Sample records for range tests prepared

  1. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  2. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  3. Modern testing meets wide range of objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

  4. Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

  5. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

  6. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

  7. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1998) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance at TTR extends only to those areas where SNL activities are carried out. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990a).

  8. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  9. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  10. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites Pre-activity survey report to clear areas to be cleaned up. No sensitive species were...

  11. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  13. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  14. A Wide Temperature Range Cryostat for Polarised Target Material Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    with current I and target density nt t 1 f 2 · P2 t · L · A2 t FOM = f 2 · P2 t · L is defining quality of frequency e + p DNP requirement: N Tn Te n Scott Reeve Wide Temperature · T Linear dependence of m on P laminar flow profile Falmer Scott Reeve Wide Temperature Range Cryostat 11

  15. Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1 Renewable Energy and the Nevada Test and Training Range Wednesday, December 15, 2010 Melissa due to renewable energy infrastructure development at the Nevada Test and Training Range. Nevada has have ever-increasing renewable energy goals. However, proposals for the development of 116 renewable

  16. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  17. Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of the Equivalence Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale Boggs

    2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment provides precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. In particular, time series of highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information that determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Analyses of precise laser ranges to the Moon continue to provide increasingly stringent limits on any violation of the EP. Current LLR solutions give (-0.8 +/- 1.3) x 10^{-13} for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, (m_G/m_I)_E - (m_G/m_I)_M. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches to solutions. Additional high accuracy ranges and improvements in the LLR data analysis model will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.

  18. Tonopah Test Range EGS graphics tracking display system: HP370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.H.; Bauhs, K.C.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the HP370 component of the Enhanced Graphics System (EGS) used at Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Selected Radar data is fed into the computer systems and the resulting tracking symbols are displayed on high-resolution video monitors in real time. These tracking symbols overlay background maps and are used for monitoring/controlling various flight vehicles. This report discusses both the operational aspects and the internal configuration of the HP370 Workstation portion of the EGS system.

  19. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  20. Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas: EnergyFallon GeothermalTest

  1. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (US), NNSA; Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (US)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSAs Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  2. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  3. Preparation of most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris [ORNL] [ORNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL] [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress Report...Prepare the most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing. M3FT-14OR0310012

  4. Neonatal Hearing Screening Test Consistent with loss in one or both ears within frequency range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Neonatal Hearing Screening Test Consistent with loss in one or both ears within frequency range: Gene specific mutation screening If familial and nonsyndromal is suspected, consider: GJB2 testing GJB6 testing CMV testing Environmental etiologies Gene specific screening may be warranted If nonsyndromal

  5. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Polly, B.; Bianchi, M.; Neymark, J.; Kennedy, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication summarizes building energy simulation test for existing homes (BESTEST-EX): instructions for implementing the test procedure, calibration tests reference results, and example acceptance-range criteria.

  6. Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine who to admit (and, in some cases, to award merit-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampton, Randy

    Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine-prepared for these tests. Some are tests of aptitude in quantitative skills, verbal and analytical reasoning and/or writing ability (e.g., GRE, LSAT, GMAT), while others are tests of content knowledge (e.g., GRE Subject Tests

  7. Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

  8. High Sodium Simulant Testing To Support SB8 Sludge Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J. D.

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Scoping studies were completed for high sodium simulant SRAT/SME cycles to determine any impact to CPC processing. Two SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having sodium supernate concentration of 1.9M at 130% and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Both of these failed to meet DWPF processing objectives related to nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Another set of SRAT/SME cycles were performed with simulant having a sodium supernate concentration of 1.6M at 130%, 125%, 110%, and 100% of the Koopman Minimum Acid requirement. Only the run at 110% met DWPF processing objectives. Neither simulant had a stoichiometric factor window of 30% between nitrite destruction and excessive hydrogen generation. Based on the 2M-110 results it was anticipated that the 2.5M stoichiometric window for processing would likely be smaller than from 110-130%, since it appeared that it would be necessary to increase the KMA factor by at least 10% above the minimum calculated requirement to achieve nitrite destruction due to the high oxalate content. The 2.5M-130 run exceeded the DWPF hydrogen limits in both the SRAT and SME cycle. Therefore, testing of this wash endpoint was halted. This wash endpoint with this minimum acid requirement and mercury-noble metal concentration profile appears to be something DWPF should not process due to an overly narrow window of stoichiometry. The 2M case was potentially processable in DWPF, but modifications would likely be needed in DWPF such as occasionally accepting SRAT batches with undestroyed nitrite for further acid addition and reprocessing, running near the bottom of the as yet ill-defined window of allowable stoichiometric factors, potentially extending the SRAT cycle to burn off unreacted formic acid before transferring to the SME cycle, and eliminating formic acid additions in the frit slurry.

  9. Ten-year development of douglas-fir and associated vegetation after different site preparation on coast range clearcuts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.I.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-years results are presented from an operational-sized, replicated experiment in the Coast Ranges of Oregon to determine the effects of six site-preparation methods on the subsequent survival and growth of Douglas-fir and associated species. Site preparation and seedling protection with plastic mesh tubing significantly enhanced tree development. Site preparation also produced large differences in frequency and cover of associated species but only minor differences in the species represented.

  10. AN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for themselves. The third home is even more aggressively revamped to target zero net energy use. The first home ... that this is worth looking at and then worth investing in," he said. Putting buildings on energy diets ProjectAN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

  11. Katech (Lithium Polymer) 4-Passenger NEV - Range and Battery Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) received a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) from the Korea Automotive Technology Institute (KATECH) for vehicle and battery characterization testing. The KATECH NEV (called the Invita) was equipped with a lithium polymer battery pack from Kokam Engineering. The Invita was to be baseline performance tested by AVTAs testing partner, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA), at ETAs contract testing facilities and test track in Phoenix, Arizona, to AVTAs NEVAmerica testing specifications and procedures. Before and during initial constant speed range testing, the Invita battery pack experienced cell failures, and the onboard charger failed. A Kokamsupplied off-board charger was used in place of the onboard charger to successfully perform a constant speed range test on the Invita. The Invita traveled a total of 47.9 miles in 1 hour 47 minutes, consuming 91.3 amp-hours and 6.19 kilowatt-hours. The Kokam Engineering lithium polymer battery was also scheduled for battery pack characterization testing, including the C/3 energy capacity, dynamic stress, and peak power tests. Testing was stopped during the initial C/3 energy capacity test, however, because the battery pack failed to withstand cycling without cell failures. After the third discharge/charge sequence was completed, it was discovered that Cell 6 had failed, with a voltage reading of 0.5 volts. Cell 6 was replaced, and the testing sequence was restarted. After the second discharge/charge sequence was complete, it was discovered that Cell 1 had failed, with its voltage reading 0.2 volts. At this point it was decided to stop all battery pack testing. During the discharge cycles, the battery pack supplied 102.21, 94.34, and 96.05 amp-hours consecutively before Cell 6 failed. After replacing Cell 6, the battery pack supplied 98.34 and 98.11 amp-hours before Cell 1 failed. The Idaho National Laboratory managed these testing activities for the AVTA, as part of DOEs FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  12. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwell, William T.; Daniels, Jeffrey; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Giles, Ken; Karr, Lynn; Kluesner, Tammy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  13. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  14. Lunar Laser Ranging Tests of the Equivalence Principle with the Earth and Moon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev; Dale H. Boggs

    2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary objective of the Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiment is to provide precise observations of the lunar orbit that contribute to a wide range of science investigations. Time series of the highly accurate measurements of the distance between the Earth and Moon provide unique information used to determine whether, in accordance with the Equivalence Principle (EP), both of these celestial bodies are falling towards the Sun at the same rate, despite their different masses, compositions, and gravitational self-energies. Current LLR solutions give $(-1.0 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^{-13}$ for any possible inequality in the ratios of the gravitational and inertial masses for the Earth and Moon, $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)$. This result, in combination with laboratory experiments on the weak equivalence principle, yields a strong equivalence principle (SEP) test of $\\Delta(M_G/M_I)_{\\tt SEP} = (-2.0 \\pm 2.0) \\times 10^{-13}$. Such an accurate result allows other tests of gravitational theories. The result of the SEP test translates into a value for the corresponding SEP violation parameter $\\eta$ of $(4.4 \\pm 4.5)\\times10^{-4}$, where $\\eta = 4\\beta -\\gamma -3$ and both $\\gamma$ and $\\beta$ are parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters. The PPN parameter $\\beta$ is determined to be $\\beta - 1 = (1.2 \\pm 1.1) \\times 10^{-4}$. Focusing on the tests of the EP, we discuss the existing data, and characterize the modeling and data analysis techniques. The robustness of the LLR solutions is demonstrated with several different approaches that are presented in the text. We emphasize that near-term improvements in the LLR ranging accuracy will further advance the research of relativistic gravity in the solar system, and, most notably, will continue to provide highly accurate tests of the Equivalence Principle.

  15. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  16. Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS.

  17. The northern boundary of the desert tortoise range on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rautenstrauch, K.R.; Brown, G.A.; Goodwin, R.G.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted in 1993 to more accurately define the northern boundary of the range of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Eighty-six transects totaling 338.2 km were walked along this boundary and 53 tortoise signs were recorded. Tortoise signs were found all along the northern edge of Jackass and Frenchman flats. Signs were found north of those valleys only in the Calico Hills at the south end of Topopah Valley and in the CP Hills at the extreme southern end of Yucca Flat. A revised map of the range of desert tortoises on NTS is presented. This information can be used by the US Department of Energy to determine whether activities conducted along or near this boundary will affect desert tortoises.

  18. Industrial Sites Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (including Record of Technical Change Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This Leachfield Corrective Action Units (CAUs) Work Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Under the FFACO, a work plan is an optional planning document that provides information for a CAU or group of CAUs where significant commonality exists. A work plan may be developed that can be referenced by leachfield Corrective Action Investigation Plans (CAIPs) to eliminate redundant CAU documentation. This Work Plan includes FFACO-required management, technical, quality assurance (QA), health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management documentation common to several CAUs with similar site histories and characteristics, namely the leachfield systems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Tonopah Test Range (TT R). For each CAU, a CAIP will be prepared to present detailed, site-specific information regarding contaminants of potential concern (COPCs), sampling locations, and investigation methods.

  19. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

  20. The Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement and the Wide Range Achievement Test: convergent and discriminant validity for blacks and whites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenson, Glenn Martin

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE WOODCOCK-JOHNSON TESTS OF ACHIEVEMENT AND THE WIDE RANGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST: CONVERGENT AND DISCRIMINANT VALIDITY FOR BLACKS AND WHITES A Thesis by GLENN MARTIN JENSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Educational Psychology THE WOODCOCK-JOHNSON TESTS OF ACHIEVEMENT AND THE WIDE RANGE ACHIEVEMENT TEST: CONVERGENT AND DISCRIMINANT VALIDITY FOR BLACKS...

  1. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 423, Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the U.S Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CADD provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend a preferred corrective action for the single Corrective Action Site (CAS), 03-02-002-0308, within CAU 423. Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles[mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The UDP is approximately 73 meters (m) (240 feet [ft]) northwest of the northwest corner of Building 03-60, the Auto Maintenance Shop. Corrective Action Unit 423 is comprised of the UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60. The UDP received waste oil products from the Auto Maintenance Shop, a light-duty fleet maintenance shop in the Area 3 compound, from 1965 to 1989 or 1990 (DOE/NV, 1997).

  3. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  4. Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

  5. APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 Tests of Gravity with Lunar Laser Ranging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 Tests of Gravity with Lunar Laser Ranging;APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 LLR Outline What LLR measures What LLR tests LLR and the equivalence principle #12;APOLLO + UW Eot-Wash Group, AAPT GR Labs Workshop, 2007 Lunar

  6. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2011 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (3) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (4) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (5) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C, field notes are included in Appendix D, and photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 3 and 4, 2011. Maintenance was performed at CAU 424, CAU 453, and CAU 487. At CAU 424, two surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 could not be located during the inspection. The two monuments were located and marked with lava rock on July 13, 2011. At CAU 453, there was evidence of animal burrowing. Animal burrows were backfilled on July 13, 2011. At CAU 487, one use restriction warning sign was missing, and wording was faded on the remaining signs. A large animal burrow was also present. The signs were replaced, and the animal burrow was backfilled on July 12, 2011. As a best management practice, the use restriction warning signs at CAU 407 were replaced with standard Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order signs on July 13, 2011. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2011, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  7. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2013 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 14, 2013. Maintenance was performed at CAU 400, CAU 424, and CAU 453. At CAU 400, animal burrows were backfilled. At CAU 424, erosion repairs were completed at Landfill Cell A3-3, subsidence was repaired at Landfill Cell A3-4, and additional lava rock was placed in high-traffic areas to mark the locations of the surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 and Landfill Cell A3-8. At CAU 453, two areas of subsidence were repaired and animal burrows were backfilled. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2013. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  8. Preparation and Testing of the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, A. V.; Bass, T.; Burrill, A.; Davis, G. K.; Marhauser, F.; Reece, C. E.; Stirbet, M.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty new 7-cell, low-loss cell-shaped cavities are required for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade project. In addition to ten pre-production units fabricated at JLab, the full set of commercially-produced cavities have been delivered. An efficient processing routine, which includes a controlled 30 micron electropolish, has been established to transform these cavities into qualified 8-cavity strings. This work began in 2010 and will run through the end of 2011. The realized cavity performance consistently exceeds project requirements and also the maximum useful gradient in CEBAF: 25 MV/m. We will describe the cavity processing and preparation protocols and summarize test results obtained to date.

  9. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR THE AREA 3 LANDFILL COMPLEX, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, CAU 424, REVISION 0, MARCH 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for the Area 3 Landfill Complex (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 424) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 424 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs), each an individual landfill located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Landfill A3-1 is CAS No. 03-08-001-A301. (2) Landfill A3-2 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A302. (3) Landfill A3-3 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A303. (4) Landfill A3-4 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A304. (5) Landfill A3-5 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A305. (6) Landfill A3-6 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A306. (7) Landfill A3-7 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A307. (8) Landfill A3-8 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A308. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (6) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. In June and July 1997, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated four groupings of site characteristics as shown in Table ES-1. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for CAU No. 424: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing waste. (2) Remediate the site per applicable state and federal regulations (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the TTR, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Landfill Complex CAU: Alternative 1 - No Action; Alternative 2 - Administrative Closure; Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Backfill, and Recontouring The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy-selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, preferred alternatives were selected for each CAS as indicated in Table ES-2. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. These alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contents of the landfills. During corrective action implementation, these alternatives will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  10. Current Short-Range Tests of the Gravitational Inverse Square Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshua C. Long; John C. Price

    2003-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated in large part by the possibility of observing signatures of compact extra dimensions, experimental searches for deviations from Newtonian gravity at short distances have improved in sensitivity by many orders of magnitude in the past five years. We review the essential features of the experiments responsible for the current limits on new effects in the range from a few microns to a few centimeters, and discuss prospects for the near future.

  11. Radiochemical data collected on events from which radioactivity escaped beyond the borders of the Nevada test range complex. [NONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hicks, H.G.

    1981-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies all nuclear events in Nevada that are known to have sent radioactivity beyond the borders of the test range complex. There have been 177 such tests, representing seven different types: nuclear detonations in the atmosphere, nuclear excavation events, nuclear safety events, underground nuclear events that inadvertently seeped or vented to the atmosphere, dispersion of plutonium and/or uranium by chemical high explosives, nuclear rocket engine tests, and nuclear ramjet engine tests. The source term for each of these events is given, together with the data base from which it was derived (except where the data are classified). The computer programs used for organizing and processing the data base and calculating radionuclide production are described and included, together with the input and output data and details of the calculations. This is the basic formation needed to make computer modeling studies of the fallout from any of these 177 events.

  12. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 386 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 425 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 consisted of a large pile of concrete rubble from the original Hard Target and construction debris associated with the Tornado Rocket Sled Tests. CAU 425 was closed in accordance with the FFACO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2002). CAU 425 was closed by implementing the following corrective actions: The approved corrective action for this unit was clean closure. Closure activities included: (1) Removal of all the debris from the site. (2) Weighing each load of debris leaving the job site. (3) Transporting the debris to the U.S. Air Force Construction Landfill for disposal. (4) Placing the radioactive material in a U.S. Department of Transportation approved container for proper transport and disposal. (5) Transporting the radioactive material to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. (6) Regrading the job site to its approximate original contours/elevation.

  13. Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

  14. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 423: BUILDING 03-60 UNDERGROUND DISCHARGE POINT, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (Corrective Action Unit 423) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 423 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is comprised of Corrective Action Site 03-02-002-0308. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 423. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following: ? Develop corrective action objectives. ? Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. ? Develop corrective action alternatives. ? Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. ? Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit. In January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). A hydrocarbon plume was found to emanate from near the bottom of the Underground Discharge Point to the west. The plume encompasses approximately 65 square meters (700 square feet). The highest total petroleum hydrocarbon level detected was 2,400 milligrams per kilogram. No other contaminants were detected above preliminary action levels. Details of the investigation can be found in Appendix A of this document. Based on the potential exposure pathways identified during the Data Quality Objectives process, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 423: ? Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soil containing contaminants of concern. ? Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use assumption, and current operations at the Tonopah Test Range, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point: ? Alternative 1 - No Action ? Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls ? Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Disposal, and Administrative Controls ? Alternative 4 - In Situ Bioremediation The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for Corrective Action Unit 423 is Alternative 2, Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. The preferred corrective action alternative was evaluated on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternative also meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils.

  15. Test Case Preparation using a Prototype H. Treharne1, J. Draper2 and S. Schneider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    a software development lifecycle which uses the B-Method. Section 3 details the typical testing activity carried out in a software development lifecycle. Section 4 describes the testing process in a formal are also presented. Keywords: Prototype, B-Method, Formal Software Lifecycle. 1 Introduction This paper

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. M. Fitzmaurice

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499, Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR). This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996). CAU 499 is located on the TTR and consists of the following single Corrective Action Site (CAS) (Figure 1): CAS RG-25-001-RD24 - Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been cased by numerous small historical over fillings, spills and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of 36 years. The tank was located on the north side of Building 24-50 on the TTR approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of the Avenue 24.

  17. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, June 2001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located near Area 3 on the TTR approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, CAU 409 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site; CAS TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1); CAS TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2). This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 409. The CADD/CR have been combined into one report based on sample data collected during the field investigation performed in November 2000. Analysis of the data generated from these investigation activities indicates preliminary action levels were not exceeded for total volatile organic compounds, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, TCLP semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (except arsenic), TCLP RCRA metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, isotopic uranium, and gamma-emitting radionuclides (except thorium-234) for any of the soil samples collected. Concentrations of arsenic were detected above the preliminary action level in all samples; however, the concentrations are considered representative of ambient conditions at the site. Thorium-234 was tentatively identified in one sample; however, the concentration is considered no greater than background. The NNSA/NV's final determination is that CAU 409 shows no evidence of soil contamination at any of the associated CASs; therefore, the recommendation for no corrective action is justified.

