Sample records for range error creating

  1. Decreasing range resolution of a SAR image to permit correction of motion measurement errors beyond the SAR range resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  2. Y-12 to help create fuel for NASA's long-range space exploration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    help create fuel for NASA's long-range space exploration missions | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  3. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  4. Dose Uncertainties in IMPT for Oropharyngeal Cancer in the Presence of Anatomical, Range, and Setup Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraan, Aafke C., E-mail: aafke.kraan@pi.infn.it [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Water, Steven van de; Teguh, David N.; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Madden, Tom; Kooy, Hanne M. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S. [Erasmus MC Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties influence the dose delivered with intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), but clinical quantification of these errors for oropharyngeal cancer is lacking. We quantified these factors and investigated treatment fidelity, that is, robustness, as influenced by adaptive planning and by applying more beam directions. Methods and Materials: We used an in-house treatment planning system with multicriteria optimization of pencil beam energies, directions, and weights to create treatment plans for 3-, 5-, and 7-beam directions for 10 oropharyngeal cancer patients. The dose prescription was a simultaneously integrated boost scheme, prescribing 66 Gy to primary tumor and positive neck levels (clinical target volume-66 Gy; CTV-66 Gy) and 54 Gy to elective neck levels (CTV-54 Gy). Doses were recalculated in 3700 simulations of setup, range, and anatomical uncertainties. Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans were used to evaluate an adaptive planning strategy using nonrigid registration for dose accumulation. Results: For the recalculated 3-beam plans including all treatment uncertainty sources, only 69% (CTV-66 Gy) and 88% (CTV-54 Gy) of the simulations had a dose received by 98% of the target volume (D98%) >95% of the prescription dose. Doses to organs at risk (OARs) showed considerable spread around planned values. Causes for major deviations were mixed. Adaptive planning based on repeat imaging positively affected dose delivery accuracy: in the presence of the other errors, percentages of treatments with D98% >95% increased to 96% (CTV-66 Gy) and 100% (CTV-54 Gy). Plans with more beam directions were not more robust. Conclusions: For oropharyngeal cancer patients, treatment uncertainties can result in significant differences between planned and delivered IMPT doses. Given the mixed causes for major deviations, we advise repeat diagnostic CT scans during treatment, recalculation of the dose, and if required, adaptive planning to improve adequate IMPT dose delivery.

  5. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  6. Error detection method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  7. A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Paul

    A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman UCLIC MPEB, Malet Place London, WC1E 7JE sarah and the subsequent process of creating a taxonomy of errors from the information gathered. A total of 350 errors were. These codes are then organised into a taxonomy similar to that of Zhang et al (2004). We show how

  8. A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    A Taxonomy of Number Entry Error Sarah Wiseman UCLIC MPEB, Malet Place London, WC1E 7JE sarah and the subsequent process of creating a taxonomy of errors from the information gathered. A total of 345 errors were. These codes are then organised into a taxonomy similar to that of Zhang et al (2004). We show how

  9. Range Fuels Commercial-Scale Biorefinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Range Fuels commercial-scale biorefinery will use a variety of feedstocks to create cellulosic ethanol, methanol, and power.

  10. Bioindustry Creates Green Jobs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioindustry Creates Green Jobs Energy from abundant, renewable, domestic biomass can reduce U.S. dependence on oil, lower impacts on climate, and stimulate jobs and eco- nomic...

  11. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Quimby, D.C. (Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  12. How Magnetic Dimers Interact to Create Long-Range Order

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Solar-Cell Efficiency How to Remove Tangles in Your DNA Stressing Out Copper TSVs with Temperature Lights, Conformational Change... Action Stability vs. Activity:...

  13. Creating music by listening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jehan, Tristan, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Machines have the power and potential to make expressive music on their own. This thesis aims to computationally model the process of creating music using experience from listening to examples. Our unbiased signal-based ...

  14. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The earth's atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  15. Rateless and rateless unequal error protection codes for Gaussian channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyle, Kevin P. (Kevin Patrick)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we examine two different rateless codes and create a rateless unequal error protection code, all for the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The two rateless codes are examined through both analysis ...

  16. Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core Nontechnical Skills In normal flight operations, crews are faced with a variety of external threats and commit a range of errors of these threats and errors therefore forms an essential element of enhancing performance and minimizing risk

  17. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  18. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartori, Pablo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Max...

  19. In Search of a Taxonomy for Classifying Qualitative Spreadsheet Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przasnyski, Zbigniew; Seal, Kala Chand

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most organizations use large and complex spreadsheets that are embedded in their mission-critical processes and are used for decision-making purposes. Identification of the various types of errors that can be present in these spreadsheets is, therefore, an important control that organizations can use to govern their spreadsheets. In this paper, we propose a taxonomy for categorizing qualitative errors in spreadsheet models that offers a framework for evaluating the readiness of a spreadsheet model before it is released for use by others in the organization. The classification was developed based on types of qualitative errors identified in the literature and errors committed by end-users in developing a spreadsheet model for Panko's (1996) "Wall problem". Closer inspection of the errors reveals four logical groupings of the errors creating four categories of qualitative errors. The usability and limitations of the proposed taxonomy and areas for future extension are discussed.

  20. Quantum error control codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhamid Awad Aly Ahmed, Sala

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major... Subject: Computer Science QUANTUM ERROR CONTROL CODES A Dissertation by SALAH ABDELHAMID AWAD ALY AHMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY...

  1. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  2. Quantum Error Correction Workshop on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassl, Markus

    Error Correction Avoiding Errors: Mathematical Model decomposition of the interaction algebra;Quantum Error Correction Designed Hamiltonians Main idea: "perturb the system to make it more stable" · fast (local) control operations = average Hamiltonian with more symmetry (cf. techniques from NMR

  3. Dynamic Prediction of Concurrency Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadowski, Caitlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relation 15 Must-Before Race Prediction 16 Implementation 17viii Abstract Dynamic Prediction of Concurrency Errors bySANTA CRUZ DYNAMIC PREDICTION OF CONCURRENCY ERRORS A

  4. Creating a Star on Earth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Energy Department's Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, scientists are trying to accomplish what was once considered the realm of science fiction: creating a star on Earth.

  5. Modular error embedding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandford, II, Maxwell T. (Los Alamos, NM); Handel, Theodore G. (Los Alamos, NM); Ettinger, J. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data containing noise in the low-order bits. The method applies to digital data representing analog signals, for example digital images. The method reduces the error introduced by other methods that replace the low-order bits with auxiliary information. By a substantially reverse process, the embedded auxiliary data can be retrieved easily by an authorized user through use of a digital key. The modular error embedding method includes a process to permute the order in which the host data values are processed. The method doubles the amount of auxiliary information that can be added to host data values, in comparison with bit-replacement methods for high bit-rate coding. The invention preserves human perception of the meaning and content of the host data, permitting the addition of auxiliary data in the amount of 50% or greater of the original host data.

  6. Approaches to Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julia Kempe

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this little survey is to give a simple description of the main approaches to quantum error correction and quantum fault-tolerance. Our goal is to convey the necessary intuitions both for the problems and their solutions in this area. After characterising quantum errors we present several error-correction schemes and outline the elements of a full fledged fault-tolerant computation, which works error-free even though all of its components can be faulty. We also mention alternative approaches to error-correction, so called error-avoiding or decoherence-free schemes. Technical details and generalisations are kept to a minimum.

  7. STATISTICAL MODEL OF SYSTEMATIC ERRORS: LINEAR ERROR MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

    to apply. The algorithm to maximize a likelihood function in the case of a non-linear physico - the same variances of errors 3.1. One-way classification 3.2. Linear regression 4. Real case (vaporizationSTATISTICAL MODEL OF SYSTEMATIC ERRORS: LINEAR ERROR MODEL E.B. Rudnyi Department of Chemistry

  8. Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henkel, Werner

    Unequal Error Protection Turbo Codes Diploma Thesis Neele von Deetzen Arbeitsbereich Nachrichtentechnik School of Engineering and Science Bremen, February 28th, 2005 #12;Unequal Error Protection Turbo Convolutional Codes / Turbo Codes 18 3.1 Structure

  9. Quantum computing with nearest neighbor interactions and error rates over 1%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David S. Wang; Austin G. Fowler; Lloyd C. L. Hollenberg

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale quantum computation will only be achieved if experimentally implementable quantum error correction procedures are devised that can tolerate experimentally achievable error rates. We describe a quantum error correction procedure that requires only a 2-D square lattice of qubits that can interact with their nearest neighbors, yet can tolerate quantum gate error rates over 1%. The precise maximum tolerable error rate depends on the error model, and we calculate values in the range 1.1--1.4% for various physically reasonable models. Even the lowest value represents the highest threshold error rate calculated to date in a geometrically constrained setting, and a 50% improvement over the previous record.

  10. EIA - Sorry! Unexpected Error

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hosted byCold Fusion Error

  11. Uncertainty quantification and error analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higdon, Dave M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Mark C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Habib, Salman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klein, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berliner, Mark [OHIO STATE UNIV.; Covey, Curt [LLNL; Ghattas, Omar [UNIV OF TEXAS; Graziani, Carlo [UNIV OF CHICAGO; Seager, Mark [LLNL; Sefcik, Joseph [LLNL; Stark, Philip [UC/BERKELEY; Stewart, James [SNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UQ studies all sources of error and uncertainty, including: systematic and stochastic measurement error; ignorance; limitations of theoretical models; limitations of numerical representations of those models; limitations on the accuracy and reliability of computations, approximations, and algorithms; and human error. A more precise definition for UQ is suggested below.

  12. Register file soft error recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Bruce M.; Fox, Thomas W.; Wait, Charles D.; Muff, Adam J.; Watson, III, Alfred T.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Register file soft error recovery including a system that includes a first register file and a second register file that mirrors the first register file. The system also includes an arithmetic pipeline for receiving data read from the first register file, and error detection circuitry to detect whether the data read from the first register file includes corrupted data. The system further includes error recovery circuitry to insert an error recovery instruction into the arithmetic pipeline in response to detecting the corrupted data. The inserted error recovery instruction replaces the corrupted data in the first register file with a copy of the data from the second register file.

  13. Creating an iron understudy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    iron reactivity. To test their process, the team created tiny iron oxide spheres with titanium added to control the Fe(II)Fe(III) ratio directly. The designer particles are also...

  14. Franklin Trouble Shooting and Error Messages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Trouble Shooting and Error Messages Error Messages Message or Symptom Fault Recommendation job hit wallclock time limit user or system Submit...

  15. Engineering Engineers create solutions to problems and challenges. . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Engineering Engineers create solutions to problems and challenges. . . Their work ranges from to the restora- tion of water quality in contaminated aquifers. Engineers are involved in product and systems. . . Successful engineers need a sound educational foundation in a range of technical subjects built on science

  16. Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Wang; Kai Sun; Hen Fan; Vlatko Vedral

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

  17. Finding beam focus errors automatically

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

  18. Data& Error Analysis 1 DATA and ERROR ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukasyan, Alexander

    Data& Error Analysis 1 DATA and ERROR ANALYSIS Performing the experiment and collecting data learned, you might get a better grade.) Data analysis should NOT be delayed until all of the data. This will help one avoid the problem of spending an entire class collecting bad data because of a mistake

  19. GIORGIO QUAZZA MEDAL (Created 1979)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corporation headed by Yasuo Ichii, Shoji Murayama and Takahiro Yamasaki for the project Application Design (Prentice Hall, 2001) AU/AT/CL #12;APPLICATION PAPER PRIZE (Created 1986) CONGRESS SITE. FUJII, M. IWATA: Parallel Processing of Robot Simulation JP TALLIN, 1990 R. KULHAVY: Differential

  20. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  1. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  2. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  3. Bioindustry Creates Green Jobs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioindustry Creates Green Jobs Bioindustry Creates Green Jobs Energy from abundant, renewable, domestic biomass can reduce U.S. dependence on oil, lower impacts on climate, and...

  4. Creating a GPS for aluminum ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Released: August 14, 2014 New approach pinpoints locations in simple zeolite catalysts Aluminum EXAFS and zeolite...

  5. Static Detection of Disassembly Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnamoorthy, Nithya; Debray, Saumya; Fligg, Alan K.

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Static disassembly is a crucial ?rst step in reverse engineering executable ?les, and there is a consider- able body of work in reverse-engineering of binaries, as well as areas such as semantics-based security anal- ysis, that assumes that the input executable has been correctly disassembled. However, disassembly errors, e.g., arising from binary obfuscations, can render this assumption invalid. This work describes a machine- learning-based approach, using decision trees, for stat- ically identifying possible errors in a static disassem- bly; such potential errors may then be examined more closely, e.g., using dynamic analyses. Experimental re- sults using a variety of input executables indicate that our approach performs well, correctly identifying most disassembly errors with relatively few false positives.

  6. Dynamic Prediction of Concurrency Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadowski, Caitlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    errors in systems code using smt solvers. In Computer Aideddata race witnesses by an SMT-based analysis. In NASA Formalscalability relies on a modern SMT solver and an e?cient

  7. Create Page | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy Offshore Place:WindOilCowal Wind Energy Ltd JumpCreate

  8. Creating and Managing Your COS Expertise Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    Creating and Managing Your COS Expertise Profile Managing Your CV and Promoting Your Work ® #12;Contents: · Creating your COS Expertise profile · Updating your COS Expertise profile · Managing your CV · Using your COS Workbench #12;Contents: · Creating your COS Expertise profile -benefits of creating

  9. Unequal error protection of subband coded bits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devalla, Badarinath

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Source coded data can be separated into different classes based on their susceptibility to channel errors. Errors in the Important bits cause greater distortion in the reconstructed signal. This thesis presents an Unequal Error Protection scheme...

  10. Logical Error Rate Scaling of the Toric Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fern H. E. Watson; Sean D. Barrett

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, a great deal of attention has focused on characterizing the performance of quantum error correcting codes via their thresholds, the maximum correctable physical error rate for a given noise model and decoding strategy. Practical quantum computers will necessarily operate below these thresholds meaning that other performance indicators become important. In this work we consider the scaling of the logical error rate of the toric code and demonstrate how, in turn, this may be used to calculate a key performance indicator. We use a perfect matching decoding algorithm to find the scaling of the logical error rate and find two distinct operating regimes. The first regime admits a universal scaling analysis due to a mapping to a statistical physics model. The second regime characterizes the behavior in the limit of small physical error rate and can be understood by counting the error configurations leading to the failure of the decoder. We present a conjecture for the ranges of validity of these two regimes and use them to quantify the overhead -- the total number of physical qubits required to perform error correction.

  11. Two-Layer Error Control Codes Combining Rectangular and Hamming Product Codes for Cache Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Meilin

    We propose a novel two-layer error control code, combining error detection capability of rectangular codes and error correction capability of Hamming product codes in an efficient way, in order to increase cache error ...

  12. Harmonic Analysis Errors in Calculating Dipole,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to reduce the harmonic field calculation errors. A conformal transfor- mation of a multipole magnet into a dipole reduces these errors. Dipole Magnet Calculations A triangular...

  13. SHEAN (Simplified Human Error Analysis code) and automated THERP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.R.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most widely used human error analysis tools is THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction). Unfortunately, this tool has disadvantages. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, realizing these drawbacks, commissioned Dr. Swain, the author of THERP, to create a simpler, more consistent tool for deriving human error rates. That effort produced the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program Human Reliability Analysis Procedure (ASEP), which is more conservative than THERP, but a valuable screening tool. ASEP involves answering simple questions about the scenario in question, and then looking up the appropriate human error rate in the indicated table (THERP also uses look-up tables, but four times as many). The advantages of ASEP are that human factors expertise is not required, and the training to use the method is minimal. Although not originally envisioned by Dr. Swain, the ASEP approach actually begs to be computerized. That WINCO did, calling the code SHEAN, for Simplified Human Error ANalysis. The code was done in TURBO Basic for IBM or IBM-compatible MS-DOS, for fast execution. WINCO is now in the process of comparing this code against THERP for various scenarios. This report provides a discussion of SHEAN.

  14. A process for creating Celtic knot work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Hunter Guymin

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Celtic art contains mysterious and fascinating aesthetic elements including complex knot work motifs. The problem is that creating and exploring these motifs require substantial human effort. One solution to this problem is to create a process...

  15. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  16. Distributed Error Confinement Extended Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patt-Shamir, Boaz

    . These algorithms can serve as building blocks in more general reactive systems. Previous results in exploring locality in reactive systems were not error confined, and relied on the assump- tion (not used in current, that seems inherent for voting in reactive networks; its analysis leads to an interesting combinatorial

  17. Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José J. Baldoví; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Arińo; Guillermo Mínguez Espallargas

    2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

  18. Y-12 to help create fuel for NASA's long-range space exploration missions

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational Nuclear Securitysafety workshopNuclear|

  19. Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic 'mismatch' creates nano 'dumbbells' By Jared Sagoff * December 4, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Like snowflakes, nanoparticles come in a wide variety of shapes and...

  20. Systematic ranging and late warning asteroid impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnocchia, D; Micheli, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe systematic ranging, an orbit determination technique especially suitable to assess the near-term Earth impact hazard posed by newly discovered asteroids. For these late warning cases, the time interval covered by the observations is generally short, perhaps a few hours or even less, which leads to severe degeneracies in the orbit estimation process. The systematic ranging approach gets around these degeneracies by performing a raster scan in the poorly-constrained space of topocentric range and range rate, while the plane of sky position and motion are directly tied to the recorded observations. This scan allows us to identify regions corresponding to collision solutions, as well as potential impact times and locations. From the probability distribution of the observation errors, we obtain a probability distribution in the orbital space and then estimate the probability of an Earth impact. We show how this technique is effective for a number of examples, including 2008 TC3 and 2014 AA, the only tw...

  1. Automated Diagnosis of Product-line Configuration Errors on Feature Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Automated Diagnosis of Product-line Configuration Errors on Feature Models Jules White and Doulas Feature models are widely used to model software product-line (SPL) variability. SPL variants are config Introduction Current trends and challenges. Software Product- Lines (SPLs) are a technique for creating

  2. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  3. Finding Mentors and Creating aFinding Mentors and Creating a Supportive Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilbury, Dawn

    Finding Mentors and Creating aFinding Mentors and Creating a Supportive Climate The academic mentoring relationships in addition to mentoring in more contemporary terms, where mentoring occurs as well as the classic mentors. We will also explore strategies for creating your own peer mentoring

  4. NASA Creates Space Technology Mission Directorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drew media attention and articles on 3D printing, including coverage by Popular Mechanics and website on 3D printing and prototyping technology to create parts for the Space Launch System at Marshall Space

  5. Error handling strategies in multiphase inverse modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameter estimation by inverse modeling involves the repeated evaluation of a function of residuals. These residuals represent both errors in the model and errors in the data. In practical applications of inverse modeling of multiphase flow and transport, the error structure of the final residuals often significantly deviates from the statistical assumptions that underlie standard maximum likelihood estimation using the least-squares method. Large random or systematic errors are likely to lead to convergence problems, biased parameter estimates, misleading uncertainty measures, or poor predictive capabilities of the calibrated model. The multiphase inverse modeling code iTOUGH2 supports strategies that identify and mitigate the impact of systematic or non-normal error structures. We discuss these approaches and provide an overview of the error handling features implemented in iTOUGH2.

  6. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  7. Flux recovery and a posteriori error estimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    bility and the local efficiency bounds for this estimator are established provided that the ... For simple model problems, the energy norm of the true error is equal.

  8. Original Article Error Bounds and Metric Subregularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    theory of error bounds of extended real-valued functions. Another objective is to ... Another observation is that neighbourhood V in the original definition of metric.

  9. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions over Multiple Timescales (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Milligan, M.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation presents some statistical analysis of wind power forecast errors and error distributions, with examples using ERCOT data.

  10. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  11. Light beam range finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  12. Error Mining on Dependency Trees Claire Gardent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Error Mining on Dependency Trees Claire Gardent CNRS, LORIA, UMR 7503 Vandoeuvre-l`es-Nancy, F-l`es-Nancy, F-54600, France shashi.narayan@loria.fr Abstract In recent years, error mining approaches were propose an algorithm for mining trees and ap- ply it to detect the most likely sources of gen- eration

  13. SEU induced errors observed in microprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asenek, V.; Underwood, C.; Oldfield, M. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre] [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). Surrey Space Centre; Velazco, R.; Rezgui, S.; Cheynet, P. [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France)] [TIMA Lab., Grenoble (France); Ecoffet, R. [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)] [Centre National d`Etudes Spatiales, Toulouse (France)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors present software tools for predicting the rate and nature of observable SEU induced errors in microprocessor systems. These tools are built around a commercial microprocessor simulator and are used to analyze real satellite application systems. Results obtained from simulating the nature of SEU induced errors are shown to correlate with ground-based radiation test data.

  14. Remarks on statistical errors in equivalent widths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Vollmann; Thomas Eversberg

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Equivalent width measurements for rapid line variability in atomic spectral lines are degraded by increasing error bars with shorter exposure times. We derive an expression for the error of the line equivalent width $\\sigma(W_\\lambda)$ with respect to pure photon noise statistics and provide a correction value for previous calculations.

  15. Probabilistic growth of large entangled states with low error accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Simon C Benjamin; Joseph Fitzsimons

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of complex entangled states, resources that enable quantum computation, can be achieved via simple 'probabilistic' operations which are individually likely to fail. However, typical proposals exploiting this idea carry a severe overhead in terms of the accumulation of errors. Here we describe an method that can rapidly generate large entangled states with an error accumulation that depends only logarithmically on the failure probability. We find that the approach may be practical for success rates in the sub-10% range, while ultimately becoming unfeasible at lower rates. The assumptions that we make, including parallelism and high connectivity, are appropriate for real systems including measurement-induced entanglement. This result therefore shows the feasibility for real devices based on such an approach.

  16. Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poulin, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this paper, we describe these codes in the language of the stabilizer formalism of standard quantum error correction theory. This is achieved by adding a "gauge" group to the standard stabilizer definition of a code. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor's 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 3 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvement of the error threshold of fault tolerant quantum computing. We also derive a modified Hamming bound that applies to all stabilizer codes, including degenerate ones.

  17. Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Poulin

    2006-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this paper, we describe these codes in the stabilizer formalism of standard quantum error correction theory. This is achieved by adding a "gauge" group to the standard stabilizer definition of a code that defines an equivalence class between encoded states. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shor's 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 4 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure and a wider class of logical operations without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvements of the error threshold of fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  18. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  19. Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 1 Running Head: PREDICTION ERROR AND EVENT BOUNDARIES A computational model of event segmentation from perceptual prediction. Jeremy R. Reynolds, Jeffrey M. Zacks, and Todd S. Braver Washington University Manuscript #12;Prediction Error and Event Boundaries 2 People tend

  20. Creating Addressable Aqueous Microcompartments above Solid Supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    combinatorial libraries of solid supported fluid lipid membranes because these systems retain many a novel soft lithographic technique5 for partitioning and addressing aqueous solutions above supported methodology affords the ability to create a large number of aqueous compartments consisting of various

  1. Creating a three dimensional holographic movie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra, Marvin J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was carried out on the ability to create a three-dimensional holographic movie. Holograms were written on VRP-M emulsion film with the green line of an Argon-Ion laser. The type of hologram write setup ...

  2. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  3. Error Detection and Error Classification: Failure Awareness in Data Transfer Scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louisiana State University; Balman, Mehmet; Kosar, Tevfik

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Data transfer in distributed environment is prone to frequent failures resulting from back-end system level problems, like connectivity failure which is technically untraceable by users. Error messages are not logged efficiently, and sometimes are not relevant/useful from users point-of-view. Our study explores the possibility of an efficient error detection and reporting system for such environments. Prior knowledge about the environment and awareness of the actual reason behind a failure would enable higher level planners to make better and accurate decisions. It is necessary to have well defined error detection and error reporting methods to increase the usability and serviceability of existing data transfer protocols and data management systems. We investigate the applicability of early error detection and error classification techniques and propose an error reporting framework and a failure-aware data transfer life cycle to improve arrangement of data transfer operations and to enhance decision making of data transfer schedulers.

  4. This file was created by scanning the printed publication. Text errors identified by the software have been corrected;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project: Scientific Assessment Thomas M. Quigley, Editor U Research Station. 56 p. (Quigley, Thomas M., ed. Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project

  5. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

  6. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the Northern Cascade Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Robert D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of the NorthernUSA Fred Beckey. Range of Glaciers: The Exploration of thewill find that Range of Glaciers is a must read. The book

  7. CREATING THE NORTHEAST GASOLINE SUPPLY RESERVE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2012, Superstorm Sandy made landfall in the northeastern United States and caused heavy damage to two refineries and left more than 40 terminals in New York Harbor closed due to water damage and loss of power. This left some New York gas stations without fuel for as long as 30 days. As part of the Obama Administration’s ongoing response to the storm, the Department of Energy created the first federal regional refined product reserve, the Northeast Gasoline Supply Reserve.

  8. Barriers to creating a secure MPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.; Matt, B.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davida, G.I. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores some of the many issues in developing security enhanced MPI for embedded real-time systems supporting the Department of Defense`s Multi-level Security policy (DoD MLS) are presented along with the preliminary design for such an MPI variant. In addition some of the many issues that need to be addressed in creating security enhanced versions of MPI for other domains are discussed. 19 refs.

  9. Quantum error-correcting codes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

  10. Organizational Errors: Directions for Future Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, John Stephen

    The goal of this chapter is to promote research about organizational errors—i.e., the actions of multiple organizational participants that deviate from organizationally specified rules and can potentially result in adverse ...

