbiditic system during the last climatic cycle: Example of the Cilaos deep-sea fan, offshore La Runion Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 2009]). insu-00771704,version1-10Jan2013 #12;3 The conventional sequence stratigraphy model for clastic sequence stratigraphy54 concepts. Covault and Graham (2010) showed that deep-sea deposition occurs at all1 Processes controlling a volcaniclastic turbiditic system during the last climatic cycle: Example

293

Open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier and hybrid solar/electric absorption refrigeration system. Annual report, January 1993--December 1993. Calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report presents work performed during calendar year 1993 by the Florida Solar Energy Center under contract to the US Department of Energy. Two distinctively different solar powered indoor climate control systems were analyzed: the open cycle liquid desiccant dehumidifier, and an improved efficiency absorption system which may be fired by flat plate solar collectors. Both tasks represent new directions relative to prior FSEC research in Solar Cooling and Dehumidification.

Nimmo, B.G.; Thornbloom, M.D.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

295

Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges.

Schroeder, Jenna N.

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Gaussian and sinc shaped few-cycle pulse driven ultrafast coherent population transfer in lambda- like atomic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report and propose a simple scheme to achieve efficient and fast coherent population transfer (CPT) by utilizing either a nonlinearly chirped Gaussian shaped few-cycle laser pulse or an unchirped sinc-shaped few-cycle laser pulse. The proposed scheme is shown to be fairly robust against the variation of the laser parameters such as temporal pulse width, chirp rates, carrier envelope phases and Rabi frequencies. We find that compared to the so-called stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, our scheme for complete population transfer with few-cycle Gaussian shaped laser pulses requires less pulse area.

Parvendra Kumar; Amarendra K. Sarma

2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

DESIGN OF HYBRID POWER GENERATION CYCLES EMPLOYING AMMONIA-WATER-CARBON DIOXIDE MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A power cycle generates electricity from the heat of combustion of fossil fuels. Its efficiency is governed by the cycle configuration, the operating parameters, and the working fluid. Typical. designs use pure water as the fluid. in the last two decades, hybrid cycles based on ammonia-water, and carbon-dioxide mixtures as the working fluid have been proposed. These cycles may improve the power generation efficiency of Rankine cycles by 15%. Improved efficiency is important for two reasons: it lowers the cost of electricity being produced, and by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels per unit power, it reduces the generation of environmental pollutants. The goal of this project is to develop a computational optimization-based method for the design and analysis of hybrid bottoming power cycles to minimize the usage of fossil fuels. The development of this methodology has been achieved by formulating this task as that of selecting the least cost power cycle design from all possible configurations. They employ a detailed thermodynamic property prediction package they have developed under a DOE-FETC grant to model working fluid mixtures. Preliminary results from this work suggest that a pure NH{sub 3} cycle outperforms steam or the expensive Kalina cycle.

Ashish Gupta

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towers....................................................................... 9 Dish/Engine Systems, and dish/engine. Parabolic troughs are the most commercially available technology. Linear Fresnel and power Rankine steam cycles, similar to those used for coal and nuclear plants. Steam cycle power plants require

Laughlin, Robert B.

299

Cycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Given a graph and a subset of marked elements (nodes, edges, or some combination thereof), a cycleCycle cover with short cycles Nicole Immorlica£ Mohammad Mahdian£ Vahab S. Mirrokni£ Abstract Cycle for variants of cycle covering problems which bound the size and/or length of the covering cycles

Immorlica, Nicole

300

How Minds Work The IDA Cognitive Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 How Minds Work The IDA Cognitive Cycle Stan Franklin Computer Science Division & Institute for Intelligent Systems The University of Memphis #12;HMW: The IDA Cognitive Cycle 2 Memory Systems #12;HMW: The IDA Cognitive Cycle 3 Global Workspace Theory I · The nervous system is a distributed parallel

Memphis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An assessment of potential for benefit from integrating geographic information systems technology into life-cycle management of infrastructures a focus for infrastructure management practice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Dr. Robert L. Lytton Infrastructure life-cycle management phases with the greatest potential for benefit from Geographic Information Systems (GIS), is the subject of this thesis. The planning, design, construction, operations, maintenance... then focuses on analysis of data collected by a questionnaire sent to in&astructure managers in Texas. The survey was made to assess how important and frequently they deal with issues associated with the planning, design, construction, operation, maintenance...

Millegan, Harold Lynn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Life Cycle Water Consumption and Water Resource Assessment for Utility-Scale Geothermal Systems: An In-Depth Analysis of Historical and Forthcoming EGS Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the third in a series of reports sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program in which a range of water-related issues surrounding geothermal power production are evaluated. The first report made an initial attempt at quantifying the life cycle fresh water requirements of geothermal power-generating systems and explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids. The initial analysis of life cycle fresh water consumption of geothermal power-generating systems identified that operational water requirements consumed the vast majority of water across the life cycle. However, it relied upon limited operational water consumption data and did not account for belowground operational losses for enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). A second report presented an initial assessment of fresh water demand for future growth in utility-scale geothermal power generation. The current analysis builds upon this work to improve life cycle fresh water consumption estimates and incorporates regional water availability into the resource assessment to improve the identification of areas where future growth in geothermal electricity generation may encounter water challenges. This report is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to assess the water consumption of geothermal technologies and identify areas where water availability may present a challenge to utility-scale geothermal development. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or nongeothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. The geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as EGSs that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists, but where water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 2 describes the approach and methods for this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS binary plant, a 50-MW EGS binary plant, a 10-MW hydrothermal binary plant, and a 50-MW hydrothermal flash plant. The methods focus on (1) the collection of data to improve estimation of EGS stimulation volumes, aboveground operational consumption for all geothermal technologies, and belowground operational consumption for EGS; and (2) the mapping of the geothermal and water resources of the western United States to assist in the identification of potential water challenges to geothermal growth. Chapters 3 and 4 present the water requirements for the power plant life cycle. Chapter 3 presents the results of the current data collection effort, and Chapter 4 presents the normalized volume of fresh water consumed at each life cycle stage per lifetime energy output for the power plant scenarios evaluated. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, the majority of water is consumed by plant operations. For the EGS binary scenarios, where dry cooling was assumed, belowground operational water loss is the greatest contributor depending upon the physical and operational conditions of the reservoir. Total life cycle water consumption requirements for air-cooled EGS binary scenarios vary between 0.22 and 1.85 gal/kWh, depending upon the extent of belowground operational water consumption. The air-cooled hydrothermal binary and flash plants experience far less fresh water consumption over the life cycle, at 0.04 gal/kWh. Fresh water requirements associated with air- cooled binary operations are primarily from aboveground water needs, including dust control, maintenance, and domestic use. Although wet-cooled hydrothermal flash systems require water for cooling, these plants generally rely upon the geofluid, fluid from the geothermal reservoir, which typically has high salinity and total dissolved solids concentration and is much warmer than normal groundwater sources, for their cooling water needs; thus,

Clark, Corrie E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Harto, Christopher B. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Schroeder, Jenna N. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Martino, Louis E. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division; Horner, Robert M. [Environmental Science Division] [Environmental Science Division

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

Mathur, A K

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 15-18, 1984 monoxide varies between 1.6 and 4.7%, but it is generally between 4.1 and 4.7%. Carbon dioxide is less than 0.5% and observed to be increasing very slowly. A sharp increase.... The amount of carbon monoxide varies between 0.4% and 3.0% and appears to alternately decrease and increase. This rather strange phenomenon remains to be explained. The carbon dioxide increases steadily from 0.5% at 125 hours to 3.1% at liDO hours...

Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Expeditious Data Center Sustainability, Flow, and Temperature Modeling: Life-Cycle Exergy Consumption Combined with a Potential Flow Based, Rankine Vortex Superposed, Predictive Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amongst lower powered racks. In: ASME 2002 Internationallow power data center test cell. In: Proceedings of ASME

Lettieri, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Solid State Joining of High Temperature Alloy Tubes for USC and Heat-Exchanger Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project was to develop materials enabling joining technologies for use in forward looking heat-exchanger fabrication in Brayton cycle HIPPS, IGCC, FutureGen concepts capable of operating at temperatures in excess of 1000{degree}C as well as conventional technology upgrades via Ultra Super-Critical (USC) Rankine-cycle boilers capable of operating at 760{degree}C (1400F)/38.5MPa (5500psi) steam, while still using coal as the principal fossil fuel. The underlying mission in Rankine, Brayton or Brayton-Rankine, or IGCC combined cycle heat engine is a steady quest to improving operating efficiency while mitigating global environmental concerns. There has been a progressive move to higher overall cycle efficiencies, and in the case of fossil fuels this has accelerated recently in part because of concerns about greenhouse gas emissions, notably CO{sub 2}. For a heat engine, the overall efficiency is closely related to the difference between the highest temperature in the cycle and the lowest temperature. In most cases, efficiency gains are prompted by an increase in the high temperature, and this in turn has led to increasing demands on the materials of construction used in the high temperature end of the systems. Our migration to new advanced Ni-base and Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys poses significant fabrication challenges, as these materials are not readily weldable or the weld performs poorly in the high temperature creep regime. Thus the joining challenge is two-fold to a) devise appropriate joining methodologies for similar/dissimilar Ni-base and ODS alloys while b) preserving the near baseline creep performance in the welded region. Our program focus is on solid state joining of similar and dissimilar metals/alloys for heat exchanger components currently under consideration for the USC, HIPPS and IGCC power systems. The emphasis is to manipulate the joining methods and variables available to optimize joint creep performance compared to the base material creep performance. Similar and dissimilar butt joints were fabricated of MA956, IN740 alloys and using inertia welding techniques. We evaluated joining process details and heat treatments and its overall effect on creep response. Fixed and incrementally accelerated temperature creep tests were performed for similar and dissimilar joints and such incremental creep life data is compiled and reported. Long term MA956-MA556 joint tests indicate a firm 2Ksi creep stress threshold performance at 850{degree}C with a maximum exposure of over 9725 hours recorded in the current program. A Larsen Miller Parameter (LMP) of 48.50 for a 2Ksi test at 850{degree}C was further corroborated with tests at 2Ksi stress at 900{degree}C yielding a LMP=48.80. Despite this threshold the joints exhibit immense temperature sensitivity and fail promptly when test temperature raised above 900{degree}C. In comparison the performance of dissimilar joints was inferior, perhaps dictated by the creep characteristics of the mating nickel-base alloys. We describe a parametric window of joint development, and post weld heat treatment (PWHT) in dissimilar joints with solid solution (IN601, IN617) and precipitate strengthened (IN740) materials. Some concerns are evident regarding the diffusion of aluminum in dissimilar joints during high temperature recrystallization treatments. It is noted that aggressive treatments rapidly deplete the corrosion protecting aluminum reservoir in the vicinity of the joint interface. Subsequently, the impact of varying PWHT has been evaluated in the context on ensuing creep performance.