  18. Corrective action decision document second gas station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403). Revision No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes}. The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-03 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (3 5 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service.

  19. Voices of Four Taiwanese College Students' Experiences with the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) Preparation (PREP) Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, To-Yu

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    preparation course at the university in Taiwan. In the middle and again at the end of students test preparation process, the researcher conducted and audio-recorded an approximately 30-minute interview with each of the four participants via Skype. Four themes...

  20. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408: Bomblet Target Area (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. This CAS includes the following seven target areas: Mid Target Flightline Bomblet Location Strategic Air Command (SAC) Target Location 1 SAC Target Location 2 South Antelope Lake Tomahawk Location 1 Tomahawk Location 2 The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for the CAS within CAU 408 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 408 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From July 2009 through August 2010, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: Identify and remove munitions of explosive concern (MEC) associated with DOE activities. Investigate potential disposal pit locations. Remove depleted uranium-contaminated fragments and soil. Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 408. Assessment of the data indicated COCs are not present at CAS TA-55-002-TAB2; therefore, no corrective action is necessary. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities. The MEC was successfully removed and dispositioned as planned using current best available technologies. As MEC guidance and general MEC standards acknowledge that MEC response actions cannot determine with 100 percent certainty that all MEC and unexploded ordnance (UXO) are removed, the clean closure of CAU 408 will implement a best management practice of posting UXO hazard warning signs near the seven target areas. The signs will warn future land users of the potential for encountering residual UXO hazards. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 408. Corrective Action Unit 408 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at undisturbed locations near the area of the disposal pits; field screening samples for radiological constituents; analysis for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters of samples beneath the disposal pits; and bioassessment samples, if VOC or TPH contamination concentrations exceed field-screening levels. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  2. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

  3. Abstract--Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components were tested over the Martian temperature range for their use in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, William B.

    supplies and multi meter using IEEE GPIB- 488 standard for data acquisition. Measurements were then taken TESTING Cryogenic cooling is a process of bringing down the temperature of the DUT (Device under Test to vapor state and thus the idea behind cryogenic cooling is to make a liquid vaporize and thus cool

  4. Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 407) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 407, Roller Coaster RadSafe Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, report number DOEN-694, October 2001. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on April 24,2001. No issues with the post-closure monitoring plan, Section 5 .O, were raised. However, other concerns raised by stakeholders required that the CR be revised. Revision 1 of CR was issued in December of 2001 and was approved by NDEP on January 7,2002. Section 5.2 of the NDEP-approved CR calls for site inspections to be conducted within the first six months following completion of cover construction. Following the first six months, site inspection are to be conducted twice yearly for the next two years. This report provides the results of the six month post-construction site inspection. As stated in Section 5.2 of the CR, Post-closure site inspections at CAU 407 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. To meet the fiscal year 2002 post-closure inspection schedule, the first post-closure site inspection was conducted on November 6,2001. The site inspection was conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 24,2000) and submittal of revision 0 of the CR (October 31,2001). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection requirements stated in revision 0 of the CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklist, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure Inspection Checklist is found in Attachment A, a copy of the field notes is found in Attachment By and copies of the inspection photographs are found in Attachment C.

  5. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan, CAU No. 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points landfill Tonopah test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept. The SAFER process is employed at Corrective Action Units (CAUs) where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action prior to the implementation of a Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision-making. The purpose of the investigation in the SAFER process is to document and verify the adequacy of existing information (such as process knowledge); to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or to take no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action.

  6. Voices of Four Taiwanese College Students' Experiences with the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) Preparation (PREP) Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, To-Yu

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ? The four participating students were selected from 50 college juniors who used the TOEIC PREP software for two semesters in order to prepare for the TOIEC test. All of the students majored in Applied Foreign Languages and were enrolled in a required TOIEC...

  7. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vanta, E.B. [Wright Laboratory Armament Directorate, Eglin Air Force Base, FL (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  8. Fracture toughness testing of Linde 1092 reactor vessel welds in the transition range using Charpy-sized specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavinich, W.A. [Framatome Technologies Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Yoon, K.K. [Framatome Technologies Inc., Lynchburg, VA (United States); Hour, K.Y. [Babcock and Wilcox Co., Lynchburg, VA (United States). Research and Development Div.; Hoffman, C.L. [ABB-CE, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present reference toughness method for predicting the change in fracture toughness can provide over estimates of these values because of uncertainties in initial RT{sub NDT} and shift correlations. It would be preferable to directly measure fracture toughness. However, until recently, no standard method was available to characterize fracture toughness in the transition range. ASTM E08 has developed a draft standard that shows promise for providing lower bound transition range fracture toughness using the master curve approach. This method has been successfully implemented using 1T compact fracture specimens. Combustion Engineering reactor vessel surveillance programs do not have compact fracture specimens. Therefore, the CE Owners Group developed a program to validate the master curve method for Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens for future application on irradiated specimens. This method was validated for Linde 1092 welds using unirradiated Charpy-sized and reconstituted Charpy-sized specimens by comparison of results with those from compact fracture specimens.

  9. Search for Lorentz invariance violation through tests of the gravitational inverse square law at short-ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Cheng-Gang; Tan, Wen-Hai; Yang, Shan-Qing; Luo, Jun; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for sidereal variations in the non-Newtonian force between two tungsten plates separated at millimeter ranges sets experimental limits on Lorentz invariance violation involving quadratic couplings of Riemann curvature. We show that the Lorentz invariance violation force between two finite flat plates is dominated by the edge effects, which includes a suppression effect leading to lower limits than previous rough estimates. From this search, we determine the current best constraints of the Lorentz invariance violating coefficients at a level of $10^{-8}$ m$^{2}$.

  10. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  11. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit Number 423: Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Number 423, the Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), which is located in Area 3 at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, part of the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU Number 423 is comprised of only one Corrective Action Site (CAS) which includes the Building 03-60 UDP and an associated discharge line extending from Building 03-60 to a point approximately 73 meters (240 feet) northwest. The UDP was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to dispose of waste fluids from the Building 03-60 automotive maintenance shop. It is likely that soils surrounding the UDP have been impacted by oil, grease, cleaning supplies and solvents as well as waste motor oil and other automotive fluids released from the UDP.

  12. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 541 is co-located on the boundary of Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site and Range 65C of the Nevada Test and Training Range, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 541 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 541, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-04, Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site 05-45-03, Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the investigation report. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 1, 2014, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Air Force; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 541. The site investigation process also will be conducted in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices to be applied to this activity. The potential contamination sources associated with CASs 05-23-04 and 05-45-03 are from nuclear testing activities conducted at the Atmospheric Tests (6) - BFa Site and Atmospheric Test Site - Small Boy sites. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 541 will be evaluated based on information collected from field investigations. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The total effective dose will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

  13. Radiological and Environmental Monitoring at the Clean Slate I and III Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, With Emphasis on the Implications for Off-site Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]) implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range [NAFR]). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in the dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero (GZ). Three testsClean Slate I, II, and IIIwere conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat. The fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) installed two monitoring stations in 2008, Station 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Range Operations Center (ROC) and Station 401 at Clean Slate III. Station 402 was installed at Clean Slate I in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The monitoring activity was implemented to determine if radionuclide contamination in the soil at the Clean Slate sites was being transported beyond the contamination area boundaries. Some of the data collected also permits comparison of radiological exposure at the TTR monitoring stations to conditions observed at Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations around the NTTR. Annual average gross alpha values from the TTR monitoring stations are higher than values from the surrounding CEMP stations. Annual average gross beta values from the TTR monitoring stations are generally lower than values observed for the surrounding CEMP stations. This may be due to use of sample filters with larger pore space because when glass-fiber filters began to be used at TTR Station 400, gross beta values increased. Gamma spectroscopy typically identified only naturally occurring radionuclides. The radionuclides cesium-134 and -137 were identified in only two samples at each station collected in the weeks following the destruction of the nuclear power reactor in Fukushima, Japan, on March 11, 2011. Observed gamma energy values never exceeded the local background by more than 4 ?R/h. The higher observed gamma values were coincident with wind from any of the cardinal directions, which suggests that there is no significant transport from the Clean Slate contamination areas. Annual average daily gamma values at the TTR stations are higher than at the surrounding CEMP stations, but they are equivalent to or just slightly higher than the background estimates made at locations at equivalent elevations, such as Denver, Colorado. Winds in excess of approximately 15 mph begin to resuspend soil particles and create dust, but dust generation is also affected by soil temperature, relative humidity, and soil water content. Power curves provide good predictive equations for dust concentration as a function of wind speed. However, winds in the highest wind speed category occur infrequently. iii

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0 (includes ROTCs 1, 2, and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NV

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is included in the Nevada Test and Training Range (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range) approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-19-002-TAB2, Debris Mound; TA-21-003-TANL, Disposal Trench; TA-21-002-TAAL, Disposal Trench; 09-21-001-TA09, Disposal Trenches; 03-19-001, Waste Disposal Site. This CAU is being investigated because contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment, and waste may have been disposed of with out appropriate controls. Four out of five of these CASs are the result of weapons testing and disposal activities at the TTR, and they are grouped together for site closure based on the similarity of the sites (waste disposal sites and trenches). The fifth CAS, CAS 03-19-001, is a hydrocarbon spill related to activities in the area. This site is grouped with this CAU because of the location (TTR). Based on historical documentation and process know-ledge, vertical and lateral migration routes are possible for all CASs. Migration of contaminants may have occurred through transport by infiltration of precipitation through surface soil which serves as a driving force for downward migration of contaminants. Land-use scenarios limit future use of these CASs to industrial activities. The suspected contaminants of potential concern which have been identified are volatile organic compounds; semivolatile organic compounds; high explosives; radiological constituents including depleted uranium, beryllium, total petroleum hydrocarbons; and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals. Field activities will consist of geophysical and radiological surveys, and collecting soil samples at biased locations by appropriate methods. A two-step data quality objective strategy will be followed: (1) define the nature of contamination at each CAS location by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); and, (2) determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  15. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

  16. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area (TTR). Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 408 comprises Corrective Action Site TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. Clean closure of CAU 408 will be accomplished by removal of munitions and explosives of concern within seven target areas and potential disposal pits. The target areas were used to perform submunitions related tests for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of CAU 408 is limited to submunitions released from DOE activities. However, it is recognized that the presence of other types of unexploded ordnance and munitions may be present within the target areas due to the activities of other government organizations. The CAU 408 closure activities consist of: Clearing bomblet target areas within the study area. Identifying and remediating disposal pits. Collecting verification samples. Performing radiological screening of soil. Removing soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include unexploded submunitions, explosives, Resource Conservation Recovery Act metals, and depleted uranium. Contaminants are not expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, REVISION 0, march 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428, Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 428 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03- 05- 002- SW01 and 03- 05- 002- SW05, respectively known as Area 3 Septic Waste System 1 and Septic Waste System 5. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada , Rev. 1 (DOE/ NV, 1998c). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 428. A system of leachfields and associated collection systems was used for wastewater disposal at Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990 to replace the discrete septic waste systems. Operations within various buildings at Area 3 generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with contaminants of potential concern and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Corrective Action Unit 428 is composed of two leachfield systems in the northern portion of Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include oil/ diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. A limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from four of the septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform video surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (2) Collect samples of material in the septic tanks. (3) Conduct exploratory trenching to locate and inspect subsurface components. (4) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tanks and outfall end of distribution boxes. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes via trenching. (6) Collect surface and near- surface samples near potential locations of the Acid Sewer Outfall if Septic Waste System 5 Leachfield cannot be located. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/ diesel range organics). Limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from particular septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (10) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/ hydrologic parameters. (11) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at the discretion of the Site Supervisor if total petroleum hydrocarbons exceed field- screening levels.

  18. Final Development and test preparation of the first 3.7m long Nb3Sn quadrupole by LARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Anerella, M.; Barzi, E.; Bingham, B.; Bocian, D.; Bordini, B.; Bossert, R.; Bottura, L.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidize, G.; /Fermilab /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley /CERN

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The test of the first LARP (LHC Accelerator Research Program) Long Quadrupole is a significant milestone toward the development of Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupoles for LHC (Large Hadron Collider) Luminosity Upgrades. These 3.7-m long magnets, scaled from the 1-m long Technological Quadrupoles, are used to develop our capabilities to fabricate and assemble Nb{sub 3}Sn coils and structures with lengths comparable to accelerator magnet dimensions. The long quadruples have a target gradient of 200 T/m in a 90-mm aperture. Pre-stress and support are provided by an Al-shell-based structure pre-loaded using bladders and keys. The coils were fabricated at BNL and FNAL, the shell-based structure was designed and assembled at LBNL, the test is performed at FNAL. In this paper we present the final steps of the development of the first model (LQS01), several upgrades to the test facility, the test results of witness cables, and the short sample limit.

  19. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerel G. Nelson

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan provides the closure methods for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems (SWS) 2 and 6, located at the Tonopah Test Range. SWS 2 consists of Septic Tanks 33-4, 33-5, 33-6, and two associated leachfields. SWS 6 consists of one associated leachfield. The Area 3 SWS 2 and 6 are also known as Corrective Action Sites (CASs) 03-05-002-SW02 and 03-05-002-SW06 respectively. Site investigation activities were completed in February 1998 and are documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). The site characterization found septage in Septic Tank 33-5. Septic Tank 33-4 is closed. Septic Tank 33-6 is still active and in line with the Sandia National Laboratories consolidated system. This site was investigated for volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, RCRA metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons. Characterizations of the three leachfields associated with these septic tanks were characterized and not detected above the Preliminary Action Levels. During the characterization, it was determined that Septic Tank 33-5 had not been closed. Therefore, closure activities will consist of removal of the residual septage and closure-in-place. Septic Tank 33-5 will be closed by filling of the emptied tank with clean inert material (sand) and sealing the top with a concrete cap.

  1. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training RangeSouth (UTTRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks beneath the graben in areas with temperatures as high as 140 C (284 F). In conclusion, all of the field data collected during 2011 and documented in the Appendices of this report indicate that there is reasonable potential for a viable geothermal resource along faults that bound the Wendover graben. Prospects for a system capable of binary electrical generation are especially good, and the possibility of a flash steam system is also within reason. The next steps should focus on securing the necessary funding for detailed geophysical surveys and for drilling a set of temperature gradient wells to further evaluate the resource, and to focus deep exploration efforts in the most promising areas.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  3. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field...

  4. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by:...

  5. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by:...

  6. Introduction Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction Motivation Preparation Notos' Components Results Conclusions and Future Work Building Problem Description and Motivation Preparation Notation, Passive DNS trends and Anchor Classes Notos Reputation Results Conclusions and Future Work Special thanks to: Damballa Passive DNS data, Malware and BL

  7. Short-range tests of the equivalence principle G. L. Smith, C. D. Hoyle, J. H. Gundlach, E. G. Adelberger, B. R. Heckel, and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    galaxy 4 . This paper describes our exploration of the short-range regime, where we compared the accelerations of Cu and Pb toward a rotating 3 ton uranium attractor. The experimental results are based on two

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the modification of the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons. This UR was established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and was based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This reevaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify the UR for CAS TA-03-001-TARC to an administrative UR. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). This Administrative UR was based on a Remote Work Sites future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  9. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 1998, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: CAS TA-03-001-TARC Roller Coaster Lagoons CAS TA-21-001-TARC Roller Coaster N. Disposal Trench These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to modify these URs to administrative URs. Administrative URs differ from standard URs in that they do not require onsite postings (i.e., signs) or other physical barriers (e.g., fencing, monuments), and they do not require periodic inspections (see Section 6.2 of the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels [NNSA/NSO, 2006c]). These Administrative URs were based on a Remote Work Sites future land use scenario that was used to calculate the FAL. The administrative UR will protect workers from an exposure exceeding that used in the calculation of the FAL (i.e., 336 hours per year). Any proposed activity within these use restricted areas that would potentially cause an exposure exceeding this exposure limit would require approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the postings and signage at each site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at these sites that are unrelated to the FFACO URs such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004f). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at these sites.

  10. Microsoft Word - STWA Test Report - FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3292012 - G. Hughes & J. BUELT ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS STWA, INC. VISCOSITY REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by:...

  11. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.

    1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value.

  12. Microsoft Word - STWA Test Report - May 2012 Test - REV2012.05...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5022012 - G. Hughes & W. Riesland ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS STWA, INC. VISCOSITY REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared...

  13. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FC9510 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field...

  14. Website Helps Students Prepare For Range of Virginia Standards...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8; Science 3, 5 and 8; Technology 5 and 8 and high school Chemistry, Earth Science, Algebra I and II, and Geometry SOL questions and responses. "The most frequently accessed...

  15. Food Preparation Unit Preparation Materials and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    brush, potato masher, peeler, strainer, and steamer basket. Food and kitchen equipment for preparation

  16. ACCELERATOR TEST FACILITY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Effective: 04012004 Page 1 of 2 Subject: Accelerator Test Facility - Linear Accelerator General Systems Guide Prepared by: Michael Zarcone...

  17. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  18. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris [ORNL; Yatsandra, Oyola [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL; none,; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Li-Jung, Kuo [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  19. Design, Development, Pre-Testing and Preparation for Full Scale Cold Testing of a System for Field Remediation of Vertical Pipe Units at the Hanford Site 618-10 Burial Grounds -12495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliwell, Stephen [VJ Technologies Inc. 89 Carlough Road, Bohemia, New York, 11716 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford site, in the 1950's and 60's, radioactive waste materials, including Transuranic (TRU) wastes from a number of laboratories were stored in vertical pipe units (VPUs) in what are now the 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. Although the current physical condition of the VPUs is unknown, initial R and D studies had shown that in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents was feasible. This paper describes the R and D work and testing activities to validate the concept of in-ground size reduction and stabilization of VPU contents, and the design and pre-testing of major plant items and augering systems on full size simulated VPUs. The paper also describes the full size prototype equipment which will be used in full size cold testing of simulated VPUs off the Hanford site, to prove the equipment, develop operating procedures, and train operators prior to deployment on site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Safe and effective field remediation, removal and disposal of the VPUs in the 600 area are critical to the success of the River Corridor Closure Contract at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. (authors)

  20. p-Type transparent conducting oxides and methods for preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahriari, Dean Y. (Evanston, IL); Barnabe, Antoine (Toulouse, FR); Mason, Thomas O. (Evanston, IL); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R. (Evanston, IL)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A facile, low temperature and low pressure method for the preparation of a wide range of phase pure ABO.sub.2 compositions.

  1. Novel hard compositions and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel very hard compositions of matter are prepared by using in all embodiments only a minor amount of a particular carbide (or materials which can form the carbide in situ when subjected to heat and pressure); and no strategic cobalt is needed. Under a particular range of conditions, densified compositions of matter of the invention are prepared having hardnesses on the Rockwell A test substantially equal to the hardness of pure tungsten carbide and to two of the hardest commercial cobalt-bonded tungsten carbides. Alternately, other compositions of the invention which have slightly lower hardnesses than those described above in one embodiment also possess the advantage of requiring no tungsten and in another embodiment possess the advantage of having a good fracture toughness value. Photomicrographs show that the shapes of the grains of the alloy mixture with which the minor amount of carbide (or carbide-formers) is mixed are radically altered from large, rounded to small, very angular by the addition of the carbide. Superiority of one of these hard compositions of matter over cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide for ultra-high pressure anvil applications was demonstrated.