  11. Quantum Error Correction for Quantum Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara M. Terhal

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review we consider the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory. We review the theory of fault-tolerance and quantum error-correction, discuss examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates and the route towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular the surface code architecture. We discuss the complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  12. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Net-Zero Building Technologies Create...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Net-Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings Issue 6 Print Version Share this resource Net-Zero Building Technologies Create Substantial Energy Savings...

  13. New Energy Department Partnership Creates Solar Bridges to Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Department Partnership Creates Solar Bridges to Energy Security New Energy Department Partnership Creates Solar Bridges to Energy Security July 7, 2015 - 3:21pm Addthis New...

  14. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Introduction Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing

  15. Iowa: Geothermal System Creates Jobs, Reduces Emissions in Rural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geothermal System Creates Jobs, Reduces Emissions in Rural Community Iowa: Geothermal System Creates Jobs, Reduces Emissions in Rural Community November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  16. Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient, Lower Cost Concentrating Solar Power Systems Energy Department Announces New University-Led Projects to Create More Efficient,...

  17. EPA Webcast - Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EPA Webcast - Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform Your Community EPA Webcast - Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform Your Community November 18, 2014...

  18. Webinar: Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform Your...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Webinar: Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform Your Community Webinar: Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform Your Community November 18, 2014 3:00PM to...

  19. Haverford Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer August 1, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy...

  20. Short-Term Load Forecasting Error Distributions and Implications for Renewable Integration Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Load forecasting in the day-ahead timescale is a critical aspect of power system operations that is used in the unit commitment process. It is also an important factor in renewable energy integration studies, where the combination of load and wind or solar forecasting techniques create the net load uncertainty that must be managed by the economic dispatch process or with suitable reserves. An understanding of that load forecasting errors that may be expected in this process can lead to better decisions about the amount of reserves necessary to compensate errors. In this work, we performed a statistical analysis of the day-ahead (and two-day-ahead) load forecasting errors observed in two independent system operators for a one-year period. Comparisons were made with the normal distribution commonly assumed in power system operation simulations used for renewable power integration studies. Further analysis identified time periods when the load is more likely to be under- or overforecast.

  1. Parameters and error of a theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, P.; Nix, J.R.; Swiatecki, W.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a definition for the error of a theoretical model of the type whose parameters are determined from adjustment to experimental data. By applying a standard statistical method, the maximum-likelihoodlmethod, we derive expressions for both the parameters of the theoretical model and its error. We investigate the derived equations by solving them for simulated experimental and theoretical quantities generated by use of random number generators. 2 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Evaluating operating system vulnerability to memory errors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G. (University of New Mexico); Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Mueller, Frank (North Carolina State University); Fiala, David (North Carolina State University); Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability is of great concern to the scalability of extreme-scale systems. Of particular concern are soft errors in main memory, which are a leading cause of failures on current systems and are predicted to be the leading cause on future systems. While great effort has gone into designing algorithms and applications that can continue to make progress in the presence of these errors without restarting, the most critical software running on a node, the operating system (OS), is currently left relatively unprotected. OS resiliency is of particular importance because, though this software typically represents a small footprint of a compute node's physical memory, recent studies show more memory errors in this region of memory than the remainder of the system. In this paper, we investigate the soft error vulnerability of two operating systems used in current and future high-performance computing systems: Kitten, the lightweight kernel developed at Sandia National Laboratories, and CLE, a high-performance Linux-based operating system developed by Cray. For each of these platforms, we outline major structures and subsystems that are vulnerable to soft errors and describe methods that could be used to reconstruct damaged state. Our results show the Kitten lightweight operating system may be an easier target to harden against memory errors due to its smaller memory footprint, largely deterministic state, and simpler system structure.

  3. The Error-Pattern-Correcting Turbo Equalizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alhussien, Hakim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The error-pattern correcting code (EPCC) is incorporated in the design of a turbo equalizer (TE) with aim to correct dominant error events of the inter-symbol interference (ISI) channel at the output of its matching Viterbi detector. By targeting the low Hamming-weight interleaved errors of the outer convolutional code, which are responsible for low Euclidean-weight errors in the Viterbi trellis, the turbo equalizer with an error-pattern correcting code (TE-EPCC) exhibits a much lower bit-error rate (BER) floor compared to the conventional non-precoded TE, especially for high rate applications. A maximum-likelihood upper bound is developed on the BER floor of the TE-EPCC for a generalized two-tap ISI channel, in order to study TE-EPCC's signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain for various channel conditions and design parameters. In addition, the SNR gain of the TE-EPCC relative to an existing precoded TE is compared to demonstrate the present TE's superiority for short interleaver lengths and high coding rates.

  4. T-609: Adobe Acrobat/Reader Memory Corruption Error in CoolType Library Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can create a specially crafted PDF file that, when loaded by the target user, will trigger a memory corruption error in the CoolType library and execute arbitrary code on the target system. The code will run with the privileges of the target user.

  5. A systems approach to reducing utility billing errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogura, Nori

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods for analyzing the possibility of errors are practiced by organizations who are concerned about safety and error prevention. However, in situations where the error occurrence is random and difficult to track, ...

  6. Error Detection and Recovery for Robot Motion Planning with Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald, Bruce Randall

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robots must plan and execute tasks in the presence of uncertainty. Uncertainty arises from sensing errors, control errors, and uncertainty in the geometry of the environment. The last, which is called model error, has ...

  7. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  8. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  9. How to Create a New Integer Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanya Khovanova

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several standard procedures used to create new sequences from a given sequence or from a given pair of sequences. In this paper I discuss the most popular of these procedures. For each procedure, I give a definition and provide examples based on three famous sequences: the natural numbers, the prime numbers and the Fibonacci numbers. I also add my thoughts on what makes a sequence interesting. My goal is to help my readers invent new sequences, differentiate interesting sequences from boring ones, and better understand sequences they encounter.

  10. Widget:CreatePage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to:WestwoodCreatePage Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  11. Project ATHENA creates surrogate human organ systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News,Program DirectionProject ATHENA creates surrogate

  12. Thermostabilized enzyme created for biofuels production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2DandEnergyThermostabilized enzyme created

  13. Creating Structure in Your Unstructured Internship/Practicum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Creating Structure in Your Unstructured Internship/Practicum If you create an internship with an organization that does not have a formalized internship program or a formal position description, you can create a more meaningful experience if you create a mutually agreed upon internship description, set

  14. Running jobs error: "inet_arp_address_lookup"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" Resolved: Running jobs error: "inetarpaddresslookup" September 22, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom: After the Hopper August 14...

  15. Global Error bounds for systems of convex polynomials over ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is devoted to study the Lipschitzian/Holderian type global error ...... set is not neccessarily compact, we obtain the Hölder global error bound result.

  16. Design of frequency synthesizers for short range wireless transceivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valero Lopez, Ari Yakov

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid growth of the market for short-range wireless devices, with standards such as Bluetooth and Wireless LAN (IEEE 802.11) being the most important, has created a need for highly integrated transceivers that target drastic power and area...

  17. Optimal error estimates for corrected trapezoidal rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talvila, Erik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrected trapezoidal rules are proved for $\\int_a^b f(x)\\,dx$ under the assumption that $f"\\in L^p([a,b])$ for some $1\\leq p\\leq\\infty$. Such quadrature rules involve the trapezoidal rule modified by the addition of a term $k[f'(a)-f'(b)]$. The coefficient $k$ in the quadrature formula is found that minimizes the error estimates. It is shown that when $f'$ is merely assumed to be continuous then the optimal rule is the trapezoidal rule itself. In this case error estimates are in terms of the Alexiewicz norm. This includes the case when $f"$ is integrable in the Henstock--Kurzweil sense or as a distribution. All error estimates are shown to be sharp for the given assumptions on $f"$. It is shown how to make these formulas exact for all cubic polynomials $f$. Composite formulas are computed for uniform partitions.

  18. Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore accidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    Integrating human related errors with technical errors to determine causes behind offshore of offshore accidents there is a continuous focus on safety improvements. An improved evaluation method concepts in the model are structured in hierarchical categories, based on well-established knowledge

  19. Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults' memory errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Mara

    Running head: STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS Stereotype threat can reduce older adults, 90089-0191. Phone: 213-740-6772. Email: barbersa@usc.edu #12;STEREOTYPE THREAT REDUCES MEMORY ERRORS 2 Abstract (144 words) Stereotype threat often incurs the cost of reducing the amount of information

  20. Uncertainty and error in computational simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Alvin, K.F.; Rutherford, B.M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper addresses the question: ``What are the general classes of uncertainty and error sources in complex, computational simulations?`` This is the first step of a two step process to develop a general methodology for quantitatively estimating the global modeling and simulation uncertainty in computational modeling and simulation. The second step is to develop a general mathematical procedure for representing, combining and propagating all of the individual sources through the simulation. The authors develop a comprehensive view of the general phases of modeling and simulation. The phases proposed are: conceptual modeling of the physical system, mathematical modeling of the system, discretization of the mathematical model, computer programming of the discrete model, numerical solution of the model, and interpretation of the results. This new view is built upon combining phases recognized in the disciplines of operations research and numerical solution methods for partial differential equations. The characteristics and activities of each of these phases is discussed in general, but examples are given for the fields of computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer. They argue that a clear distinction should be made between uncertainty and error that can arise in each of these phases. The present definitions for uncertainty and error are inadequate and. therefore, they propose comprehensive definitions for these terms. Specific classes of uncertainty and error sources are then defined that can occur in each phase of modeling and simulation. The numerical sources of error considered apply regardless of whether the discretization procedure is based on finite elements, finite volumes, or finite differences. To better explain the broad types of sources of uncertainty and error, and the utility of their categorization, they discuss a coupled-physics example simulation.

  1. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded FELs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention from the promise of transform-limited pulses in the soft X-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  2. On the Error in QR Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ] . . . [R(t2, t1) +E2][R(t1, t0) +E1]R(t0) , k = 1, 2, . . . , where Q(tk) is the exact Q-factor at tk and the triangular transitions R(tj , tj?1) are also the exact ones. Moreover, the factors Ej , j = 1, . . . , k, are bounded in norm by the local error... committed during integration of the relevant differential equations; see Theorems 3.1 and 3.16.” We will henceforth simply write (2.7) ?Ej? ? ?, j = 1, 2, . . . , and stress that ? is computable, in fact controllable, in terms of local error tolerances...

  3. Creating materials with a desired refraction coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is given for creating material with a desired refraction coefficient. The method consists of embedding into a material with known refraction coefficient many small particles of size $a$. The number of particles per unit volume around any point is prescribed, the distance between neighboring particles is $O(a^{\\frac{2-\\kappa}{3}})$ as $a\\to 0$, $0<\\kappa<1$ is a fixed parameter. The total number of the embedded particle is $O(a^{\\kappa-2})$. The physical properties of the particles are described by the boundary impedance $\\zeta_m$ of the $m-th$ particle, $\\zeta_m=O(a^{-\\kappa})$ as $a\\to 0$. The refraction coefficient is the coefficient $n^2(x)$ in the wave equation $[\

  4. Simple Loran Cycle Error Detection Algorithms for Maritime Harbor Entrance Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    to be demonstrated. Early in the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Loran Evaluation program it was recognized algorithm is a consequence of the integrity requirements for aviation and because of the significant residual range error and biases of eLoran implemented for aviation. Both these requirements are different

  5. High Performance Dense Linear System Solver with Soft Error Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    High Performance Dense Linear System Solver with Soft Error Resilience Peng Du, Piotr Luszczek systems, and in some scientific applications C/R is not applicable for soft error at all due to error) high performance dense linear system solver with soft error resilience. By adopting a mathematical

  6. Distribution of Wind Power Forecasting Errors from Operational Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation offers new data and statistical analysis of wind power forecasting errors in operational systems.

  7. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jo¨nsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  8. MEASUREMENT AND CORRECTION OF ULTRASONIC ANEMOMETER ERRORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    commonly show systematic errors depending on wind speed due to inaccurate ultrasonic transducer mounting three- dimensional wind speed time series. Results for the variance and power spectra are shown. 1 wind speeds with ultrasonic anemometers: The measu- red flow is distorted by the probe head

  9. Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Kuo Chin Irwin

    Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control Chun-hung Cheng1 , Jian Tang2 , Ada Wai is a function that matches a new object with one of the predefined classes. Document classification is characterized by the large number of attributes involved in the objects (documents). The traditional method

  10. Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Ada Waichee

    Hierarchical Classification of Documents with Error Control Chun­hung Cheng 1 , Jian Tang 2 , Ada. Classification is a function that matches a new object with one of the predefined classes. Document classification is characterized by the large number of attributes involved in the objects (documents

  11. Chapter 10 Creating and Maintaining Geographic Databases 131 Creating and Maintaining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    (DBMS), a specialist piece of software designed to handle multi-user access to an integrated set of data and versioning. 10 #12;Chapter 10 Creating and Maintaining Geographic Databases 132 KEY WORDS AND CONCEPTS DBMS.2 Database management systems 10.3 Storing data in DBMS tables 10.4 SQL 10.5 Geographic database types

  12. Shared Dosimetry Error in Epidemiological Dose-Response Analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stram, Daniel O.; Preston, Dale L.; Sokolnikov, Mikhail; Napier, Bruce; Kopecky, Kenneth J.; Boice, John; Beck, Harold; Till, John; Bouville, Andre; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation dose reconstruction systems for large-scale epidemiological studies are sophisticated both in providing estimates of dose and in representing dosimetry uncertainty. For example, a computer program was used by the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study to provide 100 realizations of possible dose to study participants. The variation in realizations reflected the range of possible dose for each cohort member consistent with the data on dose determinates in the cohort. Another example is the Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2013 which estimates both external and internal exposures and provides multiple realizations of "possible" dose history to workers given dose determinants. This paper takesmore »up the problem of dealing with complex dosimetry systems that provide multiple realizations of dose in an epidemiologic analysis. In this paper we derive expected scores and the information matrix for a model used widely in radiation epidemiology, namely the linear excess relative risk (ERR) model that allows for a linear dose response (risk in relation to radiation) and distinguishes between modifiers of background rates and of the excess risk due to exposure. We show that treating the mean dose for each individual (calculated by averaging over the realizations) as if it was true dose (ignoring both shared and unshared dosimetry errors) gives asymptotically unbiased estimates (i.e. the score has expectation zero) and valid tests of the null hypothesis that the ERR slope ? is zero. Although the score is unbiased the information matrix (and hence the standard errors of the estimate of ?) is biased for ?6Ľ0 when ignoring errors in dose estimates, and we show how to adjust the information matrix to remove this bias, using the multiple realizations of dose. The use of these methods in the context of several studies including, the MayakWorker Cohort, and the U.S. Atomic Veterans Study, is discussed.« less

  13. Precise method of compensating radiation-induced errors in a hot-cathode-ionization gauge with correcting electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeki, Hiroshi, E-mail: saeki@spring8.or.jp; Magome, Tamotsu, E-mail: saeki@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Kohto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate pressure-measurement errors caused by a synchrotron radiation environment, a precise method using a hot-cathode-ionization-gauge head with correcting electrode, was developed and tested in a simulation experiment with excess electrons in the SPring-8 storage ring. This precise method to improve the measurement accuracy, can correctly reduce the pressure-measurement errors caused by electrons originating from the external environment, and originating from the primary gauge filament influenced by spatial conditions of the installed vacuum-gauge head. As the result of the simulation experiment to confirm the performance reducing the errors caused by the external environment, the pressure-measurement error using this method was approximately less than several percent in the pressure range from 10{sup ?5} Pa to 10{sup ?8} Pa. After the experiment, to confirm the performance reducing the error caused by spatial conditions, an additional experiment was carried out using a sleeve and showed that the improved function was available.

  14. Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters Solar Hot Water Creates Savings for Homeless Shelters July 15, 2010 - 12:10pm Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts?...

  15. Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure)...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean Energy Future (Brochure), SunShot, Solar Energy Technologies Program (SETP), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Capturing the Sun, Creating a Clean...

  16. Energy Department creates Jobs Strategy Council to Focus on Job...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    creates Jobs Strategy Council to Focus on Job Growth in Energy Economy Energy Department creates Jobs Strategy Council to Focus on Job Growth in Energy Economy January 23, 2015 -...

  17. Progress in Understanding Error-field Physics in NSTX Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Menard, R.E. Bell, D.A. Gates, S.P. Gerhardt, J.-K. Park, S.A. Sabbagh, J.W. Berkery, A. Egan, J. Kallman, S.M. Kaye, B. LeBlanc, Y.Q. Liu, A. Sontag, D. Swanson, H. Yuh, W. Zhu and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The low aspect ratio, low magnetic field, and wide range of plasma beta of NSTX plasmas provide new insight into the origins and effects of magnetic field errors. An extensive array of magnetic sensors has been used to analyze error fields, to measure error field amplification, and to detect resistive wall modes in real time. The measured normalized error-field threshold for the onset of locked modes shows a linear scaling with plasma density, a weak to inverse dependence on toroidal field, and a positive scaling with magnetic shear. These results extrapolate to a favorable error field threshold for ITER. For these low-beta locked-mode plasmas, perturbed equilibrium calculations find that the plasma response must be included to explain the empirically determined optimal correction of NSTX error fields. In high-beta NSTX plasmas exceeding the n=1 no-wall stability limit where the RWM is stabilized by plasma rotation, active suppression of n=1 amplified error fields and the correction of recently discovered intrinsic n=3 error fields have led to sustained high rotation and record durations free of low-frequency core MHD activity. For sustained rotational stabilization of the n=1 RWM, both the rotation threshold and magnitude of the amplification are important. At fixed normalized dissipation, kinetic damping models predict rotation thresholds for RWM stabilization to scale nearly linearly with particle orbit frequency. Studies for NSTX find that orbit frequencies computed in general geometry can deviate significantly from those computed in the high aspect ratio and circular plasma cross-section limit, and these differences can strongly influence the predicted RWM stability. The measured and predicted RWM stability is found to be very sensitive to the E × B rotation profile near the plasma edge, and the measured critical rotation for the RWM is approximately a factor of two higher than predicted by the MARS-F code using the semi-kinetic damping model.

  18. How to apply on Sknadsweb 1. Create a profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    How to apply on Sřknadsweb 1. Create a profile 2. Choose your course(s) 3. Upload your documents 4. Making changes/updates 1. Create a profile 1 #12;1. Create a profile 2 · Click the link on our website a profile 3 · Most applicants do not have a Norwegian personal ID number (fřdselsnummer), and can register

  19. CREATING 3D ANIMATED HUMAN BEHAVIORS FOR VIRTUAL WORLDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    i CREATING 3D ANIMATED HUMAN BEHAVIORS FOR VIRTUAL WORLDS Jan M. Allbeck A DISSERTATION in Computer, and a scholar. #12;iv ABSTRACT CREATING 3D ANIMATED HUMAN BEHAVIORS FOR VIRTUAL WORLDS Jan M. Allbeck Norman I. Badler Creating virtual scenarios that simulate a substantial human population with typical and varied

  20. Error Channels and the Threshold for Fault-tolerant Quantum Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Eastin

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation treats the topics of threshold calculation, ancilla construction, and non-standard error models. Chapter 2 introduces background material ranging from quantum mechanics to classical coding to thresholds for quantum computation. In Chapter 3 numerical and analytical means are used to generate estimates of and bounds on the threshold given an error model described by a restricted stochastic Pauli channel. Chapter 4 develops a simple, flexible means of estimating the threshold and applies it to some cases of interest. Finally, a novel method of ancilla construction is proposed in Chapter 5, and the difficulties associated with implementing it are discussed.

  1. Quantum Latin squares and unitary error bases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Musto; Jamie Vicary

    2015-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we introduce quantum Latin squares, combinatorial quantum objects which generalize classical Latin squares, and investigate their applications in quantum computer science. Our main results are on applications to unitary error bases (UEBs), basic structures in quantum information which lie at the heart of procedures such as teleportation, dense coding and error correction. We present a new method for constructing a UEB from a quantum Latin square equipped with extra data. Developing construction techniques for UEBs has been a major activity in quantum computation, with three primary methods proposed: shift-and-multiply, Hadamard, and algebraic. We show that our new approach simultaneously generalizes the shift-and-multiply and Hadamard methods. Furthermore, we explicitly construct a UEB using our technique which we prove cannot be obtained from any of these existing methods.

  2. Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Blanchard, Sean P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Debardeleben, Nathan A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    As supercomputers continue to get faster and more powerful in the future, they will also have more nodes. If nothing is done, then the amount of memory in supercomputer clusters will soon grow large enough that memory failures will be unmanageable to deal with by manually replacing memory DIMMs. "Improving Memory Error Handling Using Linux" is a process oriented method to solve this problem by using the Linux kernel to disable (offline) faulty memory pages containing bad addresses, preventing them from being used again by a process. The process of offlining memory pages simplifies error handling and results in reducing both hardware and manpower costs required to run Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) clusters. This process will be necessary for the future of supercomputing to allow the development of exascale computers. It will not be feasible without memory error handling to manually replace the number of DIMMs that will fail daily on a machine consisting of 32-128 petabytes of memory. Testing reveals the process of offlining memory pages works and is relatively simple to use. As more and more testing is conducted, the entire process will be automated within the high-performance computing (HPC) monitoring software, Zenoss, at LANL.

  3. Systematic Errors in measurement of b1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, S A

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A class of spin observables can be obtained from the relative difference of or asymmetry between cross sections of different spin states of beam or target particles. Such observables have the advantage that the normalization factors needed to calculate absolute cross sections from yields often divide out or cancel to a large degree in constructing asymmetries. However, normalization factors can change with time, giving different normalization factors for different target or beam spin states, leading to systematic errors in asymmetries in addition to those determined from statistics. Rapidly flipping spin orientation, such as what is routinely done with polarized beams, can significantly reduce the impact of these normalization fluctuations and drifts. Target spin orientations typically require minutes to hours to change, versus fractions of a second for beams, making systematic errors for observables based on target spin flips more difficult to control. Such systematic errors from normalization drifts are discussed in the context of the proposed measurement of the deuteron b(1) structure function at Jefferson Lab.

  4. Prescribed Range Burning in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    to level terrain. Wind is chan- neled up canyons with increasing speed. In addition, wind in valleys and on slopes moves upward during the day because of surface heating and downward at night because of surface cooling unless prevailing winds are strong... under the canopy of a shrub or tree to generate the necessary heat to kill plant tissue. Mechanically cleared firelines and roads in brush or trees create openings that produce unusual wind movements. Figure 2. Prevailing wind direction depends...

  5. Test models for improving filtering with model errors through stochastic parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gershgorin, B. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States); Harlim, J. [Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States)], E-mail: jharlim@ncsu.edu; Majda, A.J. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The filtering skill for turbulent signals from nature is often limited by model errors created by utilizing an imperfect model for filtering. Updating the parameters in the imperfect model through stochastic parameter estimation is one way to increase filtering skill and model performance. Here a suite of stringent test models for filtering with stochastic parameter estimation is developed based on the Stochastic Parameterization Extended Kalman Filter (SPEKF). These new SPEKF-algorithms systematically correct both multiplicative and additive biases and involve exact formulas for propagating the mean and covariance including the parameters in the test model. A comprehensive study is presented of robust parameter regimes for increasing filtering skill through stochastic parameter estimation for turbulent signals as the observation time and observation noise are varied and even when the forcing is incorrectly specified. The results here provide useful guidelines for filtering turbulent signals in more complex systems with significant model errors.

  6. Message passing in fault tolerant quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. E. Evans; A. M. Stephens

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by Knill's scheme for message passing error detection, here we develop a scheme for message passing error correction for the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor code. We show that for two levels of concatenated error correction, where classical information obtained at the first level is used to help interpret the syndrome at the second level, our scheme will correct all cases with four physical errors. This results in a reduction of the logical failure rate relative to conventional error correction by a factor proportional to the reciprocal of the physical error rate.

  7. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy.

  8. Extended range chemical sensing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, R.C.; Schubert, W.K.

    1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for sensing chemicals over extended range of concentrations. In particular, first and second sensors each having separate, but overlapping ranges for sensing concentrations of hydrogen are provided. Preferably, the first sensor is a MOS solid state device wherein the metal electrode or gate is a nickel alloy. The second sensor is a chemiresistor comprising a nickel alloy. 6 figures.

  9. Efficient Error Calculation for Multiresolution Texture-Based Volume Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaMar, E; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiresolution texture-based volume visualization is an excellent technique to enable interactive rendering of massive data sets. Interactive manipulation of a transfer function is necessary for proper exploration of a data set. However, multiresolution techniques require assessing the accuracy of the resulting images, and re-computing the error after each change in a transfer function is very expensive. They extend their existing multiresolution volume visualization method by introducing a method for accelerating error calculations for multiresolution volume approximations. Computing the error for an approximation requires adding individual error terms. One error value must be computed once for each original voxel and its corresponding approximating voxel. For byte data, i.e., data sets where integer function values between 0 and 255 are given, they observe that the set of error pairs can be quite large, yet the set of unique error pairs is small. instead of evaluating the error function for each original voxel, they construct a table of the unique combinations and the number of their occurrences. To evaluate the error, they add the products of the error function for each unique error pair and the frequency of each error pair. This approach dramatically reduces the amount of computation time involved and allows them to re-compute the error associated with a new transfer function quickly.

  10. Quantum Error Correcting Subsystem Codes From Two Classical Linear Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dave Bacon; Andrea Casaccino

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The essential insight of quantum error correction was that quantum information can be protected by suitably encoding this quantum information across multiple independently erred quantum systems. Recently it was realized that, since the most general method for encoding quantum information is to encode it into a subsystem, there exists a novel form of quantum error correction beyond the traditional quantum error correcting subspace codes. These new quantum error correcting subsystem codes differ from subspace codes in that their quantum correcting routines can be considerably simpler than related subspace codes. Here we present a class of quantum error correcting subsystem codes constructed from two classical linear codes. These codes are the subsystem versions of the quantum error correcting subspace codes which are generalizations of Shor's original quantum error correcting subspace codes. For every Shor-type code, the codes we present give a considerable savings in the number of stabilizer measurements needed in their error recovery routines.