Bimal Kad

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Carbon Cycling and Biosequestration Integrating Biology and Climate Through Systems Science Report from the March 2008 Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most daunting challenges facing science in the 21st Century is to predict how Earth's ecosystems will respond to global climate change. The global carbon cycle plays a central role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and thus Earth's climate, but our basic understanding of the myriad of tightly interlinked biological processes that drive the global carbon cycle remains limited at best. Whether terrestrial and ocean ecosystems will capture, store, or release carbon is highly dependent on how changing climate conditions affect processes performed by the organisms that form Earth's biosphere. Advancing our knowledge of biological components of the global carbon cycle is thus crucial to predicting potential climate change impacts, assessing the viability of climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and informing relevant policy decisions. Global carbon cycling is dominated by the paired biological processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Photosynthetic plants and microbes of Earth's land-masses and oceans use solar energy to transform atmospheric CO{sub 2} into organic carbon. The majority of this organic carbon is rapidly consumed by plants or microbial decomposers for respiration and returned to the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Coupling between the two processes results in a near equilibrium between photosynthesis and respiration at the global scale, but some fraction of organic carbon also remains in stabilized forms such as biomass, soil, and deep ocean sediments. This process, known as carbon biosequestration, temporarily removes carbon from active cycling and has thus far absorbed a substantial fraction of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

Graber, J.; Amthor, J.; Dahlman, R.; Drell, D.; Weatherwax, S.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE EFFECTS ON THE TREATMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE LONG-TERM ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL SYSTEMS - EBS INPUT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign within the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) program has been tasked with investigating the disposal of the nation's spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for a range of potential waste forms and geologic environments. The planning, construction, and operation of a nuclear disposal facility is a long-term process that involves engineered barriers that are tailored to both the geologic environment and the waste forms being emplaced. The UFD Campaign is considering a range of fuel cycles that in turn produce a range of waste forms. The UFD Campaign is also considering a range of geologic media. These ranges could be thought of as adding uncertainty to what the disposal facility design will ultimately be; however, it may be preferable to thinking about the ranges as adding flexibility to design of a disposal facility. For example, as the overall DOE-NE program and industrial actions result in the fuel cycles that will produce waste to be disposed, and the characteristics of those wastes become clear, the disposal program retains flexibility in both the choice of geologic environment and the specific repository design. Of course, other factors also play a major role, including local and State-level acceptance of the specific site that provides the geologic environment. In contrast, the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) repository license application (LA) is based on waste forms from an open fuel cycle (PWR and BWR assemblies from an open fuel cycle). These waste forms were about 90% of the total waste, and they were the determining waste form in developing the engineered barrier system (EBS) design for the Yucca Mountain Repository design. About 10% of the repository capacity was reserved for waste from a full recycle fuel cycle in which some actinides were extracted for weapons use, and the remaining fission products and some minor actinides were encapsulated in borosilicate glass. Because the heat load of the glass was much less than the PWR and BWR assemblies, the glass waste form was able to be co-disposed with the open cycle waste, by interspersing glass waste packages among the spent fuel assembly waste packages. In addition, the Yucca Mountain repository was designed to include some research reactor spent fuel and naval reactor spent fuel, within the envelope that was set using the commercial reactor assemblies as the design basis waste form. This milestone report supports Sandia National Laboratory milestone M2FT-12SN0814052, and is intended to be a chapter in that milestone report. The independent technical review of this LLNL milestone was performed at LLNL and is documented in the electronic Information Management (IM) system at LLNL. The objective of this work is to investigate what aspects of quantifying, characterizing, and representing the uncertainty associated with the engineered barrier are affected by implementing different advanced nuclear fuel cycles (e.g., partitioning and transmutation scenarios) together with corresponding designs and thermal constraints.

Sutton, M; Blink, J A; Greenberg, H R; Sharma, M

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sandia National Laboratories: SCO2 Brayton Cycle Technology Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) Brayton LabSCO2 Brayton Cycle Technology Videos SCO2 Brayton Cycle Technology Videos Tagged with: Advanced Nuclear Energy * Brayton...

312

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of Geologic Disposal Systems Influence of Nuclear Fuel Cycles on Uncertainty of Long Term Performance of...

313

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optimization of Air Conditioning Cycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a 3-ton residential air conditioner are then presented to intuitively understand the effect of expansion valve and evaporator fan cycling in a real system. A real time optimization method is explored and the feasibility, recommendations for a...

Seshadri, Swarooph

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

315

Life cycle evolution and systematics of Campanulariid hydrozoans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to study campanulariid life cycle evolution and systematics. The Campanulariidae is a hydrozoan family with many life cycle variations, and provide an excellent model system to study life cycle ...

Govindarajan, Annette Frese, 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Orbital Resonance and Solar Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of planetary moves, encoded in DE406 ephemerides. We show resonance cycles between most planets in Solar System, of differing quality. The most precise resonance - between Earth and Venus, which not only stabilizes orbits of both planets, locks planet Venus rotation in tidal locking, but also affects the Sun: This resonance group (E+V) also influences Sunspot cycles - the position of syzygy between Earth and Venus, when the barycenter of the resonance group most closely approaches the Sun and stops for some time, relative to Jupiter planet, well matches the Sunspot cycle of 11 years, not only for the last 400 years of measured Sunspot cycles, but also in 1000 years of historical record of "severe winters". We show, how cycles in angular momentum of Earth and Venus planets match with the Sunspot cycle and how the main cycle in angular momentum of the whole Solar system (854-year cycle of Jupiter/Saturn) matches with climatologic data, assumed to show connection with Solar output power and insolation. We show the possible connections between E+V events and Solar global p-Mode frequency changes. We futher show angular momentum tables and charts for individual planets, as encoded in DE405 and DE406 ephemerides. We show, that inner planets orbit on heliocentric trajectories whereas outer planets orbit on barycentric trajectories.

P. A. Semi

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of a high efficiency compressor/expander for an air cycle air conditioning system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the methods and procedures used and the results obtained in the design, fabrication, and testing of a rotary vane type compressor operated on air cycle thermodynamics. The history and results of the testing of a similar expander are summarized and the full report of that work is referenced. The machine design used was based on one patented by Ecton Corporation. The goal of the reported effort was to demonstrate the attainable efficiencies of these machines. Appropriate test rigs were assembled and the machines were tested at various operating conditions. The compressor testing did not achieve the full design speed because of time constraints but important data was obtained at 87% speed (3000 rpm). The maximum measured total efficiencies were 78% for the expander and 71% for the compressor. Various design improvements which may yield improved performance were identified and reported.

Summers, R.L.; Smolinski, R.E.

1982-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Frequency modulated few-cycle optical pulse trains induced controllable ultrafast coherent population oscillations in three-level atomic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a study on the ultrafast coherent population oscillations (UCPO) in two level atoms induced by the frequency modulated few-cycle optical pulse train. The phenomenon of UCPO is investigated by numerically solving the optical Bloch equations beyond the rotating wave approximation. We demonstrate that the quantum state of the atoms and the frequency of UCPO may be controlled by controlling the number of pulses in the pulse trains and the pulse repetition time respectively. Moreover, the robustness of the population inversion against the variation of the laser pulse parameters is also investigated. The proposed scheme may be useful for the creation of atoms in selected quantum state for desired time duration and may have potential applications in ultrafast optical switching.

Parvendra Kumar; Amarendra K. Sarma

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Use of Statistical Entropy and Life Cycle Analysis to Evaluate Global Warming Potential of Waste Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of conservation of mass [4]. In order to fully account for the flows of materials through waste management systems Management Systems Scott Kaufman, Eilhann Kwon, Nikhil Krishnan, Marco Castaldi, Nickolas Themelis Earth management systems involving thermal treatment. Now, a simple lifecycle "net energy" metric encompassing

Columbia University

320

Insights Into the P-To-Q Conversion in the Catalytic Cycle of Methane Monooxygenase From a Synthetic Model System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the catalytic cycle of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), it has been proposed that cleavage of the O-O bond in the ({mu}-peroxo)diiron(III) intermediate P gives rise to the diiron(IV) intermediate Q with an Fe{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2} diamond core, which oxidizes methane to methanol. As a model for this conversion, ({mu}-oxo) diiron(III) complex 1 ([Fe{sup III}{sub 2}({mu}-O)({mu}-O{sub 2}H{sub 3})(L){sub 2}]{sup 3+}, L = tris(3,5-dimethyl-4-methoxypyridyl-2-methyl)amine) has been treated consecutively with one eq of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and one eq of HClO{sub 4} to form 3 ([Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}(L){sub 2}]{sup 4+}). In the course of this reaction a new species, 2, can be observed before the protonation step; 2 gives rise to a cationic peak cluster by ESI-MS at m/z 1,399, corresponding to the [Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}L{sub 2}H](OTf){sub 2}{sup +} ion in which 1 oxygen atom derives from 1 and the other two originate from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Moessbauer studies of 2 reveal the presence of two distinct, exchange coupled iron(IV) centers, and EXAFS fits indicate a short Fe-O bond at 1.66 {angstrom} and an Fe-Fe distance of 3.32 {angstrom}. Taken together, the spectroscopic data point to an HO-Fe{sup IV}-O-Fe{sup IV} = O core for 2. Protonation of 2 results in the loss of H{sub 2}O and the formation of 3. Isotope labeling experiments show that the [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core of 3 can incorporate both oxygen atoms from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The reactions described here serve as the only biomimetic precedent for the conversion of intermediates P to Q in the sMMO reaction cycle and shed light on how a peroxodiiron(III) unit can transform into an [Fe{sup IV}{sub 2}({mu}-O){sub 2}] core.

Xue, G.; Fiedler, A.T.; Martinho, M.; Munck, E.; Que, L.; Jr.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multi Megawatt Power System Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Missions to the outer planets or to near-by planets requiring short times and/or increased payload carrying capability will benefit from nuclear power. A concept study was undertaken to evaluate options for a multi-megawatt power source for nuclear electric propulsion. The nominal electric power requirement was set at 15 MWe with an assumed mission profile of 120 days at full power, 60 days in hot standby, and another 120 days of full power, repeated several times for 7 years of service. Of the numerous options considered, two that appeared to have the greatest promise were a gas-cooled reactor based on the NERVA Derivative design, operating a closed cycle Brayton power conversion system; and a molten lithium-cooled reactor based on SP-100 technology, driving a boiling potassium Rankine power conversion system. This study examined the relative merits of these two systems, seeking to optimize the specific mass. Conclusions were that either concept appeared capable of approaching the specific mass goal of 3-5 kg/kWe estimated to be needed for this class of mission, though neither could be realized without substantial development in reactor fuels technology, thermal radiator mass efficiency, and power conversion and distribution electronics and systems capable of operating at high temperatures. Though the gas-Brayton systems showed an apparent advantage in specific mass, differences in the degree of conservatism inherent in the models used suggests expectations for the two approaches may be similar. Brayton systems eliminate the need to deal with two-phase flows in the microgravity environment of space.

Longhurst, Glen Reed; Harvego, Edwin Allan; Schnitzler, Bruce Gordon; Seifert, Gary Dean; Sharpe, John Phillip; Verrill, Donald Alan; Watts, Kenneth Donald; Parks, Benjamin Travis

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

System Evaluation and Economic Analysis of a HTGR Powered High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322C and 750C, respectively. The power conversion unit will be a Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 40%. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 40.4% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.75 kg/s and an oxygen production rate of 13.8 kg/s. An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.67/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return, IRR, of 12% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20%. A second analysis shows that if the power cycle efficiency increases to 44.4%, the hydrogen production efficiency increases to 42.8% and the hydrogen and oxygen production rates are 1.85 kg/s and 14.6 kg/s respectively. At the higher power cycle efficiency and an IRR of 12% the cost of hydrogen production is $3.50/kg.

Michael G. McKellar; Edwin A. Harvego; Anastasia A. Gandrik

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A model library of solar thermal electric components for the computer code TRNSYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new approach to modeling solar thermal electric plants using the TRNSYS simulation environment is discussed. The TRNSYS environment offers many advantages over currently used tools, including the option to more easily study the hybrid solar/fossil plant configurations that have been proposed to facilitate market penetration of solar thermal technologies. A component library developed for Rankine cycle, Brayton cycle, and solar system modeling is presented. A comparison between KPRO and TRNSYS results for a simple Rankine cycle show excellent correlation.

Pitz-Paal, R. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Koeln (Germany). Solare Energietechnik; Jones, S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Cycle Track Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing driveways & low-volume streets Signalized intersections #12;Trend in kilometers cycled per year

Bertini, Robert L.