  2. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 405: Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada(April 2001, Rev. 0) with Record of Technical Change No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2001-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 405, Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 405 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW03, 03-05-002-SW04, and 03-05-002-SW07 (also collectively known as: Septic Waste Systems [SWSs] 3, 4, and 7). Located in Area 3 in the northwest section of the TTR, approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, this location was historically (between 1960 and 1990) used as a research facility with the mission to perform defense-related projects, and whose operations generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with COPCs and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Though Septic Waste Systems 3, 4, and 7 were origin ally constructed to receive sanitary sewage, they may have inadvertently received effluent containing potentially hazardous and radiological constituents containing acetone, benzene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, toluene, xylenes, volatile organic compound constituents, phenols, arsenic, barium, lead, mercury, hydrocarbons of oil and grease, and uranium-234, -235, and -238. The Area 3 septic systems were documented in a DOE/NV 1996 report as being included in the septic tank abandonment program conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in 1993; however, this program was not completed and the possibility exists that some of the Area 3 septic tanks may not have been abandoned. Even though all of the SWSs addressed in this CAIP are inactive, geophysical surveys conducted in 1993 were generally inconclusive and did not provide useful data for the purposes of this investigation. The scope of this current investigation, therefore, will be to determine the existence of the identified CO PCs and excavation will be the primary investigation method employed for these leachfield systems, but this effort may be limited by existing facilities and utilities. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the subsequent corrective action decision document.

  3. EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility The Secretary of Energy recently announced DOE's intent to prepare a...

  4. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare for Upcoming Standards of Learning Tests April 12, 2004 Usage of Jefferson Lab's Science Education website is...

  5. Report on PV Test Sites and Test Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-06NT42847 Hawai Protocols plus Subtask 11.1 Deliverables 1 and 3 Photovoltaic Systems (corrected) By the Hawai`i Natural

  6. A miniature powerplant for very small, very long range autonomous aircraft. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tad McGeer

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed a new piston engine offering unprecedented efficiency for a new generation of miniature robotic aircraft. Following Phase 1 preliminary design in 1996--97, they have gone forward in Phase 2 to complete detail design, and are nearing completion of a first batch of ten engines. A small-engine dynamometer facility has been built in preparation for the test program. Provisions have been included for supercharging, which will allow operation at ceilings in the 10,000 m range. Component tests and detailed analysis indicate that the engine will achieve brake-specific fuel consumption well below 300 gm/kWh at power levels of several hundred watts. This level of performance opens the door to development of tabletop-sized aircraft having transpacific range and multi-day endurance, which will offer extraordinary new capabilities for meteorology, geomagnetic, and a variety of applications in environmental monitoring and military operations.

  7. Office Automation Document Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    .2 Distinctions 1.3 Facilities 1.3.1 Document Preparation 1.3.2 Records Management 1.3.3 Communication 1 organizations contemplating the installation of document-preparation systems. * Administrative managersOffice Automation and Document Preparation for the v' University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  8. International perspectives on coal preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report consists of the vugraphs from the presentations which covered the following topics: Summaries of the US Department of Energy`s coal preparation research programs; Preparation trends in Russia; South African coal preparation developments; Trends in hard coal preparation in Germany; Application of coal preparation technology to oil sands extraction; Developments in coal preparation in China; and Coal preparation in Australia.

  9. Process for the preparation of organoclays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing organoclays for use as rheological control agents and in the preparation of nanocomposites. Typically, the clay is dispersed in water, and a specific amount of polymeric hydrotrope, ranging from 0.1 to 15 weight percent relative to the weight of the clay, is adsorbed onto the clay surface. Quaternary amine exchange is also performed on the clay to modify the surface hydrophilic/lipophilic balance (HLB) of the clay.

  10. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  11. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  12. Test Anxiety Tips to Ease Your Test Anxiety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Test Anxiety Tips to Ease Your Test Anxiety Adapted from: Study Guides and Strategies website, Overcoming test anxiety Test taking can be overwhelming and can cause a lot of anxiety. Try these tips to ease your anxiety through the testing process! Before Approach the exam with confidence Be prepared

  13. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  14. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  15. Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL-Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 1 Energy Impacts of Effective 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. LBNL Report Number LBNL-6683E #12;Energy Impacts of Effective Residential Range Hood Use, LBNL- Page 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored

  16. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  17. Preparation of acetaldehyde

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Depew, L.S.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a process for the preparation of acetaldehyde by the hydrogenation of ketene in the presence of a transition metal hydrogenation catalyst.

  18. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Robert D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the NorthernUSA Fred Beckey. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of thewill find that Range of Glaciers is a must read. The book

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Northern Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  20. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  1. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Nw Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes NOTE: These are theoreticalcomputer simulation tests of various methods on eight hypothetical 'model' basing-and-range...

  2. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  3. North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2010 Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Executive summary The North Sea Whitefish (NSW) survey sailed on 31 May 2010, fishing operations began on 1North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2010 Prepared by Chris Darby, Danny Normandale, Matthew Parker the first two surveys are encouraging. The NSW recorded a good range of ages for all target species in all

  4. www.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and missile launch, tracking, and recovery · Nuclear effects testing · High-speed sled track · Directed energy weapons testing · Climatic and dynamic environments testing · Atmospheric research · Electronicwww.nasa.gov WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE ACCESS CAPABILITIES SUMMARY White Sands Test Facility (WSTF

  5. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  6. Notice of Preparation, Comments, and Scoping Meeting Transcript

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT Project Title: Richmond Bay Campus 2013 Long Range Development Plan of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), this Notice of Preparation is hereby sent to inform you that UC is preparing a Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) on the RBC 2013 LRDP and Phase 1 development. The EIR

  7. EXPORT CONTROLS PREPARED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    EXPORT CONTROLS MANUAL PREPARED BY: Office of General Counsel The California State University SEPTEMBER 2012 #12; Export Controls Manual Table of Contents I. INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................... 1 II. HISTORY OF EXPORT CONTROLS

  8. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 9 PNWD-SA-7032 / 9 What are the Steps in Using the VSP Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 10 PNWD-SA-7032 / 10 Hypotheses Being TestedHypotheses Being Tested is false., i.e., on showing that the segment does not need to be bumped out. #12;Range Sustainability (VSP

  9. Lunar Laser Ranging Test of the Invariance of c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Y. Gezari

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The speed of laser light pulses launched from Earth and returned by a retro-reflector on the Moon was calculated from precision round-trip time-of-flight measurements and modeled distances. The measured speed of light (c) in the moving observers rest frame was found to exceed the canonical value c = 299,792,458 m/s by 200+/-10 m/s, just the speed of the observatory along the line-of-sight due to the rotation of the Earth during the measurements. This is a first-order violation of local Lorentz invariance; the speed of light seems to depend on the motion of the observer after all, as in classical wave theory, and implies that a preferred reference frame exists for the propagation of light. However, the present experiment cannot identify the physical system to which such a reference frame might be tied.

  10. aeronautical test range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16. This work was supported by the National Aeronautics and Space-2199 NASACR-1999-209827 ICASE Report No. 99-50 Efficient Symbolic State-space Construction for...

  11. Landmark : towards and alternative testing range, Vieques, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allora, Jennifer, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How does land differentiate itself from other land by the way that it is marked? What implicit power relations are evidenced in these land marking processes? Whose interests are served in the designation of certain places ...

  12. EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM Recovery Act PressEMTackles Cleanup at

  13. DOE completes environmental assessment on INL National Security Test Range

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOE SolarPrinter-friendly icon

  14. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind PowerNevada State ClearinghouseNevada

  15. Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAirWork (WaterStormwater General

  16. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005) | Open Energy Information(Blewitt,

  17. Preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, K.

    1984-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for the preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate. Ethylenediamine dinitrate, a useful explosive, may readily be prepared by solvent extraction of nitrate ion from an acidic aqueous solution thereof using a high-molecular-weight, water-insoluble amine dissolved in an organic solvent, and reacting the resulting oraganic solution with ethylenediamine. The process of the instant invention avoids the use of concentrated nitric acid, as is currently practiced, resulting in a synthesis which is far less hazardous, especially for large quantities of the explosive, and more efficient.

  18. Preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Kien-yin (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for the preparation of ethylenediamine dinitrate. Ethylenediamine dinitrate, a useful explosive, may readily be prepared by solvent extraction of nitrate ion from an acidic aqueous solution thereof using a high-molecular-weight, water-insoluble amine dissolved in an organic solvent, and reacting the resulting organic solution with ethylenediamine. The process of the instant invention avoids the use of concentrated nitric acid, as is currently practiced, resulting in a synthesis which is far less hazardous especially for large quantities of the explosive, and more efficient.

  19. Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is the "Who Wants to Win 1,000,000 Math and Science Quiz Jefferson Lab's Science Education Website Helps Students Prepare for Upcoming Standards of Learning Tests April 7,...

  20. Recovery of coal from preparation plant effluents using a packed column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V.; Khan, L.; Yang, D.; Banerjee, D.D.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of recovering coal from coal preparation plant waste (or effluent) streams at the pilot scale using the packed column flotation process is demonstrated. In Phase I of the project, a total of four effluent samples were tested at the bench scale with the objective of recovering low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal products that were, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal produced by the preparation plants supplying the waste stream samples. Phase II of the project comprised demonstration of the technology at the pilot scale using a 4-in. I.D. {times} 20-ft tall column installed at the Applied Laboratory of the Illinois State Geological Survey. A large effluent sample was conducted, consisting of particle size distribution, proximate and complete analyses, and batch froth flotation testing. Ash, total and pyritic sulfur, and calorific value of the effluent sample were also determined. The effluent feed sample contained 50-55% ash and 2.2% total sulfur. Confirmatory tests were conducted at Michigan Technological University using a bench-scale packed column. A product containing 5.4% ash was obtained at 97.5% ash rejection and 71.8% combustible matter recovery. Changing the process operating parameters allowed the quality of the product to be controlled such that its ash content ranged between 6 and 10%, with combustible matter recoveries in the 71-77% range. Pilot testing was conducted using a test matrix designed to study the effects of primary variables (feed rate, percent solids, and reagent dosage) and operating variables (air rate, wash water, and pulp level) with the objective of optimizing the process performance. Feed rates of 20-108 lb/hour were tested, with very good performance being obtained at a feed rate of 32 lb/hour (374 lb/h/ft{sup 2}).

  1. Exam Preparation & Strategies for Exam Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;4 Learning Levels & Types of Exam Questions Exams test our ability to use acquired knowledge. Our ability, proposed a six-level model of learning, with each level requiring a different type of cognitive processing and learning objectives on course outlines - Are previous exams available for review and practice? - Listen

  2. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  3. Preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting a mixture of hydrogen and ketene with a heterogeneous catalyst containing a transition metal to produce acetaldehyde, which is then reacted with ketene in the presence of an acid catalyst to produce vinyl acetate.

  4. Experiments: Preparation and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    the experimental setup und the results of performing the experiment. Again, this is part of human cultureExperiments: Preparation and Measurement by Arnold Neumaier, Vienna March 1996 Abstract Introduction Experiments, properly arranged, provide information about a physical system by suitable

  5. Production and Testing Experience with the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, F. Marhauser, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CEBAF recirculating CW electron linear accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently undergoing a major upgrade to 12 GeV. This project includes the fabrication, preparation, and testing of 80 new 7-cell SRF cavities, followed by their incorporation into ten new cryomodules for subsequent testing and installation. In order to maximize the cavity Q over the full operable dynamic range in CEBAF (as high as 25 MV/m), the decision was taken to apply a streamlined preparation process that includes a final light temperature-controlled electropolish of the rf surface over the vendor-provided bulk BCP etch. Cavity processing work began at JLab in September 2010 and will continue through December 2011. The excellent performance results are exceeding project requirements and indicate a fabrication and preparation process that is stable and well controlled. The cavity production and performance experience to date will be summarized and lessons learned reported to the community.

  6. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills, ed.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2009 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years Nevada Test Site Environmental Reports (NTSERs) are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order DOE O 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NNSA/NSO Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This NTSER summarizes data and compliance status for calendar year 2009 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and its two support facilities, the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF) and the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL)-Nellis. It also addresses environmental restoration (ER) projects conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). Through a Memorandum of Agreement, NNSA/NSO is responsible for the oversight of TTR ER projects, and the Sandia Site Office of NNSA (NNSA/SSO) has oversight of all other TTR activities. NNSA/SSO produces the TTR annual environmental report available at http://www.sandia.gov/news/publications/environmental/index.html.

  7. TORIS Data Preparation Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guinn, H.; Remson, D.

    1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this manual is to present guidelines and procedures for the preparation of new data for the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) data base. TORIS is an analytical system currently maintained by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Bartlesville Project Office. It uses an extensive field- and reservoir-level data base to evaluate the technical and economic recovery potential of specific crude oil reservoirs.

  8. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  9. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  10. Sample Preparation and Characterisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    supplied by Corus RD&T. These were from creep tests, and comprised a screw-thread, which was used to hold.49 0.011 0.009 11.15 Mo Ni Nb V W 0.85 0.34 0.01 0.28 0.02 Table 6.2: Composition of creep-tested steel Fracture surface Screw thread Gauge Figure 6.1: Failed creep test specimen. The arrows show the position

  11. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 406: Area 3 Building 03-74 and Building 03-58 Under ground Discharge Points and Corrective Action Unit 429: Area 3 Building 03-55 and Area 9 Building 09-52 Underground Discharge Points, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Underground Discharge Points (UDPs) included in both CAU 406 and CAU 429. The CAUs are located in Area 3 and Area 9 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

  12. Thermal oxidation procedure PREPARATION........................................................................................................................................... 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    procedure - 2 - Preparation. The preparation procedure sets up the power, gas supplies, cooling water, (DI to check all the supplies. Cooling water Gas supplies Routing DI water for wet oxidation We start........................................................................................................................................... 2 Step 1 Turn on the cooling water

  13. A single-chip real-Time range finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sicheng

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    for their temporal bandwidth and detection performance. The mathematical and optical models of the system are built and carefully verified. A prototype based on this technique has been fabricated and tested. The experimental results prove that the range finder can...

  14. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J. (Yankton, SD); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Perry, W. Lee (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  15. Surface preparation and plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, J.W.; Waldrop, F.B.; Reno, R.W.

    1982-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers electroplating and electroless nickel plating since coatings of this type play an important role in diamond turning technology. Items to be discussed include preparation of substrates prior to coating, plating defects such as pits and nodules and their influence on optics, the influence of stress in coatings, plating details for copper, gold, silver, and electroless nickel, and the importance of additives and their influence on grain size and structure of deposits. Some comments are made on future challenges that could be presented to the plating community to further improve the quality of coatings applied for diamond turning purposes. 60 references, 8 figures, 9 tables.

  16. The preparation and analysis of ammonia base sulfite pulping liquor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honstead, John Frederick

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    much better check between results obtained by two different operators testing the same sample, and using the Palm- rose method. In a mill the liquor is test d b? shift men as the liquor is being prepared, and also by technicians in the laboratory...

  17. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  18. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (AVTA) Data and Results The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies...

  20. Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

  1. Temperature inversion in long-range interacting systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teles, Tarcisio N; Casetti, Lapo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature inversions occur in nature, e.g., in the solar corona and in interstellar molecular clouds: somewhat counterintuitively, denser parts of the system are colder than dilute ones. We propose a simple and appealing mechanism to spontaneously generate temperature inversions in systems with long-range interactions, by preparing them in inhomogeneous thermal equilibrium states and then applying an impulsive perturbation. In similar situations, short-range systems would typically relax to another thermal equilibrium, with uniform temperature profile. By contrast, in long-range systems, the interplay between wave-particle interaction and spatial inhomogeneity drives the system to nonequilibrium stationary states that generically exhibit temperature inversion. Our work underlines the crucial role the range of interparticle interaction plays in determining the nature of steady states attained when macroscopic systems are brought out of thermal equilibrium.

  2. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . MCKETTA is an economist with the College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, University of Idaho has been developed for determining the cost of Fire Management Inputs (FMls)-the direct frreline costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES

  3. Process for preparing liquid wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR); O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Hansen, Jeffrey S. (Corvallis, OR)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing radioactive and other hazardous liquid wastes for treatment by the method of vitrification or melting is provided for.

  4. Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R PreparePrepare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PrePre Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R PreparePrepare Energy Fuels REnergy Fuels R 44 Union B44 Union 80228 Telephone: (303) 980-0540 Fax: (303) 985-2080 www.golder.com OFFICES ACROSS AFRICA, ASIA, AUSTRALIA, EUROPE, NORTH AMERICA AND SOUTH AMERICA TAILINGS CELL DESIGN REPORT PION RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE

  5. Website Helps Students Prepare For Range of Virginia Standards of Learning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHE FUTUREBrowsertables shown

  6. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  7. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  8. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INLs Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendors system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system being evaluated. This can be the system manufacturer, a system user, or a third party organization such as a government agency. b. The term Vendor (or Vendors) System replaces the name of the specific SCADA/EMS being tested.

  9. CITIZENSHIP NOW! EXAM PREPARATION HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    CITIZENSHIP NOW! EXAM PREPARATION HANDBOOK #12;washington oregon nevada idaho montananorthdakota to offer targeted programs--Si Se Puede!, a joint education initiative between CUNY and the Consulate NOW! EXAM PREPARATION HANDBOOK #12;T he City University of New York is the nation's largest urban

  10. Preparation of thorium-uranium gel spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Haas, P.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic oxide spheres with diameters of 15 to 1500 ..mu..m are being evaluated for fabrication of power reactor fuel rods. (Th,U)O/sub 2/ spheres can be prepared by internal or external chemical gelation of nitrate solutions or oxide sols. Two established external gelation techniques were tested but proved to be unsatisfactory for the intended application. Established internal gelation techniques for UO/sub 2/ spheres were applied with minor modifications to make 75% ThO/sub 2/-25% UO/sub 2/ spheres that sinter to diameters of 200 to 1400 ..mu..m (99% T.D.).

  11. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  12. Range Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange Fuels

  13. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen in Preparing for market launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen in California Preparing for market launch Catherine Dunwoody June 27, 2012 #12;2 A fuel cell vehicle is electric! 2 300-400 mile range Zero-tailpipe emissions To launch market and build capacity #12;12 H2 stations and vehicle growth #12;13 California Fuel Cell

  14. PROPOSAL PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysics Lab PPPL recognized forPRODUCTION6 -83 -45

  15. Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31 Garfield County, Colorado September, 1995 Report Prepared for Mud Hammer Development Project Partners Mobil Oil...

