Sample records for random vibration environment

  1. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction Analysis Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic Soil-Structure...

  2. Stretched Polymers in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe; Yvan Velenik

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched random environments.

  3. Random walk in random environment: a dynamicist's approch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, I-Shih

    , equivalently: RW in a (quenched) disordered medium, or: Random walk in random environment (RWRE) Marco LenciRandom walk in random environment: a dynamicist's approch Marco Lenci Universit`a di Bologna RWRE #12;Random walk in random environment Random walk (RW): Point (particle, walker) travels on Zd

  4. Random walks in random environment Tom Schmitz (MPI Leipzig)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thalmaier, Anton

    Random walks in random environment Tom Schmitz (MPI Leipzig) The model of random walks in random environment (RWRE) originates from physical and biological sciences and describes a random motion in a disordered medium. We consider RWRE on the d-dimensional lattice. The jump probabil- ities are themselves

  5. Bridges of Random Walks in a Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathon Peterson

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 25, 2010 ... Bridges of Random Walks in a Random Environment. Jonathon Peterson. Cornell University. Department of Mathematics. Joint work with Nina...

  6. RANDOM WALK IN DETERMINISTICALLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liverani, Carlangelo

    RANDOM WALK IN DETERMINISTICALLY CHANGING ENVIRONMENT DMITRY DOLGOPYAT AND CARLANGELO LIVERANI Abstract. We consider a random walk with transition probabilities weakly dependent on an environment of the environment the walk satisfies the CLT. 1. Introduction The continuing interest in the limit properties

  7. Central Limit Theorem for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. When $d \\ge 3$ and the fluctuation of the environment is well moderated by the random walk, we prove a central limit theorem for the density of the population, together with upper bounds for the density of the most populated site and the replica overlap. We also discuss the phase transition of this model in connection with directed polymers in random environment.

  8. A fluctuation theorem in a random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bonetto; G. Gallavotti; G. Gentile

    2006-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple class of chaotic systems in a random environment is considered and the fluctuation theorem is extended under the assumption of reversibility.

  9. SYSTEMS OF ONE-DIMENSIONAL RANDOM WALKS IN A COMMON RANDOM ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Jonathon

    SYSTEMS OF ONE-DIMENSIONAL RANDOM WALKS IN A COMMON RANDOM ENVIRONMENT JONATHON PETERSON Abstract. We consider a system of independent one-dimensional random walks in a common random environment under-dimensional random walks in a common random environment. We modify the standard notion of random walks in random

  10. KNOTS AND RANDOM WALKS IN VIBRATED GRANULAR CHAINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. BEN-NAIM; ET AL

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors study experimentally statistical properties of the opening times of knots in vertically vibrated granular chains. Our measurements are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with a theoretical model involving three random walks interacting via hard core exclusion in one spatial dimension. In particular, the knot survival probability follows a universal scaling function which is independent of the chain length, with a corresponding diffusive characteristic time scale. Both the large-exit-time and the small-exit-time tails of the distribution are suppressed exponentially, and the corresponding decay coefficients are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values.

  11. Testing a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  12. Localization for Branching Random Walks in Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyun Hu; Nobuo Yoshida

    2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider branching random walks in $d$-dimensional integer lattice with time-space i.i.d. offspring distributions. This model is known to exhibit a phase transition: If $d \\ge 3$ and the environment is "not too random", then, the total population grows as fast as its expectation with strictly positive probability. If,on the other hand, $d \\le 2$, or the environment is ``random enough", then the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely. We show the equivalence between the slow population growth and a natural localization property in terms of "replica overlap". We also prove a certain stronger localization property, whenever the total population grows strictly slower than its expectation almost surely.

  13. Large deviations for random walks in a random environment on a strip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 28, 2013 ... We consider a random walk in a random environment (RWRE) on the strip ... For a fixed environment ?, we can define the RWRE starting at (x,...

  14. Random-walk in Beta-distributed random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Barraquand; Ivan Corwin

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an exactly-solvable model of random walk in random environment that we call the Beta RWRE. This is a random walk in $\\mathbb{Z}$ which performs nearest neighbour jumps with transition probabilities drawn according to the Beta distribution. We also describe a related directed polymer model, which is a limit of the $q$-Hahn interacting particle system. Using a Fredholm determinant representation for the quenched probability distribution function of the walker's position, we are able to prove second order cube-root scale corrections to the large deviation principle satisfied by the walker's position, with convergence to the Tracy-Widom distribution. We also show that this limit theorem can be interpreted in terms of the maximum of strongly correlated random variables: the positions of independent walkers in the same environment. The zero-temperature counterpart of the Beta RWRE can be studied in a parallel way. We also prove a Tracy-Widom limit theorem for this model.