  11. Reply To "Comment on 'Quantum Convolutional Error-Correcting Codes' "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. F. Chau

    2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In their comment, de Almedia and Palazzo \\cite{comment} discovered an error in my earlier paper concerning the construction of quantum convolutional codes (quant-ph/9712029). This error can be repaired by modifying the method of code construction.

  12. Human error contribution to nuclear materials-handling events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Bradley (Bradley Jordan)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes a sample of 15 fuel-handling events from the past ten years at commercial nuclear reactors with significant human error contributions in order to detail the contribution of human error to fuel-handling ...

  13. Evolved Error Management Biases in the Attribution of Anger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galperin, Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    von Hippel, W. , Poore, J. C. , Buss, D. M. , et al. (under27, 733-763. Haselton, M. G. , & Buss, D. M. (2000). Error27, 733-763. Haselton, M. G. , & Buss, D. M. (2000). Error

  14. Clustered Error Correction of Codeword-Stabilized Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunfan Li; Ilya Dumer; Leonid P. Pryadko

    2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Codeword stabilized (CWS) codes are a general class of quantum codes that includes stabilizer codes and many families of non-additive codes with good parameters. For such a non-additive code correcting all t-qubit errors, we propose an algorithm that employs a single measurement to test all errors located on a given set of t qubits. Compared with exhaustive error screening, this reduces the total number of measurements required for error recovery by a factor of about 3^t.

  15. Efficient Semiparametric Estimators for Biological, Genetic, and Measurement Error Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Tanya

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the models considered in Tsiatis and Ma (2004), our model is less stringent because it allows an unspecified model error distribution and unspecified covariate distribution, not just the latter. With an unspecified model error distribution, the RMM... with measurement error is a very different problem compared to the model considered in Tsiatis and Ma (2004), where the model error distribution has a known parametric form. Consequently, the semiparamet- ric treatment here is also drastically different. Our...

  16. Error Analysis in Nuclear Density Functional Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Schunck; Jordan D. McDonnell; Jason Sarich; Stefan M. Wild; Dave Higdon

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear density functional theory (DFT) is the only microscopic, global approach to the structure of atomic nuclei. It is used in numerous applications, from determining the limits of stability to gaining a deep understanding of the formation of elements in the universe or the mechanisms that power stars and reactors. The predictive power of the theory depends on the amount of physics embedded in the energy density functional as well as on efficient ways to determine a small number of free parameters and solve the DFT equations. In this article, we discuss the various sources of uncertainties and errors encountered in DFT and possible methods to quantify these uncertainties in a rigorous manner.

  17. Franklin Trouble Shooting and Error Messages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) TargetFormsTrouble Shooting and Error

  18. Edison Trouble Shooting and Error Messages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarthTrouble Shooting and Error

  19. Report of the Error and Emittance Task Force on the superconducting super collider: Part 1, Resistive machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the design and specifications of the resistive accelerators in the SSC complex was conducted during the past year. This review was initiated in response to a request from the SSC Project Manager. The Error and Emittance Task Force was created October 30, 1992, and charged with reviewing issues associated with the specification of errors and tolerances throughout the injector chain and in the Collider, and to optimize the global error budget. Effects which directly impact the emittance budget were of prime importance. The Task Force responded to three charges: Examination of the resistive accelerators and their injection and extraction systems; examination of the connecting beamlines and the overall approach taken in their design; and global filling, timing, and synchronization issues. The High Energy Booster and the Collider were deemed to be sufficiently different from the resistive accelerators that it was decided to treat them as a separate group. They will be the subject of a second part to this report.

  20. Susceptibility of Commodity Systems and Software to Memory Soft Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Susceptibility of Commodity Systems and Software to Memory Soft Errors Alan Messer, Member, IEEE Abstract--It is widely understood that most system downtime is acounted for by programming errors transient errors in computer system hardware due to external factors, such as cosmic rays. This work

  1. Error rate and power dissipation in nano-logic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong Un

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current-controlled logic and single electron logic processors have been investigated with respect to thermal-induced bit error. A maximal error rate for both logic processors is regarded as one bit-error/year/chip. A maximal clock frequency...

  2. Bolstered Error Estimation Ulisses Braga-Neto a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga-Neto, Ulisses

    the bolstered error estimators proposed in this paper, as part of a larger library for classification and error of the data. It has a direct geometric interpretation and can be easily applied to any classification rule as smoothed error estimation. In some important cases, such as a linear classification rule with a Gaussian

  3. altered environment created: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environment in which to simulate the Punitive Ostracism condition. Categories Richards, Debbie 17 The University of Oklahoma creates a safe environment for all faculty, staff,...

  4. assessments creating understanding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the logical components of the dataspace. We 6 Transcending the Individual Human Mind -- Creating Shared Understanding through Collaborative Design CiteSeer Summary: Complex...

  5. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Report: 11-SI-006 Creating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Final Report: 11-SI-006 Creating Optimal Fracture Networks Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced...

  6. Obama Administration Announces Job-Creating Grid Modernization...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    grid capacity and create thousands of jobs in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota, New Mexico, Nevada, Wyoming, Utah, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Oregon, and Wisconsin. "These...

  7. Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for creating new materials By Else Tennessen * August 14, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new...

  8. Creating Markets for Green Biofuels: Measuring and improving environmental performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian T.; Plevin, Richard J.; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004). Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America'sCreating Markets For Green Biofuels Kalaitzandonakes, N. ,166. Lancaster, C. (2006). Biofuels assurance schemes and

  9. Molecule Nanoweaver Creates High-Tech Medical Patches and Multilayered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecule Nanoweaver Creates High-Tech Medical Patches and Multilayered Capsules Technology available for licensing: Molecule Nanoweaver, a unique tool that can be used as both a...

  10. Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign - A Handbook for Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to reduce energy shortages and reduce America's dependence on foreign oil. Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign: A Handbook for Federal Energy Managers More Documents &...

  11. Ames Laboratory scientists create cheaper magnetic material for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory scientists create cheaper magnetic material for cars, wind turbines Contacts: For release: April 23, 2015 Karl A. Gschneidner, Division of Materials Sciences and...

  12. Smart Grid: Creating Jobs while Delivering Reliable,Environmentally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smart Grid: Creating Jobs while Delivering Reliable, Environmentally-friendly Energy Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2017)...

  13. Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program (KCTP) "Newly Created...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Powerpedia Page The Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program (KCTP) has a new logo and a newly created Powerpedia page. The page layout and program descriptions allow for...

  14. An Improved Technique for Reducing False Alarms Due to Soft Errors A significant fraction of soft errors in modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polian, Ilia

    of soft errors in modern microprocessors has been reported to never lead to a system failure. Any techniques are enhanced by a methodology to handle soft errors on address bits. Furthermore, we demonstrate]. Consequently, many state-of-the art systems provide soft error detection and correction capabilities [Hass 89

  15. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margalit, Danielle N., E-mail: dmargalit@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K. [Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique. There was a lower error rate with IMRT compared with 3D/conventional RT, highlighting the need for sustained vigilance against errors common to more traditional treatment techniques.

  16. Locked modes and magnetic field errors in MST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Kerst, D.W.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the MST reversed field pinch magnetic oscillations become stationary (locked) in the lab frame as a result of a process involving interactions between the modes, sawteeth, and field errors. Several helical modes become phase locked to each other to form a rotating localized disturbance, the disturbance locks to an impulsive field error generated at a sawtooth crash, the error fields grow monotonically after locking (perhaps due to an unstable interaction between the modes and field error), and over the tens of milliseconds of growth confinement degrades and the discharge eventually terminates. Field error control has been partially successful in eliminating locking.

  17. Range Condition: Key to Sustained Ranch Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; White, Larry D.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Range condition, or a rangeland's "state of health," is an ecological measurement of the current condition of a range. Range condition is evaluated by the plant species composition. This leaflet explains the importance of range condition, how range...

  18. Evaluating and Minimizing Distributed Cavity Phase Errors in Atomic Clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ruoxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform 3D finite element calculations of the fields in microwave cavities and analyze the distributed cavity phase errors of atomic clocks that they produce. The fields of cylindrical cavities are treated as an azimuthal Fourier series. Each of the lowest components produces clock errors with unique characteristics that must be assessed to establish a clock's accuracy. We describe the errors and how to evaluate them. We prove that sharp structures in the cavity do not produce large frequency errors, even at moderately high powers, provided the atomic density varies slowly. We model the amplitude and phase imbalances of the feeds. For larger couplings, these can lead to increased phase errors. We show that phase imbalances produce a novel distributed cavity phase error that depends on the cavity detuning. We also design improved cavities by optimizing the geometry and tuning the mode spectrum so that there are negligible phase variations, allowing this source of systematic error to be dramatically reduced.

  19. Evaluating and Minimizing Distributed Cavity Phase Errors in Atomic Clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruoxin Li; Kurt Gibble

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform 3D finite element calculations of the fields in microwave cavities and analyze the distributed cavity phase errors of atomic clocks that they produce. The fields of cylindrical cavities are treated as an azimuthal Fourier series. Each of the lowest components produces clock errors with unique characteristics that must be assessed to establish a clock's accuracy. We describe the errors and how to evaluate them. We prove that sharp structures in the cavity do not produce large frequency errors, even at moderately high powers, provided the atomic density varies slowly. We model the amplitude and phase imbalances of the feeds. For larger couplings, these can lead to increased phase errors. We show that phase imbalances produce a novel distributed cavity phase error that depends on the cavity detuning. We also design improved cavities by optimizing the geometry and tuning the mode spectrum so that there are negligible phase variations, allowing this source of systematic error to be dramatically reduced.

  20. Analysis of Errors in a Special Perturbations Satellite Orbit Propagator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckerman, M.; Jones, J.P.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed an analysis of error densities for the Special Perturbations orbit propagator using data for 29 satellites in orbits of interest to Space Shuttle and International Space Station collision avoidance. We find that the along-track errors predominate. These errors increase monotonically over each 36-hour prediction interval. The predicted positions in the along-track direction progressively either leap ahead of or lag behind the actual positions. Unlike the along-track errors the radial and cross-track errors oscillate about their nearly zero mean values. As the number of observations per fit interval decline the along-track prediction errors, and amplitudes of the radial and cross-track errors, increase.

  1. E791 DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM Error reports received ; no new errors reported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory

    of events written to tape. 18 #12; Error and Status Displays Mailbox For Histogram Requests Vax­online Event Display VAX 11 / 780 Event Reconstruction Event Display Detector Monitoring 3 VAX Workstations 42 EXABYTE of the entire E791 DA system. The VAX 11/780 was the user interface to the VME part of the system, via the DA

  2. Accurate description of torsion potentials in conjugated polymers using density functionals with reduced self-interaction error

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Christopher; Gray, Matthew T.; Brunsfeld, Max; Parrish, Robert M.; Sherrill, C. David; Sears, John S.; Brédas, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.bredas@chemistry.gatech.edu, E-mail: thomas.koerzdoerfer@uni-potsdam.de [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Körzdörfer, Thomas, E-mail: jean-luc.bredas@chemistry.gatech.edu, E-mail: thomas.koerzdoerfer@uni-potsdam.de [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States) [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Computational Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the torsion potentials in two prototypical ?-conjugated polymers, polyacetylene and polydiacetylene, as a function of chain length using different flavors of density functional theory. Our study provides a quantitative analysis of the delocalization error in standard semilocal and hybrid density functionals and demonstrates how it can influence structural and thermodynamic properties. The delocalization error is quantified by evaluating the many-electron self-interaction error (MESIE) for fractional electron numbers, which allows us to establish a direct connection between the MESIE and the error in the torsion barriers. The use of non-empirically tuned long-range corrected hybrid functionals results in a very significant reduction of the MESIE and leads to an improved description of torsion barrier heights. In addition, we demonstrate how our analysis allows the determination of the effective conjugation length in polyacetylene and polydiacetylene chains.

  3. Optimal Threshold-Based Multi-Trial Error/Erasure Decoding with the Guruswami-Sudan Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senger, Christian; Bossert, Martin; Zyablov, Victor V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, multi-trial error/erasure decoding of Reed-Solomon (RS) codes is based on Bounded Minimum Distance (BMD) decoders with an erasure option. Such decoders have error/erasure tradeoff factor L=2, which means that an error is twice as expensive as an erasure in terms of the code's minimum distance. The Guruswami-Sudan (GS) list decoder can be considered as state of the art in algebraic decoding of RS codes. Besides an erasure option, it allows to adjust L to values in the range 1=1 times. We show that BMD decoders with z_BMD decoding trials can result in lower residual codeword error probability than GS decoders with z_GS trials, if z_BMD is only slightly larger than z_GS. This is of practical interest since BMD decoders generally have lower computational complexity than GS decoders.

  4. Risk Analyst Workbench Design and Architecture CREATE REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    and analysis capabilities for the risk analysis and decision analysis steps of the CREATE Terrorism Modeling-0112 August 31, 2005 Center for Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events University of Southern/2/2006 Executive Summary The CREATE Risk Analyst Workbench (RAW) is a software tool that provides modeling

  5. Creating Highquality Roadmaps for Motion Planning in Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraerts, R.J.

    Creating High­quality Roadmaps for Motion Planning in Virtual Environments Roland Geraerts and Mark, the Netherlands Email: {roland,markov}@cs.uu.nl Abstract--- Our goal is to create roadmaps that are particularly suited for motion planning in virtual environments. We use our Reachability Roadmap Method to compute

  6. Creating Works-Like Prototypes of Mechanical Objects Bongjin Koo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawala, Maneesh

    of creating works-like prototypes. Designers are increasingly turning to 3D printing as a tool for fab Graphics]: Computational Ge- ometry and Object Modeling--Geometric algorithms. Keywords: fabrication, 3D printing, sketch-based modeling Links: DL PDF WEB VIDEO 1 Introduction Creating physical prototypes

  7. An Environment for Creating Interactive Statistical Documents Samuel E. Buttrey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Deborah

    An Environment for Creating Interactive Statistical Documents Samuel E. Buttrey Deborah Nolan The spectacular growth and acceptance of the Web has made it a very attractive medium for interactive documents that is embedded within the reader's browser. In this presentation, we describe how we have created an environment

  8. Shelves in ePrints Soton Creating a shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Shelves in ePrints Soton Creating a shelf 1. Log into ePrints and select Manage Shelves towards top Shelf button to create further shelves. When you are ready to make your shelf publicly visible click shelves 1. In the depoit process, click on the Shelves button (prior to the Deposit button

  9. Creating a Job Search Plan UWM Alumni Career Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Creating a Job Search Plan UWM Alumni Career Services Cindy Petrites, Ph.D. www.alumni.uwm.edu #12;Agenda · Reasons for a job search plan · Job search essentials and how to prioritize · Keeping track of your job search · Creating a flexible job search plan #12;Reasons for a Job Search Plan Can help you

  10. Graphical Quantum Error-Correcting Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; C. H. Oh

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a purely graph-theoretical object, namely the coding clique, to construct quantum errorcorrecting codes. Almost all quantum codes constructed so far are stabilizer (additive) codes and the construction of nonadditive codes, which are potentially more efficient, is not as well understood as that of stabilizer codes. Our graphical approach provides a unified and classical way to construct both stabilizer and nonadditive codes. In particular we have explicitly constructed the optimal ((10,24,3)) code and a family of 1-error detecting nonadditive codes with the highest encoding rate so far. In the case of stabilizer codes a thorough search becomes tangible and we have classified all the extremal stabilizer codes up to 8 qubits.

  11. Output error identification of hydrogenerator conduit dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, M.A.; Wozniak, L. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Whittemore, T.R. (Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two output error model reference adaptive identifiers are considered for estimating the parameters in a reduced order gate position to pressure model for the hydrogenerator. This information may later be useful in an adaptive controller. Gradient and sensitivity functions identifiers are discussed for the hydroelectric application and connections are made between their structural differences and relative performance. Simulations are presented to support the conclusion that the latter algorithm is more robust, having better disturbance rejection and less plant model mismatch sensitivity. For identification from recorded plant data from step gate inputs, the other algorithm even fails to converge. A method for checking the estimated parameters is developed by relating the coefficients in the reduced order model to head, an externally measurable parameter.

  12. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  13. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . MCKETTA is an economist with the College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range Sciences, University of Idaho has been developed for determining the cost of Fire Management Inputs (FMls)-the direct frreline costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES

  14. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  15. Engagement of Academic Libraries and Information Science Schools in Creating Curriculum for Sustainability: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jankowska, Maria A.; Smith , Bonnie J.; Buehler, Marianne A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Libraries and Information Science Schools in CreatingLibraries and Information Science Schools in CreatingLibraries and Information Science Schools in Creating

  16. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance. 6 figs.

  17. Range gated strip proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range gated strip proximity sensor uses one set of sensor electronics and a distributed antenna or strip which extends along the perimeter to be sensed. A micro-power RF transmitter is coupled to the first end of the strip and transmits a sequence of RF pulses on the strip to produce a sensor field along the strip. A receiver is coupled to the second end of the strip, and generates a field reference signal in response to the sequence of pulse on the line combined with received electromagnetic energy from reflections in the field. The sensor signals comprise pulses of radio frequency signals having a duration of less than 10 nanoseconds, and a pulse repetition rate on the order of 1 to 10 MegaHertz or less. The duration of the radio frequency pulses is adjusted to control the range of the sensor. An RF detector feeds a filter capacitor in response to received pulses on the strip line to produce a field reference signal representing the average amplitude of the received pulses. When a received pulse is mixed with a received echo, the mixing causes a fluctuation in the amplitude of the field reference signal, providing a range-limited Doppler type signature of a field disturbance.

  18. Quantum root-mean-square error and measurement uncertainty relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Busch; Pekka Lahti; Reinhard F Werner

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have witnessed a controversy over Heisenberg's famous error-disturbance relation. Here we resolve the conflict by way of an analysis of the possible conceptualizations of measurement error and disturbance in quantum mechanics. We discuss two approaches to adapting the classic notion of root-mean-square error to quantum measurements. One is based on the concept of noise operator; its natural operational content is that of a mean deviation of the values of two observables measured jointly, and thus its applicability is limited to cases where such joint measurements are available. The second error measure quantifies the differences between two probability distributions obtained in separate runs of measurements and is of unrestricted applicability. We show that there are no nontrivial unconditional joint-measurement bounds for {\\em state-dependent} errors in the conceptual framework discussed here, while Heisenberg-type measurement uncertainty relations for {\\em state-independent} errors have been proven.

  19. Deterministic treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrassi, Alberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter describes a novel approach for the treatment of model error in geophysical data assimilation. In this method, model error is treated as a deterministic process fully correlated in time. This allows for the derivation of the evolution equations for the relevant moments of the model error statistics required in data assimilation procedures, along with an approximation suitable for application to large numerical models typical of environmental science. In this contribution we first derive the equations for the model error dynamics in the general case, and then for the particular situation of parametric error. We show how this deterministic description of the model error can be incorporated in sequential and variational data assimilation procedures. A numerical comparison with standard methods is given using low-order dynamical systems, prototypes of atmospheric circulation, and a realistic soil model. The deterministic approach proves to be very competitive with only minor additional computational c...

  20. A two reservoir model of quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. Clemens; Julio Gea-Banacloche

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a two reservoir model of quantum error correction with a hot bath causing errors in the qubits and a cold bath cooling the ancilla qubits to a fiducial state. We consider error correction protocols both with and without measurement of the ancilla state. The error correction acts as a kind of refrigeration process to maintain the data qubits in a low entropy state by periodically moving the entropy to the ancilla qubits and then to the cold reservoir. We quantify the performance of the error correction as a function of the reservoir temperatures and cooling rate by means of the fidelity and the residual entropy of the data qubits. We also make a comparison with the continuous quantum error correction model of Sarovar and Milburn [Phys. Rev. A 72 012306].

  1. Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  2. Particle-induced bit errors in high performance fiber optic data links for satellite data management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, P.W.; Carts, M.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States) SFA, Inc., Landover, MD (United States)); Dale, C.J. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)); LaBel, K.A. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental test methods and analysis tools are demonstrated to assess particle-induced bit errors on fiber optic link receivers for satellites. Susceptibility to direct ionization from low LET particles is quantified by analyzing proton and helium ion data as a function of particle LET. Existing single event analysis approaches are shown to apply, with appropriate modifications, to the regime of temporally (rather than spatially) distributed bits, even though the sensitivity to single events exceeds conventional memory technologies by orders of magnitude. The cross-section LET dependence follows a Weibull distribution at data rates from 200 to 1,000 Mbps and at various incident optical power levels. The LET threshold for errors is shown, through both experiment and modeling, to be 0 in all cases. The error cross-section exhibits a strong inverse dependence on received optical power in the LET range where most orbital single events would occur, thus indicating that errors can be minimized by operating links with higher incident optical power. Also, an analytic model is described which incorporates the appropriate physical characteristics of the link as well as the optical and receiver electrical characteristics. Results indicate appropriate steps to assure suitable link performance even in severe particle orbits.

  3. Trial application of a technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc., Oakton, VA (United States); Cooper, S.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States); Parry, G.W. [NUS, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new method for HRA, ATHEANA, has been developed based on a study of the operating history of serious accidents and an understanding of the reasons why people make errors. Previous publications associated with the project have dealt with the theoretical framework under which errors occur and the retrospective analysis of operational events. This is the first attempt to use ATHEANA in a prospective way, to select and evaluate human errors within the PSA context.

  4. Temperature-dependent errors in nuclear lattice simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee; Richard Thomson

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the temperature dependence of discretization errors in nuclear lattice simulations. We find that for systems with strong attractive interactions the predominant error arises from the breaking of Galilean invariance. We propose a local "well-tempered" lattice action which eliminates much of this error. The well-tempered action can be readily implemented in lattice simulations for nuclear systems as well as cold atomic Fermi systems.

  5. A surrogate-based uncertainty quantification with quantifiable errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bang, Y.; Abdel-Khalik, H. S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surrogate models are often employed to reduce the computational cost required to complete uncertainty quantification, where one is interested in propagating input parameters uncertainties throughout a complex engineering model to estimate responses uncertainties. An improved surrogate construction approach is introduced here which places a premium on reducing the associated computational cost. Unlike existing methods where the surrogate is constructed first, then employed to propagate uncertainties, the new approach combines both sensitivity and uncertainty information to render further reduction in the computational cost. Mathematically, the reduction is described by a range finding algorithm that identifies a subspace in the parameters space, whereby parameters uncertainties orthogonal to the subspace contribute negligible amount to the propagated uncertainties. Moreover, the error resulting from the reduction can be upper-bounded. The new approach is demonstrated using a realistic nuclear assembly model and compared to existing methods in terms of computational cost and accuracy of uncertainties. Although we believe the algorithm is general, it will be applied here for linear-based surrogates and Gaussian parameters uncertainties. The generalization to nonlinear models will be detailed in a separate article. (authors)

  6. Error estimates for the Euler discretization of an optimal control ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph Frédéric Bonnans

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 10, 2014 ... Abstract: We study the error introduced in the solution of an optimal control problem with first order state constraints, for which the trajectories ...

  7. Cosmic Ray Spectral Deformation Caused by Energy Determination Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Carlson; Conny Wannemark

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Using simulation methods, distortion effects on energy spectra caused by errors in the energy determination have been investigated. For cosmic ray proton spectra, falling steeply with kinetic energy E as E-2.7, significant effects appear. When magnetic spectrometers are used to determine the energy, the relative error increases linearly with the energy and distortions with a sinusoidal form appear starting at an energy that depends significantly on the error distribution but at an energy lower than that corresponding to the Maximum Detectable Rigidity of the spectrometer. The effect should be taken into consideration when comparing data from different experiments, often having different error distributions.

  8. Optimized Learning with Bounded Error for Feedforward Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggiore, Manfredi

    Optimized Learning with Bounded Error for Feedforward Neural Networks A. Alessandri, M. Sanguineti-based learnings. A. Alessandri is with the Naval Automatio

  9. New Fractional Error Bounds for Polynomial Systems with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Our major result extends the existing error bounds from the system involving only a ... linear complementarity systems with polynomial data as well as high-order ...

  10. Identification of toroidal field errors in a modified betatron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loschialpo, P. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)); Marsh, S.J. (SFA Inc., Landover, Maryland 20785 (United States)); Len, L.K.; Smith, T. (FM Technologies Inc., 10529-B Braddock Road, Fairfax, Virginia 22032 (United States)); Kapetanakos, C.A. (Beam Physics Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A newly developed probe, having a 0.05% resolution, has been used to detect errors in the toroidal magnetic field of the NRL modified betatron accelerator. Measurements indicate that the radial field components (errors) are 0.1%--1% of the applied toroidal field. Such errors, in the typically 5 kG toroidal field, can excite resonances which drive the beam to the wall. Two sources of detected field errors are discussed. The first is due to the discrete nature of the 12 single turn coils which generate the toroidal field. Both measurements and computer calculations indicate that its amplitude varies from 0% to 0.2% as a function of radius. Displacement of the outer leg of one of the toroidal field coils by a few millimeters has a significant effect on the amplitude of this field error. Because of uniform toroidal periodicity of these coils this error is a good suspect for causing the excitation of the damaging [ital l]=12 resonance seen in our experiments. The other source of field error is due to the current feed gaps in the vertical magnetic field coils. A magnetic field is induced inside the vertical field coils' conductor in the opposite direction of the applied toroidal field. Fringe fields at the gaps lead to additional field errors which have been measured as large as 1.0%. This source of field error, which exists at five toroidal locations around the modified betatron, can excite several integer resonances, including the [ital l]=12 mode.