  16. Make the Grade General Test Taking Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    Make the Grade General Test Taking Tips Adapted from: The Academic Skills Center At California Polytechnic State University Tips Before, During, and After the Test Here are some tips you can implement to help you through tests. Try implementing these techniques to make the grade! Before Start to prepare

  17. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  18. Laser Ranging for Gravitational, Lunar, and Planetary Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen M. Merkowitz; Philip W. Dabney; Jeffrey C. Livas; Jan F. McGarry; Gregory A. Neumann; Thomas W. Zagwodzki

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    More precise lunar and Martian ranging will enable unprecedented tests of Einstein's theory of General Relativity and well as lunar and planetary science. NASA is currently planning several missions to return to the Moon, and it is natural to consider if precision laser ranging instruments should be included. New advanced retroreflector arrays at carefully chosen landing sites would have an immediate positive impact on lunar and gravitational studies. Laser transponders are currently being developed that may offer an advantage over passive ranging, and could be adapted for use on Mars and other distant objects. Precision ranging capability can also be combined with optical communications for an extremely versatile instrument. In this paper we discuss the science that can be gained by improved lunar and Martian ranging along with several technologies that can be used for this purpose.

  19. Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Prepares for Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS The historic underground test area known as Yucca Flat is the focus of an upcoming independent peer review. In preparation, groundwater specialists working for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) groundwater program have scheduled a week-long dry run in February.

  20. Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Angela

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

  1. Future STEM Leaders Prepare for the National Science Bowl

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Angela

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, students from across the country converge on Washington, DC, for the National Science Bowl, an intense academic competition that tests the students' knowledge in science, engineering, chemistry, math and Earth science. Follow one team, from Washington DC's Woodrow Wilson High School, as they prepare for and compete in the 2014 National Science Bowl.

  2. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energys Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  3. Elements present in leach solutions from unsaturated spent fuel tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Buck, E.C.; Gong, M.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary results for the composition of the leachate from unsaturated tests at 90{degrees}C with spent fuel for 55--134 days with J-13 groundwater are reported. The pH of the leachate solutions was found to be acidic, ranging from 4 to 7. The actinide concentrations were 10{sup 5} greater than those reported for saturated spent fuel tests in which the leachate pH was 8. We also found that most species in the leachate were present as colloids containing both americium and curium. The presence of actinides in a form not currently included in repository radionuclide transport models provides information that can be used in spent fuel reaction modeling, the performance assessment of the repository and the design of the engineering barrier system. This report was prepared as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

  4. Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten Trioxide Cyclic Trimers on FeO(111)Pt(111). Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...

  5. Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Have a plan in place in case a natural disaster or other...

  6. Lightning arrestor connector lead magnesium niobate qualification pellet test procedures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuohig, W. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Mahoney, Patrick A.; Tuttle, Bruce Andrew; Wheeler, Jill Susanne

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced knowledge preservation for DOE DP technical component activities has recently received much attention. As part of this recent knowledge preservation effort, improved documentation of the sample preparation and electrical testing procedures for lead magnesium niobate--lead titanate (PMN/PT) qualification pellets was completed. The qualification pellets are fabricated from the same parent powders used to produce PMN/PT lightning arrestor connector (LAC) granules at HWF&T. In our report, the procedures for fired pellet surface preparation, electrode deposition, electrical testing and data recording are described. The dielectric measurements described in our report are an information only test. Technical reasons for selecting the electrode material, electrode size and geometry are presented. The electrical testing is based on measuring the dielectric constant and dissipation factor of the pellet during cooling from 280 C to 220 C. The most important data are the temperature for which the peak dielectric constant occurs (Curie Point temperature) and the peak dielectric constant magnitude. We determined that the peak dielectric constant for our procedure would be that measured at 1 kHz at the Curie Point. Both the peak dielectric constant and the Curie point parameters provide semi-quantitative information concerning the chemical and microstructural homogeneity of the parent material used for the production of PMN/PT granules for LACs. Finally, we have proposed flag limits for the dielectric data for the pellets. Specifically, if the temperature of the peak dielectric constant falls outside the range of 250 C {+-} 30 C we propose that a flag limit be imposed that will initiate communication between production agency and design agency personnel. If the peak dielectric constant measured falls outside the range 25,000 {+-} 10,000 we also propose that a flag limit be imposed.

  7. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  8. Operational test report for LERF Basin 242AL-44 integrity test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galioto, T.M.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This operational test report documents the results of LERF operational testing per operational test procedure (OTP) TFPE-WP-0231, ``LERF Basin Integrity Testing.`` The primary purpose of the OTP was to resolve test exceptions generated as a result of TFPE-WP-0184. The TOP was prepared and performed in accordance with WHC-SD-534-OTP-002, ``Operational Test Plan for the 242-A Evaporator Upgrades and the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility.`` WHC-S-086, ``Specification for Operational Testing of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, Basin Integrity Testing,`` identified the test requirements and acceptance criteria. The completed, signed-off test procedure is contained in Appendix A. The test log is contained in Appendix B. Section 2.1 describes all the test exceptions written during performance of the Operational Test Procedure. The test revisions generated during the testing are discussed in Section 2.2. The dispositioned test exception forms are contained in Appendix C.

  9. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Poco, J.F.; Ives, B.H.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microspheres, having a size range of approx.150- to 250-..mu..m diameter with 1- to 5-..mu..m wall thickness, have been fabricated using a solution droplet technique. The spheres were developed for possible use on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. PVA, a polymer chosen based on earlier survey work carried out at KMS Fusion, Inc., has good strength, low hydrogen permeability, is optically transparent, and water soluble. The latter property makes it safe and easy to use in our droplet generator system. A unique dual-orifice droplet generator was used to prepare the spheres. The droplet generator operating conditions and the column processing parameters were chosen using results from our 1-D model calculations as a guide. The polymer microsphere model is an extension of the model we developed to support the glass sphere production. After preparation, the spheres were physically characterized for surface quality, sphericity, wall thickness (and uniformity), and size. We also determined the buckling pressure for both uncoated and CH-coated spheres. Radiation stability to beta decay (from tritium) was evaluated by exposing the spheres to a 7-keV electron beam. The results from these and other physical property measurements are presented in this report.

  10. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  11. (Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams, in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of coal from the effluent stream samples will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of raw coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the combustible matter. The process parameters will be modified so that this technology can be applied to preparation plant effluents in order to recover a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal that is, at a minimum, compatible with the quality of the clean coal currently produced from the preparation plant. The main activities during this period were setting up the static tube test unit to conduct the experimental work as outlined in the project work plan. The first of four effluent slurry samples collected from four operating Illinois preparation plants was tested at Michigan Technological University. The first batch of tests resulted in a clean coal containing 7.5% ash at 94.5% combustible matter recovery. Another test aimed at lowering the ash further analyzed at 3.0% ash and 0.92% total sulfur. In addition, analyses of particle size distribution and sink-float testing of the +200 mesh material were undertaken as a part of the effluent characterization work. 5 tabs.

  12. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  13. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  14. Making coal burnable: preparation and use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper offers several different views on the tools available to boost the burnability of coal. One view of making coal burnable and for better emissions control lies in the combustion process. One approach is fluidized bed combustion and the two choices within this technology are atmospheric (AFBC) and pressurized (PFBC). Several tests are being conducted to develop the slagging combustor technology for direct conversion from oil to coal. Some advantages listed for this method are a simple retrofit, low particulate, NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/ emissions, no modification for burning pulverized coal or coal/water slurry, no ash and no moving parts. Another method discussed is coal blending. The industrial and utility coal burning demand, combined with vacillating regulatory situations, reveals a need for coal users to be ever more alert to fuel price and availability. Technologies in the three areas of application -- coal preparation/cleaning, combustion, and emissions control -- offer an endless array of combinations.

  15. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Maxime DESCOTEAUX Adviser Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Reviewers Peter Basser NICHD, USA Ayache INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Habib Benali INSERM / Pitié-Salpêtrière, France Denis Le Bihan

  16. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Wassermann Advisor Dr. Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia-Antipolis, France Reviewers Dr. Cyril Poupon CEA Neuro l' INRIA Sophia Antipolis et present´ee ´a l' Universit´e de Nice-Sophia Antipolis ´Ecole Doctorale

  17. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Sophia Antipolis, France Pr. Val´erie Perrier University of Grenoble, France Dr. Fabrice Wallois;UNIVERSIT ´E NICE-SOPHIA ANTIPOLIS - UFR Sciences ´Ecole Doctorale STIC (Sciences et Technologies de l

  18. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Voronoi Diagrams and Applications Camille WORMSER Advisors Pr. Jean-Daniel Boissonnat INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Pr. Mariette Yvinec INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Reviewers Pr. Aurenhammer Technische

  19. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia NUNDLOLL Defense date: 30 March 2010. Jury Members Jean Luc GOUZ? INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Advisor Frédéric GROGNARD INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Co-advisor Ludovic MAILLERET INRA Sophia Antipolis, France

  20. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Pr. Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Pr. Olivier Faugeras INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France-Fredrik Westin Harvard University, USA Examiners Pr. Nicholas Ayache INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Dr. Maher

  1. Preparation of gas selective membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Funk, E.W.

    1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

  2. Preparation of gas selective membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulprathipanja, Santi (Hoffman Estates, IL); Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

  3. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  4. JOURNAL AUTHORS SURVEY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    JISC/OSI JOURNAL AUTHORS SURVEY Report Prepared by Key Perspectives Ltd 48 Old Coach Road, Playing behind its development 4 2.2 Models and definitions of open access 8 2.2.1 Open access journals 8 2 4.1 Respondent profiles 18 4.2 Awareness of open access journals 18 4.2.1 Extent and longevity

  5. Prepared by: Environmental Design & Research,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Kwang W.

    Architecture and Engineering, P.C. (edr) 217 Montgomery St., Suite 1000 Syracuse, New York 13202 P. 315 Broadway Albany, New York 12246 Contact: Ms. Peggy McSorley Phone: (518) 320-3200 Prepared By: edr Companies (edr) 217 Montgomery Street, Suite 1000 Syracuse, New York 13202 Contact: Patrick Heaton Phone

  6. Photochemical preparation of plutonium pentafluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabideau, Sherman W. (Los Alamos, NM); Campbell, George M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel compound plutonium pentafluoride may be prepared by the photodissociation of gaseous plutonium hexafluoride. It is a white solid of low vapor pressure, which consists predominantly of a face-centered cubic structure with a.sub.o =4.2709.+-.0.0005 .ANG..

  7. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  8. Test plan for performance testing of the Eaton AC-3 electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crumley, R.L.; Heiselmann, H.W.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternating current (ac) propulsion system for an electric vehicle has been developed and tested by the Eaton Corporation. The test bed vehicle is a modified 1981 Mercury Lynx. The test plan has been prepared specifically for the third modification to this test bed and identified as the Eaton AC-3. The scope of the EG and G testing at INEL to be done on the Eaton AC-3 will include coastdown and dynamometer tests but will not include environmental, on-road, or track testing. Coastdown testing will be performed in accordance with SAE J-1263 (SAE Recommended Practice for Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques).

  9. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  10. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ally, Moonis R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Braunstein, Jerry (Clinton, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  11. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  12. Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  13. American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  15. Impulse gage development for the 100-200 ktap range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, P.C.; Naumann, W.J. (General Research Corp., Santa Barbara, CA (USA). Advanced Technologies Div.)

    1990-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Special effects underground test (UGT) material response and source diagnostics data require impulse gages that can be used in the 50--150 ktap range and have equilibrated from electrical and mechanical noise sources within 0.001 s. Such gages were designed, analyzed, and tested under this program. One- and two-dimensional stress propagation calculations were performed and predictions were developed for deformation of the gage specimen cup. These predictions were conservative when compared to gas gun test results. The response of the gage will equilibrate within 5% to its final value within 300 {mu}sec. The impulse delivered to the gages for these tests exceeded 250 ktap. The code and experimental results provides a basis for confidence in the operability of the gage in an actual UGT environment.

  16. preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioremediation Of Uranium In; Shallow Alluvial Aquifers; Shallow Alluvial Aquifers; S. B. Yabusaki; Y. Fang; S. R. Waichler; P. E. Long

    Uranium can be removed from groundwater by adding an electron donor to the subsurface that stimulates growth of native bacteria, generating conditions that result in precipitation of uranium. The long-term efficacy of this technology is unproven. Numerical modeling results for uranium bioremediation in a shallow, alluvial aquifer are provided to establish a broad framework for understanding processes associated with bioremediation of uranium and to bound conditions under which bioremediation could succeed in the long-term and conditions under which it is likely to fail. The models are benchmarked against experiments conducted at the Rifle, Colorado site. Sensitivity analysis of model parameters were conducted, examining: alternatives to the acetate electron donor (lactate and ethanol), oxygen and nitrate terminal electron acceptors, multiphase flow, density and gas entrapment processes, and hypothetical flood events. Sensitivity of simulated aqueous U(VI) concentrations to process model parameters suggest that groundwater flow rate, uranium bioreduction rate, and sulfate bioreduction parameters exert the most impact on bioremediation effectiveness. The simulated scenarios are used to assess potential performance issues for site conditions and other bioremediation approaches.

  17. Prepared

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona,Site Operations Guide Doc. No.GS05:orPOST-REMEDIAL

  18. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 115445 (2011) Spin exchange interaction with tunable range between graphene quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to lithographically pattern graphene allows for a determinis- tic device preparation, which is necessaryPHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 115445 (2011) Spin exchange interaction with tunable range between graphene in graphene. The electronic states in the conduction band are coupled indirectly by tunneling to a common

  19. Color appearance in high-dynamic-range imaging Ahmet Oguz Akyz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard, Erik

    . To prepare an im- age for display, luminance compression alone is therefore not suffi- cient. We propose monitor technology imposes severe constraints on the range of luminance values that can be displayed are in an environment that has blue illumination, such as sky light at noon, we adapt to this blue color. Therefore

  20. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  1. Cryogenic experiences during W7-X HTS-current lead tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richter, Thomas; Lietzow, Ralph [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Technical Physics (ITEP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) was responsible for design, production and test of the High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) current leads (CL) for the stellerator Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X). 16 current leads were delivered. Detailed prototype tests as well as the final acceptance tests were performed at KIT, using a dedicated test cryostat assembled beside and connected to the main vacuum vessel of the TOSKA facility. A unique feature is the upside down orientation of the current leads due to the location of the power supplies in the basement of the experimental area of W7-X. The HTS-CL consists of three main parts: the cold end for the connection to the bus bar at 4.5 K, the HTS part operating in the temperature range from 4.5 K to 65 K and a copper heat exchanger (HEX) in the temperature range from 65 K to room temperature, which is cooled with 50 K helium. Therefore in TOSKA it is possible to cool test specimens simultaneously with helium at two different temperature levels. The current lead tests included different scenarios with currents up to 18.2 kA. In total, 10 cryogenic test campaigns with a total time of about 24 weeks were performed till beginning of 2013. The test facility as well as the 2 kW cryogenic plant of ITEP showed a very good reliability. However, during such a long and complex experimental campaign, one has to deal with failures, technical difficulties and incidents. The paper gives a summary of the test performance comprising the test preparation and operation. This includes the performance and reliability of the refrigerator and the test facility with reference to the process measuring and control system, the data acquisition system, as well as the building infrastructure.

  2. Test of luminosity levelling with separated collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Jacquet, D; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Schaumann, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this test we demonstrated that in the absence of strong long range interactions a levelling of the luminosity can be achieved by a small transverse offset.

  3. W-087 Acceptance test procedure. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, A.W.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure/Operational Test Procedure (ATP/OTP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Electrical/Instrumentation and Mechanical systems function as required by project criteria and to verify proper operation of the integrated system including the interlocks.

  4. APPENDIX E. AIRNOVA, INC. EMISSION EVALUATION TEST REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    APPENDIX E. AIRNOVA, INC. ­ EMISSION EVALUATION TEST REPORT DECEMBER 2006 E-1 #12; #12;Project No Test Report #12;Prepared for: Mr. Ken Partymiller, Ph.D. Environmental Chemist Tetra Tech EM, Inc. 5326.0 Summary of Test Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.0 Test

  5. Preparation of waste oil for analysis to determine hazardous metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, D.R.; Huff, E.A.; Fox, I.M.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods for preparing waste-oil samples to permit measurement of their metals content were evaluated. For this evaluation, metals-in-oil standard reference materials were prepared by each method and the resulting solutions were analyzed for 20 metals, including those (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag) regulated as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. One preparation method involved combustion of the waste oil under oxygen at 25 atm pressure, as described in the American Society for Testing and Materials test method E926-88. As we applied it, this method gave recoveries well under 90% for most of the metals that we examined and, hence, proved unsatisfactory for routine application to waste-oil analysis. With the other method, nitric acid decomposition in a sealed vessel heated with microwave energy (analogous to US Environmental Protection Agency Method 3051), recoveries of all 20 metal contaminants were within 90 to 110% of the certified values. This microwave digestion procedure was also more efficient since it allowed six samples to be prepared together, whereas the oxygen combustion approach allowed processing of only one sample at a time.

  6. Recovery of coal fines from preparation plant effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA)); Khan, L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (USA)); Yang, D. (Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to test and demonstrate the feasibility of recovering the coal fines which are currently disposed of with plant effluent streams in order to produce a fine clean coal product. This product can then be blended with the coarse clean coal from the preparation plant. Recovery of carbonaceous material from the effluent streams will be effected by means of Michigan Technological University's static tube flotation process in conjunction with pyrite depressants. This process has been successfully demonstrated on a number of coals to reject 85% of the pyritic sulfur and recover 90% of the Btu value. The process parameters will be modified to accept preparation plant effluents in order to produce a low-ash, low-sulfur clean coal product that at a minimum is compatible with the quality requirements of the plant clean coal. This report covers the first quarter of the project. The main activities during this period were the drafting of a project work plan and the collection of four coal preparation plant effluent samples for testing. Effluent slurry samples were collected from four operating preparation plants in Illinois and shipped to Michigan Technological University for experimental work.

  7. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  8. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  9. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alexander, Kathleen B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tiegs, Terry N. (Lenoir City, TN); Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Waters, Shirley B. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 particulates and nickle aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m.sup.1/2, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa.

  10. Preparation of high purity vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, O.N.; Burkholder, H.R.; Martsching, G.A.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the various reduction and refining methods that have been used to prepare vanadium metal. Earlier work on metallothermic and carbothermic reduction processes is discussed. Recent work on improving the scaling up the aluminothermic reduction process is described in detail. Iron and silicon are first removed from commercial V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ by an ion exchange separation technique and the purified oxide is then exothermically reduced with aluminum metal. The resulting V-Al ingot is heated in a vacuum to 1700/sup 0/C to remove the aluminum and dissolved oxygen, and the sponge is then electron-beam melted to remove residual volatile impurities to yield vanadium metal of 99.98% purity. Precautions taken during each processing stage to minimize carbon, nitrogen and oxygen contamination are described. Metal containing < 50 ppmw each of C, N and O, < 20 ppmw Si, and < 10 ppmw of Fe and Al has been prepared in kilogram quantities by this method. The hardness of the beam melted is 60 to 70 DPH. Experiments designed to scale up the reduction process and to increase the efficiency of the separation and melting steps are described. Various refining techniques that have been applied to the preparation of high purity vanadium are described and comparisons made between the quality of metal obtained by each.