326

Dynamic Modeling and Control of Nuclear Reactors Coupled to Closed-Loop Brayton Cycle Systems using SIMULINK{sup TM}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of space reactors for both in-space and planetary operations will require unprecedented levels of autonomy and control. Development of these autonomous control systems will require dynamic system models, effective control methodologies, and autonomous control logic. This paper briefly describes the results of reactor, power-conversion, and control models that are implemented in SIMULINK{sup TM} (Simulink, 2004). SIMULINK{sup TM} is a development environment packaged with MatLab{sup TM} (MatLab, 2004) that allows the creation of dynamic state flow models. Simulation modules for liquid metal, gas cooled reactors, and electrically heated systems have been developed, as have modules for dynamic power-conversion components such as, ducting, heat exchangers, turbines, compressors, permanent magnet alternators, and load resistors. Various control modules for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed have also been developed and simulated. The modules are compiled into libraries and can be easily connected in different ways to explore the operational space of a number of potential reactor, power-conversion system configurations, and control approaches. The modularity and variability of these SIMULINK{sup TM} models provides a way to simulate a variety of complete power generation systems. To date, both Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR), Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR), and electric heaters that are coupled to gas-dynamics systems and thermoelectric systems have been simulated and are used to understand the behavior of these systems. Current efforts are focused on improving the fidelity of the existing SIMULINK{sup TM} modules, extending them to include isotopic heaters, heat pipes, Stirling engines, and on developing state flow logic to provide intelligent autonomy. The simulation code is called RPC-SIM (Reactor Power and Control-Simulator)

Wright, Steven A.; Sanchez, Travis [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2005-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

327

Parametric testing and evaluation of a free-piston Stirling engine/linear compressor system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 3 Kw free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) driving a linear Rankine cycle vapor compressor has been under development by the Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute and General Electric Company as a heat activated heat pump (HAHP) for residential applications since 1976. This paper presents data obtained from recent testing on the FPSE/linear compressor unit. System performance and engine/compressor matching and control tests and analyses are presented and discussed. Engine component performance and loss test data are also presented. A description of the low-cost real-time digital data acquisition system is included. Engine/compressor test results show maximum engine power levels over 3 Kw, close to the design goal of 3.2 Kw. However, maximum efficiency is approximately 25 percent, 5 points below the design goal. The test results are used to construct maps of engine performance and compressor performance. These maps support the engine/compressor matching techniques. Confirmation of the control system features needed to provide matched engine/compressor operation is presented. Loss measurements under engine oscillating flow conditions show that quasi-steady models of oscillating flow substantially underestimate losses, and that various Stirling engine models predict significantly different component losses. Both performance and component loss test results are combined with simulation trends to identify design improvements to the current hardware and the projected performance increases.

Chiu, W.; Antoniak, Z.; Hogan, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

Capstone Turbine Corporation

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

K. Smarsly, D. Hartmann, K.H. Law An Integrated Monitoring System for Life-Cycle Management of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 and 2035. Given the depletion of non- renewable, natural resources such as coal, oil, and natural gas, it becomes apparent that "green" energy systems, harnessing renewable resources, are critical was spent by China with $54 billion, followed by Germany with $41 billion, and the United States with $34

Stanford University

330

Mass-dependent fractionation of quadruple stable sulfur isotope system as a new tracer of sulfur biogeochemical cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ing rare isotopes for Earth materials was the discovery of anomalous 17 O abundance in a wide variety, USA b Department of Geology and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland and extraterrestrial materials. ? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Sulfur (32 S, 33 S, 34 S

Long, Bernard

331

Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in a Tree - Grass Inter-Cropping System in the Humid Tropics of Mexico.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Oaxaca, Mexico, where increases in productivity are limited by shortage of capital and where the tree component would be used as green manure. It is difficult to investigate the effectiveness of such a system by only using conventional field trials. I...

Hernandez-Daumas, Salvador

332

Water and Energy Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that generate electricity using steam engines, gas turbines,and power Rankine steam cycles. Dish/engine systems are air-Stirling engines (78). Once used in the turbines, the steam

McMahon, James E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

CX-002111: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Determination Optimization of Hybrid-WaterAir-Cooled Condenser In an Enhanced Turbine Geothermal Organic Rankine Cycle System CX(s) Applied: B3.6, A9 Date: 05052010...

334

Low Level Heat Recovery Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level heat recovery technology. This paper discusses heat distribution systems, latest developments in absorption refrigeration and organic Rankine cycles, and pressure, minimization possibilities. The relative merits and economics of the various...

O'Brien, W. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle is a very complex system that includes considerable dynamic complexity as well as detail complexity. In the nuclear power realm, there are experts and considerable research and development in nuclear fuel development, separations technology, reactor physics and waste management. What is lacking is an overall understanding of the entire nuclear fuel cycle and how the deployment of new fuel cycle technologies affects the overall performance of the fuel cycle. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing and delays in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works and can transition as technologies are changed. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Abdellatif M. Yacout; Gretchen E. Matthern; Steven J. Piet; David E. Shropshire

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Possibilities and limitations of life cycle assessment (LCA) in the development of waste utilization systems - Applied examples for a region in Northern Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Against the background of increasing concerns about climate change, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions has become an integral part of processes in both the waste management and the energy industries. This is reflected in the development of new waste treatment concepts, in which domestic and commercial waste is treated with the aim of utilizing its energy content, while at the same time recycling as much of its material content as possible. Life cycle assessment (LCA) represents a method of assessing the environmental relevance of a waste management system, the basis of which is a material flow analysis of the system in question. GHG emissions from different options for thermal treatment and energy recovery from waste as applied to a region in Northern Germany have been analyzed by the LCA approach and an indicative LCA, which only considers those emissions resulting from operating stages of the system. Operating stages have the main share of emissions compared to pre-processing stages. Results show that through specific separation of waste material flows and highly efficient energy recovery, thermal treatment and energy generation from waste can be optimized resulting in reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases. There are also other areas of waste utilization, currently given little attention, such as the solar drying of sewage sludge, which can considerably contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Wittmaier, M. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)], E-mail: wittmaier@hs-bremen.de; Langer, S.; Sawilla, B. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection at Bremen University of Applied Sciences GmbH, Neustadtswall 30, 28199 Bremen (Germany)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of VehicleFuel Systems 2013 DOE...

338

System Evaluation and Life-Cycle Cost Analysis of a Commercial-Scale High-Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Production Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a system evaluation and lifecycle cost analysis are presented for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) central hydrogen production plant. The plant design relies on grid electricity to power the electrolysis process and system components, and industrial natural gas to provide process heat. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to evaluate the reference central plant design capable of producing 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen. The HYSYS software performs mass and energy balances across all components to allow optimization of the design using a detailed process flow sheet and realistic operating conditions specified by the analyst. The lifecycle cost analysis was performed using the H2A analysis methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program. This methodology utilizes Microsoft Excel spreadsheet analysis tools that require detailed plant performance information (obtained from HYSYS), along with financial and cost information to calculate lifecycle costs. The results of the lifecycle analyses indicate that for a 10% internal rate of return, a large central commercial-scale hydrogen production plant can produce 50,000 kg/day of hydrogen at an average cost of $2.68/kg. When the cost of carbon sequestration is taken into account, the average cost of hydrogen production increases by $0.40/kg to $3.08/kg.

Edwin A. Harvego; James E. O'Brien; Michael G. McKellar

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Exergy method of power plant systems analysis and its application to a pressurized fluidized bed coal-fired combined-cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis surveys the concepts of exergy and extends the exergy method of analysis from the standpoint of its applications to the power plant systems. After a brief historical review of exergy concepts, the general exergy equation is derived from the combined equation of First and Second Law, and it is shown that any special case of exergy equation is a simplified form of the general exergy equation. The mathematical method for the exergy analysis of a steady-state, steady-flow system, analogous to that of the First Law, is given. The exergy losses in a power plant are discussed. Then in order to examine these losses, the Second Law performance of major processes of combustion, compression, heat transfer, mixing and throttling have been analyzed analytically, and the exergy efficiencies are defined that accurately assess the thermodynamic performance of the corresponding processes. The methods for computation of exergy loss and exergy efficiency are given and simplified for practical cases of the corresponding processes. Analytical methods for evaluating the exergy of coal, pure substances (air and water), and combustion gases are presented and the energy-exergy tables for corresponding working substances are constructed. Finally, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis, with emphasis on the Second Law (exergy) consideration, of an actual coal-fired, combined-cycle (CFCC) power plant, being designed by the General Electric Company, is carried out and suggestions are made as to what (and where), if any, improvement might be made in the design.

Ghamarian, A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may depend are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of one cycle may rely on the repetitionsDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Leue, Stefan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes of the system. The way in which cycle executions are combined is not ar- bitrary since cycles may in which cycle executions are combined is certainly not arbitrary. For instance, the repetition of oneDependency Analysis for Control Flow Cycles in Reactive Communicating Processes Stefan Leue1 , Alin

Reiterer, Harald

342

Investigating potential light-duty efficiency improvements through simulation of turbo-compounding and waste-heat recovery systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern diesel engines used in light-duty transportation applications have peak brake thermal efficiencies in the range of 40-42% for high-load operation with substantially lower efficiencies at realistic road-load conditions. Thermodynamic energy and exergy analysis reveals that the largest losses from these engines are due to combustion irreversibility and heat loss to the coolant, through the exhaust, and by direct convection and radiation to the environment. Substantial improvement in overall engine efficiency requires reducing or recovering these losses. Unfortunately, much of the heat transfer either occurs at relatively low temperatures resulting in large entropy generation (such as in the air-charge cooler), is transferred to low-exergy flow streams (such as the oil and engine coolant), or is radiated or convected directly to the environment. While there are significant opportunities for recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler for heavy-duty applications, achieving similar benefits for light-duty applications is complicated by transient, low-load operation at typical driving conditions and competition with the turbocharger and aftertreatment system for the limited thermal resources. We have developed an organic Rankine cycle model using GT-Suite to investigate the potential for efficiency improvement through waste-heat recovery from the exhaust and EGR cooler of a light-duty diesel engine. The model is used to examine the effects of efficiency-improvement strategies such as cylinder deactivation, use of advanced materials and improved insulation to limit ambient heat loss, and turbo-compounding on the steady-state performance of the ORC system and the availability of thermal energy for downstream aftertreatment systems. Results from transient drive-cycle simulations are also presented, and we discuss strategies to address operational difficulties associated with transient drive cycles and balancing the thermal requirements of waste-heat recovery, turbocharging or turbo-compounding, and exhaust aftertreatment.

Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Farinon microwave end of life cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This engineering report evaluates alternatives for the replacement of the Farinon microwave radio system. The system is beyond its expected life cycle and has decreasing maintainability. Principal applications supported by the Farinon system are two electrical utility monitor and control systems, the Integrated Transfer Trip System (ITTS), and the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system.

Poe, R.C.

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Summary Report: IBM Management of Information Systems (MoIS) 1985-1990 Grant Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phases of the system development life cycle, from projectincluding the systems development life cycle (SDLC), process

Frand, Jason

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(say, a trip) and such factors are not fully captured in this dataset. 9. Older combined cycle units were a step change in lower operating costs due to cycling...

346

Edgeworth cycles revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some gasoline markets exhibit remarkable price cycles, where price spikes are followed by a series of small price declines: a pattern consistent with a model of Edgeworth cycles described by Maskin and Tirole. We extend ...

Doyle, Joseph J.

347

Solar energy system performance evaluation: final report for Honeywell OTS 41, Shenandoah (Newnan), Georgia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 41) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, are described, based on the analysis of data collected between January and August 1981. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 41 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 702 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 1000-gallon thermal storage tank; a 3-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted air conditioner; a water-to-air heat exchanger for solar space heating; a finned-tube coil immersed in the storage tank to preheat water for a gas-fired hot water heater; and associated piping, pumps, valves, and controls. The solar system has six basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 7 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 53 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 219 MMBtu and provided 11.4 MMBtu for cooling, 8.6 MMBtu for heating, and 8.1 MMBtu for domestic hot water. The projected net annual energy savings due to the solar system were approximately 50 MMBtu of fossil energy (49,300 cubic feet of natural gas) and a loss of 280 kWh(e) of electrical energy.