  11. Investigation of Created Fracture Geometry through Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ibraheem 1987-

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful development of shale gas reservoirs is highly dependent on hydraulic fracture treatments. Many questions remain in regards to the geometry of the created fractures. Production data analysis from some shale gas wells quantifies a much...

  12. DOE's "Creating a Star on Earth" video highlights PPPL's magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE's "Creating a Star on Earth" video highlights PPPL's magnetic fusion research March 5, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A screenshot from the U.S. Department...

  13. Dissertation Checklist Coversheet Created June 2014 Student Name: Student ID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Dissertation Checklist Coversheet Created June 2014 Student Name: Student ID: Program: Supervisor's Name: Dissertation Defence Checklist Coversheet Office of Graduate Programs (OGP) University supervisory committee member has read the dissertation and agreed that it is examinable. Completed GR364

  14. A Systematic Approach to Creating and Maintaining Software Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, James C.

    and SODOS integrated database management systems with the software documentation associatedUVA A Systematic Approach to Creating and Maintaining Software Documentation Allison L. Powell CODE INTERFACE BROWSING INTERFACE STATUS FUTURE PLANS WHY SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION AS AN APPLICATION AREA

  15. Creating value from uncertainty : a study of ocean transportation contracting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pálsson, Sigurjón

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How can financial tools like real options and hedging mitigate and create value from uncertainty in transportation? This paper describes these concepts and identifies research on them that has relevance to transportation. ...

  16. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy: Creating Biofuels from Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from North Caddo Magnet High School in Vivian, LA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  17. Structural Rearrangement in Ebola Virus Protein VP40 Creates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Rearrangement in Ebola Virus Protein VP40 Creates Multiple Functions Monday, March 31, 2014 Figure 1. Three structures of VP40. Top, a butterfly-shaped dimer structure...

  18. Laboratory-scale fracture conductivity created by acid etching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pournik, Maysam

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Success of acid fracturing treatment depends greatly on the created conductivity under closure stress. In order to have sufficient conductivity, the fracture face must be non-uniformly etched while the fracture strength maintained to withstand...

  19. FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER Creating Energy Independence Since 1975

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER Creating Energy Independence Since 1975 A Research Institute at temperatures as low as -40°C Employ gas permeable matrices for the pigment encapsulation that make them

  20. Systems Portfolio Guide A Resource For Creating Your Systems Portfolio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    Systems Portfolio Guide A Resource For Creating Your Systems Portfolio Academic Quality Improvement Program Contents The Systems Portfolio........................................................................................................... 9 Using the Systems Portfolio to document the Criteria for Accreditation

  1. Homological Error Correction: Classical and Quantum Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Bombin; M. A. Martin-Delgado

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove several theorems characterizing the existence of homological error correction codes both classically and quantumly. Not every classical code is homological, but we find a family of classical homological codes saturating the Hamming bound. In the quantum case, we show that for non-orientable surfaces it is impossible to construct homological codes based on qudits of dimension $D>2$, while for orientable surfaces with boundaries it is possible to construct them for arbitrary dimension $D$. We give a method to obtain planar homological codes based on the construction of quantum codes on compact surfaces without boundaries. We show how the original Shor's 9-qubit code can be visualized as a homological quantum code. We study the problem of constructing quantum codes with optimal encoding rate. In the particular case of toric codes we construct an optimal family and give an explicit proof of its optimality. For homological quantum codes on surfaces of arbitrary genus we also construct a family of codes asymptotically attaining the maximum possible encoding rate. We provide the tools of homology group theory for graphs embedded on surfaces in a self-contained manner.

  2. A technique for human error analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, S.E.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; Wreathall, J.; Parry, G.W. [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has become an important tool in the nuclear power industry, both for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the operating utilities. Human reliability analysis (HRA) is a critical element of PRA; however, limitations in the analysis of human actions in PRAs have long been recognized as a constraint when using PRA. A multidisciplinary HRA framework has been developed with the objective of providing a structured approach for analyzing operating experience and understanding nuclear plant safety, human error, and the underlying factors that affect them. The concepts of the framework have matured into a rudimentary working HRA method. A trial application of the method has demonstrated that it is possible to identify potentially significant human failure events from actual operating experience which are not generally included in current PRAs, as well as to identify associated performance shaping factors and plant conditions that have an observable impact on the frequency of core damage. A general process was developed, albeit in preliminary form, that addresses the iterative steps of defining human failure events and estimating their probabilities using search schemes. Additionally, a knowledge- base was developed which describes the links between performance shaping factors and resulting unsafe actions.

  3. Extended-range tiltable micromirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Wiens, Gloria J. (Newberry, FL); Bronson, Jessica R. (Gainesville, FL)

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiltable micromirror device is disclosed in which a micromirror is suspended by a progressive linkage with an electrostatic actuator (e.g. a vertical comb actuator or a capacitive plate electrostatic actuator) being located beneath the micromirror. The progressive linkage includes a pair of torsion springs which are connected together to operate similar to a four-bar linkage with spring joints. The progressive linkage provides a non-linear spring constant which can allow the micromirror to be tilted at any angle within its range substantially free from any electrostatic instability or hysteretic behavior.

  4. Range Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange Fuels

  5. Creating believabilty and the effects of technology on compositing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Brandi Jannine

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    CREATING BELIEVABILITY AND THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON COMPOSITING A Thesis by BRANDI JANNINE DUNN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Visualization Sciences CREATING BELIEVABILITY AND THE EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGY ON COMPOSITING A Thesis by BRANDI JANNINE DUNN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  6. A numerical study of geometry dependent errors in velocity, temperature, and density measurements from single grid planar retarding potential analyzers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R. L.; Earle, G. D.; Heelis, R. A. [William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Road, WT15, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Klenzing, J. H. [Space Weather Laboratory/Code 674, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) have been utilized numerous times on high profile missions such as the Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program to measure plasma composition, temperature, density, and the velocity component perpendicular to the plane of the instrument aperture. These instruments use biased grids to approximate ideal biased planes. These grids introduce perturbations in the electric potential distribution inside the instrument and when unaccounted for cause errors in the measured plasma parameters. Traditionally, the grids utilized in RPAs have been made of fine wires woven into a mesh. Previous studies on the errors caused by grids in RPAs have approximated woven grids with a truly flat grid. Using a commercial ion optics software package, errors in inferred parameters caused by both woven and flat grids are examined. A flat grid geometry shows the smallest temperature and density errors, while the double thick flat grid displays minimal errors for velocities over the temperature and velocity range used. Wire thickness along the dominant flow direction is found to be a critical design parameter in regard to errors in all three inferred plasma parameters. The results shown for each case provide valuable design guidelines for future RPA development.

  7. Rapid world modeling: Fitting range data to geometric primitives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddema, J.; Little, C.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past seven years, Sandia National Laboratories has been active in the development of robotic systems to help remediate DOE`s waste sites and decommissioned facilities. Some of these facilities have high levels of radioactivity which prevent manual clean-up. Tele-operated and autonomous robotic systems have been envisioned as the only suitable means of removing the radioactive elements. World modeling is defined as the process of creating a numerical geometric model of a real world environment or workspace. This model is often used in robotics to plan robot motions which perform a task while avoiding obstacles. In many applications where the world model does not exist ahead of time, structured lighting, laser range finders, and even acoustical sensors have been used to create three dimensional maps of the environment. These maps consist of thousands of range points which are difficult to handle and interpret. This paper presents a least squares technique for fitting range data to planar and quadric surfaces, including cylinders and ellipsoids. Once fit to these primitive surfaces, the amount of data associated with a surface is greatly reduced up to three orders of magnitude, thus allowing for more rapid handling and analysis of world data.

  8. A Method for Creating anA Method for Creating an Ecological Site Extent MapEcological Site Extent Map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this example, we are interested inIn this example, we are interested in ecological site IDecological site ID R create a personal geodatabasegeodatabase inin ArcCatalogArcCatalog toto store the merged spatial data

  9. Error-Induced Beam Degradation in Fermilab's Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Phil S.; /Rochester U.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Part I, three independent models of Fermilab's Booster synchrotron are presented. All three models are constructed to investigate and explore the effects of unavoidable machine errors on a proton beam under the influence of space-charge effects. The first is a stochastic noise model. Electric current fluctuations arising from power supplies are ubiquitous and unavoidable and are a source of instabilities in accelerators of all types. A new noise module for generating the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (O-U) stochastic noise is first created and incorporated into the existing Object-oriented Ring Beam Injection and Tracking (ORBIT-FNAL) package. After being convinced with a preliminary model that the noise, particularly non-white noise, does matter to beam quality, we proceeded to measure directly current ripples and common-mode voltages from all four Gradient Magnet Power Supplies (GMPS). Then, the current signals are Fourier-analyzed. Based upon the power spectra of current signals, we tune up the Ornstein-Uhlnbeck noise model. As a result, we are able to closely match the frequency spectra between current measurements and the modeled O-U stochastic noise. The stochastic noise modeled upon measurements is applied to the Booster beam in the presence of the full space-charge effects. This noise model, accompanied by a suite of beam diagnostic calculations, manifests that the stochastic noise, impinging upon the beam and coupled to the space-charge effects, can substantially enhance the beam degradation process throughout the injection period. The second model is a magnet misalignment model. It is the first time to utilize the latest beamline survey data for building a magnet-by-magnet misalignment model. Given as-found survey fiducial coordinates, we calculate all types of magnet alignment errors (station error, pitch, yaw, roll, twists, etc.) are implemented in the model. We then follow up with statistical analysis to understand how each type of alignment errors are currently distributed around the Booster ring. The ORBIT-FNAL simulations with space charge included show that rolled magnets, in particular, have substantial effects on the Booster beam. This survey-data-based misalignment model can predict how much improvement in machine performance can be achieved if prioritized or selected realignment work is done. In other words, this model can help us investigate different realignment scenarios for the Booster. In addition, by calculating average angular kicks from all misaligned magnets, we expect this misalignment model to serve as guidelines for resetting the strengths of corrector magnets. The third model for the Booster is a time-structured multi-turn injection model. Microbunch-injection scenarios with different time structures are explored in the presence of longitudinal space-charge force. Due to the radio-frequency (RF) bucket mismatch between the Booster and the 400-MeV transferline, RF-phase offsets can be parasitically introduced during the injection process. Using the microbunch multiturn injection, we carry out ESME-ORBIT-combined simulations. This combined simulation allows us to investigate realistic charge-density distribution under full space-charge effects. The growth rates of transverse emittances turned out to be 20 % in both planes. This microbunch-injection scenarios is also applicable to the future 8-GeV Superconducting Linac Proton Driver and the upgraded Main Injector at Fermilab. In Part II, the feasibility of momentum-stacking method of proton beams is investigated. When the Run2 collider program at Fermilab comes to an end around year 2009, the present antiproton source can be available for other purposes. One possible application is to convert the antiproton accumulator to a proton accumulator, so that the beam power from the Main Injector could be enhanced by a factor of four. Through adiabatic processes and optimized parameters of synchrotron motion, we demonstrate with an aid of the ESME code that up to four proton batches can be stacked in the momentum acceptance available for the Accumulator ri

  10. ERROR VISUALIZATION FOR TANDEM ACOUSTIC MODELING ON THE AURORA TASK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    ERROR VISUALIZATION FOR TANDEM ACOUSTIC MODELING ON THE AURORA TASK Manuel J. Reyes. This structure reduces the error rate on the Aurora 2 noisy English digits task by more than 50% compared development of tandem systems showed an improvement in the performance on the Aurora task [2] of these systems

  11. Numerical Construction of Likelihood Distributions and the Propagation of Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Swain; L. Taylor

    1997-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard method for the propagation of errors, based on a Taylor series expansion, is approximate and frequently inadequate for realistic problems. A simple and generic technique is described in which the likelihood is constructed numerically, thereby greatly facilitating the propagation of errors.

  12. Calibration and Error in Placental Molecular Clocks: A Conservative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadly, Elizabeth

    Calibration and Error in Placental Molecular Clocks: A Conservative Approach Using for calibrating both mitogenomic and nucleogenomic placental timescales. We applied these reestimates to the most calibration error may inflate the power of the molecular clock when testing the time of ordinal

  13. Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Zhaojun

    gradient method or Generalized Minimum RESidual (GMRES) method, is how to choose the residual tolerance for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models the correspondence between the residual error in the preconditioned linear system and the solution error. Using

  14. PROPAGATION OF ERRORS IN SPATIAL ANALYSIS Peter P. Siska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    , the conversion of data from analog to digital form used to be an extremely time-consuming process. At present process then the resulting error is inflated up to 20 percent for each grid cell of the final map. The magnitude of errors naturally increases with an addition of every new layer entering the overlay process

  15. Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu# *Center for Assessment & Monitoring Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3110 gong@nature.berkeley.edu mulan, accessibility, and timeliness as recorded in the lineage data (Chen and Gong, 1998). Spatial error refers

  16. Mutual information, bit error rate and security in Wójcik's scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhanjun Zhang

    2004-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the correct calculations of the mutual information of the whole transmission, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) are presented. Mistakes of the general conclusions relative to the mutual information, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) and the security in W\\'{o}jcik's paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 90}, 157901(2003)] have been pointed out.

  17. Uniform and optimal error estimates of an exponential wave ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the error propagation, cut-off of the nonlinearity, and the energy method. ...... gives Lemma 3.4 for the local truncation error, which is of spectral order in ... estimates, we adopt a strategy similar to the finite difference method [4] (cf. diagram.

  18. Quasi-sparse eigenvector diagonalization and stochastic error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    2000-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review the diagonalization of quantum Hamiltonians using the quasi-sparse eigenvector (QSE) method. We also introduce the technique of stochastic error correction, which systematically removes the truncation error of the QSE result by stochastically sampling the contribution of the remaining basis states.

  19. Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    Mining API Error-Handling Specifications from Source Code Mithun Acharya and Tao Xie Department it difficult to mine error-handling specifications through manual inspection of source code. In this paper, we, without any user in- put. In our framework, we adapt a trace generation technique to distinguish

  20. Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits A Dissertation Presented David Reed All rights reserved. #12;Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting is to use superconducting quantum bits in the circuit quantum electro- dynamics (cQED) architecture. There

  1. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 223 A Geometric Approach to Error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    may not even exist. For this reason we investigate error detection and recovery (EDR) strategies. We may not even exist. For this reason we investigate error detection and recovery (EDR ) strategies. We and implementational questions remain. The second contribution is a formal, geometric approach to EDR. While EDR

  2. Upper bounds on the error probabilities and asymptotic error exponents in quantum multiple state discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audenaert, Koenraad M. R., E-mail: koenraad.audenaert@rhul.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, S9, Krijgslaan 281, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Mosonyi, Milán, E-mail: milan.mosonyi@gmail.com [Física Teňrica: Informació i Fenomens Quŕntics, Universitat Autňnoma de Barcelona, ES-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Mathematical Institute, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Egry József u 1., Budapest 1111 (Hungary)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the multiple hypothesis testing problem for symmetric quantum state discrimination between r given states ?{sub 1}, …, ?{sub r}. By splitting up the overall test into multiple binary tests in various ways we obtain a number of upper bounds on the optimal error probability in terms of the binary error probabilities. These upper bounds allow us to deduce various bounds on the asymptotic error rate, for which it has been hypothesized that it is given by the multi-hypothesis quantum Chernoff bound (or Chernoff divergence) C(?{sub 1}, …, ?{sub r}), as recently introduced by Nussbaum and Szko?a in analogy with Salikhov's classical multi-hypothesis Chernoff bound. This quantity is defined as the minimum of the pairwise binary Chernoff divergences min{sub j

  3. An Efficient Approach towards Mitigating Soft Errors Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadi, Muhammad Sheikh; Uddin, Md Nazim; Jürjens, Jan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smaller feature size, higher clock frequency and lower power consumption are of core concerns of today's nano-technology, which has been resulted by continuous downscaling of CMOS technologies. The resultant 'device shrinking' reduces the soft error tolerance of the VLSI circuits, as very little energy is needed to change their states. Safety critical systems are very sensitive to soft errors. A bit flip due to soft error can change the value of critical variable and consequently the system control flow can completely be changed which leads to system failure. To minimize soft error risks, a novel methodology is proposed to detect and recover from soft errors considering only 'critical code blocks' and 'critical variables' rather than considering all variables and/or blocks in the whole program. The proposed method shortens space and time overhead in comparison to existing dominant approaches.

  4. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bel; C. P. Connaughton; M. Toots; M. M. Bandi

    2015-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  5. Grid-scale Fluctuations and Forecast Error in Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bel, G; Toots, M; Bandi, M M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations in wind power entering an electrical grid (Irish grid) were analyzed and found to exhibit correlated fluctuations with a self-similar structure, a signature of large-scale correlations in atmospheric turbulence. The statistical structure of temporal correlations for fluctuations in generated and forecast time series was used to quantify two types of forecast error: a timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) that quantifies the deviations between the high frequency components of the forecast and the generated time series, and a scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$) that quantifies the degree to which the models fail to predict temporal correlations in the fluctuations of the generated power. With no $a$ $priori$ knowledge of the forecast models, we suggest a simple memory kernel that reduces both the timescale error ($e_{\\tau}$) and the scaling error ($e_{\\zeta}$).

  6. Wide-range voltage modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rust, K.R.; Wilson, J.M.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Superconducting Super Collider`s Medium Energy Booster Abort (MEBA) kicker modulator will supply a current pulse to the abort magnets which deflect the proton beam from the MEB ring into a designated beam stop. The abort kicker will be used extensively during testing of the Low Energy Booster (LEB) and the MEB rings. When the Collider is in full operation, the MEBA kicker modulator will abort the MEB beam in the event of a malfunction during the filling process. The modulator must generate a 14-{mu}s wide pulse with a rise time of less than 1 {mu}s, including the delay and jitter times. It must also be able to deliver a current pulse to the magnet proportional to the beam energy at any time during ramp-up of the accelerator. Tracking the beam energy, which increases from 12 GeV at injection to 200 GeV at extraction, requires the modulator to operate over a wide range of voltages (4 kV to 80 kV). A vacuum spark gap and a thyratron have been chosen for test and evaluation as candidate switches for the abort modulator. Modulator design, switching time delay, jitter and pre-fire data are presented.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Creating a Topography at a Surface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, David P. (Albuquerque, NM); Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); Mayer, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Vasile, Michael J. (Albuquerque, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus whereby an optical interferometer is utilized to monitor and provide feedback control to an integrated energetic particle column, to create desired topographies, including the depth, shape and/or roughness of features, at a surface of a specimen. Energetic particle columns can direct energetic species including, ions, photons and/or neutral particles to a surface to create features having in-plane dimensions on the order of 1 micron, and a height or depth on the order of 1 nanometer. Energetic processes can include subtractive processes such as sputtering, ablation, focused ion beam milling and, additive processes, such as energetic beam induced chemical vapor deposition. The integration of interferometric methods with processing by energetic species offers the ability to create desired topographies at surfaces, including planar and curved shapes.

  8. Creating the Future of Solar Energy, Today | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copyin SaltCreatingCreating

  9. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  10. Spot Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Treatment Planning Technique and Analysis of Consequences of Rotational and Translational Alignment Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Jeff, E-mail: jmeye3@utsouthwestern.ed [University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Amos, Richard [University of Texas-M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conventional proton therapy with passively scattered beams is used to treat a number of tumor sites, including prostate cancer. Spot scanning proton therapy is a treatment delivery means that improves conformal coverage of the clinical target volume (CTV). Placement of individual spots within a target is dependent on traversed tissue density. Errors in patient alignment perturb dose distributions. Moreover, there is a need for a rational planning approach that can mitigate the dosimetric effect of random alignment errors. We propose a treatment planning approach and then analyze the consequences of various simulated alignment errors on prostate treatments. Methods and Materials: Ten control patients with localized prostate cancer underwent treatment planning for spot scanning proton therapy. After delineation of the clinical target volume, a scanning target volume (STV) was created to guide dose coverage. Errors in patient alignment in two axes (rotational and yaw) as well as translational errors in the anteroposterior direction were then simulated, and dose to the CTV and normal tissues were reanalyzed. Results: Coverage of the CTV remained high even in the setting of extreme rotational and yaw misalignments. Changes in the rectum and bladder V45 and V70 were similarly minimal, except in the case of translational errors, where, as a result of opposed lateral beam arrangements, much larger dosimetric perturbations were observed. Conclusions: The concept of the STV as applied to spot scanning radiation therapy and as presented in this report leads to robust coverage of the CTV even in the setting of extreme patient misalignments.

  11. Error-eliminating rapid ultrasonic firing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, J.; Koren, Y.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for producing reliable navigation data for a mobile vehicle, such as a robot, combines multiple range samples to increase the confidence'' of the algorithm in the existence of an obstacle. At higher vehicle speed, it is crucial to sample each sensor quickly and repeatedly to gather multiple samples in time to avoid a collision. Erroneous data is rejected by delaying the issuance of an ultrasonic energy pulse by a predetermined wait-period, which may be different during alternate ultrasonic firing cycles. Consecutive readings are compared, and the corresponding data is rejected if the readings differ by more than a predetermined amount. The rejection rate for the data is monitored and the operating speed of the navigation system is reduced if the data rejection rate is increased. This is useful to distinguish and eliminate noise from the data which truly represents the existence of an article in the field of operation of the vehicle.

  12. Error-eliminating rapid ultrasonic firing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann (Ann Arbor, MI); Koren, Yoram (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for producing reliable navigation data for a mobile vehicle, such as a robot, combines multiple range samples to increase the "confidence" of the algorithm in the existence of an obstacle. At higher vehicle speed, it is crucial to sample each sensor quickly and repeatedly to gather multiple samples in time to avoid a collision. Erroneous data is rejected by delaying the issuance of an ultrasonic energy pulse by a predetermined wait-period, which may be different during alternate ultrasonic firing cycles. Consecutive readings are compared, and the corresponding data is rejected if the readings differ by more than a predetermined amount. The rejection rate for the data is monitored and the operating speed of the navigation system is reduced if the data rejection rate is increased. This is useful to distinguish and eliminate noise from the data which truly represents the existence of an article in the field of operation of the vehicle.

  13. Wind Power Forecasting Error Distributions: An International Comparison; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Sillanpaa, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Scharff, R.; Soder, L.; Larsen, X. G.; Giebel, G.; Flynn, D.; Dobschinski, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power forecasting is expected to be an important enabler for greater penetration of wind power into electricity systems. Because no wind forecasting system is perfect, a thorough understanding of the errors that do occur can be critical to system operation functions, such as the setting of operating reserve levels. This paper provides an international comparison of the distribution of wind power forecasting errors from operational systems, based on real forecast data. The paper concludes with an assessment of similarities and differences between the errors observed in different locations.

  14. Universal Framework for Quantum Error-Correcting Codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Li; Li-Juan Xing

    2009-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a universal framework for quantum error-correcting codes, i.e., the one that applies for the most general quantum error-correcting codes. This framework is established on the group algebra, an algebraic notation for the nice error bases of quantum systems. The nicest thing about this framework is that we can characterize the properties of quantum codes by the properties of the group algebra. We show how it characterizes the properties of quantum codes as well as generates some new results about quantum codes.

  15. Creating Youth Friendly Health Services in Serbia and Bosnia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    Creating Youth Friendly Health Services in Serbia and Bosnia Fran Perkins, Charlotte Lombardo & Bosnia in May 08 Finding system to provide ongoing training Jazas in Serbia Government in Bosnia #12 of Belgrade New 5th year course in Adolescent Medicine at University of Novi Sad with textbook Bosnia Review

  16. Computer software engineers design, create, and modify computer applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer software engineers design, create, and modify computer applications. Computer Software Engineers (0*NET 15-1031.00, 15-1032.00) Significant Points Computer software engineers are projected are expected for college graduates with at least a bachelor's degree in computer engineering or computer

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE PROPOSAL TO CREATE DISTRICTS WITHIN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.1Environmental Assessment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2.2Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.0 ENVIRONMENTAL AND BIOLOGICAL IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Atka Mackerel Biology

  18. Suffolk Woodfuel Cluster Creating a sustainable woodfuel market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suffolk Woodfuel Cluster Creating a sustainable woodfuel market objectives In support chip size, moisture content and logistics. · To provide marketing support to woodfuel companies and to replace oil- fired boilers with wood burning alternatives is now running at 2-3 a day. · The sharing

  19. ENGINEERS DON'T JUST USE TECHNOLOGY WE CREATE IT!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    #12;ENGINEERS DON'T JUST USE TECHNOLOGY WE CREATE IT! Engineers design, build and change our 21st, communications technologies, sensing and defense--engineers shape our world in ways few others do. VISIT US of the nearly 90 options available to UConn undergraduates. Eleven engineering-specific minors include

  20. Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

  1. CREATING A SOLAR CITY Determining the Potential of Solar Rooftop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    CREATING A SOLAR CITY Determining the Potential of Solar Rooftop Systems in the City of Newark and Environmental Policy University of Delaware August 2009 #12;The Center for Energy and Environmental Policy, environmental, and sustainable development policy. The Center serves as a University-wide forum

  2. Faculty Senate Bill to Create a Faculty Personnel Policies Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    with the Vice President of Academic Affairs, will propose a slate of committee members with one representative from each participating division. The ad hoc selection committee shall create a slate that is diverse in regard to the members' status (for example, relating to academic rank and tenure). This slate

  3. Credibility Factors in Professional Journalists' Versus User-Created Blogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drinkwater, Kaitlyn S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    in this new medium to do a manifest content analysis of blogs. The findings of these factors may be used more in user-generated (a generic term for online content created by regular people) blogs than those maintained by professional journalists. This may...