  11. The ORNL Surplus Facilities Management Program Long Range Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrick, T.E.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National SFMP, administered by the Richland Operations Office. This program was established to provide for the management of DOE surplus radioactively contaminated facilities from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition is completed. As part of this program, the ORNL SFMP oversees some 76 individual surplus facilities, ranging in complexity from abandoned waste storage tanks to large experimental reactors. The ORNL SFMP has prepared this Long Range Plan to outline the long-term management strategy for those facilities included in the program. The primary objective of this plan are to: (1) develop a base of information for each ORNL SFMP facility, (2) conduct preliminary decommissioning analyses to identify feasible alternatives, (3) assess the current and future risk of each facility, (4) establish a priority list for the decommissioning projects, and (5) integrate the individual project costs and schedules into an overall program schedule and cost estimate for the ORNL site. The Long Range Plan also provides an overview of the ORNL SFMP management structure, specifies the decommissioning criteria to be employed, and identifies special technical problems, research and development needs, and special facilities and equipment that may be required for decommissioning operations.

  12. Raw material preparation for ultra high production rate sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kortmann, H.A.; Ritz, V.J. [Studiengesellschaft fuer Eisenerzaufbereitung, Liebenburg-Othfresen (Germany); Cappel, F.; Weisel, H.; Richter, G. [LURGI AG, Frankfurt (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An R and D program in pot grate sintering showed, that an intensive preparation of ores, additives and coke breeze improves the sintering capacity. The tests were conducted using an ore mixture composed of typical ores imported to Europe. The highest capacities were attained up to 63.8 t/m{sup 2} {times} 24 h maximum for a sinter which well fulfills the high requirements on chemical, physical and metallurgical properties.

  13. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  14. Method of surface preparation of niobium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY); Schill, John F. (Ridge, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is for a method of preparing a surface of niobium. The preparation method includes polishing, cleaning, baking and irradiating the niobium surface whereby the resulting niobium surface has a high quantum efficiency.

  15. Preparing for Project Implementation Assigning Accountability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assigning Accountability for Each Project (April 14, 2010) More Documents & Publications Preparing for Project Implementation after an Energy Assessment...

  16. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan Prepared by: Environment, Health, Safety, and Security .....................................................16 3.0 Potential Sources of Pollution

  17. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RECORDS SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION, AND APPORTIONMENT ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES Administrative Management Records...

  18. Prepared by Heather Wilcox Feb. 22, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worden, Alexandra Z.

    in an autoclaved glass bottle (we pre- autoclave the bottle). Aliquots of SUCROSE LYSIS BUFFER can be prepared

  19. PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind and solar integration study May 2010 Prepared for NREL by GE Energy 1 River Road Schenectady, New York 12345PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy PREPARED BY: GE Energy MAY 2010 WESTERNWIND AND SOLAR INTEGRATION STUDY #12;#12;Western

  20. Viking Range: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Viking Range, LLC failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  1. Laboratory robotics -- An automated tool for preparing ion chromatography calibration standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, J.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of a laboratory robot as an automated tool for preparing multi-level calibration standards for On-Line Ion Chromatography (IC) Systems. The robot is designed for preparation of up to six levels of standards, with each level containing up to eleven ionic species in aqueous solution. The robot is required to add the standards` constituents as both a liquid and solid additions and to keep a record of exactly what goes into making up every standard. Utilizing a laboratory robot to prepare calibration standards provides significant benefits to the testing environment. These benefits include: accurate and precise calibration standards in individually capped containers with preparation traceability; automated and unattended multi-specie preparation for both anion and cation analytical channels; the ability to free up a test operator from a repetitive routine and re-apply those efforts to test operations; The robot uses a single channel IC to analyze each prepared standard for specie content and concentration. Those results are later used as a measure of quality control. System requirements and configurations, robotic operations, manpower requirements, analytical verification, accuracy and precision of prepared solutions, and robotic downtime are discussed in detail.

  2. Tunnel and Subsurface Void Detection and Range to Target Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip B. West

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers and technicians at the Idaho National Laboratory invented, designed, built and tested a device capable of detecting and measuring the distance to, an underground void, or tunnel. Preliminary tests demonstrated positive detection of, and range to, a void thru as much as 30 meters of top-soil earth. Device uses acoustic driving point impedance principles pioneered by the Laboratory for well-bore physical properties logging. Data receipts recorded by the device indicates constructive-destructive interference patterns characteristic of acoustic wave reflection from a downward step-change in impedance mismatch. Prototype tests demonstrated that interference patterns in receipt waves could depict the patterns indicative of specific distances. A tool with this capability can quickly (in seconds) indicate the presence and depth/distance of a void or tunnel. Using such a device, border security and military personnel can identify threats of intrusion or weapons caches in most all soil conditions including moist and rocky.

  3. How to Prepare Your Abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / TexasA4. U.S. to Prepare

  4. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  5. Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yusheng (Los Alamos, NM); He, Duanwei (Sichuan, CN)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

  6. The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators: Convexity and Related Results Chi-Kwong Li Classification 47A12, 47A13, 47A55. Keywords Joint essential numerical range, self-adjoint operator, Hilbert the joint behavior of several operators A1, . . . , Am. One may see [1, 5, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 23, 28, 31

  7. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  8. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Dehumidifiers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six residential vapor compression cycle dehumidifiers spanning the available range of capacities and efficiencies were tested in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems Laboratory. Each was tested under a wide range of indoor air conditions to facilitate the development of performance curves for use in whole-building simulation tools.

  9. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  10. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO); Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  11. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  12. Preparation of hydrophobic organic aeorgels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic methods for the preparation of hydrophobic organics aerogels. One method involves the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3-dimethoxybenzene or 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene with formaldehyde in non-aqueous solvents. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be dried using either supercritical solvent extraction to generate the new organic aerogels or air dried to produce an xerogel. Other methods involve the sol-gel polymerization of 1,3,5 trihydroxy benzene (phloroglucinol) or 1,3 dihydroxy benzene (resorcinol) and various aldehydes in non-aqueous solvents. These methods use a procedure analogous to the one-step base and two-step base/acid catalyzed polycondensation of phloroglucinol and formaldehyde, but the base catalyst used is triethylamine. These methods can be applied to a variety of other sol-gel precursors and solvent systems. These hydrophobic organics aerogels have numerous application potentials in the field of material absorbers and water-proof insulation.

  13. National Coal Council Presentation/Prepared Remarks | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Coal Council PresentationPrepared Remarks National Coal Council PresentationPrepared Remarks National Coal Council PresentationPrepared Remarks More Documents &...

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Graphene Oxide Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dikin,D.; Stankovich, S.; Zimney, E.; Piner, R.; Dommett, G.; Evmenenko, G.; Nguyen, S.; Ruoff, R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-standing paper-like or foil-like materials are an integral part of our technological society. Their uses include protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, electronic or optoelectronic components, and molecular storage. Inorganic 'paper-like' materials based on nanoscale components such as exfoliated vermiculite or mica platelets have been intensively studied and commercialized as protective coatings, high-temperature binders, dielectric barriers and gas-impermeable membranes. Carbon-based flexible graphite foils composed of stacked platelets of expanded graphite have long been used in packing and gasketing applications because of their chemical resistivity against most media, superior sealability over a wide temperature range, and impermeability to fluids. The discovery of carbon nanotubes brought about bucky paper, which displays excellent mechanical and electrical properties that make it potentially suitable for fuel cell and structural composite applications. Here we report the preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper, a free-standing carbon-based membrane material made by flow-directed assembly of individual graphene oxide sheets. This new material outperforms many other paper-like materials in stiffness and strength. Its combination of macroscopic flexibility and stiffness is a result of a unique interlocking-tile arrangement of the nanoscale graphene oxide sheets.

  15. Strain-controlled bulge test B. Erdem Alacaa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alaca, B. Erdem

    mechanical tests,68 creep and viscoelas- tic tests,9,10 and high-temperature testing11 were re- ported. All cover a wide spectrum ranging from 10-8 s-1 (creep testing) to 108 s-1 (hypervelocity impact testing).12Strain-controlled bulge test B. Erdem Alacaa) and K. Bugra Toga College of Engineering, Koc

  16. AVTA: 2014 Chevrolet Cruze Diesel Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  17. AVTA: 2012 Nissan Leaf All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  18. AVTA: 2013 Ford Fusion Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  19. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  20. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-Max Energi PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  1. AVTA: 2013 Ford Focus All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  2. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. Test comparability, with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

  3. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  4. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  5. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  6. Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that caused by blending of biodiesel. Test cycles where an active regeneration of the DPF occurred resulted in a nearly threefold increase in NO{sub x} emissions and a 15% increase in fuel consumption. The full quantification of DPF regeneration events further complicates the accurate calculation of fuel impacts on emissions and fuel consumption.

  7. Aerosol preparation of intact lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J (Berkeley, CA)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  8. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  9. APS Long Range Schedule FY1996

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long Range Commissioning Schedule for FY1996 Date First Shift 0:00-8:00 Second Shift 8:00-16:00 Third Shift 16:00-24:00 31596 SR Studies 1-ID-A Shielding Verification SR Studies...

  10. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of common range and pasture plants are listed in this publication. The common and scientific name of each species are given, along with the species' value as a grazing plant for wildlife and livestock....

  11. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  12. Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

  13. COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado, seismic, seismicity, crust, fault, hazard ABSTRACT Construction of seismic hazard and risk maps depends upon carefully constrained input parameters including background seismicity, seismic attenuation

  14. Long range interactions in nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajter, Richard F.

    Our understanding of the long range electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

  15. Programmable near-infrared ranging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

  16. Preparation for upgrading western subbituminous coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, R.W.; Cha, C.Y.; Sheesley, D.C.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to establish the physical and chemical characteristics of western coal and determine the best preparation technologies for upgrading this resource. Western coal was characterized as an abundant, easily mineable, clean, low-sulfur coal with low heating value, high moisture, susceptibility to spontaneous ignition, and considerable transit distances from major markets. Project support was provided by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The research was conducted by the Western Research Institute, (WRI) in Laramie, Wyoming. The project scope of work required the completion of four tasks: (1) project planning, (2) literature searches and verbal contacts with consumers and producers of western coal, (3) selection of the best technologies to upgrade western coal, and (4) identification of research needed to develop the best technologies for upgrading western coals. The results of this research suggest that thermal drying is the best technology for upgrading western coals. There is a significant need for further research in areas involving physical and chemical stabilization of the dried coal product. Excessive particle-size degradation and resulting dustiness, moisture reabsorption, and high susceptibility to spontaneous combustion are key areas requiring further research. Improved testing methods for the determination of equilibrium moisture and susceptibility to spontaneous ignition under various ambient conditions are recommended.

  17. PREPARING FOR A SUCCESSFUL EVMS CERTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE SL; BASCHE AD

    2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The client, a government agency, requires its contractor to obtain an Earned Value Management System (EVMS) certification that meets the intent of ANSI/EIA-748-B, Earned Value Management Systems. The contractor has extensive experience with certification preparation, having completed two certifications within two years. Information from a previous EVMS certification and internal system surveillances are used to prepare for client-based EVMS certifications and bi-annual surveillances. The contractor also sent members of its group to assist other companies preparing for surveillances and certifications to perform 'Black Hat Reviews.' This paper is a lessons learned on preparing a team for EVMS certification. The information is also applicable for surveillances, since the contractor prepares its team for the surveillance in the same manner as the initial certification. Some of the areas covered include required documents, tracing the data through the systems, Control Account Manager (CAM) preparation, and system verification.

  18. Adiabatic state preparation study of methylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veis, Libor, E-mail: libor.veis@jh-inst.cas.cz; Pittner, Ji?, E-mail: jiri.pittner@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovsk Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejkova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computers attract much attention as they promise to outperform their classical counterparts in solving certain type of problems. One of them with practical applications in quantum chemistry is simulation of complex quantum systems. An essential ingredient of efficient quantum simulation algorithms are initial guesses of the exact wave functions with high enough fidelity. As was proposed in Aspuru-Guzik et al. [Science 309, 1704 (2005)], the exact ground states can in principle be prepared by the adiabatic state preparation method. Here, we apply this approach to preparation of the lowest lying multireference singlet electronic state of methylene and numerically investigate preparation of this state at different molecular geometries. We then propose modifications that lead to speeding up the preparation process. Finally, we decompose the minimal adiabatic state preparation employing the direct mapping in terms of two-qubit interactions.

  19. Range Con: a management evaluation system for assessing sucess of selected range improvement practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekblad, Steven Linn

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategic resource management plans. Individual management skills and managerial environment have not been considered when predicting biological and economic response of range management practices. Risk for individual managers adopting unsuited... APPENDIX Prototype Range Management Skills Survey. Range Management Skills Survey Survey Data Tables. Validation Figures. VITA 64 65 74 92 104 106 1X LIST OP FIGURES FIGURE Page 1. The Range Con expert system in relation to the Resource...

  20. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  1. Unexpected short- and medium-range atomic structure of sputtered amorphous silicon upon thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberl, B.; McKerracher, I.; Ruffell, S.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bogle, S. N.; Li, T.; Abelson, J. R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Munroe, P. [Electron Microscope Unit, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the structure of magnetron-sputtered (MS) amorphous silicon (a-Si) prepared under standard deposition conditions and compare this to pure ion-implanted (II) a-Si. The structure of both films is characterized in their as-prepared and thermally annealed states. Significant differences are observed in short- and medium-range order following thermal annealing. Whereas II a-Si undergoes structural relaxation toward a continuous random network, MS a-Si exhibits little change. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the presence of nanopores in the MS film consistent with reduced mass-density. Therefore, the short- and medium-range order of annealed, MS a-Si is tentatively attributed to these pores.

  2. National Institute for prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    /jb #12;Readying a Prototype SDLC Interface for CID Beta Testing Meeting Industry Standards for the way in which electronic devices are connected. The current link protocol calls for an SDLC. The SDLC project will add support to a controller type (NEMA TS2, type 1) that is currently not supported

  3. Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

  4. Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.

    1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

  5. HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGI SPENT SHALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, P.K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations on hydraulic cement from spent oil shale,"April 16-18, 1980 HYDRAULIC CEMENT PREPARATION FROM LURGIpressi ve b strength, MPa this cement in moist environments.

  6. Methods for preparation of cyclopentadienyliron (II) arenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keipert, S.J.

    1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two improved methods for preparation of compounds with the structure shown in the equation, [(Cp)--Fe--(Ar)][sup +][sub b]X[sup b[minus

  7. Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition This second edition of the "Green Book" was issued by DOE to assist preparers and reviewers of NEPA documents, with the...

  8. MA 159 Final Exam Memo/Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owen Davis

    2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 159 Final Exam Memo/Preparation. Monday, December 10 10:20 AM (2 hour exam). In Lambert Fieldhouse. **Note the early time and have double and...

  9. Remote preparation of an atomic quantum memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenjamin Rosenfeld; Stefan Berner; Juergen Volz; Markus Weber; Harald Weinfurter

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage and distribution of quantum information are key elements of quantum information processing and quantum communication. Here, using atom-photon entanglement as the main physical resource, we experimentally demonstrate the preparation of a distant atomic quantum memory. Applying a quantum teleportation protocol on a locally prepared state of a photonic qubit, we realized this so-called remote state preparation on a single, optically trapped 87Rb atom. We evaluated the performance of this scheme by the full tomography of the prepared atomic state, reaching an average fidelity of 82%.

  10. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    SCHEDULE 5: BUDGET PREPARATION, PRESENTATION, AND APPORTIONMENT Budget and apportionment records include the various files accumulated in the course of formulating the budget for...

  11. Preparation of Samples for Compositional Analysis: Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the analysis. Procedures are listed that are suitable for the preparation of biomass feedstocks and a variety of biomass-derived materials. Representative sampling of biomass...

  12. Document prepared by APIC Bioterrorism Task Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    ATTACHMENT Document prepared by APIC Bioterrorism Task Force Judith F. English, Mae Y. Cundiff of civilian populations not recommended. 3. Infection Control Practices for Patient Management Symptomatic

  13. Lunar Laser Ranging, Gravitomagnetism and Frame-Dragging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignazio Ciufolini

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past century Einstein's theory of General Relativity gave rise to an experimental triumph, however, there are still aspects of this theory to be measured or more accurately tested. One of the main challenges in experimental gravitation, together with the direct detection of gravitational waves, is today the accurate measurement of the gravitomagnetic field generated by the angular momentum of a body. Here, after a description of frame-dragging and gravitomagnetism and of the main experiments to detect these relativistic phenomena, we show that the fundamental tests of General Relativity performed by Lunar Laser Ranging do not, however, include a measurement of the intrinsic gravitomagnetic field generated by the angular momentum of a body.

  14. Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction of a polarization sensitive planar antenna for microwaves in the centimeter range the construction of the actual antenna circuit took place, a number of tests were performed to develop of various techniques. Following these tests, a prototype antenna circuit was constructed and measurements

  15. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Hu, Anzi; Wall, Michael L; Foss-Feig, Michael; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  16. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jrmie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramrez Surez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  17. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Surez, O L Ramrez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  18. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jrmie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramrez Surez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  19. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe-Xuan Gong; Mohammad F. Maghrebi; Anzi Hu; Michael L. Wall; Michael Foss-Feig; Alexey V. Gorshkov

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  20. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system`s embedded operating and data reduction software.

  1. Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

  2. AVTA: 2010 Mercedes Benz HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Mercedes Benz hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  3. AVTA: 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  4. AVTA: 2011 Honda CRZ HEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Honda CRZ hybrid electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  5. AVTA: 2011 Chevrolet Volt Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Chevrolet Volt 2011. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  6. Process for preparing energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA; , Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Swansiger, Rosalind W. (Livermore, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sol-gel chemistry is used for the preparation of energetic materials (explosives, propellants and pyrotechnics) with improved homogeneity, and/or which can be cast to near-net shape, and/or made into precision molding powders. The sol-gel method is a synthetic chemical process where reactive monomers are mixed into a solution, polymerization occurs leading to a highly cross-linked three dimensional solid network resulting in a gel. The energetic materials can be incorporated during the formation of the solution or during the gel stage of the process. The composition, pore, and primary particle sizes, gel time, surface areas, and density may be tailored and controlled by the solution chemistry. The gel is then dried using supercritical extraction to produce a highly porous low density aerogel or by controlled slow evaporation to produce a xerogel. Applying stress during the extraction phase can result in high density materials. Thus, the sol-gel method can be used for precision detonator explosive manufacturing as well as producing precision explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, along with high power composite energetic materials.