Mathur, A K; Pederson, S

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

mathematics single cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

47 mathematics education single cycle master's study programme #12;48 single cycle master's study program in Mathematics Education #12;49 single cycle master's study program in Mathematics Education MATHEMATICS EDUCATION The program is in tune with the principles of the Bologna Declaration. · Academic title

?umer, Slobodan

349

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cycle to Cycle Manufacturing Process Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most manufacturing processes produce parts that can only be correctly measured after the process cycle has been completed. Even if in-process measurement and control is possible, it is often too expensive or complex to ...

Hardt, David E.

351

Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity of Photovoltaic Electricity #12;IEA-PVPS-TASK 12 Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SYSTEMS PROGRAMME Methodology

352

Cromer Cycle Air Conditioner: A Study to Confirm Target Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Cromer cycle uses a desiccant wheel operating in conjunction with a typical air conditioning system. Simulations and laboratory prototypes demonstrate that the cycle has the potential for enhanced humidity control with sensible heat ratios...

Cromer, C. J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Design considerations of a power supply system for fast cycling superconducting accelerator magnets of 2 Tesla b-field generated by a conductor of 100 kA current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently proposed fast cycling accelerators for proton drivers (SF-SPS, CERN and SF-MR, SF-BOOSTER, FNAL) neutrino sources require development of new magnet technology. In support of this magnet development a power supply system will need to be developed that can support the high current and high rate of power swing required by the fast cycling (1 sec rise and fall in the SF-MR, 5Hz in Booster). This paper will outline a design concept for a +/- 2000 V and 100,000 A fast ramping power supply system. This power supply design is in support of a 6.44 km magnet system at 0.020 H and 330 m 5 Hz, 0.00534 H superconducting loads. The design description will include the layout and plan for extending the present FNAL Main Injector style ramping power supply to the higher currents needed for this operation. This will also include the design for a harmonic filter and power factor corrector that will be needed to control the large power swings caused by the fast cycle time. A conceptual design for the current regulation system and control will also be outlined. The power circuit design will include the bridge, filter and transformer plan based on existing designs.

Hays, Steve; Piekarz, Henryk; Pfeffer, Howie; Claypool, Brad; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

VISION: Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that work together in unison. In order to support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives systems analysis group is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION.

Jacob Jacobson; A. M. Yacout; Gretchen Matthern; Steven Piet; David Shropshire; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Life Cycle Asset Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

(The following directives are deleted or consolidated into this Order and shall be phased out as noted in Paragraph 2: DOE 1332.1A; DOE 4010.1A; DOE 4300.1C; DOE 4320.1B; DOE 4320.2A; DOE 4330.4B; DOE 4330.5; DOE 4540.1C; DOE 4700.1). This Order supersedes specific project management provisions within DOE O 430.1A, LIFE CYCLE ASSET MANAGEMENT. The specific paragraphs canceled by this Order are 6e(7); 7a(3); 7b(11) and (14); 7c(4),(6),(7),(11), and (16); 7d(4) and (8); 7e(3),(10), and (17); Attachment 1, Definitions (item 30 - Line Item Project, item 42 - Project, item 48 - Strategic System); and Attachment 2, Contractor Requirements Document (paragraph 1d regarding a project management system). The remainder of DOE O 430.1A remains in effect. Cancels DOE O 430.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.3.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

356

Stirling-cycle refrigerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Stirling-cycle refrigerator comprises a plurality of Stirling-cycle refrigerator units each having a displacer defining an expansion chamber, a piston defining a compression chamber, and a circuit including a heater and a cooler and interconnecting the expansion chamber and the compression chamber, and a heat exchanger shared by the circuits and disposed between the coolers and the heaters for effecting heat exchange between working gases in the circuits. The heat exchanger may comprise a countercurrent heat exchanger, and the Stirling-cycle refrigerator units are operated in cycles which are 180/sup 0/ out of phase with each other.

Nakamura, K.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

357

60 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 3, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 An SPC Monitoring System for Cycle-Based  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATION SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, VOL. 3, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 An SPC the raw observations themselves. Further, a decision-making technique is developed using the SPC-based signals. Index Terms--Cycle-based waveform signals, Haar transforma- tion, multivariate control charts

Zhou, Shiyu

358

Modeling the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of existing nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis codes was performed to determine if any existing codes meet technical and functional requirements defined for a U.S. national program supporting the global and domestic assessment, development and deployment of nuclear energy systems. The program would be implemented using an interconnected architecture of different codes ranging from the fuel cycle analysis code, which is the subject of the review, to fundamental physical and mechanistic codes. Four main functions are defined for the code: (1) the ability to characterize and deploy individual fuel cycle facilities and reactors in a simulation, while discretely tracking material movements, (2) the capability to perform an uncertainty analysis for each element of the fuel cycle and an aggregate uncertainty analysis, (3) the inclusion of an optimization engine able to optimize simultaneously across multiple objective functions, and (4) open and accessible code software and documentation to aid in collaboration between multiple entities and facilitate software updates. Existing codes, categorized as annualized or discrete fuel tracking codes, were assessed according to the four functions and associated requirements. These codes were developed by various government, education and industrial entities to fulfill particular needs. In some cases, decisions were made during code development to limit the level of detail included in a code to ease its use or to focus on certain aspects of a fuel cycle to address specific questions. The review revealed that while no two of the codes are identical, they all perform many of the same basic functions. No code was able to perform defined function 2 or several requirements of functions 1 and 3. Based on this review, it was concluded that the functions and requirements will be met only with development of a new code, referred to as GENIUS.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar; Christopher A. Juchau

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Compatible Hamilton cycles in Dirac graphs Michael Krivelevich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compatible Hamilton cycles in Dirac graphs Michael Krivelevich Choongbum Lee Benny Sudakov system F over a Dirac graph G, there exists a Hamilton cycle compatible with F. This settles in a very strong form, a conjecture of H¨aggkvist from 1988. 1 Introduction A Hamilton cycle in a graph G

Krivelevich, Michael

360

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

Not Available

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Life Cycle Cost Estimate  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Life-cycle costs (LCCs) are all the anticipated costs associated with a project or program alternative throughout its life. This includes costs from pre-operations through operations or to the end of the alternative.This chapter discusses life cycle costs and the role they play in planning.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Quantum Thermodynamic Cycles and Quantum Heat Engines (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the quantum mechanical generalization of force or pressure, and then we extend the classical thermodynamic isobaric process to quantum mechanical systems. Based on these efforts, we are able to study the quantum version of thermodynamic cycles that consist of quantum isobaric process, such as quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle. We also consider the implementation of quantum Brayton cycle and quantum Diesel cycle with some model systems, such as single particle in 1D box and single-mode radiation field in a cavity. These studies lay the microscopic (quantum mechanical) foundation for Szilard-Zurek single molecule engine.

H. T. Quan

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cycle isolation monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Extension of the supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle to low reactor power operation: investigations using the coupled anl plant dynamics code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 liquid metal reactor code system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made on the development of a control strategy for the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle enabling removal of power from an autonomous load following Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) down to decay heat levels such that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used to cool the reactor until decay heat can be removed by the normal shutdown heat removal system or a passive decay heat removal system such as Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) loops with DRACS in-vessel heat exchangers. This capability of the new control strategy eliminates the need for use of a separate shutdown heat removal system which might also use supercritical CO{sub 2}. It has been found that this capability can be achieved by introducing a new control mechanism involving shaft speed control for the common shaft joining the turbine and two compressors following reduction of the load demand from the electrical grid to zero. Following disconnection of the generator from the electrical grid, heat is removed from the intermediate sodium circuit through the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger, the turbine solely drives the two compressors, and heat is rejected from the cycle through the CO{sub 2}-to-water cooler. To investigate the effectiveness of shaft speed control, calculations are carried out using the coupled Plant Dynamics Code-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code for a linear load reduction transient for a 1000 MWt metallic-fueled SFR with autonomous load following. No deliberate motion of control rods or adjustment of sodium pump speeds is assumed to take place. It is assumed that the S-CO{sub 2} turbomachinery shaft speed linearly decreases from 100 to 20% nominal following reduction of grid load to zero. The reactor power is calculated to autonomously decrease down to 3% nominal providing a lengthy window in time for the switchover to the normal shutdown heat removal system or for a passive decay heat removal system to become effective. However, the calculations reveal that the compressor conditions are calculated to approach surge such that the need for a surge control system for each compressor is identified. Thus, it is demonstrated that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate in the initial decay heat removal mode even with autonomous reactor control. Because external power is not needed to drive the compressors, the results show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be used for initial decay heat removal for a lengthy interval in time in the absence of any off-site electrical power. The turbine provides sufficient power to drive the compressors. Combined with autonomous reactor control, this represents a significant safety advantage of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle by maintaining removal of the reactor power until the core decay heat falls to levels well below those for which the passive decay heat removal system is designed. The new control strategy is an alternative to a split-shaft layout involving separate power and compressor turbines which had previously been identified as a promising approach enabling heat removal from a SFR at low power levels. The current results indicate that the split-shaft configuration does not provide any significant benefits for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle over the current single-shaft layout with shaft speed control. It has been demonstrated that when connected to the grid the single-shaft cycle can effectively follow the load over the entire range. No compressor speed variation is needed while power is delivered to the grid. When the system is disconnected from the grid, the shaft speed can be changed as effectively as it would be with the split-shaft arrangement. In the split-shaft configuration, zero generator power means disconnection of the power turbine, such that the resulting system will be almost identical to the single-shaft arrangement. Without this advantage of the split-shaft configuration, the economic benefits of the single-shaft arrangement, provided by just one turbine and lower losses at the design point, are more important to the overall cycle performance. Therefore, the single-shaft

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

365

Malone cycle refrigerator development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress made in demonstrating a Malone Cycle Refrigerator/Freezer. The Malone cycle is similar to the Stirling cycle but uses a supercritical fluid in place of real gas. In the approach, solid-metal diaphragms are used to seal and sweep the working volumes against the high working fluid pressures required in Malone cycle machines. This feature eliminates the friction and leakage that accounted for nearly half the losses in the best piston-defined Malone cycle machines built to date. The authors successfully built a Malone cycle refrigerator that: (1) used CO{sub 2} as the working fluid, (2) operated at pressures up to 19.3 Mpa (2,800 psi), (3) achieved a cold end metal temperatures of {minus}29 C ({minus}20 F), and (4) produced over 400 Watts of cooling at near ambient temperatures. The critical diaphragm components operated flawlessly throughout characterization and performance testing, supporting the conclusion of high reliability based on analysis of fatigue date and actual strain measurements.

Shimko, M.A.; Crowley, C.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon...

367

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Brayton-cycle gas turbine topping . , . . , , -Effect of Brayton Cycle. Gas Turbine Topping on the Grossof either Brayton-cycle gas turbines or Rankine-cycle steam

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Helium process cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A unique process cycle and apparatus design separates the consumer (cryogenic) load return flow from most of the recycle return flow of a refrigerator and/or liquefier process cycle. The refrigerator and/or liquefier process recycle return flow is recompressed by a multi-stage compressor set and the consumer load return flow is recompressed by an independent consumer load compressor set that maintains a desirable constant suction pressure using a consumer load bypass control valve and the consumer load return pressure control valve that controls the consumer load compressor's suction pressure. The discharge pressure of this consumer load compressor is thereby allowed to float at the intermediate pressure in between the first and second stage recycle compressor sets. Utilizing the unique gas management valve regulation, the unique process cycle and apparatus design in which the consumer load return flow is separate from the recycle return flow, the pressure ratios of each recycle compressor stage and all main pressures associated with the recycle return flow are allowed to vary naturally, thus providing a naturally regulated and balanced floating pressure process cycle that maintains optimal efficiency at design and off-design process cycle capacity and conditions automatically.