  4. Creating an intelligent agent for StarCraft: Brood War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    Creating an intelligent agent for StarCraft: Brood War University of Ličge Faculty of Applied artificialintelligence (AI)? Video games Why real-time strategy (RTS) games? Introduction #12;StarCraft: Brood War a patrol unit #12;Implementation Chapter III #12;StarCraft is not open source! The Brood War Application

  5. Together we'll create your future Electronic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    : Professor Alan Purvis CES (Centre for Electronic Systems) School of Engineering Durham University Science now and potentially in the future. Ultrasonics Centre for Electronic Systems School of EngineeringTogether we'll create your future Centre for Electronic Systems Research Opportunities Contact

  6. A Systematic Approach to Creating and Maintaining Software Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, James C.

    & Williamson) ­ Both DIF and SODOS integrated database management systems with the software documentationUVA A Systematic Approach to Creating and Maintaining Software Documentation Allison L. Powell SOURCE CODE INTERFACE BROWSING INTERFACE STATUS FUTURE PLANS WHY SOFTWARE DOCUMENTATION AS AN APPLICATION

  7. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  8. Peer Mentor & Protg Created by: Sara Xayarath Hernandez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipson, Michal

    Peer Mentor & Protégé Handbook Created by: Sara Xayarath Hernandez Director of Diversity Programs and guidance of the more experienced students serving as peer mentors. Benefits to the peer mentors include of their peers while experiencing professional development themselves. In CU EMPower, the peer mentors

  9. Creating Robust Roadmaps for Motion Planning in Changing Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    Creating Robust Roadmaps for Motion Planning in Changing Environments Jur P. van den Berg1 Dennis-- In this paper we introduce a method based on the Probabilistic Roadmap (PRM) Planner to construct robust roadmaps for motion planning in changing environments. PRM's are usually aimed at static environments

  10. Health Care Reform Challenge: Creating a High Performance Healthcare System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Health Care Reform Challenge: Creating a High Performance Healthcare System Tom Simmer, MD Chief;The Challenge of Reform: Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) · ACO's are provider organizations health care delivery Organized Systems of Care Population focus for primary care physicians, hospitals

  11. Date Created: March 2008 Date Amended: March 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    Date Created: March 2008 Date Amended: March 2009 DYSLEXIA POLICY.doc- 1 - DYSLEXIA POLICY 1 (both written and spoken) reading, memory and organisation associated with the terms dyslexia, dyspraxia this document the term `dyslexia' will be used in a comprehensive way to refer to all of the above. The College

  12. ISI Web of KnowledgeSM : Creating Alerts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    ISI Web of KnowledgeSM : Creating Alerts http://isiknowledge.com/ The alerting capacity in ISI Web text · HTML · ISI ResearchSoft (for import into EndNote) · Field Tagged (for import into RefWorks) #12

  13. Creating an Order in Distributed Digital Libraries by Integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauber,Andreas

    Creating an Order in Distributed Digital Libraries by Integrating Independent Self­Organizing Maps/188, A--1040 Wien, Austria fandi, dieterg@ifs.tuwien.ac.at Abstract Digital document libraries information. In this paper we describe an approach for organizing dis­ tributed digital libraries based

  14. Job Description Library Create a New Job Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    UBC eRecruit Job Description Library #12;Page 4 Create a New Job Description Navigation: Job Description Library>Add/Edit/Copy Job Descriptions Step 1: Use this page to enter preliminary Job Description, Location: Enter the codes associated with the department. Employment Group, Job Family, Job Code/Classification

  15. A Method for Creating Collaborative Mobile Learning Trails Kevin Walker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or exhibit of interest. Introduction This research explores the use of mobile technology to create project; · the Mobile Learning in Informal Science Settings project; · the Philosophy of Technology hypotheses? · How does the use of web-linked mobile technology change the process of the above activities

  16. (STEM) fields and supports Raytheon's efforts to create an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    (STEM) fields and supports Raytheon's efforts to create an inclusive work force. "Raytheon to these disciplines," said Mike Keebaugh '67 Math '71g, Comp Sci, president for Raytheon's Intelligence Equity, particularly of our students. Office of the Vice Provost for Educational Equity The Raytheon

  17. please recycle. Creating Leaders of Consequence for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    on the other. In short: We need environmental managers who know business, law, public policy and/or engineeringplease recycle. Creating Leaders of Consequence for a Sustainable Future Hybrid Environmental Professional Program Providing financial aid for dual degree students Today's environmental leaders need a foot

  18. 1. Create your AUDIENCE RESPONSE (rwpoll account ) on your laptop.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1. Create your AUDIENCE RESPONSE (rwpoll account ) on your laptop. Follow these steps so your the Device ID to complete step 2 of the Audience Response registration! By clicking Continue, you. This will allow your account to automatically sync with the MCW participant list for Audience Response Sessions

  19. Using Shelves Creating Shelves in CaltechAUTHORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Christof

    Using Shelves Creating Shelves in CaltechAUTHORS Login to CaltechAUTHORS using your IMSS credentials. Click on "Manage Shelves" in the gray bar at the top of your screen. Click on "New Shelf of the Shelf in the Description field. Save your changes. To manage access for your shelves, go to the Manage

  20. Lab1 Creating a grid 1 GIS Laboratory Exercises

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    _________________________________________________________________________________ TASK: To create, by hand, an analog gridded database from a base map. LEARNING OBJECTIVES: · understand IN CLASSROOM: · Copies of a base map of the campus · Blank transparencies with a 2cm or 1/4" grid · One grid, one base map and one or more pens and is

  1. Page 1 of 2 Document created: May 20, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /computer monitors, mirrors, polished metal surfaces) Keep your laser pointer off while you are talking, especially as a toy #12;Page 2 of 2 Document created: May 20, 2014 What does a proper label look like? A sample FDA-compliant label and other information that will be seen on laser pointers properly classified and labeled as 3R

  2. SU-E-T-51: Bayesian Network Models for Radiotherapy Error Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalet, A; Phillips, M; Gennari, J [UniversityWashington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a probabilistic model of radiotherapy plans using Bayesian networks that will detect potential errors in radiation delivery. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with medical physicists and other domain experts were employed to generate a set of layered nodes and arcs forming a Bayesian Network (BN) which encapsulates relevant radiotherapy concepts and their associated interdependencies. Concepts in the final network were limited to those whose parameters are represented in the institutional database at a level significant enough to develop mathematical distributions. The concept-relation knowledge base was constructed using the Web Ontology Language (OWL) and translated into Hugin Expert Bayes Network files via the the RHugin package in the R statistical programming language. A subset of de-identified data derived from a Mosaiq relational database representing 1937 unique prescription cases was processed and pre-screened for errors and then used by the Hugin implementation of the Estimation-Maximization (EM) algorithm for machine learning all parameter distributions. Individual networks were generated for each of several commonly treated anatomic regions identified by ICD-9 neoplasm categories including lung, brain, lymphoma, and female breast. Results: The resulting Bayesian networks represent a large part of the probabilistic knowledge inherent in treatment planning. By populating the networks entirely with data captured from a clinical oncology information management system over the course of several years of normal practice, we were able to create accurate probability tables with no additional time spent by experts or clinicians. These probabilistic descriptions of the treatment planning allow one to check if a treatment plan is within the normal scope of practice, given some initial set of clinical evidence and thereby detect for potential outliers to be flagged for further investigation. Conclusion: The networks developed here support the use of probabilistic models into clinical chart checking for improved detection of potential errors in RT plans.

  3. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimm, Lars J., E-mail: Lars.grimm@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)] [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  4. Please report errors and omissions to: max-80@d30.info PDF document created by John Ray -02/08/2008 -V1R0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    including 1BE.IBisync, SDLC, HDLC, CCITT-X.25 ar.d others. Automatic CRC qeneratiodckecking, sync character

  5. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wise, William L. (Mountain View, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, .DELTA.S.sub.R, on a continuous real-time basis for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error .gtoreq..DELTA.S.sub.R, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than .DELTA.S.sub.R, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  6. A Posteriori Error Estimation for - Department of Mathematics ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuhao Cao supervised under Professor Zhiqiang Cai

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 19, 2013 ... the “correct” Hilbert space the true flux µ?1?×u lies in, to recover a ...... The error heat map shows that ZZ-patch recovery estimator leads.

  7. Quantum error correcting codes based on privacy amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhicheng Luo

    2008-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Calderbank-Shor-Steane (CSS) quantum error-correcting codes are based on pairs of classical codes which are mutually dual containing. Explicit constructions of such codes for large blocklengths and with good error correcting properties are not easy to find. In this paper we propose a construction of CSS codes which combines a classical code with a two-universal hash function. We show, using the results of Renner and Koenig, that the communication rates of such codes approach the hashing bound on tensor powers of Pauli channels in the limit of large block-length. While the bit-flip errors can be decoded as efficiently as the classical code used, the problem of efficiently decoding the phase-flip errors remains open.

  8. avoid vocal errors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Error Avoiding Quantum Codes Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: The existence is proved of a class of open quantum...

  9. An Approximation Algorithm for Constructing Error Detecting Prefix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 2, 2006 ... 2-bit Hamming prefix code problem. Our algorithm spends O(n log3 n) time to calculate a 2-bit. Hamming prefix code with an additive error of at ...

  10. Secured Pace Web Server with Collaboration and Error Logging Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Lixin

    : Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) using the Java Secure Socket Extension (JSSE) API, error logging............................................................................................ 8 Chapter 3 Secure Pace Web Server with SSL........................................................... 29 3.1 Introduction to SSL

  11. Transition state theory: Variational formulation, dynamical corrections, and error estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Den Eijnden, Eric

    Transition state theory: Variational formulation, dynamical corrections, and error estimates Eric, Brazil Received 18 February 2005; accepted 9 September 2005; published online 7 November 2005 Transition which aim at computing dynamical corrections to the TST transition rate constant. The theory

  12. YELLOW SEA ACOUSTIC UNCERTAINTY CAUSED BY HYDROGRAPHIC DATA ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    the littoral and blue waters. After a weapon platform has detected its targets, the sensors on torpedoes, bathymetry, bottom type, and sound speed profiles. Here, the effect of sound speed errors (i.e., hydrographic

  13. Strontium-90 Error Discovered in Subcontract Laboratory Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. D. Brown A. S. Nagel

    1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    West Valley Demonstration Project health physicists and environment scientists discovered a series of errors in a subcontractor's spreadsheet being used to reduce data as part of their strontium-90 analytical process.

  14. Sample covariance based estimation of Capon algorithm error probabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Christ D.

    The method of interval estimation (MIE) provides a strategy for mean squared error (MSE) prediction of algorithm performance at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) below estimation threshold where asymptotic predictions fail. ...

  15. Sensitivity of OFDM Systems to Synchronization Errors and Spatial Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    jitter cause inter-carrier interference. The overall system performance in terms of symbol error rate is limited by the inter-carrier interference. For a reliable information reception, compensatory measures must be taken. The second part...

  16. Diagnosing multiplicative error by lensing magnification of type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak lensing causes spatially coherent fluctuations in flux of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). This lensing magnification allows for weak lensing measurement independent of cosmic shear. It is free of shape measurement errors associated with cosmic shear and can therefore be used to diagnose and calibrate multiplicative error. Although this lensing magnification is difficult to measure accurately in auto correlation, its cross correlation with cosmic shear and galaxy distribution in overlapping area can be measured to significantly higher accuracy. Therefore these cross correlations can put useful constraint on multiplicative error, and the obtained constraint is free of cosmic variance in weak lensing field. We present two methods implementing this idea and estimate their performances. We find that, with $\\sim 1$ million SNe Ia that can be achieved by the proposed D2k survey with the LSST telescope (Zhan et al. 2008), multiplicative error of $\\sim 0.5\\%$ for source galaxies at $z_s\\sim 1$ can be detected and la...

  17. Model Error Correction for Linear Methods in PET Neuroreceptor Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renaut, Rosemary

    Model Error Correction for Linear Methods in PET Neuroreceptor Measurements Hongbin Guo address: hguo1@asu.edu (Hongbin Guo) Preprint submitted to NeuroImage December 11, 2008 #12;reached. A new

  18. Universally Valid Error-Disturbance Relations in Continuous Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atsushi Nishizawa; Yanbei Chen

    2015-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum physics, measurement error and disturbance were first naively thought to be simply constrained by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Later, more rigorous analysis showed that the error and disturbance satisfy more subtle inequalities. Several versions of universally valid error-disturbance relations (EDR) have already been obtained and experimentally verified in the regimes where naive applications of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation failed. However, these EDRs were formulated for discrete measurements. In this paper, we consider continuous measurement processes and obtain new EDR inequalities in the Fourier space: in terms of the power spectra of the system and probe variables. By applying our EDRs to a linear optomechanical system, we confirm that a tradeoff relation between error and disturbance leads to the existence of an optimal strength of the disturbance in a joint measurement. Interestingly, even with this optimal case, the inequality of the new EDR is not saturated because of doublely existing standard quantum limits in the inequality.

  19. Robust mixtures in the presence of measurement errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianyong Sun; Ata Kaban; Somak Raychaudhury

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a mixture-based approach to robust density modeling and outlier detection for experimental multivariate data that includes measurement error information. Our model is designed to infer atypical measurements that are not due to errors, aiming to retrieve potentially interesting peculiar objects. Since exact inference is not possible in this model, we develop a tree-structured variational EM solution. This compares favorably against a fully factorial approximation scheme, approaching the accuracy of a Markov-Chain-EM, while maintaining computational simplicity. We demonstrate the benefits of including measurement errors in the model, in terms of improved outlier detection rates in varying measurement uncertainty conditions. We then use this approach in detecting peculiar quasars from an astrophysical survey, given photometric measurements with errors.

  20. TESLA-FEL 2009-07 Errors in Reconstruction of Difference Orbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Standard Least Squares Solution 2 3 Error Emittance and Error Twiss Parameters as the position of the reconstruction point changes, we will introduce error Twiss parameters and invariant error in the point of interest has to be achieved by matching error Twiss parameters in this point to the desired

  1. A Taxonomy to Enable Error Recovery and Correction in Software Vilas Sridharan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaeli, David R.

    A Taxonomy to Enable Error Recovery and Correction in Software Vilas Sridharan ECE Department years, reliability research has largely used the following taxonomy of errors: Undetected Errors Errors (CE). While this taxonomy is suitable to characterize hardware error detection and correction

  2. Lead exposure at uncovered outdoor firing ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, R.L.; Hicks, A.M.; O'Leary, L.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive lead exposure in shooting instructors at indoor firing ranges and covered outdoor firing ranges has been documented. The City of Los Angeles assessed exposure of its full-time shooting instructors at uncovered outdoor ranges via air monitoring and blood lead-level measurements. Results of these tests revealed that significant lead exposure and absorption can occur at outdoor firing ranges. The use of copper-jacketed ammunition may decrease air lead levels and decrease lead absorption by range instructors.

  3. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Jordan, Jay D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Theodore J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  4. Coding Techniques for Error Correction and Rewriting in Flash Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Shoeb Ahmed

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    CODING TECHNIQUES FOR ERROR CORRECTION AND REWRITING IN FLASH MEMORIES A Thesis by SHOEB AHMED MOHAMMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CODING TECHNIQUES FOR ERROR CORRECTION AND REWRITING IN FLASH MEMORIES A Thesis by SHOEB AHMED MOHAMMED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  5. Systematic errors in current quantum state tomography tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Schwemmer; Lukas Knips; Daniel Richart; Tobias Moroder; Matthias Kleinmann; Otfried Gühne; Harald Weinfurter

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Common tools for obtaining physical density matrices in experimental quantum state tomography are shown here to cause systematic errors. For example, using maximum likelihood or least squares optimization for state reconstruction, we observe a systematic underestimation of the fidelity and an overestimation of entanglement. A solution for this problem can be achieved by a linear evaluation of the data yielding reliable and computational simple bounds including error bars.

  6. Fault-Tolerant Thresholds for Encoded Ancillae with Homogeneous Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Eastin

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a procedure for calculating thresholds for quantum computation as a function of error model given the availability of ancillae prepared in logical states with independent, identically distributed errors. The thresholds are determined via a simple counting argument performed on a single qubit of an infinitely large CSS code. I give concrete examples of thresholds thus achievable for both Steane and Knill style fault-tolerant implementations and investigate their relation to threshold estimates in the literature.

  7. Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from Microbes to Jellyfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    SYMPOSIUM Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from, Engineering and Applied Science, Pasadena, CA, 91125, USA From the symposium ``Marine Ecosystem Engineers@si.edu Synopsis Ecosystem engineers are species that alter the physical environment in ways that create new

  8. Bit error rate tester using fast parallel generation of linear recurring sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pierson, Lyndon G.; Witzke, Edward L.; Maestas, Joseph H.

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast method for generating linear recurring sequences by parallel linear recurring sequence generators (LRSGs) with a feedback circuit optimized to balance minimum propagation delay against maximal sequence period. Parallel generation of linear recurring sequences requires decimating the sequence (creating small contiguous sections of the sequence in each LRSG). A companion matrix form is selected depending on whether the LFSR is right-shifting or left-shifting. The companion matrix is completed by selecting a primitive irreducible polynomial with 1's most closely grouped in a corner of the companion matrix. A decimation matrix is created by raising the companion matrix to the (n*k).sup.th power, where k is the number of parallel LRSGs and n is the number of bits to be generated at a time by each LRSG. Companion matrices with 1's closely grouped in a corner will yield sparse decimation matrices. A feedback circuit comprised of XOR logic gates implements the decimation matrix in hardware. Sparse decimation matrices can be implemented with minimum number of XOR gates, and therefore a minimum propagation delay through the feedback circuit. The LRSG of the invention is particularly well suited to use as a bit error rate tester on high speed communication lines because it permits the receiver to synchronize to the transmitted pattern within 2n bits.

  9. Creating the Clean Energy Jobs of the 21st Century | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Creating the Clean Energy Jobs of the 21st Century Creating the Clean Energy Jobs of the 21st Century Fact Sheet on clean energy jobs in Nevada Creating the Clean Energy Jobs of...

  10. Original documentation created by University of Central Florida. Outlook 2007 vs GroupWise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Original documentation created by University of Central Florida. Outlook to in GW!) Personal folders are stored in the Cabinet #12;Original documentation created as a grey envelope. #12;Original documentation created by University of Central

  11. Original documentation created by University of Central Florida. Outlook 2010 vs GroupWise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Original documentation created by University of Central Florida. Outlook #12;Original documentation created by University of Central Florida. Cabinet as a grey envelope. #12;Original documentation created by University of Central

  12. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  13. A new and efficient error resilient entropy code for image and video compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min, Jungki

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Image and video compression standards such as JPEG, MPEG, H.263 are severely sensitive to errors. Among typical error propagation mechanisms in video compression schemes, loss of block synchronization causes the worst result. Even one bit error...

  14. Error Monitoring: A Learning Strategy for Improving Academic Performance of LD Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.; Nolan, Susan; Clark, Frances L.; Alley, Gordon R.; Warner, Michael M.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Error monitoring, a learning strategy for detecting and correcting errors in written products, was taught to nine learning disabled adolescents. Students could detect and correct more errors after they received training ...

  15. Assessing the Impact of Differential Genotyping Errors on Rare Variant Tests of Association

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fast, Shannon Marie

    Genotyping errors are well-known to impact the power and type I error rate in single marker tests of association. Genotyping errors that happen according to the same process in cases and controls are known as non-differential ...

  16. Statistical Assessment of Proton Treatment Plans Under Setup and Range Uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Peter C.; Cheung, Joey P.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Li, Heng; Mohan, Radhe; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei, E-mail: dong.lei@scrippshealth.org [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate a method for quantifying the effect of setup errors and range uncertainties on dose distribution and dose–volume histogram using statistical parameters; and to assess existing planning practice in selected treatment sites under setup and range uncertainties. Methods and Materials: Twenty passively scattered proton lung cancer plans, 10 prostate, and 1 brain cancer scanning-beam proton plan(s) were analyzed. To account for the dose under uncertainties, we performed a comprehensive simulation in which the dose was recalculated 600 times per given plan under the influence of random and systematic setup errors and proton range errors. On the basis of simulation results, we determined the probability of dose variations and calculated the expected values and standard deviations of dose–volume histograms. The uncertainties in dose were spatially visualized on the planning CT as a probability map of failure to target coverage or overdose of critical structures. Results: The expected value of target coverage under the uncertainties was consistently lower than that of the nominal value determined from the clinical target volume coverage without setup error or range uncertainty, with a mean difference of ?1.1% (?0.9% for breath-hold), ?0.3%, and ?2.2% for lung, prostate, and a brain cases, respectively. The organs with most sensitive dose under uncertainties were esophagus and spinal cord for lung, rectum for prostate, and brain stem for brain cancer. Conclusions: A clinically feasible robustness plan analysis tool based on direct dose calculation and statistical simulation has been developed. Both the expectation value and standard deviation are useful to evaluate the impact of uncertainties. The existing proton beam planning method used in this institution seems to be adequate in terms of target coverage. However, structures that are small in volume or located near the target area showed greater sensitivity to uncertainties.

  17. Private quantum codes: introduction and connection with higher rank numerical ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Kribs; S. Plosker

    2014-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief introduction to private quantum codes, a basic notion in quantum cryptography and key distribution. Private code states are characterized by indistinguishability of their output states under the action of a quantum channel, and we show that higher rank numerical ranges can be used to describe them. We also show how this description arises naturally via conjugate channels and the bridge between quantum error correction and cryptography.

  18. Viking Range: Order (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Viking Range, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Viking Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. American Range: Order (2014-CE-23006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered American Range Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding American Range had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  1. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, D.J.

    1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution is disclosed. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna. 46 figs.

  2. Noise pair velocity and range echo location system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An echo-location method for microwaves, sound and light capable of using incoherent and arbitrary waveforms of wide bandwidth to measure velocity and range (and target size) simultaneously to high resolution. Two interferometers having very long and nearly equal delays are used in series with the target interposed. The delays can be longer than the target range of interest. The first interferometer imprints a partial coherence on an initially incoherent source which allows autocorrelation to be performed on the reflected signal to determine velocity. A coherent cross-correlation subsequent to the second interferometer with the source determines a velocity discriminated range. Dithering the second interferometer identifies portions of the cross-correlation belonging to a target apart from clutter moving at a different velocity. The velocity discrimination is insensitive to all slowly varying distortions in the signal path. Speckle in the image of target and antenna lobing due to parasitic reflections is minimal for an incoherent source. An arbitrary source which varies its spectrum dramatically and randomly from pulse to pulse creates a radar elusive to jamming. Monochromatic sources which jigger in frequency from pulse to pulse or combinations of monochromatic sources can simulate some benefits of incoherent broadband sources. Clutter which has a symmetrical velocity spectrum will self-cancel for short wavelengths, such as the apparent motion of ground surrounding target from a sidelooking airborne antenna.

  3. Interpretation of ensembles created by multiple iterative rebuilding of macromolecular models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Turk, Dusan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterogeneity in ensembles generated by independent model rebuilding principally reflects the limitations of the data and of the model-building process rather than the diversity of structures in the crystal. Automation of iterative model building, density modification and refinement in macromolecular crystallography has made it feasible to carry out this entire process multiple times. By using different random seeds in the process, a number of different models compatible with experimental data can be created. Sets of models were generated in this way using real data for ten protein structures from the Protein Data Bank and using synthetic data generated at various resolutions. Most of the heterogeneity among models produced in this way is in the side chains and loops on the protein surface. Possible interpretations of the variation among models created by repetitive rebuilding were investigated. Synthetic data were created in which a crystal structure was modelled as the average of a set of ‘perfect’ structures and the range of models obtained by rebuilding a single starting model was examined. The standard deviations of coordinates in models obtained by repetitive rebuilding at high resolution are small, while those obtained for the same synthetic crystal structure at low resolution are large, so that the diversity within a group of models cannot generally be a quantitative reflection of the actual structures in a crystal. Instead, the group of structures obtained by repetitive rebuilding reflects the precision of the models, and the standard deviation of coordinates of these structures is a lower bound estimate of the uncertainty in coordinates of the individual models.

  4. Development of an integrated system for estimating human error probabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auflick, J.L.; Hahn, H.A.; Morzinski, J.A.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project had as its main objective the development of a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA), knowledge-based expert system that would provide probabilistic estimates for potential human errors within various risk assessments, safety analysis reports, and hazard assessments. HRA identifies where human errors are most likely, estimates the error rate for individual tasks, and highlights the most beneficial areas for system improvements. This project accomplished three major tasks. First, several prominent HRA techniques and associated databases were collected and translated into an electronic format. Next, the project started a knowledge engineering phase where the expertise, i.e., the procedural rules and data, were extracted from those techniques and compiled into various modules. Finally, these modules, rules, and data were combined into a nearly complete HRA expert system.

  5. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst's understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  6. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst`s understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  7. Non-Gaussian numerical errors versus mass hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Meurice; M. B. Oktay

    2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We probe the numerical errors made in renormalization group calculations by varying slightly the rescaling factor of the fields and rescaling back in order to get the same (if there were no round-off errors) zero momentum 2-point function (magnetic susceptibility). The actual calculations were performed with Dyson's hierarchical model and a simplified version of it. We compare the distributions of numerical values obtained from a large sample of rescaling factors with the (Gaussian by design) distribution of a random number generator and find significant departures from the Gaussian behavior. In addition, the average value differ (robustly) from the exact answer by a quantity which is of the same order as the standard deviation. We provide a simple model in which the errors made at shorter distance have a larger weight than those made at larger distance. This model explains in part the non-Gaussian features and why the central-limit theorem does not apply.