  7. Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

  8. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  9. Guidelines for Manuscript Preparation Purdue University Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Guidelines for Manuscript Preparation Purdue University Press The editing of your book or essay will be considerably faster and less costly if you follow a few guidelines for manuscript preparation. Double-space all the space bar to indent paragraphs. Do not type anything in all caps. Do include page numbers in your

  10. Energy Audit Procedures Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Audit Procedures Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery Subtask 3.5.1: Residential Energy Efficiency Deliverable 1 Prepared by The University of Hawai or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Project Report 1: Energy Audit

  11. Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , proposed a six-level model of learning, with each level requiring a different type of cognitive processingSee over Exam Preparation Identifying Levels of Learning When you are preparing for an exam, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. Understanding these levels and the types of exam questions

  12. PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by GE Energy 1 River Road Schenectady, New York 12345 Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Acker, Karin Wadsack, Carson Pete, Jason Kemper and Mark Bielecki State University of New YorkPREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department

  13. NOTICE OF PREPARATION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sze, Lawrence

    NOTICE OF PREPARATION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT DATE: September 25, 2013 TO: Responsible (Trustees) will be the lead agency for the preparation of an environmental impact report (EIR to: CSU Board of Trustees c/o Nicole Carter, Senior Planner SWCA Environmental Consultants 1422

  14. Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

  15. 6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation C.-Y. Lin 1 , Z. Wang 2 , W.-N. Chen and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  16. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, H.; Valenzuela, J.A.; Nutt, W.E.

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof. 6 figures.

  17. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, Herbert (Norwich, VT); Valenzuela, Javier A. (Grantham, NH); Nutt, William E. (Enfield, NH)

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof.

  18. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna (10), so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive (24) and transmit cavities (22) by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling.

  19. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling. 25 figs.

  20. Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Machinery C T C T EET 365W Electrical Power & Machinery Laboratory C C, V V C C, V V EET 370T EnergyElectrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE Course Number and Name Fall 2010 Spr 2011 Sum 2011 Fall 2011 Spr 2012 Sum 2012 Fall 2012 Spr 2013 Sum 2013 Fall 2013 Spr 2014 Sum 2014 EET

  1. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  2. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryuzaki, Sou, E-mail: ryuzaki.soh.341@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Meyer, Jakob A. S.; Petersen, Sren; Nrgaard, Kasper; Hassenkam, Tue; Laursen, Bo W. [Nano-Science Center and Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Universitetparken 5, 2100 Kbenhaven (Denmark)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp{sup 3} carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics with a conductivity of 267.2?537.5?S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp{sup 2} networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective methods to make well-reduced GO sheets.

  3. String Tests of 3S1P Configurations for Electric Energy Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    String Tests of 3S1P Configurations for Electric Energy Storage Applications Prepared for the U.2 Deliverable 2 Report on Results of Storage Tests Prepared by Hawai`i Natural Energy Institute School of OceanPConfigurationsfor ElectricEnergyStorageApplications Matthieu Dubarry and Bor Yann Liaw Hawaii Natural Energy

  4. Large dynamic range diagnostics for high current electron LINACs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evtushenko, P., E-mail: Pavel.Evtushenko@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab FEL driver accelerator - Energy Recovery Linac has provided a beam with average current of up to 9 mA and beam energy of 135 MeV. The high power beam operations have allowed developing and testing methods and approaches required to set up and tune such a facility simultaneously for the high beam power and high beam quality required for high performance FEL operations. In this contribution we briefly review this experience and outline problems that are specific to high current - high power non-equilibrium linac beams. While the original strategy for beam diagnostics and tuning have proven to be quite successful, some shortcomings and unresolved issues were also observed. The most important issues are the non-equilibrium (non-Gaussian) nature of the linac beam and the presence of small intensity - large amplitude fraction of the beam a.k.a. beam halo. Thus we also present a list of the possible beam halo sources and discuss possible mitigations means. We argue that for proper understanding and management of the beam halo large dynamic range (>10{sup 6}) transverse and longitudinal beam diagnostics can be used. We also present results of transverse beam profile measurements with the dynamic range approaching 10{sup 5} and demonstrate the effect the increased dynamic range has on the beam characterization, i.e., emittance and Twiss parameters measurements. We also discuss near future work planned in this field and where the JLab FEL facility will be used for beam tests of the developed of new diagnostics.

  5. Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Larry Young

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

  6. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  7. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  8. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as 12C(e,e'p)11B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to directly observe these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3 < xB < 0.7 deep inelastic scattering ratios.

  9. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23601 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as {sup 12}C(e,e'p){sup 11}B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to isolate the signal from these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3

  10. Intermediate Range Order and Transport Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Simulation Study February 7, 2005 Patrick Pfleiderer ICP, University of Stuttgart in Collaboration: 2 2 21 ),...,,( dt d mV i iNii r rrrF =-= t m ttt ttt t m t ttttt i ii ii i i iii 2 )()( )()( 2-range and responsible for covalent character obtained from ab initio calculations time step: 1.6fs 6 2 r C eA r eqq

  11. What Range Herbivores Eat -- and Why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Forbes, T. D. A.; Machen, Richard V.

    1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    systems that have the chemicals need- ed to digest it. Cellulose is digested by fermenta- tion. Fermentation requires time and a con- ducive environment in the digestive system *Assistant Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor... fermentation can take place. Some monogastrics (like horses, rabbits) have either an enlarged stomach or areas in the large intestine and/or cecum where fermentation can take place. Monogastrics with an enlarged stomach (like the hippopotamus) are called...

  12. Causality and the effective range expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the generalization of Wigner's causality bounds and Bethe's integral formula for the effective range parameter to arbitrary dimension and arbitrary angular momentum. We also discuss the impact of these constraints on the separation of low- and high-momentum scales and universality in low-energy scattering. Some of our results were summarized earlier in a letter publication. In this work, we present full derivations and several detailed examples.

  13. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  14. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  15. Cold Dissolved Saltcake Waste Simulant Development, Preparation, and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Russell, Renee L.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Sell, Rachel L.

    2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. is identifying and developing supplemental process technologies to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission. Bulk vitrification, containerized grout, and steam reforming are three technologies under consideration for treatment of the radioactive saltcake wastes in 68 single-shell tanks. To support development and testing of these technologies, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with developing a cold dissolved saltcake simulant formulation to be representative of an actual saltcake waste stream, preparing 25- and 100-L batches of the simulant, and analyzing the composition of the batches to ensure conformance to formulation targets. Lacking a defined composition for dissolved actual saltcake waste, PNNL used available tank waste composition information and an equilibrium chemistry model (Environmental Simulation Program [ESP{trademark}]) to predict the concentrations of analytes in solution. Observations of insoluble solids in initial laboratory preparations for the model-predicted formulation prompted reductions in the concentration of phosphate and silicon in the final simulant formulation. The analytical results for the 25- and 100-L simulant batches, prepared by an outside vendor to PNNL specifications, agree within the expected measurement accuracy ({approx}10%) of the target concentrations and are highly consistent for replicate measurements, with a few minor exceptions. In parallel with the production of the 2nd simulant batch (100-L), a 1-L laboratory control sample of the same formulation was carefully prepared at PNNL to serve as an analytical standard. The instrumental analyses indicate that the vendor prepared batches of solution adequately reflect the as-formulated simulant composition. In parallel with the simulant development effort, a nominal 5-M (molar) sodium actual waste solution was prepared at the Hanford Site from a limited number of tank waste samples. Because this actual waste solution w as also to be used for testing the supplemental treatment technologies, the modeled simulant formulation was predicated on the composite of waste samples used to prepare it. Subsequently, the actual waste solution was filtered and pretreated to remove radioactive cesium at PNNL and then analyzed using the same instrumentation and procedures applied to the simulant samples. The overall agreement of measured simulant and actual waste solution compositions is better than {+-}10% for the most concentrated species including sodium, nitrate, hydroxide, carbonate, and nitrite. While the magnitude of the relative difference in the simulant and actual waste composition is large (>20% difference) for a few analytes (aluminum, chromium, fluoride, potassium, and total organic carbon), the absolute differences in concentration are in general not appreciable. Our evaluation is that these differences in simulant and actual waste solutions should have a negligible impact on bulk vitrification and containerized grout process testing, while the impact of the low aluminum concentration on steam reforming is yet to be determined.

  16. Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

  17. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  18. Bubble formation in Rangely Field, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, J. W

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tc Determine the Effect of Times Of. Standing on Time &equired for Bubble Formation at 67 psi Supersaturaticns. Page 20 Tests to Determine Bubble Frequency. Average Bubble Frequency Data. 23 27 The data reported in this thesis deal... if present, or would tend to form one. However, as the pressure on the saturated oil declines, the oil becomes supersatur- ated, except as bubbles may form and diffusion take place tc eliminate the supersaturation. This research is devoted to a study...

  19. Long-range propagation of ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    hours. Friday, February 22, 2013 #12;OceanPowerTechnologies A 103 foot long, 260ton buoy being tested #12;Wave Power? PelamisWavePower With T=10sec and a = 1 meter, the energy flux is 40kW/meter. An average 40kW/meter of wave power is typical of good sites. Energy Flux = cg Energy Density = g2 Ta2 8

  20. Method for preparing polyaniline fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  1. Conditioned changes in pain reactivity: conditioned stimuli elicit hypoalgesia under a wide range of test conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illich, Paul Anthony

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conditioned hypoalgesia, two recent reports suggest that a conditioned stimulus (CS) which has been paired with an aversive event may sometimes produce an increase in pain reactivity, or "hyperalgesia" rather than hypoalgesia (Davis & Henderson, 1985...-Evans hooded rats) (Davis & Henderson, 1985; Lysle & Fowler, 1988). Currently, it is not clear what determines whether a stimulus which has been paired with an aversive event will elicit either an increase or decrease in pain reactivity. In the present...

  2. Telecom Implementation In The first long range link testing (34 KM) was done in 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lien, Jyh-Ming

    and days from the nearest highway · 1 I #12;Putting Alvarion radio at Kobang School #12;#12;#12;· S.N at Mohare Relay Station #12;Installing Antennas #12;Tower at Mohare #12;Web Site Nepal Wireless #12;Solar Paners at Mohare Relay Station #12;Power Generation and Backup Systems Used in the Relay Stations · S.N

  3. BIOLOGICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTROL Host Range Testing of Tamarixia radiata (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    ) Sourced From the Punjab of Pakistan for Classical Biological Control of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), sourced from the Punjab of Pakistan 2008, Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), was detected for the rst

  4. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) | Open Energy Information Sabin, Et Al.,

  5. Title Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range SANDIA-ENVIR-6 Land

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 Hour ofGeologic map of

  6. Title Final Environmental Impact Statement: Tonopah Test Range Area 10, Nye County, NV

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 Hour ofGeologic map

  7. Title Preactivity Survey Report for Five Tonopah Test Range Explosive Ordnance Disposal Sites

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 Hourto the vergeMobility

  8. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co2010) |Information| Open

  9. ASN Aircraft accident Beechcraft 1900C N27RA Tonopah-Test Range Airport, NV (XSD)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AO 474.2 Chg 1KANSAS CITY FIELD 10 6 C

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula, Montana: EnergyAnalysis ofDecker, 1983) |(Sabin, Et Al.,

  11. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric|

  12. Test of Two NB Superstructure Prototypes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekutowicz, J.

    2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative layout of the TESLA linear collider [1], based on weakly coupled multi-cell superconducting structures (superstructures), significantly reduces investment cost due to a simplification in the RF system of the main accelerator. In January 1999, preparation of the beam test of the superstructure began in order to prove the feasibility of this layout. Progress in the preparation was reported frequently in Proceedings of TESLA Collaboration Meetings. Last year, two superstructures were installed in the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY to experimentally verify: methods to balance the accelerating gradient in a weakly coupled system, the stability of the energy gain for the entire train of bunches in macro-pulses and the damping of Higher Order Modes (HOMs). We present results of the first cold and beam test of these two Nb prototypes.

  13. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

  14. Short range correlations and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Piasetzky, L.B. Weinstein, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering. We speculate that the observed correlation is due to the fact that both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by high momentum nucleons in the nucleus. The observed phenomenological relationship can be used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn-pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, View the MathML source, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions, and the u/d ratio in a free proton.

  15. Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.Frequency |DepartmentEventRange Fuels

  16. Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange

  17. Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name:Rancia 2Rangely, Colorado: Energy

  18. Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11 Connecticut2 of 3)the Office98RainRaisingRange

  19. Preparing for Hurricane Irene: Follow Local Direction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hurricane Irene is heading towards the East Coast, and while the extent of its impact is not yet known, those who may be effected (even inland areas), should get prepared and follow the direction...

  20. Is Your Plant Prepared for a Hurricane?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program BestPractices fact sheet lists resources for manufacturers and steps they can take to prepare for the devastating winds and floods caused by hurricanes.

  1. a amework for change Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    october 2008 Pursuant to AB 32 e California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 Climate Change Proposed______________________________________________C-131 Green Buildings_____________________________________ C-138 Industrya amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources Board for the State of California

  2. INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST Date: Dept: Preparer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Karoui, Noureddine

    INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT REQUEST Date: Dept: Preparer: UC Employee Student Vendor Other: Name: Emp/Stu/Ven ID: Address: City/ST/Zip: E-Mail: Phone: US Citizen/Permanent Resident? Yes No Fax

  3. International Particle Accelerator Community Prepares for May...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Particle Accelerator Community Prepares for May 3-8 Gathering in Richmond NEWPORT NEWS, VA - April 29, 2015 - Scientists, engineers and students from across U.S. and...

  4. Numerically Efficient Parallel Algorithms Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation using High Performance Computing Prepared by New Mexico Tech New Mexico Institute of Mining agency thereof. #12;Final Report for Task One Project: Application of High Performance Computing

  5. Process for the preparation of organoclays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing organoclays from smectites for use as rheological control agents and in the preparation of nanocomposites. Typically, the clay is dispersed in water, and a substantially monomolecular layer of a water soluble polymer is applied to the surfaces of the clay. A surfactant is also applied to the clay to modify the surface hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance of the clay, and the organoclay is separated out for subsequent use.

  6. Remote State Preparation for Quantum Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Ber; Erez Zohar

    2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote state preparation is generation of a desired state by a remote observer. In spite of causality, it is well known, according to the Reeh-Schlieder theorem, that it is possible for relativistic quantum field theories, and a "physical" process achieving this task, involving superoscillatory functions, has recently been introduced. In this work we deal with non-relativistic fields, and show that remote state preparation is also possible for them, hence generalizing the Reeh-Schlieder theorem.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy A. Wills

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) 2008 was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This and previous years NTSERs are posted on the NNSA/NSO website at http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/publications/aser.aspx.

  9. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MEDIA IN THE PREPARATION OF TAMRA BHASMA WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO TAMAKA SVASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Wadodkar; K. U. Pillai; H. S. Sarma

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Three types of tamra bhasmas separately prepared by using the media of mercury, Solanum xanthocarpum and sulphur were tested in patients of tamaka svasa. Results suggest that the process of making tamra bhasma with sulphur is superior to others due to several reasons.

  10. A Method for the Preparation of NIST Traceable Fossil Fuel Standards with Concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at NIST with high accuracy and precision by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry and quality control test samples. Unlike calibrants prepared from high purity components, this method enables Abbreviations M bar Calculated concentration of mixture EDXRF Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence n number

  11. Preparations for Physics Studies with ATLAS During the First Years of the LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fabiola Gianotti

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    I will review the status of the ATLAS detector installation and commissioning, and discuss the preparation for physics with test-beam studies, detailed simulations, and runs with cosmics. I will then show examples of physics opportunities with the first LHC data.

  12. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  13. Be prepared. Learn how to drive in winter conditions. Winter weather challenges our

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    Be prepared. Learn how to drive in winter conditions. Winter weather challenges our driving skills in cold weather. Watch for"black ice", areas of the road with a thin, almost invisible coating of ice weather. Mother Nature's road test. Know before you go. ShiftIntoWinter.ca | DriveBC.ca This information

  14. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  15. Copyright 1999, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference held in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    to explore plasticity related concepts. The tests are on dry sand to ensure drained behaviour. Eight testsCopyright 1999, Offshore Technology Conference This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 Offshore Technology Conference held in Houston, Texas, 36 May 1999. This paper was selected

  16. Progress in preparing scenarios for operation of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sips, A. C. C.; Giruzzi, G.; Ide, S.; Kessel, C.; Luce, T. C.; Snipes, J. A.; Stober, J. K.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of operating scenarios is one of the key issues in the research for ITER which aims to achieve a fusion gain (Q) of ~10, while producing 500MW of fusion power for ?300 s. The ITER Research plan proposes a success oriented schedule starting in hydrogen and helium, to be followed by a nuclear operation phase with a rapid development towards Q ~ 10 in deuterium/tritium. The Integrated Operation Scenarios Topical Group of the International Tokamak Physics Activity initiates joint activities among worldwide institutions and experiments to prepare ITER operation. Plasma formation studies report robust plasma breakdown in devicesmorewith metal walls over a wide range of conditions, while other experiments use an inclined EC launch angle at plasma formation to mimic the conditions in ITER. Simulations of the plasma burn-through predict that at least 4MW of Electron Cyclotron heating (EC) assist would be required in ITER. For H-modes at q??~ 3, many experiments have demonstrated operation with scaled parameters for the ITER baseline scenario at ne/nGW ~ 0.85. Most experiments, however, obtain stable discharges at H??(y,2) ~ 1.0 only for bN = 2.02.2. For the rampup in ITER, early X-point formation is recommended, allowing auxiliary heating to reduce the flux consumption. A range of plasma inductance (li(3)) can be obtained from 0.65 to 1.0, with the lowest values obtained in H-mode operation. For the rampdown, the plasma should stay diverted maintaining H-mode together with a reduction of the elongation from 1.85 to 1.4. Simulations show that the proposed rampup and rampdown schemes developed since 2007 are compatible with the present ITER design for the poloidal field coils. At 1315 MA and densities down to ne/nGW ~ 0.5, long pulse operation (>1000 s) in ITER is possible at Q ~ 5, useful to provide neutron fluence for Test Blanket Module assessments. ITER scenario preparation in hydrogen and helium requires high input power (>50 MW). H-mode operation in helium may be possible at input powers above 35MW at a toroidal field of 2.65T, for studying H-modes and ELM mitigation. In hydrogen, H-mode operation is expected to be marginal, even at 2.65T with 60MW of input power. Simulation code benchmark studies using hybrid and steady state scenario parameters have proved to be a very challenging and lengthy task of testing suites of codes, consisting of tens of sophisticated modules. Nevertheless, the general basis of the modelling appears sound, with substantial consistency among codes developed by different groups. For a hybrid scenario at 12 MA, the code simulations give a range for Q = 6.58.3, using 30MW neutral beam injection and 20MW ICRH. For non-inductive operation at 79 MA, the simulation results show more variation. At high edge pedestal pressure (Tped ~ 7 keV), the codes predict Q = 3.33.8 using 33MW NB, 20MW EC, and 20MW ion cyclotron to demonstrate the feasibility of steady-state operation with the day-1 heating systems in ITER. Simulations using a lower edge pedestal temperature (~3 keV) but improved core confinement obtain Q = 56.5, when ECCD is concentrated at mid-radius and ~ 20MW off-axis current drive (ECCD or LHCD) is added. Several issues remain to be studied, including plasmas with dominant electron heating, mitigation of transient heat loads integrated in scenario demonstrations and (burn) control simulations in ITER scenarios.less

  17. Automated Test Coverage Measurement for Reactor Protection System Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated Test Coverage Measurement for Reactor Protection System Software Implemented in Function in implementing safety critical systems such as nuclear reactor protection systems. We have defined new structural- ing a case study using test cases prepared by domain experts for reactor protection system software

  18. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control.