Ganni, Venkatarao (Yorktown, VA)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

370

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) Project represents the culmination of the proof-of-concept (POC) development stage in the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to advance MHD technology to early commercial development stage utility power applications. The project is a joint effort, combining the skills of three topping cycle component developers: TRW, Avco/TDS, and Westinghouse. TRW, the prime contractor and system integrator, is responsible for the 50 thermal megawatt (50 MW{sub t}) slagging coal combustion subsystem. Avco/TDS is responsible for the MHD channel subsystem (nozzle, channel, diffuser, and power conditioning circuits), and Westinghouse is responsible for the current consolidation subsystem. The ITC Project will advance the state-of-the-art in MHD power systems with the design, construction, and integrated testing of 50 MW{sub t} power train components which are prototypical of the equipment that will be used in an early commercial scale MHD utility retrofit. Long duration testing of the integrated power train at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana will be performed, so that by the early 1990's, an engineering data base on the reliability, availability, maintainability and performance of the system will be available to allow scaleup of the prototypical designs to the next development level. This Sixteenth Quarterly Technical Progress Report covers the period May 1, 1991 to July 31, 1991.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION): A Tool for Analyzing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Futures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of a set of complex components that are intended to work together. To support the nuclear renaissance, it is necessary to understand the impacts of changes and timing of events in any part of the fuel cycle system such as how the system would respond to each technological change, a series of which moves the fuel cycle from where it is to a postulated future state. The system analysis working group of the United States research program on advanced fuel cycles (formerly called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative) is developing a dynamic simulation model, VISION, to capture the relationships, timing, and changes in and among the fuel cycle components to help develop an understanding of how the overall fuel cycle works. This paper is an overview of the philosophy and development strategy behind VISION. The paper includes some descriptions of the model components and some examples of how to use VISION. For example, VISION users can now change yearly the selection of separation or reactor technologies, the performance characteristics of those technologies, and/or the routing of material among separation and reactor types - with the model still operating on a PC in <5 min.

Jacob J. Jacobson; Steven J. Piet; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire; Robert F. Jeffers; A. M. Yacout; Tyler Schweitzer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Combined cycle meets Thailand's growing power demands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how an ample supply of natural gas led the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to choose gas-fired combustion turbines. Thailand's rapid industrialization, which began in the late 1980's, placed a great strain on the country's electricity supply system. The demand for electricity grew at an astonishing 14% annually. To deal with diminishing reserve capacity margins, the EGAT announced, in 1988, a power development program emphasizing gas-fired combined cycle power plants. Plans included six 320-MW combined cycle blocks at three sites, and an additional 600-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant at Bang Pakong. As electricity demand continued to increase, EGAT expanded its plans to include two additional 320-MW combined cycle blocks, a 600-MW combined cycle block, and a 650-MW gas- and oil-fired thermal plant. All are currently in various stages of design and construction.

Sheets, B.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Takabut, K. (Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

375

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

Swift, Gregory W. (Santa Fe, NM); Kotsubo, Vincent Y. (La Canada, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Evaluation of Life-Cycle Assessment Studies of Chinese Cement Production: Challenges and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system boundary, data sources, data quality assessment, data disaggregation and other elements. The Development of Life Cycle

Lu, Hongyou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Understanding the petrochemical cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presentation will examine the nature of the supply, demand and profitability cycles that appear to be endemic in the petrochemical industry. The focus will be on the underlying factors that cause cyclicality. Data for ethylene and first line derivatives will be used both to provide quantitative illustrations of the magnitude of the cyclical effects and to give an improved perspective on the forces that drive cylicality. We will also examine to what extent cycle timing may be predictable, and present some scenario based projections.

Sedriks, W. [SRI Consulting, Melno Park, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

Brent Dixon; Steve Piet; David Shropshire; Gretchen Matthern

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Advanced Heat Exchanger Development for Molten Salts in Nuclear and Non Nuclear Systems  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

Sabharwall, Piyush; Clark, Denis; Sridharan, Kumar; Zheng, Guiqiu; Anderson, Mark

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Heat Exchanger Development for Molten Salts in Nuclear and Non Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study addresses present work concerned with advanced heat exchanger development for molten salt in nuclear and non nuclear thermal systems. The molten salt systems discussed herein use alloys, such as Hastelloy N and 242, which show corrosion resistance to molten salt at nominal operating temperatures up to 700C. These alloys were diffusion welded, and the corresponding information is presented. Test specimens were prepared for exposing diffusion welds to molten salt environments. Hastelloy N and 242 were found to be weldable by diffusion welding, with ultimate tensile strengths about 90% of base metal values. Both diffusion welds and sheet material in Hastelloy N were corrosion tested in?58 mol% KF and 42 mol% ZrF4 at 650, 700, and 850C for 200, 500, and 1,000 hours. Corrosion rates found were similar between welded and nonwelded materials, typically <10 mils per year. For materials of construction, nickel and alloys with dense nickel coatings are effectively inert to corrosion in fluorides, but not so in chlorides. Hence, additional testing of selected alloys for resistance to intergranular corrosion is needed, as is a determination of corrosion rate as a function of contaminant type and alloy composition with respect to chromium and carbon to better define the optimal chromium and carbon composition, independent of galvanic or differential solubility effects. Also presented is the division of the nuclear reactor and high temperature components per ASME standards, along with design requirements for a subcritical Rankine power cycle heat exchanger that has to overcome pressure difference of about 17 MPa.

Piyush Sabharwall; Denis Clark; Kumar Sridharan; Guiqiu Zheng; Mark Anderson

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Life cycle assessment of a rock crusher  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nordberg, Inc., a capital equipment manufacturer, performed a Life Cycle Assessment study on its rock crusher to aid in making decisions on product design and energy improvements. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a relatively new cutting edge environmental tool recently standardized by ISO that provides quantitative environmental and energy data on products or processes. This paper commences with a brief introduction to LCA and presents the system boundaries, modeling and assumptions for the rock crusher study. System boundaries include all life major cycle stages except manufacturing and assembly of the crusher. Results of the LCA show that over 99% of most of the flows into and out of the system may be attributed to the use phase of the rock crusher. Within the use phase itself, over 95% of each environmental inflow and outflow (with some exceptions) are attributed to electricity consumption, and not the replacement of spares/wears or lubricating oil over the lifetime of the crusher. Results tables and charts present selected environmental flows, including CO{sub 2} NOx, SOx, particulate matter, and energy consumption, for each of the rock crusher life cycle stages and the use phase. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of adopting a rigorous scientific approach to assess energy and environmental impacts over the life cycle of capital equipment. Nordberg has used these results to enhance its engineering efforts toward developing an even more energy efficient machine to further progress its vision of providing economic solutions to its customers by reducing the crusher operating (mainly electricity) costs.

Landfield, A.H.; Karra, V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to design and construct prototypical hardware for an integrated MHD topping cycle, and conduct long duration proof-of-concept tests of integrated system at the US DOE Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The results of the long duration tests will augment the existing engineering design data base on MHD power train reliability, availability, maintainability, and performance, and will serve as a basis for scaling up the topping cycle design to the next level of development, an early commercial scale power plant retrofit. The components of the MHD power train to be designed, fabricated, and tested include: A slagging coal combustor with a rated capacity of 50 MW thermal input, capable of operation with an Eastern (Illinois {number sign}6) or Western (Montana Rosebud) coal, a segmented supersonic nozzle, a supersonic MHD channel capable of generating at least 1.5 MW of electrical power, a segmented supersonic diffuser section to interface the channel with existing facility quench and exhaust systems, a complete set of current control circuits for local diagonal current control along the channel, and a set of current consolidation circuits to interface the channel with the existing facility inverter.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

GENERAL CIRCULATION Energy Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process. PE is useful for global energy balance. Solar radiant energy does not reach the Earth equally everywhere. On average, the tropics receive and absorb far more solar energy annually than the polar regionsGENERAL CIRCULATION Contents Energy Cycle Mean Characteristics Momentum Budget Overview Energy

Grotjahn, Richard

385

CLASS DESCRIPTIONS CYCLING SERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will utilize concepts from the 50-minute cycling class while going the distance to optimal health. Whether you're an avid cyclist, triathlete, or desire a longer class for a greater challenge, join us for this 75-minute AN URBANATHLETE Are you registered to compete in an adventure race like the Men's Health Urbanathlon, Warrior Dash

Pittendrigh, Barry

386

Life cycle assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a technical, data-based and holistic approach to define and subsequently reduce the environmental burdens associated with a product, process, or activity by identifying and quantifying energy and material usage and waste discharges, assessing the impact of those wastes on the environment, and evaluating and implementing opportunities to effect environmental improvements. The assessment includes the entire life-cycle of the product, process or activity encompassing extraction and processing of raw materials, manufacturing, transportation and distribution, use/reuse, recycling and final disposal. LCA is a useful tool for evaluating the environmental consequences of a product, process, or activity, however, current applications of LCA have not been performed in consistent or easily understood ways. This inconsistency has caused increased criticism of LCA. The EPA recognized the need to develop an LCA framework which could be used to provide consistent use across the board. Also, additional research is needed to enhance the understanding about the steps in the performance of an LCA and its appropriate usage. This paper will present the research activities of the EPA leading toward the development of an acceptable method for conducting LCA`s. This research has resulted in the development of two guidance manuals. The first manual is intended to be a practical guide to conducting and interpreting the life-cycle inventory. A nine-step approach to performing a comprehensive inventory is presented along with the general issues to be addressed. The second manual addresses life-cycle design.

Curran, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Cycle Combustion Turbines Steven Simmons February 27 2014 1 #12;CCCT Today's Discussion 1 Meeting Pricing of 4 advanced units using information from Gas Turbine World Other cost estimates from E E3 EIA Gas Turbine World California Energy Commission Date 2010 Oct 2012, Dec 2013 Apr 2013 2013 Apr

388

Properties and Cycle Performance of Refrigerant Blends Operating Near and Above the Refrigerant Critical Point, Task 2: Air Conditioner System Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this project was to investigate and compare the performance of an R410A air conditioner to that of an R22 air conditioner, with specific interest in performance at high ambient temperatures at which the condenser of the R410A system may be operating above the refrigerant's critical point. Part 1 of this project consisted of conducting comprehensive measurements of thermophysical for refrigerant R125 and refrigerant blends R410A and R507A and developing new equation of state formulations and mixture models for predicting thermophysical properties of HFC refrigerant blends. Part 2 of this project conducted performance measurements of split-system, 3-ton R22 and R410A residential air conditioners in the 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C) outdoor temperature range and development of a system performance model. The performance data was used in preparing a beta version of EVAP-COND, a windows-based simulation package for predicting performance of finned-tube evaporators and condensers. The modeling portion of this project also included the formulation of a model for an air-conditioner equipped with a thermal expansion valve (TXV). Capacity and energy efficiency ratio (EER) were measured and compared. The R22 system's performance was measured over the outdoor ambient temperature range of 80 to 135 F (27.8 to 57.2 C). The same test range was planned for the R410A system. However, the compressor's safety system cut off the compressor at the 135.0 F (57.2 C) test temperature. The highest measurement on this system was at 130.0 F (54.4 C). Subsequently, a custom-manufactured R410A compressor with a disabled safety system and a more powerful motor was installed and performance was measured at outdoor temperatures up to 155.0 F (68.3 C). Both systems had similar capacity and EER performance at 82.0 F (27.8 C). The capacity and EER degradation of both systems were nearly linearly dependent with rising ambient outdoor ambient test temperatures. The performance degradation of R410A at higher temperatures was greater than R22. However, the R22 and R410A systems both operated normally during all tests. Visual observations of the R410A system provided no indication of vibrations or TXV hunting at high ambient outdoor test conditions with the compressor operating in the transcritical regime.