  8. Reducing Collective Quantum State Rotation Errors with Reversible Dephasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin C. Cox; Matthew A. Norcia; Joshua M. Weiner; Justin G. Bohnet; James K. Thompson

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that reversible dephasing via inhomogeneous broadening can greatly reduce collective quantum state rotation errors, and observe the suppression of rotation errors by more than 21 dB in the context of collective population measurements of the spin states of an ensemble of $2.1 \\times 10^5$ laser cooled and trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms. The large reduction in rotation noise enables direct resolution of spin state populations 13(1) dB below the fundamental quantum projection noise limit. Further, the spin state measurement projects the system into an entangled state with 9.5(5) dB of directly observed spectroscopic enhancement (squeezing) relative to the standard quantum limit, whereas no enhancement would have been obtained without the suppression of rotation errors.

  9. Meta learning of bounds on the Bayes classifier error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Kevin R; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meta learning uses information from base learners (e.g. classifiers or estimators) as well as information about the learning problem to improve upon the performance of a single base learner. For example, the Bayes error rate of a given feature space, if known, can be used to aid in choosing a classifier, as well as in feature selection and model selection for the base classifiers and the meta classifier. Recent work in the field of f-divergence functional estimation has led to the development of simple and rapidly converging estimators that can be used to estimate various bounds on the Bayes error. We estimate multiple bounds on the Bayes error using an estimator that applies meta learning to slowly converging plug-in estimators to obtain the parametric convergence rate. We compare the estimated bounds empirically on simulated data and then estimate the tighter bounds on features extracted from an image patch analysis of sunspot continuum and magnetogram images.

  10. Innovate Washington Group Looks to Create State Business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly column for TCH - April 2012. Excerpt here: Change is inevitable. In fact, many say it’s the only constant. One can either wait for the waves to hit and try not to drown, or get ahead of them and maximize the ride. I believe being proactive is the harder, but more powerful option. Over the past couple years numerous people have proactively worked to effect a particular change across the state of Washington: create a thriving ecosystem to accelerate technology-based economic development and achieve sustainable job growth. The result is an organization called Innovate Washington.

  11. Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copyin SaltCreating a

  12. Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign - A Handbook for Federal Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Copyin SaltCreating

  13. Create The Look You Like-With Color.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoades, Beverly

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and 8-1326 Create The Look You Like- With Texture. DIMENSIONS OF COLOR To become more familiar with the dimensions of color, let's consider a few principles. Hue refers to the name of a color. Primary hues are red, yellow and blue. These cannot... and are arranged between the primary colors on the color Wheel : purple or violet-a combination of red and blue green - a combination of blue and yellow orange-a combination of red and yellow , Extension consumer information specailist, The Texas A&M University...

  14. Creating a Culture of Risk Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us ContactPracticesWinter (Part 2) |Creating a

  15. Recovery Act Creates Jobs, Accelerates Cleanup at DOE's Paducah Site |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department of Energy Recovery Act Creates Jobs,

  16. SciTech Connect: Create a New Account

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter Principalfuel cells" Find + Advanced SearchCreate a

  17. ARI: Creating a 2020 DOE | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of2 of 5) ALARA TrainingANDREW ( ARI ) AssetARI: Creating

  18. Creating a Climate for Successful Project Implementation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex(GC-72)Columbia Government |Energy Creating a

  19. Minority-Owned Business Creating Career Opportunities | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the National 93-4Energy Minority-Owned Business Creating

  20. Creating an Energy Innovation Ecosystem | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,AgendaPREVENTING28, 2012As theWinter (Part 2)Creating

  1. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  2. Exploiting Photo-induced Reactions in Polymer Blends to Create Hierarchically Ordered, Defect-free Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balazs, Anna (U of Pittsburgh) [U of Pittsburgh

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations reveal how photo-induced chemical reactions can be exploited to create long-range order in binary and ternary polymeric materials. The process is initiated by shining a spatially uniform light over a photosensitive AB binary blend, which undergoes both a reversible chemical reaction and phase separation. We then introduce a well-collimated, higher-intensity light source. Rastering this secondary light over the sample locally increases the reaction rate and causes formation of defect-free, spatially periodic structures. These binary structures resemble either the lamellar or hexagonal phases of microphase-separated di-block copolymers. We measure the regularity of the ordered structures as a function of the relative reaction rates for different values of the rastering speed and determine the optimal conditions for creating defect-free structures in the binary systems. We then add a non-reactive homo-polymer C, which is immiscible with both A and B. We show that this component migrates to regions that are illuminated by the secondary, higher-intensity light, allowing us to effectively write a pattern of C onto the AB film. Rastering over the ternary blend with this collimated light now leads to hierarchically ordered patterns of A, B, and C. The findings point to a facile, non-intrusive process for manufacturing high-quality polymeric devices in a low-cost, efficient manner.

  3. Trade-off between the tolerance of located and unlocated errors in nondegenerate quantum error-correcting codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry L. Haselgrove; Peter P. Rohde

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent study [Rohde et al., quant-ph/0603130 (2006)] of several quantum error correcting protocols designed for tolerance against qubit loss, it was shown that these protocols have the undesirable effect of magnifying the effects of depolarization noise. This raises the question of which general properties of quantum error-correcting codes might explain such an apparent trade-off between tolerance to located and unlocated error types. We extend the counting argument behind the well-known quantum Hamming bound to derive a bound on the weights of combinations of located and unlocated errors which are correctable by nondegenerate quantum codes. Numerical results show that the bound gives an excellent prediction to which combinations of unlocated and located errors can be corrected with high probability by certain large degenerate codes. The numerical results are explained partly by showing that the generalized bound, like the original, is closely connected to the information-theoretic quantity the quantum coherent information. However, we also show that as a measure of the exact performance of quantum codes, our generalized Hamming bound is provably far from tight.

  4. Hard Data on Soft Errors: A Large-Scale Assessment of Real-World Error Rates in GPGPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haque, Imran S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are gaining widespread use in computational chemistry and other scientific simulation contexts because of their huge performance advantages relative to conventional CPUs. However, the reliability of GPUs in error-intolerant applications is largely unproven. In particular, a lack of error checking and correcting (ECC) capability in the memory subsystems of graphics cards has been cited as a hindrance to the acceptance of GPUs as high-performance coprocessors, but the impact of this design has not been previously quantified. In this article we present MemtestG80, our software for assessing memory error rates on NVIDIA G80 and GT200-architecture-based graphics cards. Furthermore, we present the results of a large-scale assessment of GPU error rate, conducted by running MemtestG80 on over 20,000 hosts on the Folding@home distributed computing network. Our control experiments on consumer-grade and dedicated-GPGPU hardware in a controlled environment found no errors. However, our su...

  5. Are you getting an error message in UniFi Plus? (suggestion...check the auto-hint line!) In most cases, Unifi Plus does not prominently display error messages; instead, the error message will be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    Are you getting an error message in UniFi Plus? (suggestion...check the auto-hint line!) In most cases, Unifi Plus does not prominently display error messages; instead, the error message and processing messages Keyboard shortcuts Instructions for accessing other blocks, windows or forms from

  6. Error estimates and specification parameters for functional renormalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnoerr, David [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Boettcher, Igor, E-mail: I.Boettcher@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Pawlowski, Jan M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Wetterich, Christof [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a strategy for estimating the error of truncated functional flow equations. While the basic functional renormalization group equation is exact, approximated solutions by means of truncations do not only depend on the choice of the retained information, but also on the precise definition of the truncation. Therefore, results depend on specification parameters that can be used to quantify the error of a given truncation. We demonstrate this for the BCS–BEC crossover in ultracold atoms. Within a simple truncation the precise definition of the frequency dependence of the truncated propagator affects the results, indicating a shortcoming of the choice of a frequency independent cutoff function.

  7. Quantum error correcting codes and 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, Larry, E-mail: lguth@math.mit.edu [Department of Mathematics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Lubotzky, Alexander, E-mail: alex.lubotzky@mail.huji.ac.il [Institute of Mathematics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 4-dimensional arithmetic hyperbolic manifolds, we construct some new homological quantum error correcting codes. They are low density parity check codes with linear rate and distance n{sup ?}. Their rate is evaluated via Euler characteristic arguments and their distance using Z{sub 2}-systolic geometry. This construction answers a question of Zémor [“On Cayley graphs, surface codes, and the limits of homological coding for quantum error correction,” in Proceedings of Second International Workshop on Coding and Cryptology (IWCC), Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 5557 (2009), pp. 259–273], who asked whether homological codes with such parameters could exist at all.

  8. Full protection of superconducting qubit systems from coupling errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Storcz; J. Vala; K. R. Brown; J. Kempe; F. K. Wilhelm; K. B. Whaley

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state qubits realized in superconducting circuits are potentially extremely scalable. However, strong decoherence may be transferred to the qubits by various elements of the circuits that couple individual qubits, particularly when coupling is implemented over long distances. We propose here an encoding that provides full protection against errors originating from these coupling elements, for a chain of superconducting qubits with a nearest neighbor anisotropic XY-interaction. The encoding is also seen to provide partial protection against errors deriving from general electronic noise.

  9. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  10. Correctable noise of Quantum Error Correcting Codes under adaptive concatenation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesse Fern

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the transformation of noise under a quantum error correcting code (QECC) concatenated repeatedly with itself, by analyzing the effects of a quantum channel after each level of concatenation using recovery operators that are optimally adapted to use error syndrome information from the previous levels of the code. We use the Shannon entropy of these channels to estimate the thresholds of correctable noise for QECCs and find considerable improvements under this adaptive concatenation. Similar methods could be used to increase quantum fault tolerant thresholds.

  11. Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

  12. Creating a Sealstone: A Study of Seals in the Greek Late Bronze Age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Younger, John G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes how Minoan-Mycenaean sealstones were created, using evidence of unfinished seals....

  13. Controlling dispersion forces between small particles with artificially created random light fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georges Bruegger; Luis Froufe-Perez; Frank Scheffold; Juan Jose Saenz

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Appropriate combinations of laser beams can be used to trap and manipulate small particles with "optical tweezers" as well as to induce significant "optical binding" forces between particles. These interaction forces are usually strongly anisotropic depending on the interference landscape of the external fields. This is in contrast with the familiar isotropic, translationally invariant, van der Waals and, in general, Casimir-Lifshitz interactions between neutral bodies arising from random electromagnetic waves generated by equilibrium quantum and thermal fluctuations. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that dispersion forces between small colloidal particles can also be induced and controlled using artificially created fluctuating light fields. Using optical tweezers as gauge, we present experimental evidence for the predicted isotropic attractive interactions between dielectric microspheres induced by laser-generated, random light fields. These light induced interactions open a path towards the control of translationally invariant interactions with tuneable strength and range in colloidal systems.

  14. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  15. Soft Error Modeling and Protection for Sequential Elements Hossein Asadi and Mehdi B. Tahoori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on system-level soft error rate. The number of clock cycles required for an error in a bistable to be propagated to system outputs is used to measure the vulnerability of bistables to soft errors. 1 Introduction, soft errors become the main reliability concern during lifetime operation of digital systems. Soft

  16. Low-Cost Hardening of Image Processing Applications Against Soft Errors Ilia Polian1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polian, Ilia

    , and their hardening against soft errors becomes an issue. We propose a methodology to identify soft errors as uncritical based on their impact on the system's functionality. We call a soft error uncritical if its impact are imperceivable for the human user of the system. We focus on soft errors in the motion esti- mation subsystem

  17. Distinguishing congestion and error losses: an ECN/ELN based scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamakshisundaram, Raguram

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    error rates, like wireless links, packets are lost more due to error than due to congestion. But TCP does not differentiate between error and congestion losses and hence reduces the sending rate for losses due to error also, which unnecessarily reduces...

  18. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

  19. Viking Range: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-23014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Viking Range, LLC failed to certify cooking products as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Designing Automation to Reduce Operator Errors Nancy G. Leveson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    Designing Automation to Reduce Operator Errors Nancy G. Leveson Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Everett Palmer NASA Ames Research Center Introduction Advanced automation has been of mode­related problems [SW95]. After studying accidents and incidents in the new, highly automated

  1. Measurement Errors in Visual Servoing V. Kyrki ,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kragic, Danica

    feedback for closed loop control of a robot motion termed visual servoing has received a significant amount robot trajectory and its uncertainty. The procedures of camera calibration have improved enormously over on the modeling of an error function and thus has a major effect on the robot's trajectory. On the other hand

  2. Energy efficiency of error correction for wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    -control is an important issue for mobile computing systems. This includes energy spent in the physical radio transmission and Networking Conference 1999 [7]. #12;ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF ERROR CORRECTION FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONA ­ 2 on the energy of transmission and the energy of redundancy computation. We will show that the computational cost

  3. Effects of errors in the solar radius on helioseismic inferences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu

    1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequencies of intermediate-degree f-modes of the Sun seem to indicate that the solar radius is smaller than what is normally used in constructing solar models. We investigate the possible consequences of an error in radius on results for solar structure obtained using helioseismic inversions. It is shown that solar sound speed will be overestimated if oscillation frequencies are inverted using reference models with a larger radius. Using solar models with radius of 695.78 Mm and new data sets, the base of the solar convection zone is estimated to be at radial distance of $0.7135\\pm 0.0005$ of the solar radius. The helium abundance in the convection zone as determined using models with OPAL equation of state is $0.248\\pm 0.001$, where the errors reflect the estimated systematic errors in the calculation, the statistical errors being much smaller. Assuming that the OPAL opacities used in the construction of the solar models are correct, the surface $Z/X$ is estimated to be $0.0245\\pm 0.0006$.

  4. Error field and magnetic diagnostic modeling for W7-X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Sam A. [PPPL; Gates, David A. [PPPL; NEILSON, GEORGE H. [PPPL; OTTE, M.; Bozhenkov, S.; Pedersen, T. S.; GEIGER, J.; LORE, J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction, detection, and compensation of error fields for the W7-X device will play a key role in achieving a high beta (? = 5%), steady state (30 minute pulse) operating regime utilizing the island divertor system [1]. Additionally, detection and control of the equilibrium magnetic structure in the scrape-off layer will be necessary in the long-pulse campaign as bootstrapcurrent evolution may result in poor edge magnetic structure [2]. An SVD analysis of the magnetic diagnostics set indicates an ability to measure the toroidal current and stored energy, while profile variations go undetected in the magnetic diagnostics. An additional set of magnetic diagnostics is proposed which improves the ability to constrain the equilibrium current and pressure profiles. However, even with the ability to accurately measure equilibrium parameters, the presence of error fields can modify both the plasma response and diverter magnetic field structures in unfavorable ways. Vacuum flux surface mapping experiments allow for direct measurement of these modifications to magnetic structure. The ability to conduct such an experiment is a unique feature of stellarators. The trim coils may then be used to forward model the effect of an applied n = 1 error field. This allows the determination of lower limits for the detection of error field amplitude and phase using flux surface mapping. *Research supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 with Princeton University.

  5. Two infinite families of nonadditive quantum error-correcting codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixia Yu; Qing Chen; C. H. Oh

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct explicitly two infinite families of genuine nonadditive 1-error correcting quantum codes and prove that their coding subspaces are 50% larger than those of the optimal stabilizer codes of the same parameters via the linear programming bound. All these nonadditive codes can be characterized by a stabilizer-like structure and thus their encoding circuits can be designed in a straightforward manner.

  6. Threshold error rates for the toric and surface codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. S. Wang; A. G. Fowler; A. M. Stephens; L. C. L. Hollenberg

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface code scheme for quantum computation features a 2d array of nearest-neighbor coupled qubits yet claims a threshold error rate approaching 1% (NJoP 9:199, 2007). This result was obtained for the toric code, from which the surface code is derived, and surpasses all other known codes restricted to 2d nearest-neighbor architectures by several orders of magnitude. We describe in detail an error correction procedure for the toric and surface codes, which is based on polynomial-time graph matching techniques and is efficiently implementable as the classical feed-forward processing step in a real quantum computer. By direct simulation of this error correction scheme, we determine the threshold error rates for the two codes (differing only in their boundary conditions) for both ideal and non-ideal syndrome extraction scenarios. We verify that the toric code has an asymptotic threshold of p = 15.5% under ideal syndrome extraction, and p = 7.8 10^-3 for the non-ideal case, in agreement with prior work. Simulations of the surface code indicate that the threshold is close to that of the toric code.

  7. RESIDUAL TYPE A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES FOR ELLIPTIC OBSTACLE PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    to double obstacle problems are briefly discussed. Key words. a posteriori error estimates, residual Science Foundation under the grant No.19771080 and China National Key Project ``Large Scale Scientific\\Gamma satisfies / Ÿ 0 on @ and K is the convex set of admissible displacements K := fv 2 H 1 0(\\Omega\\Gamma : v

  8. Multilayer Perceptron Error Surfaces: Visualization, Structure and Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Marcus

    . This is commonly formulated as a multivariate non­linear optimization problem over a very high­dimensional space of analysis are not well­suited to this problem. Visualizing and describ­ ing the error surface are also three related methods. Firstly, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is proposed as a method

  9. Multi-layer Perceptron Error Surfaces: Visualization, Structure and Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, Marcus

    . This is commonly formulated as a multivariate non-linear optimization problem over a very high-dimensional space of analysis are not well-suited to this problem. Visualizing and describ- ing the error surface are also three related methods. Firstly, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is proposed as a method

  10. Analysis of possible systematic errors in the Oslo method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Larsen; M. Guttormsen; M. Krticka; E. Betak; A. Bürger; A. Görgen; H. T. Nyhus; J. Rekstad; A. Schiller; S. Siem; H. K. Toft; G. M. Tveten; A. V. Voinov; K. Wikan

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have reviewed the Oslo method, which enables the simultaneous extraction of level density and gamma-ray transmission coefficient from a set of particle-gamma coincidence data. Possible errors and uncertainties have been investigated. Typical data sets from various mass regions as well as simulated data have been tested against the assumptions behind the data analysis.

  11. Flexible Error Protection for Energy Efficient Reliable Architectures Timothy Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan, Dong

    Flexible Error Protection for Energy Efficient Reliable Architectures Timothy Miller , Nagarjuna and Computer Engineering The Ohio State University {millerti,teodores}@cse.ohio-state.edu, nagarjun. To deal with these com- peting trends, energy-efficient solutions are needed to deal with reli- ability

  12. Fast Error Estimates For Indirect Measurements: Applications To Pavement Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Fast Error Estimates For Indirect Measurements: Applications To Pavement Engineering Carlos that is difficult to measure directly (e.g., lifetime of a pavement, efficiency of an engine, etc). To estimate y computation time. As an example of this methodology, we give pavement lifetime estimates. This work

  13. A Method for Treating Discretization Error in Nondeterministic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, K.F.

    1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A response surface methodology-based technique is presented for treating discretization error in non-deterministic analysis. The response surface, or metamodel, is estimated from computer experiments which vary both uncertain physical parameters and the fidelity of the computational mesh. The resultant metamodel is then used to propagate the variabilities in the continuous input parameters, while the mesh size is taken to zero, its asymptotic limit. With respect to mesh size, the metamodel is equivalent to Richardson extrapolation, in which solutions on coarser and finer meshes are used to estimate discretization error. The method is demonstrated on a one dimensional prismatic bar, in which uncertainty in the third vibration frequency is estimated by propagating variations in material modulus, density, and bar length. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the method for combining non-deterministic analysis with error estimation to obtain estimates of total simulation uncertainty. The results also show the relative sensitivity of failure estimates to solution bias errors in a reliability analysis, particularly when the physical variability of the system is low.

  14. Considering Workload Input Variations in Error Coverage Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Johan

    different parts of the workload code to be executed different number of times. By using the results from in the workload input when estimating error detection coverage using fault injection are investigated. Results sequence based on results from fault injection experiments with another input sequence is presented

  15. Data aware, Low cost Error correction for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Data aware, Low cost Error correction for Wireless Sensor Networks Shoubhik Mukhopadhyay, Debashis challenges in adoption and deployment of wireless networked sensing applications is ensuring reliable sensor of such applications. A wireless sensor network is inherently vulnerable to different sources of unreliability

  16. Error Minimization Methods in Biproportional Apportionment Federica Ricca Andrea Scozzari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serafini, Paolo

    as an alternative to the classical axiomatic approach introduced by Balinski and Demange in 1989. We provide and in the statistical literature. A milestone theoretical setting was given by Balinski and Demange in 1989 [5, 6 a class of methods for Biproportional Apportionment characterized by an "error minimization" approach

  17. DISCRIMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF UXO USING MAGNETOMETRY: INVERSION AND ERROR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    DISCRIMINATION AND CLASSIFICATION OF UXO USING MAGNETOMETRY: INVERSION AND ERROR ANALYSIS USING for the different solutions didn't even overlap. Introduction A discrimination and classification strategy ambiguity and possible remanent magnetization the recovered dipole moment is compared to a library

  18. Error Exponent for Discrete Memoryless Multiple-Access Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasopoulos, Achilleas

    Error Exponent for Discrete Memoryless Multiple-Access Channels by Ali Nazari A dissertation Bayraktar Associate Professor Jussi Keppo #12;c Ali Nazari 2011 All Rights Reserved #12;To my parents. ii Becky Turanski, Nancy Goings, Michele Feldkamp, Ann Pace, Karen Liska and Beth Lawson for efficiently

  19. Time reversal in thermoacoustic tomography - an error estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristova, Yulia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The time reversal method in thermoacoustic tomography is used for approximating the initial pressure inside a biological object using measurements of the pressure wave made outside the object. This article presents error estimates for the time reversal method in the cases of variable, non-trapping sound speeds.

  20. IPASS: Error Tolerant NMR Backbone Resonance Assignment by Linear Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    IPASS: Error Tolerant NMR Backbone Resonance Assignment by Linear Programming Babak Alipanahi1 automatically picked peaks. IPASS is proposed as a novel integer linear programming (ILP) based assignment assignment method. Although a variety of assignment approaches have been developed, none works well on noisy

  1. Research Article Preschool Speech Error Patterns Predict Articulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -age clinical outcomes. Many atypical speech sound errors in preschoolers may be indicative of weak phonological Outcomes in Children With Histories of Speech Sound Disorders Jonathan L. Preston,a,b Margaret Hull disorders (SSDs) predict articulation and phonological awareness (PA) outcomes almost 4 years later. Method

  2. Edinburgh Research Explorer Prevalence and Causes of Prescribing Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher

    of Prescribing Errors: The PRescribing Outcomes for Trainee Doctors Engaged in Clinical Training (PROTECT) Study: The PRescribing Outcomes for Trainee Doctors Engaged in Clinical Training (PROTECT) Study Cristi´n Ryan1 , Sarah Kingdom, 7 Health Psychology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, United Kingdom, 8 Clinical Pharmacology

  3. Verification of unfold error estimates in the unfold operator code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation that attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the unfold operator (UFO) code written at Sandia National Laboratories. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, the UFO code also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by estimated random uncertainties in the data. In UFO the unfold uncertainty is obtained from the error matrix. This built-in estimate has now been compared to error estimates obtained by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the test problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5{percent} (standard deviation). One hundred random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95{percent} confidence level). A possible 10{percent} bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetermined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Achievable Error Exponents for the Private Fingerprinting Game

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    Achievable Error Exponents for the Private Fingerprinting Game Anelia Somekh-Baruch and Neri Merhav a forgery of the data while aiming at erasing the fingerprints in order not to be detected. Their action have presented and analyzed a game-theoretic model of private2 fingerprinting systems in the presence

  5. RESOLVE Upgrades for on Line Lattice Error Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.; Corbett, J.; White, G.; /SLAC; Zambre, Y.; /Unlisted

    2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have increased the speed and versatility of the orbit analysis process by adding a command file, or 'script' language, to RESOLVE. This command file feature enables us to automate data analysis procedures to detect lattice errors. We describe the RESOLVE command file and present examples of practical applications.

  6. Stereoscopic Light Stripe Scanning: Interference Rejection, Error Minimization and Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper addresses the problem of rejecting interfer- ence due to secondary specular reflections, cross structure, acquisition delay, lack of error recovery, and incorrect modelling of measurement noise. We cause secondary reflections, edges and textures may have a stripe-like appearance, and cross-talk can

  7. Error Control Based Model Reduction for Parameter Optimization of Elliptic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of technical devices that rely on multiscale processes, such as fuel cells or batteries. As the solutionError Control Based Model Reduction for Parameter Optimization of Elliptic Homogenization Problems optimization of elliptic multiscale problems with macroscopic optimization functionals and microscopic material

  8. Development of an Expert System for Classification of Medical Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopec, Danny

    in the United States. There has been considerable speculation that these figures are either overestimated published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) indicated that between 44,000 and 98,000 unnecessary deaths per in hospitals in the IOM report, what is of importance is that the number of deaths caused by such errors

  9. Odometry Error Covariance Estimation for Two Wheel Robot Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robotics Research Centre Department of Electrical and Computer Systems Engineering Monash University Technical Report MECSE-95-1 1995 ABSTRACT This technical report develops a simple statistical error model of the robot. Other paths can be composed of short segments of constant curvature arcs without great loss

  10. Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  11. The thermodynamics of creating correlations: Limitations and optimal protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Edward Bruschi; Martí Perarnau-Llobet; Nicolai Friis; Karen V. Hovhannisyan; Marcus Huber

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish a rigorous connection between fundamental resource theories at the quantum scale. Correlations and entanglement constitute indispensable resources for numerous quantum information tasks. However, their establishment comes at the cost of energy, the resource of thermodynamics, and is limited by the initial entropy. Here, the optimal conversion of energy into correlations is investigated. Assuming the presence of a thermal bath, we establish general bounds for arbitrary systems and construct a protocol saturating them. The amount of correlations, quantified by the mutual information, can increase at most linearly with the available energy, and we determine where the linear regime breaks down. We further consider the generation of genuine quantum correlations, focusing on the fundamental constituents of our universe: fermions and bosons. For fermionic modes, we find the optimal entangling protocol. For bosonic modes, we show that while Gaussian operations can be outperformed in creating entanglement, their performance is optimal for high energies.