  19. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. 14 figs.

  20. Method for detection and imaging over a broad spectral range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yefremenko, Volodymyr (Westmont, IL); Gordiyenko, Eduard (Westmont, IL); Pishko, legal representative, Olga (Kharkov, UA); Novosad, Valentyn (Chicago, IL); Pishko, deceased; Vitalii (Westmont, IL)

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the coordinate sensitivity in a superconducting microbolometer employs localized light, heating or magnetic field effects to form normal or mixed state regions on a superconducting film and to control the spatial location. Electron beam lithography and wet chemical etching were applied as pattern transfer processes in epitaxial Y--Ba--Cu--O films. Two different sensor designs were tested: (i) a 3 millimeter long and 40 micrometer wide stripe and (ii) a 1.25 millimeters long, and 50 micron wide meandering-like structure. Scanning the laser beam along the stripe leads to physical displacement of the sensitive area, and, therefore, may be used as a basis for imaging over a broad spectral range. Forming the superconducting film as a meandering structure provides the equivalent of a two-dimensional detector array. Advantages of this approach are simplicity of detector fabrication, and simplicity of the read-out process requiring only two electrical terminals.

  1. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) Impact drop testing Slow-cycle fatigue testing High temperature testing to 2500F ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

  2. Lunar Laser Ranging Contributions to Relativity and Geodesy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juergen Mueller; James G. Williams; Slava G. Turyshev

    2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Lunar laser ranging (LLR) is used to conduct high-precision measurements of ranges between an observatory on Earth and a laser retro-reflector on the lunar surface. Over the years, LLR has benefited from a number of improvements both in observing technology and data modeling, which led to the current accuracy of post-fit residuals of ~2 cm. Today LLR is a primary technique to study the dynamics of the Earth-Moon system and is especially important for gravitational physics, geodesy and studies of the lunar interior. LLR is used to perform high-accuracy tests of the equivalence principle, to search for a time-variation in the gravitational constant, and to test predictions of various alternative theories of gravity. On the geodesy front, LLR contributes to the determination of Earth orientation parameters, such as nutation, precession (including relativistic precession), polar motion, and UT1, i.e. especially to the long-term variation of these effects. LLR contributes to the realization of both the terrestrial and selenocentric reference frames. The realization of a dynamically defined inertial reference frame, in contrast to the kinematically realized frame of VLBI, offers new possibilities for mutual cross-checking and confirmation. Finally, LLR also investigates the processes related to the Moon's interior dynamics. Here, we review the LLR technique focusing on its impact on relativity and give an outlook to further applications, e.g. in geodesy. We present results of our dedicated studies to investigate the sensitivity of LLR data with respect to the relativistic quantities. We discuss the current observational situation and the level of LLR modeling implemented to date. We also address improvements needed to fully utilize the scientific potential of LLR.

  3. Thrust faulting in Temblor Range, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simonson, R.R.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface studies confirm the presence of overthrusting in the Temblor Range between Gonyer Canyon and Recruit Pass. In the subsurface, three wells have penetrated the Cree fault, the Hudbay Cree' No. 1 (7,300 ft), the Frantzen Oil Company Cree' No. 1 (5,865 ft) and the Arco Cree Fee' 1A well (5,915 ft). Below the fault, 25 to 35{degree} of westerly dips on the west flank of the sub-thrust Phelps anticline are encountered. The McDonald section below the fault is comprised of siliceous fractured shale which contains live oil and gas showings. A drill-stem test of the interval from 8,247 to 8,510 ft in the Frantzen well resulted in a recovery of 1,200 ft clean 34{degree} oil and 40 MCF per day gas. The shut in pressure was 3,430 lb, which is a normal hydrostatic pressure common to the producing structures in the southern San Joaquin Valley. The equivalent of this interval has produced over 7,000 bbl of oil in the Arco Cree' 1A well. The Arco Cree Fee' No. 1A well crossed the axis of the Phelps Anticline as indicated by good dipmeter and bottomed in Lower Zemorrian at 14,512 ft total depth. This well was not drilled deep enough to reach the Point of Rocks Sand and did not test the gas showings in the lower Miocene section. In the Gonyer Canyon area, subsurface evidence indicated conditions are similar to those in the Cree area because a large structure is present below a thrust fault. It is believed that significant accumulations will be found beneath thrust faults in the eastern part of the Temblor Range where conditions are similar to those that were instrumental in forming fields such as the Elk Hills, B. V. Hills, Belgian Anticline and others.

  4. Results of long-range beam-beam studies - scaling with beam separation and intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Metral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roy, G; Trad, G; Kaltchev, D; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied possible limitations due to the long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC. With a large number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, we have reduced the crossing angles to enhance long-range beam-beam effects to evaluate their influence on dynamic aperture and losses. Different beta* and intensities have been used in two dedicated experiments and allow the test of the expected scaling laws.

  5. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  6. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.B. Weinstein, E. Piasetzky, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate xB, 0.35?xB?0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at xB?1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F2n/F2p, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  7. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B. Weinstein; E. Piasetzky; D. W. Higinbotham; J. Gomez; O. Hen; R. Shneor

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at intermediate $x_B$, $0.35\\le x_B\\le 0.7$, is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at $x_B\\ge 1.$. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free $pn$ pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, and $F_2^n/F_2^p$, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  8. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinstein, L. B. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Piasetzky, E.; Hen, O.; Shneor, R. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Higinbotham, D. W.; Gomez, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States)

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate x{sub B}, 0.35{<=}x{sub B{<=}}0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at x{sub B{>=}}1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F{sub 2}{sup n}/F{sub 2}{sup p}, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  9. New Training Resource Prepares Rescuers for Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Training Resource Prepares Rescuers for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Emergencies New Training Resource Prepares Rescuers for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Emergencies April 21, 2015 - 11:26am...

  10. Student Design Competition Guide to Project Preparation and Submittal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Design Competition Guide to Project Preparation and Submittal Student Design Competition Guide to Project Preparation and Submittal, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Zero...

  11. apatite powders prepared: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , and thermal properties of Nafion powders prepared by high-energy ball milling of pellets is given. Nafion powders prepared in this manner exhibit thermal behavior similar...

  12. Secretary Steven Chu's Remarks as Prepared for Delivery at the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chu's Remarks as Prepared for Delivery at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University Secretary Steven Chu's Remarks as Prepared for Delivery at the Polytechnic Institute...

  13. EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and Cancellation of an Environmental Impact Statement EA-1947: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment and...

  14. EIS-0496: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0496: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement DOE's Western Area Power Administration...

  15. EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High Energy...

  16. EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0500: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Crystal Springs Hatchery Program; Bingham, Custer,...

  17. EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    81: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High...

  18. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft Landing. Redox Chemistry in Thin Layers of Organometallic Complexes Prepared Using Ion Soft...

  19. Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs April 11, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis...

  20. President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the Impacts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the Impacts of Climate Change; Tribal Leaders to Serve on Task Force President Issues Executive Order Aimed at Preparing for the...

  1. EIS-0394: Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0394: Advance Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Implementation of the...

  2. EM's Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing its Highest-Risk Facility for Demolition EM's Richland Operations Office Marks Milestone in Preparing its Highest-Risk...

  3. Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

  4. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  5. Fast parallel algorithms for short-range molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plimpton, S.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a subset of atoms; the second assigns each a subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently -- those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 10,000,000 atoms on three parallel supercomputers, the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860, and Intel Delta. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and the Intel Delta performs about 30 times faster than a single Y-MP processor and 12 times faster than a single C90 processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

  6. David Rettner, PE American Engineering Testing, Inc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    management ! Long range planning/budgeting ! Asset management ! Huge research potential! #12;Tools within. American Engineering Testing, Inc April 27, 2010 #12;Project Overview !! Funded and Managed by State Aid !! Project Advisors: MCEA 10-ton Committee !! Consultant: ! Braun Intertec ! American Engineering Testing

  7. Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Range Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 1 PNWD-SA-7032 Range Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Software Range Sustainability ModuleRange Sustainability Module Using Visual Sample Sustainability (VSP) PNWD-SA-7032 2 PNWD-SA-7032 / 2 ObjectiveObjectiveObjective Learn how to use the Range

  8. Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  9. Remote state preparation of spatial qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Sols-Prosser; L. Neves

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum communication protocol of remote state preparation (RSP) for pure states of qubits encoded in single photons transmitted through a double slit, the so-called spatial qubits. Two measurement strategies that one can adopt to remotely prepare the states are discussed. The first strategy is the well-known spatial postselection, where a single-pixel detector measures the transverse position of the photon between the focal and the image plane of a lens. The second strategy, proposed by ourselves, is a generalized measurement divided into two steps: the implementation of a two-outcome positive operator-valued measurement (POVM) followed by the spatial postselection at the focal plane of the lens by a two-pixel detector in each output of the POVM. In both cases we analyze the effects of the finite spatial resolution of the detectors over three figures of merit of the protocol, namely, the probability of preparation, the fidelity and purity of the remotely prepared states. It is shown that our strategy improves these figures compared with spatial postselection, at the expense of increasing the classical communication cost as well as the required experimental resources. In addition, we present a modified version of our strategy for RSP of spatial qudits which is able to prepare arbitrary pure states, unlike spatial postselection alone. We expect that our study may also be extended for RSP of the angular spectrum of a single-photon field as an alternative for quantum teleportation which requires very inefficient nonlinear interactions.

  10. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isobe, M., E-mail: isobe@nifs.ac.jp; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Misawa, T. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori 590-0494 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212 (Japan); Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S. [Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu 183-8511 (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ?5 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  11. The Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, TW; Adelberger, Eric G.; Battat, J.; Carey, LN; Hoyle, Charles D.; LeBlanc, P.; Michelsen, EL; Nordtvedt, K.; Orin, AE; Strasburg, Jana D.; Stubbs, CW; Swanson, HE; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to aproximately one-orderof-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.

  12. APOLLO: the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Murphy, Jr.; E. G. Adelberger; J. B. R. Battat; L. N. Carey; C. D. Hoyle; P. LeBlanc; E. L. Michelsen; K. Nordtvedt; A. E. Orin; J. D. Strasburg; C. W. Stubbs; H. E. Swanson; E. Williams

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to approximately one-order-of-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.

  13. Test procedures and instructions for Hanford tank waste supernatant cesium removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, D.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides specific test procedures and instructions to implement the test plan for the preparation and conduct of a cesium removal test using Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed supernatant liquor from tank 251-AW-101 in a bench-scale column.Cesium sorbents to be tested include resorcinol-formaldehyde resin and crystalline silicotitanate. The test plan for which this provides instructions is WHC-SD-RE-TP-022, Hanford Tank Waste Supernatant Cesium Removal Test Plan.

  14. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  15. Analytical Energy Gradients in Range-Separated Hybrid Density Functional Theory with Random Phase Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mussard, Bastien; ngyn, Jnos G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical forces have been derived in the Lagrangian framework for several random phase approximation (RPA) correlated total energy methods based on the range separated hybrid (RSH) approach, which combines a short-range density functional approximation for the short-range exchange-correlation energy with a Hartree-Fock-type long-range exchange and RPA long-range correlation. The RPA correlation energy has been expressed as a ring coupled cluster doubles (rCCD) theory. The resulting analytical gradients have been implemented and tested for geometry optimization of simple molecules and intermolecular charge transfer complexes, where intermolecular interactions are expected to have a non-negligible effect even on geometrical parameters of the monomers.

  16. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Even, Jr., William R. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  17. Nanocrystalline Complex Oxides Prepared by Mechanochemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepelak, V. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); On leave from the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 45, 04353 Kosice (Slovakia); Bergmann, I. [VOLKSWAGEN AG, 38436 Wolfsburg (Germany); Indris, S. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Herrmann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Subrt, J. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Heitjans, P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 3-3A, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Becker, K.-D. [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Braunschweig University of Technology, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The preparation of complex oxides by the conventional solid-state (ceramic) route requires a number of stages, including homogenization of the powder precursors, compaction of the reactants, and finally prolonged heat treatment at considerably elevated temperatures under controlled oxygen fugacity. One goal of modern materials research and development has been to identify simpler processing schemes that do not rely upon high-temperature treatments for inducing solid-state reactions. At present, mechanochemical methods become widely used for the preparation of nanocrystalline materials due to their relative simplicity and availability. In this work, selected examples of the preparation of nanoscale complex oxides via single-step mechanochemical routes are presented. Nuclear spectroscopic methods are employed to follow the mechanically induced formation of nanooxides and to characterize the nonequilibrium structural state of the resulting nanophases at the atomic level.

  18. NO. REV. MO. _ ALSEP/LCRU EMC Test Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    NO. REV. MO. ATM 1050 _ ALSEP/LCRU EMC Test Results PAGE 1 OF 10 DATE 19 August 1971 The results of the ALSEP/LCRU EMC test are reported in this ATM. C~.·--~ s--·~e'Jn~,__')!).Prepared by:__~~~"f--.;;.~-------- Approved by: ~JM.MD. ithian #12;NO. RIV. NO. ATM 1050 ALSEP/LCRU EMC Test Results 2 10PAGE OF Aall

  19. Method of preparing meso-haloalkylporphyrins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. Also disclosed is a process for the preparation of meso-halocarbyl-porphyrins which comprises contacting a halocarbyl dipyrromethane with a halocarbyl-substituted aldehyde in the presence of an acid granular solid catalyst. Also disclosed is a process for the preparation of meso-halocarbyl-porphyrins which comprises contacting a halocarbyl dipyrromethane with a halocarbyl-substituted aldehyde in the presence of an acid granular solic catalyst.

  20. Characterization of gels prepared from silicon ethoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Su-Jin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by heating to a high temperature, with low heating rates. Tg and Tc were correlated to water gt alcohol contents in presence of HCI or HF. Aerogels were found to have high pore volume, low bulk density, large pore size, and weak mechanical strength.... Structures of dried gels 2. 3, Densification 13 14 15 19 19 CHAPTER III 3. 1. Raw materials 3. 2. Xerogel preparation 3. 3. Aerogel preparation 3. 4. Characterization of dried gels 3, 4. 1. Mercury porosimetry 3. 4. 2. BET analysis 3. 4, 3...

  1. Characterization of gels prepared from silicon ethoxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Su-Jin

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by heating to a high temperature, with low heating rates. Tg and Tc were correlated to water gt alcohol contents in presence of HCI or HF. Aerogels were found to have high pore volume, low bulk density, large pore size, and weak mechanical strength.... Structures of dried gels 2. 3, Densification 13 14 15 19 19 CHAPTER III 3. 1. Raw materials 3. 2. Xerogel preparation 3. 3. Aerogel preparation 3. 4. Characterization of dried gels 3, 4. 1. Mercury porosimetry 3. 4. 2. BET analysis 3. 4, 3...

  2. In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INLs High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

  3. Past Test One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MA 366: Introduction to Di?'erential Equations. Fall 2001, Test One. Instructor: Yip o This test booklet has FIVE QUESTIONS, totaling 50 points for the whole test.

  4. Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Vehicle Accelerated Reliability Test Battery Electric Vehicle Fast Charge Test Battery Energy Storage Performance Test For DC Fast Charge Demand Reduction...

  5. PREPARATION AND SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF THREE NEW ACTINIDE (IV) BOROHYDRIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Rodney Howard

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uranium tetrakis-borohydrides were prepared by a different reaction which involves the actinide tetrafluoride

  6. Process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chavez, David E; Naud, Darren L; Hiskey, Michael A

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of an energetic nitrate ester compound and related intermediates is provided.

  7. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic...

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion range profiles for heavy ions in light targets. Abstract: The determination...

  9. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (1 km...

  10. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  11. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  12. Romanian experience on packaging testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieru, G. [IAEA Technical Expert, Head, Reliability and Testing Lab., Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

  13. Cluster formation in fluids with competing short-range and long-range interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweatman, Martin B., E-mail: martin.sweatman@ed.ac.uk; Fartaria, Rui [Institute of Materials and Processes, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Materials and Processes, School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Lue, Leo [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the low density behaviour of fluids that interact through a short-ranged attraction together with a long-ranged repulsion (SALR potential) by developing a molecular thermodynamic model. The SALR potential is a model of effective solute interactions where the solvent degrees of freedom are integrated-out. For this system, we find that clusters form for a range of interaction parameters where attractive and repulsive interactions nearly balance, similar to micelle formation in aqueous surfactant solutions. We focus on systems for which equilibrium behaviour and liquid-like clusters (i.e., droplets) are expected, and find in addition a novel coexistence between a low density cluster phase and a high density cluster phase within a very narrow range of parameters. Moreover, a simple formula for the average cluster size is developed. Based on this formula, we propose a non-classical crystal nucleation pathway whereby macroscopic crystals are formed via crystal nucleation within microscopic precursor droplets. We also perform large-scale Monte Carlo simulations, which demonstrate that the cluster fluid phase is thermodynamically stable for this system.

  14. TEST STATION SALE OF PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    in the test had to meet minimum performance requirements. Those were: CREEP NON-CREEP Adj 205 day wt. 560 520AS-B428 U T BULL TEST STATION SALE OF PERFORMANCE TESTED BULLS THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 2012 12:00 NOON IN GREENEVILLE AND KNOXVILLE LIVESTOCK CENTER http://animalscience.ag.utk.edu/ (For video) #12;UT BULL TEST

  15. CESR Test Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, David L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured in 2008 as a test accelerator to investigate the physics of ultra-low emittance damping rings. During the approximately 40 days/year available for dedicated operation as a test accelerator, specialized instrumentation is used to measure growth and mitigation of the electron cloud, emittance growth due to electron cloud, intra-beam scattering, and ions, and single and multi-bunch instabilities generated by collective effects. The flexibility of the CESR guide field optics and the integration of accelerator modeling codes with the control system have made possible an extraordinary range of experiments. Findings at CesrTA with respect to electron cloud effects, emittance tuning techniques, and beam instrumentation for measuring electron cloud, beam sizes, and beam positions are the basis for much of the design of the ILC damping rings as documented in the ILC-Technical Design Report. The program has allowed the Cornell group to cultivate the kind of talen...

  16. Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2.5 V Thermal Mgmt.: Passive, Vacuum-Sealed Unit Pack Weight: 294 kg BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 6,696 mi Date of...