Piotr A. Domanski; W. Vance Payne

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

A life-cycle flexibility framework for designing, evaluating and managing "complex" real options : case studies in urban transportation and aircraft systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Designing a flexible system with real options is a method for managing uncertainty. This research introduces the concept of "complex" real options, which are composed of interconnected echnological, organizational and ...

McConnell, Joshua B. (Joshua Bryan), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

S and H Cycle Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our thirst for energy is increasing at an astounding rate. World population growth is estimated to increase by 40% (to 8.5 billion) by 2050, with annual electrical energy usage estimated increase by 100% (to 25 terawatt-hours). We must find new means and fuels as well as significantly improve the efficiency of current power plants to accommodate this growing electrical energy demand. This demand is also growing in the field of space flight. Present energy and propulsion systems are limited in the amount of power (energy) that can be generated by today's technology. This limits the distance that can be safely traveled by manned and un-manned space systems. Space flight is primarily governed by two factors: time and energy. Increasing energy of space propulsion systems will decrease flight time or allow reaching farther out into space safely for manned exploration of our solar system. For example, a round trip manned mission to Mars would take about 400 days with a NERVA type thermal nuclear rocket. To reduce the 400 days to 80 days would require an increase of energy by a factor of five. We need to develop space propulsion systems with much greater energy capability than we have today to satisfy the expansion of space exploration. The S and H Cycle nuclear engine provides a revolutionary technological approach that can contribute significantly toward solving the World electrical energy and the space travel energy requirements. (authors)

Strobl, William C. [2906 Via Pepita, Carlsbad, Ca. 92009 (United States); Holland, Joe P. [10671 Jasper Ave., Redlands, Ca. 92374 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Brayton Cycle Heat Pump for VOC Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first full size continuous operation Brayton Cycle Heat Pump (1)(2)(3) application for VOC recovery occurred in 1988. The mixed solvent recovery system was designed and supplied by NUCON for the 3M facility in Weatherford, OK (4). This first...

Kovach, J. L.

392

Stirling cycle engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a Stirling cycle engine having a plurality of working gas charges separated by pistons reciprocating in cylinders, the total gas content is minimized and the mean pressure equalization among the serial cylinders is improved by using two piston rings axially spaced at least as much as the piston stroke and by providing a duct in the cylinder wall opening in the space between the two piston rings and leading to a source of minimum or maximum working gas pressure.

Lundholm, Gunnar (Lund, SE)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Assessment for advanced fuel cycle options in CANDU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possible options for advanced fuel cycles in CANDU reactors including actinide burning options and thorium cycles were explored and are feasible options to increase the efficiency of uranium utilization and help close the fuel cycle. The actinide burning TRUMOX approach uses a mixed oxide fuel of reprocessed transuranic actinides from PWR spent fuel blended with natural uranium in the CANDU-900 reactor. This system reduced actinide content by 35% and decreased natural uranium consumption by 24% over a PWR once through cycle. The thorium cycles evaluated used two CANDU-900 units, a generator and a burner unit along with a driver fuel feedstock. The driver fuels included plutonium reprocessed from PWR, from CANDU and low enriched uranium (LEU). All three cycles were effective options and reduced natural uranium consumption over a PWR once through cycle. The LEU driven system saw the largest reduction with a 94% savings while the plutonium driven cycles achieved 75% savings for PWR and 87% for CANDU. The high neutron economy, online fuelling and flexible compact fuel make the CANDU system an ideal reactor platform for many advanced fuel cycles.

Morreale, A.C.; Luxat, J.C. [McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W. Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4L7 (Canada); Friedlander, Y. [AMEC-NSS Ltd., 700 University Ave. 4th Floor, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1X6 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Technology development life cycle processes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report and set of appendices are a collection of memoranda originally drafted in 2009 for the purpose of providing motivation and the necessary background material to support the definition and integration of engineering and management processes related to technology development. At the time there was interest and support to move from Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Level One (ad hoc processes) to Level Three. As presented herein, the material begins with a survey of open literature perspectives on technology development life cycles, including published data on %E2%80%9Cwhat went wrong.%E2%80%9D The main thrust of the material presents a rational expose%CC%81 of a structured technology development life cycle that uses the scientific method as a framework, with further rigor added from adapting relevant portions of the systems engineering process. The material concludes with a discussion on the use of multiple measures to assess technology maturity, including consideration of the viewpoint of potential users.

Beck, David Franklin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

New Regenerative Cycle for Vapor Compression Refrigeration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was a continuation of Category 1 project, completed in August 2005. Following the successful bench model demonstration of the technical feasibility and economic viability, the main objective in this stage was to fabricate the prototype of the heat pump, working on the new thermodynamic cycle. This required further research to increase the system efficiency to the level consistent with theoretical analysis of the cycle. Another group of objectives was to provide the foundation for commercialization and included documentation of the manufacturing process, preparing the business plan, organizing sales network and raising the private capital necessary to acquire production facilities.

Bergander, Mark J [Magnetic Development, Inc.; Butrymowicz, Dariusz [Polish Academy of Scinces

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

396

HEURISTIC SEARCH FOR HAMILTON CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by combining it with the remaining cycles. The following is the description of the main part of the algorithmHEURISTIC SEARCH FOR HAMILTON CYCLES IN CUBIC GRAPHS Janez ALES, Bojan MOHAR and Tomaz PISANSKI. A successful heuristic algorithm for nding Hamilton cycles in cubic graphs is described. Several graphs from

Mohar, Bojan

397

Edinburgh Research Explorer Money Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edinburgh Research Explorer Money Cycles Citation for published version: Clausen, A & Strub, C 2014 'Money Cycles' Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series. Link: Link to publication record date: 11. Dec. 2014 #12;Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series Number 249 Money Cycles

Millar, Andrew J.

398

Cheng Cycle Brings Flexibility to Steam Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Based upon an estimated steam load between 5,000 and 50,000 Ibjhr and an electrical load of approximately 1500 KW, the Engineering Department examined several energy optimization systems for this site. It was determined that a modified gas turbine... within the borders allows exact tracking of desired electrical and thermal outputs. The Allison engine used in the Cheng Cycle system was selected for its proved performance and its ample surge margin which permits stable steam injection...

Keller, D. C.; Bynum, D.; Kosla, L.

399

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor, is sized for a 10-ton heat pump system - will be scaled to power a commercial product line ranging from 7 of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

400

Emerging approaches, challenges and opportunities in life cycle assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- rable. For instance, CO2 and CH4 emissions can both be expressed as CO2-equivalent emissions by using in the life cycle and sums them across the whole system. Typically, several hundreds of emissions and resources are quantified. In the third phase, life-cycle impact assessment (LCIA), emissions and resources

Napp, Nils

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Software Requirements Specification Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION) Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Software Requirements Specification (SRS) is to define the top-level requirements for a Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) of the Advanced Fuel Cycle (AFC). This simulation model is intended to serve a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI (including costs estimates) and Generation IV reactor development studies.

D. E. Shropshire; W. H. West

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Beyond the standard duty cycle data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors

403

A Coupled Quantum Otto Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the 1-d isotropic Heisenberg model of two spin-1/2 systems as a quantum heat engine. The engine undergoes a four-step Otto cycle where the two adiabatic branches involve changing the external magnetic field at a fixed value of the coupling constant. We find conditions for the engine efficiency to be higher than the uncoupled model; in particular, we find an upper bound which is tighter than the Carnot bound. A new domain of parameter values is pointed out which was not feasible in the interaction-free model. Locally, each spin seems to effect the flow of heat in a direction opposite to the global temperature gradient. This seeming contradiction to the second law can be resolved in terms of local effective temperature of the spins.

George Thomas; Ramandeep S. Johal

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." GeneralDesign and Optimize Geothermal Power Cycles." Presented atof Practical Cycles for Geothermal Power Plants." General

Pope, W.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

life-cycle energy requirements (e total ) and global warmingtotal life-cycle global warming impacts. Chapter 3 Life-cycle Energy and Global

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Indirect-fired gas turbine dual fuel cell power cycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell and gas turbine combined cycle system which includes dual fuel cell cycles combined with a gas turbine cycle wherein a solid oxide fuel cell cycle operated at a pressure of between 6 to 15 atms tops the turbine cycle and is used to produce CO.sub.2 for a molten carbonate fuel cell cycle which bottoms the turbine and is operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. A high pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the topping fuel cell cycle to further heat the pressurized gas driving the turbine. A low pressure combustor is used to combust the excess fuel from the bottoming fuel cell to reheat the gas stream passing out of the turbine which is used to preheat the pressurized air stream entering the topping fuel cell before passing into the bottoming fuel cell cathode. The CO.sub.2 generated in the solid oxide fuel cell cycle cascades through the system to the molten carbonate fuel cell cycle cathode.

Micheli, Paul L. (Sacramento, CA); Williams, Mark C. (Morgantown, WV); Sudhoff, Frederick A. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Quantum thermodynamic cooling cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic properties of a 3-level molecular cooling cycle are derived. An inadequacy of earlier models is rectified in accounting for the spontaneous emission and absorption associated with the coupling to the coherent driving field via an environmental reservoir. This additional coupling need not be dissipative, and can provide a thermal driving force - the quantum analog of classical absorption chillers. The dependence of the maximum attainable cooling rate on temperature, at ultra-low temperatures, is determined and shown to respect the recently-established fundamental bound based on the second and third laws of thermodynamics.

Palao, J P; Gordon, J M; Palao, Jose P.; Kosloff, Ronnie; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Geothermal Life Cycle Calculator  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This calculator is a handy tool for interested parties to estimate two key life cycle metrics, fossil energy consumption (Etot) and greenhouse gas emission (ghgtot) ratios, for geothermal electric power production. It is based solely on data developed by Argonne National Laboratory for DOEs Geothermal Technologies office. The calculator permits the user to explore the impact of a range of key geothermal power production parameters, including plant capacity, lifetime, capacity factor, geothermal technology, well numbers and depths, field exploration, and others on the two metrics just mentioned. Estimates of variations in the results are also available to the user.

Sullivan, John

410

Quantum thermodynamic cooling cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum-mechanical and thermodynamic properties of a 3-level molecular cooling cycle are derived. An inadequacy of earlier models is rectified in accounting for the spontaneous emission and absorption associated with the coupling to the coherent driving field via an environmental reservoir. This additional coupling need not be dissipative, and can provide a thermal driving force - the quantum analog of classical absorption chillers. The dependence of the maximum attainable cooling rate on temperature, at ultra-low temperatures, is determined and shown to respect the recently-established fundamental bound based on the second and third laws of thermodynamics.

Jose P. Palao; Ronnie Kosloff; Jeffrey M. Gordon

2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Beowawe Binary Bottoming Cycle  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: ScopeDepartment ofEnergyBeowawe Binary Bottoming Cycle

412

The Kalina cycle and similar cycles for geothermal power production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a brief discussion of the mechanics of the Kalina cycle and ideas to extend the concept to other somewhat different cycles. A modified cycle which has a potential heat rejection advantage but little or no performance improvement is discussed. Then, the results of the application of the Kalina cycle and the modified cycle to a geothermal application (360/degree/F resource) are discussed. The results are compared with published results for the Kalina cycle with high temperature sources and estimates about performance at the geothermal temperatures. Finally, the conclusions of this scoping work are given along with recommendations of the direction of future work in this area. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Bliem, C.J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Kouchoul cycle implication in the Tailer engine cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents here the study of the Tailer engine modified cycle using the concept of load transfer for the Kouchoul cycle. Theoretical equations and numerical simulation of the Tailer engine modified cycle implicating the Kouchoul cycle are developed. The Tailer engine modified cycle can be improved by approaching cycles of spark plug engines by the addition of a phase of cooling of gases to the bottom dead center (bdc). This is possible only by putting a reservoir of cooled gas in communication with the cylinder to the bottom dead center. So as not to complicate the kinematic of the engine, the communication between cylinder and cooled reservoir is executed by some holes of 1 mm distributed on the whole periphery of the cylinder at the bdc.