  12. Doppler electron velocimetry : notes on creating a practical tool.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reu, Phillip L.; Milster, Tom (University of Arizona)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Doppler electron velocimeter (DEV) has been shown to be theoretically possible. This report attempts to answer the next logical question: Is it a practical instrument? The answer hinges upon whether enough electrons are available to create a time-varying Doppler current to be measured by a detector with enough sensitivity and bandwidth. The answer to both of these questions is a qualified yes. A target Doppler frequency of 1 MHz was set as a minimum rate of interest. At this target a theoretical beam current signal-to-noise ratio of 25-to-1 is shown for existing electron holography equipment. A detector is also demonstrated with a bandwidth of 1-MHz at a current of 10 pA. Additionally, a Linnik-type interferometer that would increase the available beam current is shown that would offer a more flexible arrangement for Doppler electron measurements over the traditional biprism.

  13. The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    The Joint Essential Numerical Range of operators: Convexity and Related Results Chi-Kwong Li Classification 47A12, 47A13, 47A55. Keywords Joint essential numerical range, self-adjoint operator, Hilbert the joint behavior of several operators A1, . . . , Am. One may see [1, 5, 12, 14, 15, 16, 19, 23, 28, 31

  14. Range gated imaging experiments using gated intensifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Yates, G.J.; Cverna, F.H.; Gallegos, R.A.; Jaramillo, S.A.; Numkena, D.M.; Payton, J.; Pena-Abeyta, C.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of range gated imaging experiments using high-speed gated/shuttered proximity focused microchannel plate image intensifiers (MCPII) are reported. Range gated imaging experiments were conducted in water for detection of submerged mines in controlled turbidity tank test and in sea water for the Naval Coastal Sea Command/US Marine Corps. Field experiments have been conducted consisting of kilometer range imaging of resolution targets and military vehicles in atmosphere at Eglin Air Force Base for the US Air Force, and similar imaging experiments, but in smoke environment, at Redstone Arsenal for the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). Wavelength of the illuminating laser was 532 nm with pulse width ranging from 6 to 12 ns and comparable gate widths. These tests have shown depth resolution in the tens of centimeters range from time phasing reflected LADAR images with MCPII shutter opening.

  15. Effective range from tetramer dissociation data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadizadeh, M R; Tomio, Lauro; Delfino, A; Frederico, T

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shifts in the four-body recombination peaks, due to lowest order range corrections in the zero range results close to the unitary limit, are obtained and used to extract the corresponding effective range of a given atomic system. From the experimental values of the tetramer dissociation positions of an ultracold gas of cesium atoms close to broad Feshbach resonances, the effective ranges are extracted, with a weighted average given by 3.9$\\pm 0.8 R_{{vdW}}$, where $R_{{vdW}}$ is the van der Waals length scale. This result is consistent with the van der Waals potential tail for the $Cs_2$ system. The method can be generally applied to other cold atom experimental setups to determine the corresponding effective range.

  16. Dosimetric influences of rotational setup errors on head and neck carcinoma intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Weihua, E-mail: fuw@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yang, Yong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Heron, Dwight E.; Saiful Huq, M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the dosimetric influence of the residual rotational setup errors on head and neck carcinoma (HNC) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with routine 3 translational setup corrections and the adequacy of this routine correction. A total of 66 kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image sets were acquired on the first day of treatment and weekly thereafter for 10 patients with HNC and were registered with the corresponding planning CT images, using 2 3-dimensional (3D) rigid registration methods. Method 1 determines the translational setup errors only, and method 2 determines 6-degree (6D) setup errors, i.e., both rotational and translational setup errors. The 6D setup errors determined by method 2 were simulated in the treatment planning system and were then corrected using the corresponding translational data determined by method 1. For each patient, dose distributions for 6 to 7 fractions with various setup uncertainties were generated, and a plan sum was created to determine the total dose distribution through an entire course and was compared with the original treatment plan. The average rotational setup errors were 0.7°± 1.0°, 0.1°±1.9°, and 0.3°±0.7° around left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) axes, respectively. With translational corrections determined by method 1 alone, the dose deviation could be large from fraction to fraction. For a certain fraction, the decrease in prescription dose coverage (V{sub p}) and the dose that covers 95% of target volume (D{sub 95}) could be up to 15.8% and 13.2% for planning target volume (PTV), and the decrease in V{sub p} and the dose that covers 98% of target volume (D{sub 98}) could be up to 9.8% and 5.5% for the clinical target volume (CTV). However, for the entire treatment course, for PTV, the plan sum showed that the average V{sub p} was decreased by 4.2% and D{sub 95} was decreased by 1.2 Gy for the first phase of IMRT with a prescription dose of 50 Gy. For CTV, the plan sum showed that the average V{sub p} was decreased by 0.8% and D{sub 98}, relative to prescription dose, was not decreased. Among these 10 patients, the plan sum showed that the dose to 1-cm{sup 3} spinal cord (D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}) increased no more than 1 Gy for 7 patients and more than 2 Gy for 2 patients. The average increase in D{sub 1cm{sup 3}} was 1.2 Gy. The study shows that, with translational setup error correction, the overall CTV V{sub p} has a minor decrease with a 5-mm margin from CTV to PTV. For the spinal cord, a noticeable dose increase was observed for some patients. So to decide whether the routine clinical translational setup error correction is adequate for this HNC IMRT technique, the dosimetric influence of rotational setup errors should be evaluated carefully from case to case when organs at risk are in close proximity to the target.

  17. Neutron scattering and extra short range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The available data on neutron scattering were analyzed to constrain a hypothetical new short-range interaction. We show that these constraints are several orders of magnitude better than those usually cited in the range between 1 pm and 5 nm. This distance range occupies an intermediate space between collider searches for strongly coupled heavy bosons and searches for new weak macroscopic forces. We emphasise the reliability of the neutron constraints in so far as they provide several independent strategies. We have identified the most promising way to improve them.

  18. Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Larry Young

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

  19. Nuclear mass systematics by complementing the Finite Range Droplet Model with neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Athanassopoulos; E. Mavrommatis; K. A. Gernoth; J. W. Clark

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A neural-network model is developed to reproduce the differences between experimental nuclear mass-excess values and the theoretical values given by the Finite Range Droplet Model. The results point to the existence of subtle regularities of nuclear structure not yet contained in the best microscopic/phenomenological models of atomic masses. Combining the FRDM and the neural-network model, we create a hybrid model with improved predictive performance on nuclear-mass systematics and related quantities.

  20. SU-E-T-170: Evaluation of Rotational Errors in Proton Therapy Planning of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, S; Zhao, L; Ramirez, E; Singh, H; Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) errors in proton therapy planning of lung cancer. Methods: A lung cancer case treated at our center was used in this retrospective study. The original plan was generated using two proton fields (posterior-anterior and left-lateral) with XiO treatment planning system (TPS) and delivered using uniform scanning proton therapy system. First, the computed tomography (CT) set of original lung treatment plan was re-sampled for rotational (roll, yaw, and pitch) angles ranged from ?5° to +5°, with an increment of 2.5°. Second, 12 new proton plans were generated in XiO using the 12 re-sampled CT datasets. The same beam conditions, isocenter, and devices were used in new treatment plans as in the original plan. All 12 new proton plans were compared with original plan for planning target volume (PTV) coverage and maximum dose to spinal cord (cord Dmax). Results: PTV coverage was reduced in all 12 new proton plans when compared to that of original plan. Specifically, PTV coverage was reduced by 0.03% to 1.22% for roll, by 0.05% to 1.14% for yaw, and by 0.10% to 3.22% for pitch errors. In comparison to original plan, the cord Dmax in new proton plans was reduced by 8.21% to 25.81% for +2.5° to +5° pitch, by 5.28% to 20.71% for +2.5° to +5° yaw, and by 5.28% to 14.47% for ?2.5° to ?5° roll. In contrast, cord Dmax was increased by 3.80% to 3.86% for ?2.5° to ?5° pitch, by 0.63% to 3.25% for ?2.5° to ?5° yaw, and by 3.75% to 4.54% for +2.5° to +5° roll. Conclusion: PTV coverage was reduced by up to 3.22% for rotational error of 5°. The cord Dmax could increase or decrease depending on the direction of rotational error, beam angles, and the location of lung tumor.

  1. Method and system for reducing errors in vehicle weighing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Abercrombie, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system (10, 23) for determining vehicle weight to a precision of <0.1%, uses a plurality of weight sensing elements (23), a computer (10) for reading in weighing data for a vehicle (25) and produces a dataset representing the total weight of a vehicle via programming (40-53) that is executable by the computer (10) for (a) providing a plurality of mode parameters that characterize each oscillatory mode in the data due to movement of the vehicle during weighing, (b) by determining the oscillatory mode at which there is a minimum error in the weighing data; (c) processing the weighing data to remove that dynamical oscillation from the weighing data; and (d) repeating steps (a)-(c) until the error in the set of weighing data is <0.1% in the vehicle weight.

  2. On the Fourier Transform Approach to Quantum Error Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hari Dilip Kumar

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum codes are subspaces of the state space of a quantum system that are used to protect quantum information. Some common classes of quantum codes are stabilizer (or additive) codes, non-stabilizer (or non-additive) codes obtained from stabilizer codes, and Clifford codes. These are analyzed in a framework using the Fourier transform on finite groups, the finite group in question being a subgroup of the quantum error group considered. All the classes of codes that can be obtained in this framework are explored, including codes more general than Clifford codes. The error detection properties of one of these more general classes ("direct sums of translates of Clifford codes") are characterized. Examples codes are constructed, and computer code search results presented and analysed.

  3. Comparison of Wind Power and Load Forecasting Error Distributions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.; Orwig, K.; Lew, D.; Milligan, M.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of large amounts of variable and uncertain power sources, such as wind power, into the electricity grid presents a number of challenges for system operations. One issue involves the uncertainty associated with scheduling power that wind will supply in future timeframes. However, this is not an entirely new challenge; load is also variable and uncertain, and is strongly influenced by weather patterns. In this work we make a comparison between the day-ahead forecasting errors encountered in wind power forecasting and load forecasting. The study examines the distribution of errors from operational forecasting systems in two different Independent System Operator (ISO) regions for both wind power and load forecasts at the day-ahead timeframe. The day-ahead timescale is critical in power system operations because it serves the unit commitment function for slow-starting conventional generators.

  4. On the efficiency of nondegenerate quantum error correction codes for Pauli channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Bjork; Jonas Almlof; Isabel Sainz

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the efficiency of pure, nondegenerate quantum-error correction-codes for Pauli channels. Specifically, we investigate if correction of multiple errors in a block is more efficient than using a code that only corrects one error per block. Block coding with multiple-error correction cannot increase the efficiency when the qubit error-probability is below a certain value and the code size fixed. More surprisingly, existing multiple-error correction codes with a code length equal or less than 256 qubits have lower efficiency than the optimal single-error correcting codes for any value of the qubit error-probability. We also investigate how efficient various proposed nondegenerate single-error correcting codes are compared to the limit set by the code redundancy and by the necessary conditions for hypothetically existing nondegenerate codes. We find that existing codes are close to optimal.

  5. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  6. APS Long Range Schedule FY1996

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long Range Commissioning Schedule for FY1996 Date First Shift 0:00-8:00 Second Shift 8:00-16:00 Third Shift 16:00-24:00 31596 SR Studies 1-ID-A Shielding Verification SR Studies...

  7. Descriptions of Range and Pasture Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragsdale, Bobby; Welch, Tommy G.

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of common range and pasture plants are listed in this publication. The common and scientific name of each species are given, along with the species' value as a grazing plant for wildlife and livestock....

  8. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo L. Gollo; Osame Kinouchi; Mauro Copelli

    2009-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the last decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of active dendritic trees is a highly non-linear function of their afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease of dynamic range.

  9. COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehan, Anne F.

    COLORADO FRONT RANGE SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC HAZARD Anne F. Sheehan University of Colorado, seismic, seismicity, crust, fault, hazard ABSTRACT Construction of seismic hazard and risk maps depends upon carefully constrained input parameters including background seismicity, seismic attenuation

  10. Long range interactions in nanoscale science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajter, Richard F.

    Our understanding of the “long range” electrodynamic, electrostatic, and polar interactions that dominate the organization of small objects at separations beyond an interatomic bond length is reviewed. From this basic-forces ...

  11. Scaling behavior of discretization errors in renormalization and improvement constants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, T; Lee, W; Sharpe, S R; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Gupta, Rajan; Lee, Weonjong; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-perturbative results for improvement and renormalization constants needed for on-shell and off-shell O(a) improvement of bilinear operators composed of Wilson fermions are presented. The calculations have been done in the quenched approximation at beta=6.0, 6.2 and 6.4. To quantify residual discretization errors we compare our data with results from other non-perturbative calculations and with one-loop perturbation theory.

  12. Error message recording and reporting in the SLC control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, N.; Bogart, J.; Phinney, N.; Thompson, K.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Error or information messages that are signaled by control software either in the VAX host computer or the local microprocessor clusters are handled by a dedicated VAX process (PARANOIA). Messages are recorded on disk for further analysis and displayed at the appropriate console. Another VAX process (ERRLOG) can be used to sort, list and histogram various categories of messages. The functions performed by these processes and the algorithms used are discussed.

  13. Error message recording and reporting in the SLC control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, N.; Bogart, J.; Phinney, N.; Thompson, K.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Error or information messages that are signaled by control software either in the VAX host computer or the local microprocessor clusters are handled by a dedicated VAX process (PARANOIA). Messages are recorded on disk for further analysis and displayed at the appropriate console. Another VAX process (ERRLOG) can be used to sort, list and histogram various categories of messages. The functions performed by these processes and the algorithms used are discussed.

  14. Topics in measurement error and missing data problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lian

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    reasons. In this research, the impact of missing genotypes is investigated for high resolution combined linkage and association mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL). We assume that the genotype data are missing completely at random (MCAR). Two... and asymptotic properties. In the genetics study, a new method is proposed to account for the missing genotype in a combined linkage and association study. We have concluded that this method does not improve power but it will provide better type I error rates...

  15. Programmable near-infrared ranging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Everett, Jr., Hobart R. (San Diego, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high angular resolution ranging system particularly suitable for indoor plications involving mobile robot navigation and collision avoidance uses a programmable array of light emitters that can be sequentially incremented by a microprocessor. A plurality of adjustable level threshold detectors are used in an optical receiver for detecting the threshold level of the light echoes produced when light emitted from one or more of the emitters is reflected by a target or object in the scan path of the ranging system.

  16. Estimating the error in simulation prediction over the design space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, R. (Rachel); Hemez, F. M. (François M.); Doebling, S. W. (Scott W.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses the assessrnent of accuracy of simulation predictions. A procedure is developed to validate a simple non-linear model defined to capture the hardening behavior of a foam material subjected to a short-duration transient impact. Validation means that the predictive accuracy of the model must be established, not just in the vicinity of a single testing condition, but for all settings or configurations of the system. The notion of validation domain is introduced to designate the design region where the model's predictive accuracy is appropriate for the application of interest. Techniques brought to bear to assess the model's predictive accuracy include test-analysis coi-relation, calibration, bootstrapping and sampling for uncertainty propagation and metamodeling. The model's predictive accuracy is established by training a metalnodel of prediction error. The prediction error is not assumed to be systcmatic. Instead, it depends on which configuration of the system is analyzed. Finally, the prediction error's confidence bounds are estimated by propagating the uncertainty associated with specific modeling assumptions.

  17. Runtime Detection of C-Style Errors in UPC Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirkelbauer, P; Liao, C; Panas, T; Quinlan, D

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Unified Parallel C (UPC) extends the C programming language (ISO C 99) with explicit parallel programming support for the partitioned global address space (PGAS), which provides a global memory space with localized partitions to each thread. Like its ancestor C, UPC is a low-level language that emphasizes code efficiency over safety. The absence of dynamic (and static) safety checks allows programmer oversights and software flaws that can be hard to spot. In this paper, we present an extension of a dynamic analysis tool, ROSE-Code Instrumentation and Runtime Monitor (ROSECIRM), for UPC to help programmers find C-style errors involving the global address space. Built on top of the ROSE source-to-source compiler infrastructure, the tool instruments source files with code that monitors operations and keeps track of changes to the system state. The resulting code is linked to a runtime monitor that observes the program execution and finds software defects. We describe the extensions to ROSE-CIRM that were necessary to support UPC. We discuss complications that arise from parallel code and our solutions. We test ROSE-CIRM against a runtime error detection test suite, and present performance results obtained from running error-free codes. ROSE-CIRM is released as part of the ROSE compiler under a BSD-style open source license.

  18. Waveform Synthesizer For Imaging And Ranging Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DUDLEY, PETER A.; [et al

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for quadrature imbalance. An operational procedure filters imbalance effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver; unwanted energies, such as imbalance energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of quadrature imbalance can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  19. Waveform Synthesizer For Imaging And Ranging Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dubbert, Dale F. (Cedar Crest, NM); Dudley, Peter A. (Albuquerque, NM); Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Tise, Bertice L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for Local Oscillator (LO) feed-through. An operational procedure filters LO feed-through effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver, unwanted energies, such as LO feed-through energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of LO feed-through can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  20. New York Network Members Join Forces to Create Green Jobs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    York Network Members Join Forces to Create Green Jobs New York Network Members Join Forces to Create Green Jobs Photo of a group of five people standing, looking at the camera....

  1. Using Machine Learning to Create Turbine Performance Models (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton, A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbine power output is known to be a strong function of wind speed, but is also affected by turbulence and shear. In this work, new aerostructural simulations of a generic 1.5 MW turbine are used to explore atmospheric influences on power output. Most significant is the hub height wind speed, followed by hub height turbulence intensity and then wind speed shear across the rotor disk. These simulation data are used to train regression trees that predict the turbine response for any combination of wind speed, turbulence intensity, and wind shear that might be expected at a turbine site. For a randomly selected atmospheric condition, the accuracy of the regression tree power predictions is three times higher than that of the traditional power curve methodology. The regression tree method can also be applied to turbine test data and used to predict turbine performance at a new site. No new data is required in comparison to the data that are usually collected for a wind resource assessment. Implementing the method requires turbine manufacturers to create a turbine regression tree model from test site data. Such an approach could significantly reduce bias in power predictions that arise because of different turbulence and shear at the new site, compared to the test site.

  2. Hydrodynamic model for picosecond propagation of laser-created nanoplasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Vikrant; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of a free-electron-laser pulse with a moderate or large size cluster is known to create a quasi-neutral nanoplasma, which then expands on hydrodynamic timescale, i.e., $>1$ ps. To have a better understanding of ion and electron data from experiments derived from laser-irradiated clusters, one needs to simulate cluster dynamics on such long timescales for which the molecular dynamics approach becomes inefficient. We therefore propose a two-step Molecular Dynamics-Hydrodynamic scheme. In the first step we use molecular dynamics code to follow the dynamics of an irradiated cluster until all the photo-excitation and corresponding relaxation processes are finished and a nanoplasma, consisting of ground-state ions and thermalized electrons, is formed. In the second step we perform long-timescale propagation of this nanoplasma with a computationally efficient hydrodynamic approach. In the present paper we examine the feasibility of a hydrodynamic two-fluid approach to follow the expansion of spherica...

  3. Self-aligned nanostructures created by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Nix, Anne-Katrin; Hofsaess, Hans [2. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hundplatz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krauser, Johann [Hochschule Harz, Friedrichstrasse 57-59, D-38855 Wernigerode (Germany); Trautmann, Christina [GSI Helmholzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Weidinger, Alois [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) swift heavy ions create conducting tracks of about 8 nm in diameter. To apply these nanowires and implement them into nanodevices, they have to be contacted and gated. In the present work, we demonstrate the fabrication of conducting vertical nanostructures in ta-C together with self-aligned gate electrodes. A multilayer assembly is irradiated with GeV heavy ions and subsequently exposed to several selective etching processes. The samples consist of a Si wafer as substrate covered by a thin ta-C layer. On top is deposited a SiN{sub x} film for insulation, a Cr layer as electrode, and finally a polycarbonate film as ion track template. Chemical track etching opens nanochannels in the polymer which are self-aligned with the conducting tracks in ta-C because they are produced by the same ions. Through the pores in the polymer template, the Cr and SiN{sub x} layers are opened by ion beam sputtering and plasma etching, respectively. The resulting structure consists of nanowires embedded in the insulating carbon matrix with a built in gate electrode and has potential application as gated field emission cathode.

  4. Range Con: a management evaluation system for assessing sucess of selected range improvement practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekblad, Steven Linn

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategic resource management plans. Individual management skills and managerial environment have not been considered when predicting biological and economic response of range management practices. Risk for individual managers adopting unsuited... APPENDIX Prototype Range Management Skills Survey. Range Management Skills Survey Survey Data Tables. Validation Figures. VITA 64 65 74 92 104 106 1X LIST OP FIGURES FIGURE Page 1. The Range Con expert system in relation to the Resource...

  5. Created to Serve: Colorado State University's Impact on the State's Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Created to Serve: Colorado State University's Impact on the State's Economy #12;2 Created to Serve: Created to Serve: Colorado State University's Impact on the State's Economy All data, research's Impact on the State's Economy Message from the President Colorado State, as a land-grant university

  6. University of Exeter Site Manager Manual Creating links 1 University of Exeter Web Team, January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearhop, Stuart

    University of Exeter Site Manager Manual Creating links 1 University of Exeter Web Team, January postgraduates' accommodation page.' Avoid using URLs for links in web page text. It is best practice to use of Exeter Site Manager Manual Creating links 2 University of Exeter Web Team, January 2012 Creating links

  7. Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirthlin, Michael J.

    Laser Range Finder Objective: Use a forward pointing laser range finder to detect and avoid obstacles. Principle Investigators: Randy Beard, Tim McLain Laser Range Finder Opti-Logic RS400 Laser path, laser detects object. 2. Upon detection, insert cylindrical object into world map and plan path

  8. Student Ownership of Work Created in Computer Science Classes and Ownership of software, including the source code, that students create as part of his or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Student Ownership of Work Created in Computer Science Classes and Projects Ownership of software, including the source code, that students create as part of his or her MSU education activities a perpetual royaltyfree nonexclusive right to use the source code and make derivative works for educational

  9. Recommended Practice: Creating Cyber Forensics Plans for Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Cornelius; Mark Fabro

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyber forensics has been in the popular mainstream for some time, and has matured into an information-technology capability that is very common among modern information security programs. The goal of cyber forensics is to support the elements of troubleshooting, monitoring, recovery, and the protection of sensitive data. Moreover, in the event of a crime being committed, cyber forensics is also the approach to collecting, analyzing, and archiving data as evidence in a court of law. Although scalable to many information technology domains, especially modern corporate architectures, cyber forensics can be challenging when being applied to non-traditional environments, which are not comprised of current information technologies or are designed with technologies that do not provide adequate data storage or audit capabilities. In addition, further complexity is introduced if the environments are designed using proprietary solutions and protocols, thus limiting the ease of which modern forensic methods can be utilized. The legacy nature and somewhat diverse or disparate component aspects of control systems environments can often prohibit the smooth translation of modern forensics analysis into the control systems domain. Compounded by a wide variety of proprietary technologies and protocols, as well as critical system technologies with no capability to store significant amounts of event information, the task of creating a ubiquitous and unified strategy for technical cyber forensics on a control systems device or computing resource is far from trivial. To date, no direction regarding cyber forensics as it relates to control systems has been produced other than what might be privately available from commercial vendors. Current materials have been designed to support event recreation (event-based), and although important, these requirements do not always satisfy the needs associated with incident response or forensics that are driven by cyber incidents. To address these issues and to accommodate for the diversity in both system and architecture types, a framework based in recommended practices to address forensics in the control systems domain is required. This framework must be fully flexible to allow for deployment into any control systems environment regardless of technologies used. Moreover, the framework and practices must provide for direction on the integration of modern network security technologies with traditionally closed systems, the result being a true defense-in-depth strategy for control systems architectures. This document takes the traditional concepts of cyber forensics and forensics engineering and provides direction regarding augmentation for control systems operational environments. The goal is to provide guidance to the reader with specifics relating to the complexity of cyber forensics for control systems, guidance to allow organizations to create a self-sustaining cyber forensics program, and guidance to support the maintenance and evolution of such programs. As the current control systems cyber security community of interest is without any specific direction on how to proceed with forensics in control systems environments, this information product is intended to be a first step.

  10. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  11. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Hu, Anzi; Wall, Michael L; Foss-Feig, Michael; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  12. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  13. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  14. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikashkali Midya; Jérémie Evrard; Sylvain Abramowicz; O. L. Ramírez Suárez; Jean-Marc Sparenberg

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  15. Topological phases with long-range interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe-Xuan Gong; Mohammad F. Maghrebi; Anzi Hu; Michael L. Wall; Michael Foss-Feig; Alexey V. Gorshkov

    2015-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological phases of matter are primarily studied in quantum many-body systems with short-range interactions. Whether various topological phases can survive in the presence of long-range interactions, however, is largely unknown. Here we show that a paradigmatic example of a symmetry-protected topological phase, the Haldane phase of an antiferromagnetic spin-1 chain, surprisingly remains intact in the presence of arbitrarily slowly decaying power-law interactions. The influence of long-range interactions on the topological order is largely quantitative, and we expect similar results for more general systems. Our conclusions are based on large-scale matrix-product-state simulations and two complementary effective-field-theory calculations. The striking agreement between the numerical and analytical results rules out finite-size effects. The topological phase considered here should be experimentally observable in a recently developed trapped-ion quantum simulator.