  17. All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    All-optical Fog Sensor for Determining the Fog Visibility Range in Optical Wireless Communication is to use an all optical based fog sensor to study the atmospheric visibility of fog and its constituents on the optical wireless communication (OWC) links in a controlled laboratory test-bid. The fog sensor measures

  18. Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1119 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1120 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1121 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1122 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1123 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1124 2013 Florida

  19. Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1182 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1183 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1184 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1185 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1186 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1187 2013 Florida

  20. Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1099 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1100 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1101 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1102 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1103 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1104 2013 Florida

  1. Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1161 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1162 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1163 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1164 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1165 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1166 2013 Florida

  2. Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    14th Annual Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1078 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1079 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1080 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1081 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1082 2013 Florida Bull Test #12

  3. Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1141 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1142 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1143 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1144 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1145 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1146 2013 Florida

  4. Hurricane Season 2006: Preparation is your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Hurricane Season 2006: Preparation is your first step to SAFETY 2005 Hurricanes NAME CATEGORY Cindy A HURRICANE WATCH,issued for your part of the coast, indicates the possibility that you could experience hurricane conditions within 36 hours. This watch should trigger your disaster plan,and protective measures

  5. Retsch PM400 ball mill Nanoparticle preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    the presence of a low binding energy boride species (CexBy) XPS Catalyst Coated, Unoxidized Boron NanoparticlesRetsch PM400 ball mill pump Nanoparticle preparation Ball Milling Method Physically grind micron are coated with various ligands/capping agents to promote suspension in a variety of fuels and/or to protect

  6. Prepared by Ryan T. Kennelly, Economic Analyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Prepared by Ryan T. Kennelly, Economic Analyst Center for Business and Economic Research Lee Business School University of Nevada, Las Vegas October 2012 #12;The Center for Business and Economic new economic indexes for the metropolitan area of Las Vegas, Nevada. We first construct a coincident

  7. Technical Note Graphene: Substrate preparation and introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Graphene: Substrate preparation and introduction Radosav S. Pantelic a , Ji Won Suk September 2010 Accepted 4 October 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Graphene Graphene oxide Cryo the transfer of continuous, single-layer, pristine graphene to standard Quan- tifoil TEM grids. We compare

  8. Think about it Preparing for Graduate School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Think about it Preparing for Graduate School Selecting Schools to Which You'll Apply Applying for Admittance The G.R.E. Writing Sample Campus Visits Graduate School Programs Your reasons for going to graduate school in English should go beyond simply that you like to read and write, that you like school

  9. Preparation of a semiconductor thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pehnt, M.; Schulz, D.L.; Curtis, C.J.; Ginley, D.S.

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of a semiconductor film. The process comprises depositing nanoparticles of a semiconductor material onto a substrate whose surface temperature during nanoparticle deposition thereon is sufficient to cause substantially simultaneous fusion of the nanoparticles to thereby coalesce with each other and effectuate film growth.

  10. Assessment Update 2009 Prepared: July 27, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    1 Assessment Update 2009 Prepared: July 27, 2009 CHBE assessment activities during AY 2008 Thresholds Details of Assessment Activities Inputs Assessment Threshold Response Review The Faculty tightened) Safety in Senior Design Reports: I viewed the Coal Bed Methane Water Treatment Project and the Coal

  11. Leafy Green Preparation and Cooling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leafy Green Preparation and Cooling Study Dominique N. Bibbins #12;Background : Leafy Greens z In the past, leafy greens have been the source of food borne-illnesses and outbreaks. z It is important Lasting knowledge of survey practices, procedures, and protocol. #12;Acknowledgements z Laura Green, Ph

  12. Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Paxton, MA May, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for May, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

  13. Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Paxton, MA June, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for June, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

  14. Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Paxton, MA May, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for May, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

  15. Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Paxton, MA July, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for July, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

  16. Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Paxton, MA June, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for June, 2005 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

  17. Data Update for Paxton, MA Prepared for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Data Update for Paxton, MA July, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative, 75 North Drive, Westborough, MA 01581 By Kai Wu Monthly Data Summary for July, 2006 This update summarizes the monthly data results for the Paxton MA monitoring site at 42-18-11.6 N, 71-53-50.9 W per the WSG84

  18. Elizabeth Alison Thompson a. Professional Preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Elizabeth Alison Thompson a. Professional Preparation Instutution Major Degree Year Cambridge Proceedings 70) Five most closely related Koepke, H. A., and Thompson, E. A. (2013) Efficient identification of equivalences in dynamic graphs and pedigree structures. Journal of Computational Biology 20: 551-570. Thompson

  19. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A.P.; Olshavsky, M.A.

    1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed. They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline. 4 figs.

  20. Energy Simulation Training Prepared for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    `i Natural Energy Institute University of Hawai`i Manoa #12;#12;TABLE OF CONTENTS HNEI FUNDING Program Subtask 3.5.1: Residential Energy Efficiency Deliverable 3 Prepared by The University of Hawai and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawai`i April 2013 #12;Acknowledgement: This material

  1. Preparation of a semiconductor thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pehnt, Martin (TuBingen, DE); Schulz, Douglas L. (Denver, CO); Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a semiconductor film. The process comprises depositing nanoparticles of a semiconductor material onto a substrate whose surface temperature during nanoparticle deposition thereon is sufficient to cause substantially simultaneous fusion of the nanoparticles to thereby coalesce with each other and effectuate film growth.

  2. Glacier Recession Prepared by Joni L. Kincaid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glacier Recession Prepared by Joni L. Kincaid for the Advancing Geospatial Skills in Science funded by the National Science Foundation's GK-12 Program. Spring, 2007 #12;Glacier: a large mass of ice Line Glacier How do glaciers form? Glaciers form in locations where the snow does not melt over

  3. Photocatalytic methods for preparation of electrocatalyst materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nwoga, Tochi Tudor; Kawahara, Kazuo; Li, Wen; Song, Yujiang; Shelnutt, John A; Miller, James E; Medforth, Craig John; Ueno, Yukiyoshi; Kawamura, Tetsuo

    2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of preparing metal particles on a support material, including platinum-containing nanoparticles on a carbon support. Such materials can be used as electrocatalysts, for example as improved electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEM-FCs).

  4. Photocatalytic methods for preparation of electrocatalyst materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Kawamura, Tetsuo; Nagami, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Muldoon, John; Shelnutt, John A; Song, Yujiang; Miller, James E; Hickner, Michael A; Medforth, Craig

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods of preparing metal particles on a support material, including platinum-containing nanoparticles on a carbon support. Such materials can be used as electrocatalysts, for example as improved electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEM-FCs).

  5. Energy Efficient Data Centers Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Board - Equinix Pacific Gas and Electric Company New York State Energy Research and DevelopmentEnergy Efficient Data Centers Prepared by William Tschudi, Tengfang Xu, Dale Sartor, Bruce Nordman, Jon Koomey, and Osman Sezgen Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National

  6. prepared at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis and presented at the University of Nice Sophia-Electrodes acquisitions in the retina Hassan NASSER Advisor Pr. Bruno Cessac INRIA Sophia-Antipolis Reviewers Pr. Stefano Statistique de l'ENS Examiners Pr. Pierre Kornprobst INRIA Sophia-Antipolis Pr. Adrián Palacios University

  7. prepared at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis Mediterranee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis M´editerran´ee and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis Graduate School of Information and Communication Sciences A dissertation´e-Salp^etri`ere, Paris, France Dr. Pierre Comon I3S / CNRS / University of Nice, France Dr. Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia

  8. prepared at Inria Sophia Antipolis -Mediterranee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    PhD THESIS prepared at Inria Sophia Antipolis - M´editerran´ee and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis Graduate School of Information and Communication Sciences A dissertation. Rachid Deriche, Inria Sophia Antipolis-M´editerran´ee, France Reviewers Dr. Christian Barillot, CNRS

  9. prepared at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis Mediterranee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia-Antipolis M´editerran´ee and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis Graduate School of Information and Communication Sciences A dissertation Features in Diffusion MRI Jian CHENG Advisers Dr. Rachid Deriche INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Dr. Tianzi

  10. prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis -Mditerrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PhD THESIS prepared at INRIA Sophia Antipolis - Méditerranée and presented at the University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis Graduate School of Information and Communication Sciences A dissertation INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France Thierry VI?VILLE INRIA Sophia Antipolis, France President Rachid DERICHE

  11. PREPARING THE VIRTUAL CLASSROOM FOR DISTANCE DELIVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    of humans and their companion domestic animals and livestock. Students learn that there are certain "at riskPREPARING THE VIRTUAL CLASSROOM FOR DISTANCE DELIVERY: MEDICAL-VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY CLINICS laboratory," library materials, conventional lectures and the 43 virtual patients in the clinics

  12. Process for the preparation of vinyl acetate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tustin, G.C.; Zoeller, J.R.; Depew, L.S.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to the preparation of vinyl acetate by contacting within a contact zone a mixture of ketene and acetaldehyde with an acid catalyst at about one bar pressure and between about 85 and 200 C and removing the reaction products from the contact zone.

  13. Prepared for: Michigan Department of Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Notre Dame, University of

    Prepared for: Michigan Department of Natural Resources Natural Heritage Grants Program and USDA DISTRIBUTIONS IN GOGEBIC COUNTY, MICHIGAN Dr. Karen E. Francl University of Notre Dame Environmental Research October 2005 #12;2 Abstract This project sought to provide valuable data for the Michigan Herp Atlas

  14. Original article Preparation and radical scavenging activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    reaction could be applied to prepare casein antioxidant peptides with higher activity equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). Analysis showed that all casein plasteins had improved radical / radical scavenging activity / antioxidant 9.6% ; : 500 U 30 C 50% 5.6 h 6 2 1,1- -2

  15. Drug delivery Preparation of Monodisperse Biodegradable Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    Drug delivery Preparation of Monodisperse Biodegradable Polymer Microparticles Using a Microfluidic Flow-Focusing Device for Controlled Drug Delivery Qiaobing Xu, Michinao Hashimoto, Tram T. Dang, Todd microparticles have broad utility as vehicles for drug delivery and form the basis of several therapies approved

  16. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, S.W.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon is described in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T{sub 2} gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon. 1 fig.

  17. Preparation of III-V semiconductor nanocrystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Olshavsky, Michael A. (Brunswick, OH)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer-scale crystals of III-V semiconductors are disclosed, They are prepared by reacting a group III metal source with a group V anion source in a liquid phase at elevated temperature in the presence of a crystallite growth terminator such as pyridine or quinoline.

  18. Process of preparing tritiated porous silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of preparing tritiated porous silicon in which porous silicon is equilibrated with a gaseous vapor containing HT/T.sub.2 gas in a diluent for a time sufficient for tritium in the gas phase to replace hydrogen present in the pore surfaces of the porous silicon.

  19. North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2011 Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Executive summary The North Sea Whitefish (NSW) survey sailed on 11 June 2011, fishing operations beganNorth Sea Whitefish Survey: 2011 Prepared by Chris Darby, Danny Normandale, Matthew Parker the three NSW surveys are starting to provide a valuable evaluation of the dynamics of the three target

  20. North Sea Whitefish Survey: 2012 Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;2 Executive summary The North Sea Whitefish (NSW) survey sailed on 03 June 2012, fishing operations beganNorth Sea Whitefish Survey: 2012 Prepared by Chris Darby, Danny Normandale, Marta Soffker, Samantha samples were collected from cod, haddock and whiting for age determination. In 2009, throughout the survey

  1. Comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toussaint, M.W.; Shedd, T.R.; VanDerSchal, W.H.; Leather, G.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus ccalyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photo bacterium phosphoreum - Microtox test, and a mixture of bacterial species - the polytox test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriadaphnta dubia), green algae (Setenastrum capricarnutum), fathead minnows (Pimephalespromelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC5O/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  2. A comparison of standard acute toxicity tests with rapid-screening toxicity tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toussaint, M.W. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Shedd, T.R. [Army Biomedical Research and Development Lab., Frederick, MD (United States); Schalie, W.H. van der [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States); Leather, G.R. [Hood Coll., Frederick, MD (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compared the relative sensitivity of five inexpensive, rapid toxicity tests to the sensitivity of five standard aquatic acute toxicity tests through literature review and testing. The rapid toxicity tests utilized organisms that require little culturing or handling prior to testing: a freshwater rotifer (Branchionus calyciflorus); brine shrimp (Artemia salina); lettuce (Lactuca sativa); and two microbial tests (Photobacterium phosphoreum--Microtox{reg_sign} test, and a mixture of bacterial species--the Polytox{reg_sign} test). Standard acute toxicity test species included water fleas (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia), green algae (Selenastrum capricornutum), fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas), and mysid shrimp (Mysidopsis bahia). Sensitivity comparisons between rapid and standard acute toxicity tests were based on LC50/EC50 data from 11 test chemicals. Individually, the lettuce and rotifer tests ranked most similar in sensitivity to the standard tests, while Microtox fell just outside the range of sensitivities represented by the group of standard acute toxicity tests. The brine shrimp and Polytox tests were one or more orders of magnitude different from the standard acute toxicity tests for most compounds. The lettuce, rotifer, and Microtox tests could be used as a battery for preliminary toxicity screening of chemicals. Further evaluation of complex real-world environmental samples is recommended.

  3. Geothermal Resource Analysis and Structure of Basin and Range Systems, Especially Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Blackwell; Kenneth Wisian; Maria Richards; Mark Leidig; Richard Smith; Jason McKenna

    2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Publish new thermal and drill data from the Dizie Valley Geothermal Field that affect evaluation of Basin and Range Geothermal Resources in a very major and positive way. Completed new geophysical surveys of Dizie Valley including gravity and aeromagnetics and integrated the geophysical, seismic, geological and drilling data at Dizie Valley into local and regional geologic models. Developed natural state mass and energy transport fluid flow models of generic Basin and Range systems based on Dizie Valley data that help to understand the nature of large scale constraints on the location and characteristics of the geothermal systems. Documented a relation between natural heat loss for geothermal and electrical power production potential and determined heat flow for 27 different geothermal systems. Prepared data set for generation of a new geothermal map of North American including industry data totaling over 25,000 points in the US alone.

  4. A process for the chemical preparation of high-field ZnO varistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brooks, R.A.; Dosch, R.G.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1986-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical preparation techniques involving co-precipitation of metals are used to provide microstructural characteristics necessary in order to produce ZnO varistors and their precursors for high field applications. The varistors produced have homogeneous and/or uniform dopant distributions and a submicron average grain size with a narrow size distribution. Precursor powders are prepared via chemical precipitation techniques and varistors made by sintering uniaxially and/or isostatically pressed pellets. Using these methods, varistors were made which were suitable for high-power applications, having values of breakdown field, E/sub B/, in the 10 to 100 kV/cm range, ..cap alpha.. > 30 and densities in the range of 65 to 99% of theoretical, depending on both composition and sintering temperature.

  5. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The worlds most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  6. FIFTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.; Dunn, K.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAC storage environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Additional samples will be added to each aging environment, to support development of an aging model specific to softwood fiberboard. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Two additional softwood fiberboard source packages have been obtained and will begin to provide data on the range of variability of this material.

  7. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (NTSER) was prepared to meet the information needs of the public and the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for annual site environmental reports. It was prepared by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). This Executive Summary presents the purpose of the document, the major programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), NTS key environmental initiatives, radiological releases and potential doses to the public resulting from site operations, a summary of nonradiological releases, implementation status of the NTS Environmental Management System, a summary of compliance with environmental regulations, pollution prevention and waste minimization accomplishments, and significant environmental accomplishments. Much of the content of this Executive Summary is also presented in a separate stand-alone pamphlet titled Nevada Test Site Environmental Report Summary 2007. This NTSER was prepared to satisfy DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. Its purpose is to (1) report compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, (2) present results of environmental monitoring of radiological and nonradiological effluents, (3) report estimated radiological doses to the public from releases of radioactive material, (4) summarize environmental incidents of noncompliance and actions taken in response to them, (5) describe the NTS Environmental Management System and characterize its performance, and (6) highlight significant environmental programs and efforts. This report meets these objectives for the NTS and three offsite Nevada facilities mentioned in this report.

  8. Health Professional School Admission Tests Test Website Used for Fee # schools included Addt'l fee Test Dates Computerized? Score Range Avg Score Accepted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .50/report All year Yes 200-400 325 - FSU/MCO PCAT www.pcatweb.info/ Pharmacy $199 3 $20/school Jul-Jan Yes

  9. AVTA: 2014 Mazda Mazda3 i-ELOOP Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  10. AVTA: 2014 Smart Electric Drive Coupe All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  11. AVTA: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV All-Electric Vehicle Testing Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road....

  12. Concolic Testing Koushik Sen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    Concolic testing automates test input generation by com­ bining the concrete and symbolic (concolic) execution of the code under test. Traditional test input generation tech­ niques use either (1) concrete test inputs from these constraints. In contrast, concolic testing tightly couples both concrete

  13. Concolic Testing Koushik Sen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    Concolic testing automates test input generation by com- bining the concrete and symbolic (concolic) execution of the code under test. Traditional test input generation tech- niques use either (1) concrete test inputs from these constraints. In contrast, concolic testing tightly couples both concrete

  14. POLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -relief topography, 2) post-Miocene surface uplift of the range superimposed on pre-existing high-relief topographyPOLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA SARA GRAN MITCHELL Range of Washington State by analyzing the topography, geology, and exhumation patterns across the range

  15. Dewar Testing of Coaxial Resonators at MSU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popielarski, J; Facco, A; Hodek, M; Marti, F; Norton, D; Velianoff, G J; Wlodarczak, J; Burrill, A

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michigan State University is currently testing prototype and production cavities for two accelerator projects. 80.5 MHz {beta} = 0.085 quarter wave resonators (QWR) are being produced as part of a cryomodule for ReA3. 322 MHz {beta} = 0.53 half wave resonators (HWR) are being prototyped for a driver linac for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams. This paper will discuss test results and how different cavity preparations effect cavity performs. Also various diagnostics methods have been developed, such as second sound quench location determination, and temperature mapping to determine hot spots from defects and multipacting location.

  16. Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. 8 figs.

  17. Range-gated field disturbance sensor with range-sensitivity compensation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudorandomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies.

  18. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  19. Measurements versus Predictions for a Hybrid (Hydrostatic plus Hydrodynamic Thrust Bearing for a Range of Orifice Diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esser, Paul R.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    bearings with three different orifice diameters (1.63, 1.80, and 1.93 mm) are tested for a range of supply pressures, fluid film thicknesses, and rotational speeds. The water-lubricated test bearings have eight pockets, with feed orifices located centrally...

  20. The performance of a multiple-disk centrifugal pump as an artificial ventricle over a wide range of operating parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidhu, Amrita Singh

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of a multiple-disk centrifugal pump based on the Tesla Turbine design is tested over a wide range of operating conditions. 'This pump is tested on a mock circulatory loop (with a blood analog) approved by the NIH. This valveless...