Arques, P.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Apparent competition or apparent mutualism? shared predation when populations cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use simple mathematical models to explore the indirect interactions between two prey species that share a predator when all three species undergo population cycles. The results are compared to analogous findings for systems that reach a stable...

Abrams, Peter A.; Holt, Robert D.; Roth, James D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are shown. Keywords- Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Life Cycleindustry, and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is emerging as a

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Open cycle thermoacoustics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of thermodynamic device combining a thermodynamic cycle with the externally applied steady flow of an open thermodynamic process is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. The gas flowing through this device can be heated or cooled in a series of semi-open cyclic steps. The combination of open and cyclic flows makes possible the elimination of some or all of the heat exchangers (with their associated irreversibility). Heat is directly exchanged with the process fluid as it flows through the device when operating as a refrigerator, producing a staging effect that tends to increase First Law thermodynamic efficiency. An open-flow thermoacoustic refrigerator was built to demonstrate this concept. Several approaches are presented that describe the physical characteristics of this device. Tests have been conducted on this refrigerator with good agreement with a proposed theory.

Reid, Robert Stowers

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Stirling cycle rotary engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Stirling cycle rotary engine for producing mechanical energy from heat generated by a heat source external to the engine, the engine including: an engine housing having an interior toroidal cavity with a central housing axis for receiving a working gas, the engine housing further having a cool as inlet port, a compressed gas outlet port, a heated compressed gas inlet port, and a hot exhaust gas outlet port at least three rotors each fixedly mounted to a respective rotor shaft and independently rotatable within the toroidal cavity about the central axis; each of the rotors including a pair of rotor blocks spaced radially on diametrically opposing sides of the respective rotor shaft, each rotor block having a radially fixed curva-linear outer surface for sealed rotational engagement with the engine housing.

Chandler, J.A.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

FUEL CELL/MICRO-TURBINE COMBINED CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of conceptual design studies have been conducted that describe ultra-high efficiency fossil power plant cycles. The most promising of these ultra-high efficiency cycles incorporate high temperature fuel cells with a gas turbine. Combining fuel cells with a gas turbine increases overall cycle efficiency while reducing per kilowatt emissions. This study has demonstrated that the unique approach taken to combining a fuel cell and gas turbine has both technical and economic merit. The approach used in this study eliminates most of the gas turbine integration problems associated with hybrid fuel cell turbine systems. By using a micro-turbine, and a non-pressurized fuel cell the total system size (kW) and complexity has been reduced substantially from those presented in other studies, while maintaining over 70% efficiency. The reduced system size can be particularly attractive in the deregulated electrical generation/distribution environment where the market may not demand multi-megawatt central stations systems. The small size also opens up the niche markets to this high efficiency, low emission electrical generation option.

Larry J. Chaney; Mike R. Tharp; Tom W. Wolf; Tim A. Fuller; Joe J. Hartvigson

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

Dao, Kim (14 Nace Ave., Piedmont, CA 94611)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Accelerating cycle expansions by dynamical conjugacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Periodic orbit theory provides two important functions---the dynamical zeta function and the spectral determinant for the calculation of dynamical averages in a nonlinear system. Their cycle expansions converge rapidly when the system is uniformly hyperbolic but greatly slowed down in the presence of non-hyperbolicity. We find that the slow convergence can be associated with singularities in the natural measure. A properly designed coordinate transformation may remove these singularities and results in a dynamically conjugate system where fast convergence is restored. The technique is successfully demonstrated on several examples of one-dimensional maps and some remaining challenges are discussed.

Ang Gao; Jianbo Xie; Yueheng Lan

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1990 to January 31, 1991. Testing of the High Pressure Cooling Subsystem electrical isolator was completed. The PEEK material successfully passed the high temperature, high pressure duration tests (50 hours). The Combustion Subsystem drawings were CADAM released. The procurement process is in progress. An equipment specification and RFP were prepared for the new Low Pressure Cooling System (LPCS) and released for quotation. Work has been conducted on confirmation tests leading to final gas-side designs and studies to assist in channel fabrication.The final cathode gas-side design and the proposed gas-side designs of the anode and sidewall are presented. Anode confirmation tests and related analyses of anode wear mechanisms used in the selection of the proposed anode design are presented. Sidewall confirmation tests, which were used to select the proposed gas-side design, were conducted. The design for the full scale CDIF system was completed. A test program was initiated to investigate the practicality of using Avco current controls for current consolidation in the power takeoff (PTO) regions and to determine the cause of past current consolidation failures. Another important activity was the installation of 1A4-style coupons in the 1A1 channel. A description of the coupons and their location with 1A1 channel is presented herein.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Virtuous Cycle Cycles of activity and software projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inspection #12;Programming Cycle - single bug Selected Bug Shared Code Fix Bug Continuous Integration ~8 cycle cvscheck compilation style checking testing javadocs documentation jumble quality of unit testing #12;NetValue Development cvscheck - Source Code Control and Build Shared Centralized Automatic

Pfahringer, Bernhard

424

A Comparison of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Configurations with an Emphasis on CSP Applications (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent research suggests that an emerging power cycle technology using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) operated in a closed-loop Brayton cycle offers the potential of equivalent or higher cycle efficiency versus supercritical or superheated steam cycles at temperatures relevant for CSP applications. Preliminary design-point modeling suggests that s-CO2 cycle configurations can be devised that have similar overall efficiency but different temperature and/or pressure characteristics. This paper employs a more detailed heat exchanger model than previous work to compare the recompression and partial cooling cycles, two cycles with high design-point efficiencies, and illustrates the potential advantages of the latter. Integration of the cycles into CSP systems is studied, with a focus on sensible heat thermal storage and direct s-CO2 receivers. Results show the partial cooling cycle may offer a larger temperature difference across the primary heat exchanger, thereby potentially reducing heat exchanger cost and improving CSP receiver efficiency.

Neises, T.; Turchi, C.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Biomass Gasification Combined Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification combined cycle continues to represent an important defining technology area for the forest products industry. The ''Forest Products Gasification Initiative'', organized under the Industry's Agenda 2020 technology vision and supported by the DOE ''Industries of the Future'' program, is well positioned to guide these technologies to commercial success within a five-to ten-year timeframe given supportive federal budgets and public policy. Commercial success will result in significant environmental and renewable energy goals that are shared by the Industry and the Nation. The Battelle/FERCO LIVG technology, which is the technology of choice for the application reported here, remains of high interest due to characteristics that make it well suited for integration with the infrastructure of a pulp production facility. The capital cost, operating economics and long-term demonstration of this technology area key input to future economically sustainable projects and must be verified by the 200 BDT/day demonstration facility currently operating in Burlington, Vermont. The New Bern application that was the initial objective of this project is not currently economically viable and will not be implemented at this time due to several changes at and around the mill which have occurred since the inception of the project in 1995. The analysis shows that for this technology, and likely other gasification technologies as well, the first few installations will require unique circumstances, or supportive public policies, or both to attract host sites and investors.

Judith A. Kieffer

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Extreme Financial cycles$ B. Candelonb,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extreme Financial cycles$ B. Candelonb, , G. Gauliera , C. Hurlinb aUniversity Maastricht proposes a new approach to date extreme financial cycles. Elabo- rating on recent methods in extreme value theory, it elaborates an extension of the famous calculus rule to detect extreme peaks and troughs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

427

Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 2325, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

428

Prediction of Sunspot Cycles by Data Assimilation Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the known general properties of the solar cycles, a reliable forecast of the 11-year sunspot number variations is still a problem. The difficulties are caused by the apparent chaotic behavior of the sunspot numbers from cycle to cycle and by the influence of various turbulent dynamo processes, which are far from understanding. For predicting the solar cycle properties we make an initial attempt to use the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), a data assimilation method, which takes into account uncertainties of a dynamo model and measurements, and allows to estimate future observational data. We present the results of forecasting of the solar cycles obtained by the EnKF method in application to a low-mode nonlinear dynamical system modeling the solar $\\alpha\\Omega$-dynamo process with variable magnetic helicity. Calculations of the predictions for the previous sunspot cycles show a reasonable agreement with the actual data. This forecast model predicts that the next sunspot cycle will be significantly weaker (by $\\sim 30%$) than the previous cycle, continuing the trend of low solar activity.

I. N. Kitiashvili; A. G. Kosovichev

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

429

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

A Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine Direct Cycle with Partial Condensation for Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carbon dioxide gas turbine power generation system with a partial condensation cycle has been proposed for thermal and fast nuclear reactors, in which compression is done partly in the liquid phase and partly in the gas phase. This cycle achieves higher cycle efficiency than a He direct cycle mainly due to reduced compressor work of the liquid phase and of the carbon dioxide real gas effect, especially in the vicinity of the critical point. If this cycle is applied to a thermal reactor, efficiency of this cycle is about 55% at a reactor outlet temperature of 900 deg. C and pressure of 12.5 MPa, which is higher by about 10% than a typical helium direct gas turbine cycle plant (PBMR) at 900 deg. C and 8.4 MPa; this cycle also provides comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate core outlet temperature of 600 deg. C with that of the helium cycle at 900 deg. C. If this cycle is applied to a fast reactor, it is anticipated to be an alternative to liquid metal cooled fast reactors that can provide slightly higher cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature; it would eliminate safety problems, simplify the heat transport system and simplify plant maintenance. A passive decay heat removal system is realized by connecting a liquid carbon dioxide storage tank with the reactor vessel and by supplying carbon dioxide gasified from the tank to the core in case of depressurization event. (authors)

Yasuyoshi Kato; Takeshi Nitawaki; Yoshio Yoshizawa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Numerical Investigation of Stratified Thermal Storage Tank Applied in Adsorption Heat Pump Cycle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With the aid of the TES (Thermal Energy Storage) in the adsorption heat pump cycle, the COP of the system can be improved. Different geometrical (more)

Taheri, Hadi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

High efficiency Brayton cycles using LNG  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A modified, closed-loop Brayton cycle power conversion system that uses liquefied natural gas as the cold heat sink media. When combined with a helium gas cooled nuclear reactor, achievable efficiency can approach 68 76% (as compared to 35% for conventional steam cycle power cooled by air or water). A superheater heat exchanger can be used to exchange heat from a side-stream of hot helium gas split-off from the primary helium coolant loop to post-heat vaporized natural gas exiting from low and high-pressure coolers. The superheater raises the exit temperature of the natural gas to close to room temperature, which makes the gas more attractive to sell on the open market. An additional benefit is significantly reduced costs of a LNG revaporization plant, since the nuclear reactor provides the heat for vaporization instead of burning a portion of the LNG to provide the heat.

Morrow, Charles W. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the experimental combustion evaluations to several specific technologies that can be used with HAT technology. After 5 years of extensive research and development, P&W is pleased to report that the HAT Technology Development Program goals have been achieved. With 0 to 10 percent steam addition, emissions achieved during this program featured less than 8 ppm NO{sub x}, less than 16 ppm CO, and unburned hydrocarbons corrected to 15 percent O{sub 2} for an FT8 engine operating between 0 and 120 F with 65 to 100 percent power at any day.

Richard Tuthill

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

The investigation of exhaust powered, automotive air cycle air conditioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

domestic automobiles and trucks because of its proven success. This system requires approximately 4 hp (2. 983 kW)[3] for operation snd employs a pressurized fluorinated hydrocarbon (R-12), hereafter fluorocarbon, as a refrigerant. Most of the research... extraction and avoid the use of a fluorocarbon refrigerant. The maJority of work involved with the new units has associated itself in the area of utilizing an absorption cycle or air cycle. The absorption air conditioning unit differs significantly from...