  16. Recompile if your codes run into MPICH error after the maintenance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recompile if your codes run into MPICH errors after the maintenance on 6252014 Recompile if your codes run into MPICH error after the maintenance on 6252014 June 27, 2014 (0...

  17. Design techniques for graph-based error-correcting codes and their applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Ching Fu

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -correcting (channel) coding. The main idea of error-correcting codes is to add redundancy to the information to be transmitted so that the receiver can explore the correlation between transmitted information and redundancy and correct or detect errors caused...

  18. V-109: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-109: Google Chrome WebKit Type Confusion Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

  19. T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code T-545: RealPlayer Heap Corruption Error in 'vidplin.dll' Lets Remote Users Execute...

  20. Cognitive analysis of students' errors and misconceptions in variables, equations, and functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaobao

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    such issues, three basic algebra concepts - variable, equation, and function – are used to analyze students’ errors, possible buggy algorithms, and the conceptual basis of these errors: misconceptions. Through the research on these three basic concepts...

  1. Using Graphs for Fast Error Term Approximation of Time-varying Datasets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuber, C; LaMar, E C; Pascucci, V; Hamann, B; Joy, K I

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for the efficient computation and storage of approximations of error tables used for error estimation of a region between different time steps in time-varying datasets. The error between two time steps is defined as the distance between the data of these time steps. Error tables are used to look up the error between different time steps of a time-varying dataset, especially when run time error computation is expensive. However, even the generation of error tables itself can be expensive. For n time steps, the exact error look-up table (which stores the error values for all pairs of time steps in a matrix) has a memory complexity and pre-processing time complexity of O(n2), and O(1) for error retrieval. Our approximate error look-up table approach uses trees, where the leaf nodes represent original time steps, and interior nodes contain an average (or best-representative) of the children nodes. The error computed on an edge of a tree describes the distance between the two nodes on that edge. Evaluating the error between two different time steps requires traversing a path between the two leaf nodes, and accumulating the errors on the traversed edges. For n time steps, this scheme has a memory complexity and pre-processing time complexity of O(nlog(n)), a significant improvement over the exact scheme; the error retrieval complexity is O(log(n)). As we do not need to calculate all possible n2 error terms, our approach is a fast way to generate the approximation.

  2. T-719:Apache mod_proxy_ajp HTTP Processing Error Lets Remote Users Deny Service

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote user can cause the backend server to remain in an error state until the retry timeout expires.

  3. Bayesian Semiparametric Density Deconvolution and Regression in the Presence of Measurement Errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Abhra

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    BAYESIAN SEMIPARAMETRIC DENSITY DECONVOLUTION AND REGRESSION IN THE PRESENCE OF MEASUREMENT ERRORS A Dissertation by ABHRA SARKAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Copyright 2014 Abhra Sarkar ABSTRACT Although the literature on measurement error problems is quite extensive, so- lutions to even the most fundamental measurement error problems like density de- convolution and regression with errors...

  4. Modified automatic time error control and inadvertent interchange reduction for the WSCC interconnected power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McReynolds, W.L. (Bonneville Power Administration, Vancouver, WA (US)); Badley, D.E. (N.W. Power Pool, Coordinating Office, Portland, OR (US))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an automatic generation control (AGC) system that simultaneously reduces time error and accumulated inadvertent interchange energy in interconnected power system. This method is automatic time error and accumulated inadvertent interchange reduction (AIIR). With this method control areas help correct the system time error when doing so also tends to correct accumulated inadvertent interchange. Thus in one step accumulated inadvertent interchange and system time error are corrected.

  5. Design error diagnosis and correction in digital circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Debashis

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , each primary output would impose a con- straint on the on-set and off-set. These constraints should be combined together to derive the final on-set and off-set of the new function. Proposition 2: [9, 18, 17] Let i be the index of the primary outputs... to this equation are deleted. The work in [17] is also based on Boolean comparisons and applies to multiple errors. Overall, their method does not guarantee a solution. Test-vector simulation methods proposed for the DEDC problem include [20, 22, 26]. In [20...

  6. An error correcting procedure for imperfect supervised, nonparametric classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, Dennis Ray

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON INFORMATION THEORY . is active) . I'or simplicity in writing, Pr(B=B. ) will be ab- j breviated by Pr(B. ), and f(x/B=B ) will be abbreviated by j f (x/B. ) . The basic problem is, upon observing x, to determine j which class is active. If complete... to be B , r (x), is r (x) ( L Pr(B /x) i=1 The conditional probability of error can be minimized over j by assigning to a measurement x, the label value B such that minimizes r (x) . The rule which will do this is Bayes rule, b*. The resulting...

  7. Optimum decoding of TCM in the presence of phase errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Jae Choong

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discussed. Our approach is to assume that intersymbol interference has been effectively removed by the equalizer while the phase tracking scheme has partially removed the phase jitter, in which case the output of the equalizer will have a slowly varying.... The DAL [I] used the decision at the output ol' the Viterbi decoder to demodulate the local c&arrier. The performance degradation of coded 8-PSK when disturbed by recovered carrier phase error and jitter is investigatecl in i'Gi, in which simulation...

  8. Effects of color coding on keying time and errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Brenda Gail

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were to determine the effects if any oi' color coding upon the error rate and location time of special func- tion keys on a computer keyboard. An ACT-YA CRT keyboard interfaced with a Kromemco microcomputer was used. There were 84 high schoool... to comnunicate with more and more computer-like devices. The most common computer/human interface is the terminal, consisting of a display screen, and keyboard. The format and layout on the display screen of computer-generated information is generally...

  9. Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Transcript | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational| Department ofCommittee Report forCommon Errors

  10. Range Creek Calibrated Dates Beta-202190

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Range Creek Calibrated Dates 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Beta-202190 Beta-175753 Beta-175755 Beta-235067 Beta-202189 Beta-214831 Beta-202188 Beta-202191 Beta-203630 Beta-214832 Beta-175754 Beta a Carbon-14 calibrated date (95% CI) between 1000 and 1200 C.E. (Figure 5: Beta-235067). The calibrated

  11. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnside, Walter D. (Columbus, OH); Rudduck, Roger C. (Columbus, OH); Yu, Jiunn S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  12. 6, 1018310216, 2006 Long-range transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 6, 10183­10216, 2006 Long-range transport of Asian dust and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin and air pollutants to Taiwan: observed evidence and model simulation C.-Y. Lin 1 , Z. Wang 2 , W.-N. Chen and air pollutants to Taiwan C.-Y. Lin et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  13. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, H.; Valenzuela, J.A.; Nutt, W.E.

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof. 6 figures.

  14. Wide temperature range seal for demountable joints

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sixsmith, Herbert (Norwich, VT); Valenzuela, Javier A. (Grantham, NH); Nutt, William E. (Enfield, NH)

    1991-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a seal for demountable joints operating over a wide temperature range down to liquid helium temperatures. The seal has anti-extrusion guards which prevent extrusion of the soft ductile sealant material, which may be indium or an alloy thereof.

  15. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna (10), so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive (24) and transmit cavities (22) by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling.

  16. Impulse radar with swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Techniques are used to reduce clutter in the receive signal, such as decoupling the receive and transmit cavities by placing a space between them, using conductive or radiative damping elements on the cavities, and using terminating plates on the sides of the openings. The antennas can be arranged in a side-by-side parallel spaced apart configuration or in a coplanar opposed configuration which significantly reduces main bang coupling. 25 figs.

  17. Electrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Machinery C T C T EET 365W Electrical Power & Machinery Laboratory C C, V V C C, V V EET 370T EnergyElectrical Engineering Technology (EET) LONG RANGE SCHEDULE Course Number and Name Fall 2010 Spr 2011 Sum 2011 Fall 2011 Spr 2012 Sum 2012 Fall 2012 Spr 2013 Sum 2013 Fall 2013 Spr 2014 Sum 2014 EET

  18. Trade-off of lossless source coding error exponents Cheng Chang Anant Sahai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    Trade-off of lossless source coding error exponents Cheng Chang Anant Sahai HP Labs, Palo Alto EECS, UC Berkeley ISIT 2008 Chang (HP Labs), Sahai ( UC Berkeley) Error Exponents trade-off ISIT 2008 1 (HP Labs), Sahai ( UC Berkeley) Error Exponents trade-off ISIT 2008 2 / 14 #12;Stabilizing an unstable

  19. A Memory Soft Error Measurement on Production Systems Xin Li Kai Shen Michael C. Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Kai

    A Memory Soft Error Measurement on Production Systems Xin Li Kai Shen Michael C. Huang University and dealing with these soft (or transient) errors is impor- tant for system reliability. Several earlier for memory soft error measurement on production systems where performance impact on existing running ap

  20. A Memory Soft Error Measurement on Production Systems # Xin Li Kai Shen Michael C. Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Kai

    A Memory Soft Error Measurement on Production Systems # Xin Li Kai Shen Michael C. Huang University and dealing with these soft (or transient) errors is impor­ tant for system reliability. Several earlier for memory soft error measurement on production systems where performance impact on existing running ap

  1. An Energy-Aware Fault Tolerant Scheduling Framework for Soft Error Resilient Cloud Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    . INTRODUCTION Soft error resiliency has become a major concern for modern computing systems as CMOS technology systems [8, 9]. Although it is impossible to entirely eliminate spontaneous soft errors, they canAn Energy-Aware Fault Tolerant Scheduling Framework for Soft Error Resilient Cloud Computing

  2. Digication Error Message:"Your username is already in use by another account."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Digication Error Message:"Your username is already in use by another account." You may need you have one). If you receive the error message below, here's how to log into your Digication account. (For example, if the error message appeared when using your employee account, switch to your employee

  3. Non-Concurrent Error Detection and Correction in Fault-Tolerant Discrete-Time LTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjicostis, Christoforos

    Non-Concurrent Error Detection and Correction in Fault-Tolerant Discrete-Time LTI Dynamic Systems encoded form and allow error detection and correction to be performed through concurrent parity checks (i that allows parity checks to capture the evolution of errors in the system and, based on non-concurrent parity

  4. Error Analysis of Ia Supernova and Query on Cosmic Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiuhe Peng; Yiming Hu; Kun Wang; Yu Liang

    2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Some serious faults in error analysis of observations for SNIa have been found. Redoing the same error analysis of SNIa, by our idea, it is found that the average total observational error of SNIa is obviously greater than $0.55^m$, so we can't decide whether the universe is accelerating expansion or not.

  5. Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominici, Francesca

    1 Exposure Measurement Error in Time-Series Studies of Air Pollution: Concepts and Consequences S in time-series studies 1 11/11/99 Keywords: measurement error, air pollution, time series, exposure of air pollution and health. Because measurement error may have substantial implications for interpreting

  6. Waveform synthesis for imaging and ranging applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W.; Dudley, Peter A.; Dubert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.

    2004-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Frequency dependent corrections are provided for quadrature imbalance and Local Oscillator (LO) feed-through. An operational procedure filters imbalance and LO feed-through effects without prior calibration or equalization. Waveform generation can be adjusted/corrected in a synthetic aperture radar system (SAR), where a rolling phase shift is applied to the SAR's QDWS signal where it is demodulated in a receiver; unwanted energies, such as LO feed-through and/or imbalance energy, are separated from a desired signal in Doppler; the separated energy is filtered from the receiver leaving the desired signal; and the separated energy in the receiver is measured to determine the degree of imbalance that is represented by it. Calibration methods can also be implemented into synthesis. The degree of LO feed-through and imbalance can be used to determine calibration values that can then be provided as compensation for frequency dependent errors in components, such as the QDWS and SSB mixer, affecting quadrature signal quality.

  7. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Whitmore; M. T. Murphy

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium--argon calibration can be tracked with $\\sim$10 m s$^{-1}$ precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders ($\\sim$50--100 \\AA) and entire spectrographs arms ($\\sim$1000--3000 \\AA). Using archival spectra from the past 20 years we have probed the supercalibration history of the VLT--UVES and Keck--HIRES spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically $\\pm$200 m s$^{-1}$ per 1000 \\AA. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, $\\alpha$. The spurious deviations in $\\alpha$ produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT--UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in $\\alpha$ from quasar absorption lines.

  8. Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

  9. Aperiodic dynamical decoupling sequences in presence of pulse errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Hui Wang; V. V. Dobrovitski

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a promising tool for preserving the quantum states of qubits. However, small imperfections in the control pulses can seriously affect the fidelity of decoupling, and qualitatively change the evolution of the controlled system at long times. Using both analytical and numerical tools, we theoretically investigate the effect of the pulse errors accumulation for two aperiodic DD sequences, the Uhrig's DD UDD) protocol [G. S. Uhrig, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 98}, 100504 (2007)], and the Quadratic DD (QDD) protocol [J. R. West, B. H. Fong and D. A. Lidar, Phys. Rev. Lett {\\bf 104}, 130501 (2010)]. We consider the implementation of these sequences using the electron spins of phosphorus donors in silicon, where DD sequences are applied to suppress dephasing of the donor spins. The dependence of the decoupling fidelity on different initial states of the spins is the focus of our study. We investigate in detail the initial drop in the DD fidelity, and its long-term saturation. We also demonstrate that by applying the control pulses along different directions, the performance of QDD protocols can be noticeably improved, and explain the reason of such an improvement. Our results can be useful for future implementations of the aperiodic decoupling protocols, and for better understanding of the impact of errors on quantum control of spins.

  10. Verification of unfold error estimates in the UFO code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Biggs, F.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral unfolding is an inverse mathematical operation which attempts to obtain spectral source information from a set of tabulated response functions and data measurements. Several unfold algorithms have appeared over the past 30 years; among them is the UFO (UnFold Operator) code. In addition to an unfolded spectrum, UFO also estimates the unfold uncertainty (error) induced by running the code in a Monte Carlo fashion with prescribed data distributions (Gaussian deviates). In the problem studied, data were simulated from an arbitrarily chosen blackbody spectrum (10 keV) and a set of overlapping response functions. The data were assumed to have an imprecision of 5% (standard deviation). 100 random data sets were generated. The built-in estimate of unfold uncertainty agreed with the Monte Carlo estimate to within the statistical resolution of this relatively small sample size (95% confidence level). A possible 10% bias between the two methods was unresolved. The Monte Carlo technique is also useful in underdetemined problems, for which the error matrix method does not apply. UFO has been applied to the diagnosis of low energy x rays emitted by Z-Pinch and ion-beam driven hohlraums.

  11. A global conformance quality model. A new strategic tool for minimizing defects caused by variation, error, and complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinckley, C.M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Japanese products in the marketplace points to the dominant role of quality in product competition. Our focus is motivated by the tremendous pressure to improve conformance quality by reducing defects to previously unimaginable limits in the range of 1 to 10 parts per million. Toward this end, we have developed a new model of conformance quality that addresses each of the three principle defect sources: (1) Variation, (2) Human Error, and (3) Complexity. Although the role of variation in conformance quality is well documented, errors occur so infrequently that their significance is not well known. We have shown that statistical methods are not useful in characterizing and controlling errors, the most common source of defects. Excessive complexity is also a root source of defects, since it increases errors and variation defects. A missing link in the defining a global model has been the lack of a sound correlation between complexity and defects. We have used Design for Assembly (DFA) methods to quantify assembly complexity and have shown that assembly times can be described in terms of the Pareto distribution in a clear exception to the Central Limit Theorem. Within individual companies we have found defects to be highly correlated with DFA measures of complexity in broad studies covering tens of millions of assembly operations. Applying the global concepts, we predicted that Motorola`s Six Sigma method would only reduce defects by roughly a factor of two rather than orders of magnitude, a prediction confirmed by Motorola`s data. We have also shown that the potential defects rates of product concepts can be compared in the earliest stages of development. The global Conformance Quality Model has demonstrated that the best strategy for improvement depends upon the quality control strengths and weaknesses.

  12. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as 12C(e,e'p)11B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to directly observe these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3 < xB < 0.7 deep inelastic scattering ratios.

  13. Short-Range Nucleon-Nucleon Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23601 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Valence-shell nucleon knock-out experiments, such as {sup 12}C(e,e'p){sup 11}B, measure less strength then is predicted by independent particle shell model calculations. The theoretical solution to this problem is to include the correlations between the nucleons in the nucleus in the calculations. Motivated by these results, many electron scattering experiments have tried to isolate the signal from these correlations in order to gain new insight into the short-range part of the nucleon-nucleon potential. Unfortunately, many competing mechanisms can cause the same observable final-state as an initial-state correlation, making truly isolating the signal extremely challenging. This paper reviews the recent experimental evidence for short-range correlations, as well as explores the possibility that such correlations are responsible for the EMC effect in the 0.3

  14. Intermediate Range Order and Transport Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Simulation Study February 7, 2005 Patrick Pfleiderer ICP, University of Stuttgart in Collaboration: 2 2 21 ),...,,( dt d mV i iNii r rrrF =-= t m ttt ttt t m t ttttt i ii ii i i iii 2 )()( )()( 2-range and responsible for covalent character · obtained from ab initio calculations · time step: 1.6fs 6 2 r C eA r eqq

  15. What Range Herbivores Eat -- and Why

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert K.; Forbes, T. D. A.; Machen, Richard V.

    1999-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    systems that have the chemicals need- ed to digest it. Cellulose is digested by fermenta- tion. Fermentation requires time and a con- ducive environment in the digestive system *Assistant Professor and Extension Range Specialist; Associate Professor... fermentation can take place. Some monogastrics (like horses, rabbits) have either an enlarged stomach or areas in the large intestine and/or cecum where fermentation can take place. Monogastrics with an enlarged stomach (like the hippopotamus) are called...

  16. Causality and the effective range expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -W. Hammer; Dean Lee

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the generalization of Wigner's causality bounds and Bethe's integral formula for the effective range parameter to arbitrary dimension and arbitrary angular momentum. We also discuss the impact of these constraints on the separation of low- and high-momentum scales and universality in low-energy scattering. Some of our results were summarized earlier in a letter publication. In this work, we present full derivations and several detailed examples.

  17. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  18. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  19. Quantum control and long-range quantum correlations in dynamical Casimir arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Stassi; Simone De Liberato; Luigi Garziano; Bernardo Spagnolo; Salvatore Savasta

    2015-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent observation of the dynamical Casimir effect in a modulated superconducting waveguide, coronating thirty years of world-wide research, empowered the quantum technology community with a powerful tool to create entangled photons on-chip. In this work we show how, going beyond the single waveguide paradigm using a scalable array, it is possible to create multipartite nonclassical states, with the possibility to control the long-range quantum correlations of the emitted photons. In particular, our finite-temperature theory shows how maximally entangled $NOON$ states can be engineered in a realistic setup. The results here presented open the way to new kinds of quantum fluids of light, arising from modulated vacuum fluctuations in linear systems.

  20. BIM Principles to Practice: Using BIM to Create a New Model for Producing Animation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naugle, Nicholas D.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    BIM PRINCIPLES TO PRACTICE: USING BIM TO CREATE A NEW MODEL FOR PRODUCING ANIMATION A Thesis by NICHOLAS D. NAUGLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2011 Major Subject: Visualization Sciences i BIM Principles to Practice: Using BIM to Create a New Model for Producing Animation Copyright Nicholas D. Naugle 2011 xiv BIM PRINCIPLES TO PRACTICE: USING BIM TO CREATE A NEW...

  1. Creating energy-efficient, affordable housing Joel Fischer, Ana Hawkins, Keith Lindgren, Ceci Marn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    UMore Park Creating energy-efficient, affordable housing 5/9/2011 Joel Fischer, Ana Hawkins, Keith........................................................................................................5 Energy Efficiency.......................................................................................................................................5 Energy Efficiency Standards in Affordable Housing

  2. Track 8: Safety of Work Created Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 8: Safety of Work Created Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)

  3. Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 Laboratory Ventilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    Created: July, 2014 Laboratory Safety Design Guide Section 3 ­ Laboratory Ventilation 3-1 Section 3 LABORATORY VENTILATION Contents A. Scope .................................................................................................................3-2 B. General Laboratory Ventilation

  4. INTERNATIONALIZING BRAZIL’S UNIVERSITIES: Creating Coherent National Policies Must Be a Priority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcelo Knobel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERNATIONALIZING BRAZIL’S UNIVERSITIES: Creating Coherentalternatives. How will Brazil fare in this competition foreducation study programs, Brazil must deal with a number of

  5. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, George (Reno, NV)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  6. Statistical evaluation of design-error related accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ott, K.O.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recently published paper (Campbell and Ott, 1979), a general methodology was proposed for the statistical evaluation of design-error related accidents. The evaluation aims at an estimate of the combined residual frequency of yet unknown types of accidents lurking in a certain technological system. Here, the original methodology is extended, as to apply to a variety of systems that evolves during the development of large-scale technologies. A special categorization of incidents and accidents is introduced to define the events that should be jointly analyzed. The resulting formalism is applied to the development of the nuclear power reactor technology, considering serious accidents that involve in the accident-progression a particular design inadequacy.

  7. Statistical Error analysis of Nucleon-Nucleon phenomenological potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Navarro Perez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon-Nucleon potentials are commonplace in nuclear physics and are determined from a finite number of experimental data with limited precision sampling the scattering process. We study the statistical assumptions implicit in the standard least squares fitting procedure and apply, along with more conventional tests, a tail sensitive quantile-quantile test as a simple and confident tool to verify the normality of residuals. We show that the fulfilment of normality tests is linked to a judicious and consistent selection of a nucleon-nucleon database. These considerations prove crucial to a proper statistical error analysis and uncertainty propagation. We illustrate these issues by analyzing about 8000 proton-proton and neutron-proton scattering published data. This enables the construction of potentials meeting all statistical requirements necessary for statistical uncertainty estimates in nuclear structure calculations.

  8. Modern testing meets wide range of objectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlig-Economides, C.A.; Hegeman, P. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Houston, TX (United States)); Clark, G. (Schlumberger Oilfield Services, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing sequences in two very different wells illustrate the wide range of objectives that are met with modern testing procedures. The first example is a drill stem test in an exploration well. The second test is in an established producing well. The exploration well test incorporated tubing-conveyed perforating, fluid sampling, production logging, and matrix stimulation to evaluate and properly treat near-well bore damage, as well as to investigate reservoir volume and characterize boundaries. The test on the established producer evaluated whether a workover could remedy lower than expected productivity. Production logging was combined with stationary transient measurements.

  9. Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

  10. Short range correlations and the EMC effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Piasetzky, L.B. Weinstein, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Gomez, O. Hen, R. Shneor

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) is linearly related to the Short Range Correlation (SRC) scaling factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering. We speculate that the observed correlation is due to the fact that both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by high momentum nucleons in the nucleus. The observed phenomenological relationship can be used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn-pair cross sections, the DIS cross section for a free neutron, View the MathML source, the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions, and the u/d ratio in a free proton.

  11. Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.Frequency |DepartmentEventRange Fuels

  12. Rangely Oilfield Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,Jump to:Radiant ElectricRamkyRange

  13. Rangely, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name:Rancia 2Rangely, Colorado: Energy

  14. Range Fuels Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11 Connecticut2 of 3)the Office98RainRaisingRange

  15. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control.

  16. Short range, ultra-wideband radar with high resolution swept range gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A radar range finder and hidden object locator is based on ultra-wide band radar with a high resolution swept range gate. The device generates an equivalent time amplitude scan with a typical range of 4 inches to 20 feet, and an analog range resolution as limited by a jitter of on the order of 0.01 inches. A differential sampling receiver is employed to effectively eliminate ringing and other aberrations induced in the receiver by the near proximity of the transmit antenna, so a background subtraction is not needed, simplifying the circuitry while improving performance. Uses of the invention include a replacement of ultrasound devices for fluid level sensing, automotive radar, such as cruise control and parking assistance, hidden object location, such as stud and rebar finding. Also, this technology can be used when positioned over a highway lane to collect vehicle count and speed data for traffic control. 14 figs.

  17. Create Facebook applications with CodeIgniter Integrating the Facebook SDK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Create Facebook applications with CodeIgniter Integrating the Facebook SDK Skill Level to incorporate the Facebook SDK into the CodeIgniter framework, using the available functions to create applications. This article shows you how to get the sample Facebook application working with the Code

  18. PagePrompter: An Intelligent Agent for Web Navigation Created Using Data Mining Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regina, University of

    1 PagePrompter: An Intelligent Agent for Web Navigation Created Using Data Mining Techniques Y.Y. Yao, H.J. Hamilton, and Xuewei Wang Abstract: Creating an intelligent agent for web navigation, which is an agent that dynam- ically gives recommendations to a web site's users by learning from web usage mining

  19. Creating Small Roadmaps for Solving Motion Planning Problems # Roland Geraerts and Mark H. Overmars

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    Geraerts, R.J.

    Creating Small Roadmaps for Solving Motion Planning Problems # Roland Geraerts and Mark H. Overmars,markov}@cs.uu.nl Abstract--- In robot motion planning, many algorithms have been proposed that create a roadmap from which on the quality of the roadmap, i.e. they do not promise that a path will always be found in the roadmap if one

  20. Creating Small Roadmaps for Solving Motion Planning Problems Roland Geraerts and Mark H. Overmars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geraerts, R.J.

    Creating Small Roadmaps for Solving Motion Planning Problems Roland Geraerts and Mark H. Overmars,markov}@cs.uu.nl Abstract-- In robot motion planning, many algorithms have been proposed that create a roadmap from which on the quality of the roadmap, i.e. they do not promise that a path will always be found in the roadmap if one