Holley, James Andrew

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Supercritical carbon dioxide cycle control analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work carried out during FY 2008 on further investigation of control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle energy converters. The main focus of the present work has been on investigation of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and behavior under conditions not covered by previous work. An important scenario which has not been previously calculated involves cycle operation for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) following a reactor scram event and the transition to the primary coolant natural circulation and decay heat removal. The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code has been applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of the 96 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle following scram. The timescale for the primary sodium flowrate to coast down and the transition to natural circulation to occur was calculated with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 computer code and found to be about 400 seconds. It is assumed that after this time, decay heat is removed by the normal ABTR shutdown heat removal system incorporating a dedicated shutdown heat removal S-CO{sub 2} pump and cooler. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code configured for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) was utilized to model the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle with a decaying liquid metal coolant flow to the Pb-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers and temperatures reflecting the decaying core power and heat removal by the cycle. The results obtained in this manner are approximate but indicative of the cycle transient performance. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code calculations show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate for about 400 seconds following the reactor scram driven by the thermal energy stored in the reactor structures and coolant such that heat removal from the reactor exceeds the decay heat generation. Based on the results, requirements for the shutdown heat removal system may be defined. In particular, the peak heat removal capacity of the shutdown heat removal loop may be specified to be 1.1 % of the nominal reactor power. An investigation of the oscillating cycle behavior calculated by the ANL Plant Dynamics Code under specific conditions has been carried out. It has been found that the calculation of unstable operation of the cycle during power reduction to 0 % may be attributed to the modeling of main compressor operation. The most probable reason for such instabilities is the limit of applicability of the currently used one-dimensional compressor performance subroutines which are based on empirical loss coefficients. A development of more detailed compressor design and performance models is required and is recommended for future work in order to better investigate and possibly eliminate the calculated instabilities. Also, as part of such model development, more reliable surge criteria should be developed for compressor operation close to the critical point. It is expected that more detailed compressor models will be developed as a part of validation of the Plant Dynamics Code through model comparison with the experiment data generated in the small S-CO{sub 2} loops being constructed at Barber-Nichols Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Although such a comparison activity had been planned to be initiated in FY 2008, data from the SNL compression loop currently in operation at Barber Nichols Inc. has not yet become available by the due date of this report. To enable the transient S-CO{sub 2} cycle investigations to be carried out, the ANL Plant Dynamics Code for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle was further developed and improved. The improvements include further optimization and tuning of the control mechanisms as well as an adaptation of the code for reactor systems other than the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). Since the focus of the ANL work on S-CO{sub 2} cycle development for the majority of the current year has been on the applicability of the cycle to SFRs, work has started on modification of the ANL Plant Dynamics Code to allow

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

American business cycles and innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economists have long studied innovation and its effects on business cycles. Economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter (1883-1950) was the first economist to thoroughly discuss these ideas in his Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung, published in 1911...

Hood, Michael

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

437

Name of Lecture Intensive Thermal Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, Carnot cycle 2. Available energy (Exergy) 3. Gas power cycles (Otto cycle, Diesel cycle, Gas turbine, etc.) 4. Vapor power cycles (Rankin cycle, Heat pump) 5. Basic concepts of heat transfer

438

Life Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reichl, H. Life cycle inventory analysis and identificationAllen, D.T. ; Life cycle inventory development for waferLife Cycle Inventory of a CMOS Chip Sarah Boyd and David

Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David; Krishnan, Nikhil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

yield. A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) model is used;more accurate life-cycle assessment (LCA) of electronicthe purposes of life-cycle assessment (LCA). While it may be

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

90 Communications of the Association for Information Systems (Volume 9, 2002) 90-104 The Work System Method for Understanding Information Systems and Information Systems Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, systems analysis, information system development, implementation, system life cycle I. INTRODUCTION parts of the system. The dynamic view is based on the "work system life cycle model," which shows how represents its static view. The work system life cycle model represents its dynamic view of how systems

Bieber, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "rankine cycle system" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient HD Engine ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

turbocharger 2200 bar Common Rail 2-stage EGR cooling DPF Bottoming Cycles Electric Turbo-compound Rankine Cycle, Thermo-electrics Variable Valve Actuation High Efficiency...

442

Low Temperature Combustion Demonstrator for High Efficiency Clean...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turbocharging Optimum CR and VVA Compression Ratio Bottoming Cycles Rankine Cycle Turbo Compounding Base engine development Parasitic Losses Aftertreatment Management 2009...

443

Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Burst BufferFluorite

446

Futile cycling at the plasma membrane: a hallmark of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Transport systems catalyzing ion influx across the plasma membrane of root cells fall into two broadFutile cycling at the plasma membrane: a hallmark of low-affinity nutrient transport Dev T. Britto-affinity transport systems in the plasma membranes of root cells. In this Opinion article, we illustrate that for six

Britto, Dev T.

447

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, moreMineLand Rehabilitation · PowerGeneration · System/PlantOperation andMaintenance · AuxiliaryNaturalGas Combustion · Coal-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

448

Quantum Otto cycle efficiency on coupled qudits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of the coupled particles with spin 3/2 (quartits) in a constant magnetic field, as a working substance in the quantum Otto cycle of the heat engine, are considered. It is shown that this system as a converter of heat energy in work (i) shows the efficiency 1 at the negative absolute temperatures of heat baths, (ii) at the temperatures of the opposite sign the efficiency approaches to 1, (iii) at the positive temperatures of heat baths antiferromagnetic interaction raises efficiency threefold in comparison with uncoupled particles.

E. A. Ivanchenko

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

449

Development of the Miller cycle for natural gas engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas is a viable alternative fuel to reduce exhaust emissions. But comparing natural gas engines with base diesel engines, the power output is 20--30% lower and the thermal efficiency is 4--5% lower due to knocking in the gas engine. The Miller cycle with independent presetting of the compression and expansion ratio for gas engines increases the engine efficiency with increased expansion ratio, while engine knocking can be avoided by reducing the compression ratio. A turbocharged inter-cooled spark ignition gas engine was modified to the Miller cycle engine and a thermal efficiency of 38%, 1.14MPa BMEP was attained with a three-way catalyst system compared to a thermal efficiency of 33%, 0.97 Mpa BMEP achieved by the conventional Otto cycle. On the other hand, the higher boost pressure, due to the lower compression ratio for avoiding knocking, caused a higher back pressure. This hinders the advantages of the Miller cycle and it is difficult to improve the engine performance further. Therefore, based on the Miller cycle, other technologies for avoiding knocking were developed to improve engine performance. A two-stage intake cooling system was developed, in which a new inter-cooler is installed in the intake passages close to the cylinder head as a second inter-cooler, besides an ordinary charge cooler. This significantly cools the blow-back mixture from the cylinder in the Late Intake-Closing Method Miller cycle. Besides the two-stage intake cooling system, a new split cooling system was also developed for the Miller cycle, where cooling water flowing to the cylinder head is independent of that flowing to the cylinder block. Cooling water at 313 K is circulated in the cylinder head to extend the knock-free zone and to improve the intake charging efficiency while cooling water at 353 K is circulated in the cylinder block to reduce the friction loss.

Zhang, F.R.; Okamoto, Kazuhisa; Shimogata, Satoshi; Shoji, Fujio [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan). Energy Technology Research Inst.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Commissioning tools for life-cycle building performance assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses information systems for building life-cycle performance analysis and the use of computer-based commissioning tools within this context. There are many reasons why buildings do not perform in practice as well as intended at the design stage. One reason is the lack of commissioning. A second reason is that design intent is not well documented, and performance targets for building components and systems are not well specified. Thus, criteria for defining verification and functional tests is unclear. A third reason is that critical information is often lost throughout the building life-cycle, which causes problems such as misunderstanding of operational characteristics and sequences and reduced overall performance. The life-cycle building performance analysis tools project discussed in this paper are focused on chillers and cooling systems.

Piette, M.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Technology Insights and Perspectives for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report provides a rich resource of information for exploring fuel cycle characteristics. The most noteworthy trends can be traced back to the utilization efficiency of natural uranium resources. By definition, complete uranium utilization occurs only when all of the natural uranium resource can be introduced into the nuclear reactor long enough for all of it to undergo fission. Achieving near complete uranium utilization requires technologies that can achieve full recycle or at least nearly full recycle of the initial natural uranium consumed from the Earth. Greater than 99% of all natural uranium is fertile, and thus is not conducive to fission. This fact requires the fuel cycle to convert large quantities of non-fissile material into fissile transuranics. Step increases in waste benefits are closely related to the step increase in uranium utilization going from non-breeding fuel cycles to breeding fuel cycles. The amount of mass requiring a disposal path is tightly coupled to the quantity of actinides in the waste stream. Complete uranium utilization by definition means that zero (practically, near zero) actinide mass is present in the waste stream. Therefore, fuel cycles with complete (uranium and transuranic) recycle discharge predominately fission products with some actinide process losses. Fuel cycles without complete recycle discharge a much more massive waste stream because only a fraction of the initial actinide mass is burned prior to disposal. In a nuclear growth scenario, the relevant acceptable frequency for core damage events in nuclear reactors is inversely proportional to the number of reactors deployed in a fuel cycle. For ten times the reactors in a fleet, it should be expected that the fleet-average core damage frequency be decreased by a factor of ten. The relevant proliferation resistance of a fuel cycle system is enhanced with: decreasing reliance on domestic fuel cycle services, decreasing adaptability for technology misuse, enablement of material accountability, and decreasing material attractiveness.

S. Bays; S. Piet; N. Soelberg; M. Lineberry; B. Dixon

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The behavioral manipulation hypothesis Life cycle of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The behavioral manipulation hypothesis · No one knows how the parasite causes these Life cycle eat mostly hares · Linked cycles? Predator-Prey Cycles? · Think and then discuss: · Under the hypothesis that predators cause this cycle, what would you expect for the following when hare populations

Mitchell, Randall J.

453

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Abatement Environmental impactLife-cycle Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . LCA of

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Simple ocean carbon cycle models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic evaluation has been conducted of the potential for advanced nuclear fuel cycle strategies and options to address the issues ascribed to the use of nuclear power. Issues included nuclear waste management, proliferation risk, safety, security, economics and affordability, and sustainability. The two basic strategies, once-through and recycle, and the range of possibilities within each strategy, are considered for all aspects of the fuel cycle including options for nuclear material irradiation, separations if needed, and disposal. Options range from incremental changes to todays implementation to revolutionary concepts that would require the development of advanced nuclear technologies.

Roald Wigeland; Temitope Taiwo; Michael Todosow; William Halsey; Jess Gehin

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Procedure for Applying an Open-Cycle Heat Pump to An Existing Evaporator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An open-cycle heat pump, or mechanical vapor compression (MVC) system, is often an attractive technique for increasing the energy efficiency of an evaporator. With proper design, an MVC system is capable of dramatic cost savings when retrofitted...

Wagner, J. R.; Brush, F. C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated thermal cycle Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(1999) 436457 Summary: . PbPb-Bi - solid fuel Thermal system actinide, f.p. molten salt; graphite beads UPu cycle ADS new... developed several ideas to use the hybrid system...

458

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part I. Cycling performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part I. Cycling performance P of Sony 18650 Li-ion cells increases with increase in temperature. After 800 cycles, the cells cycled the capacity fade of commercial Li-ion cells cycled at high temperatures. We choose Sony 18650 cells with Li

Popov, Branko N.

460

Single-cycle nonlinear optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

g l e - C y c l e Nonlinear Optics E. G o u l i e l m a k iSingle-Cycle Nonlinear Optics E. Goulielmakis *, M.D-85748 Garching. Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley

Goulielmakis, E.; Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z