  15. RANDOM WALK IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH ORIENTATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RANDOM WALK IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH ORIENTATIONS ALEXIS oriented lattices, random walk in random environment, random walk in random scenery, functional limit-00634636,version2-24Nov2012 #12;RWRE IN A STRATIFIED ORIENTED MEDIUM 2 We denote by E and E

  16. Local Limit Theorems for Random Walks in a 1D Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolgopyat, Dmitry

    Local Limit Theorems for Random Walks in a 1D Random Environment D. Dolgopyat and I. Goldsheid Abstract. We consider random walks (RW) in a one-dimensional i.i.d. random environment with jumps to the nearest neighbours. For almost all environments, we prove a quenched Local Limit Theorem (LLT

  17. RANDOM WALK IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH ORIENTATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pène, Françoise

    RANDOM WALK IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT IN A TWO-DIMENSIONAL STRATIFIED MEDIUM WITH ORIENTATIONS ALEXIS walk in random environment, random walk in random scenery, functional limit theorem, transience. This research was supported by the french ANR project MEMEMO2. 1 #12;RWRE IN A STRATIFIED ORIENTED MEDIUM 2 Our

  18. NON-PERTURBATIVE APPROACH TO RANDOM WALK IN MARKOVIAN ENVIRONMENT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liverani, Carlangelo

    NON-PERTURBATIVE APPROACH TO RANDOM WALK IN MARKOVIAN ENVIRONMENT. DMITRY DOLGOPYAT AND CARLANGELO LIVERANI Abstract. We prove the CLT for a random walk in a dynamical environment where the states of the environment at different sites are independent Markov chains. 1. Introduction The study of random walk

  19. Using piezo-electric material to simulate a vibration environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jepsen, Richard A. (Albuquerque, NM); Davie, Neil T. (Cedar Crest, NM); Vangoethem, Douglas J. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Edward F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A target object can be vibrated using actuation that exploits the piezo-electric ("PE") property. Under combined conditions of vibration and centrifugal acceleration, a centrifugal load of the target object on PE vibration actuators can be reduced by using a counterweight that offsets the centrifugal loading. Target objects are also subjected to combinations of: spin, vibration, and acceleration; spin and vibration; and spin and acceleration.

  20. ASYMPTOTIC SHAPE FOR THE CONTACT PROCESS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ASYMPTOTIC SHAPE FOR THE CONTACT PROCESS IN RANDOM ENVIRONMENT OLIVIER GARET AND REGINE MARCHAND in stationary random environment. These theorems gen- eralize known results for the classical contact process environment, when the contact process survives, the set Ht/t almost surely converges to a compact set

  1. On a Class of Renewal Processes in a Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    On a Class of Renewal Processes in a Random Environment David Svensson April 12, 1998 #12; 1 #12 continuous lifelength distribution. A random environment is modelled by a positive recurrent birth and death, governed by the environment process and based on an underlying set of deterministic failure rate functions

  2. Scaling limits for gradient systems in random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Goncalves; M. D. Jara

    2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For interacting particle systems that satisfies the gradient condition, the hydrodynamic limit and the equilibrium fluctuations are well known. We prove that under the presence of a symmetric random environment, these scaling limits also hold for almost every choice of the environment, with homogenized coefficients that does not depend on the particular realization of the random environment.

  3. Stretched Polymers in Random Environment Dmitry Ioffe and Yvan Velenik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stretched Polymers in Random Environment Dmitry Ioffe and Yvan Velenik Abstract We survey recent results and open questions on the ballistic phase of stretched polymers in both annealed and quenched Introduction Stretched polymers or drifted random walks in random potentials could be consid- ered either

  4. Design and analysis of active vibration control in a microgravity environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwood, Clay Brian

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL IN A MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by CLAY BRIAN ATWOOD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESXGN AND ANALYSIS OF ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL XN A MXCROGRAVXTY ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by CLAY BRIAN ATWOOD Approved as to style and content by: Richard'Alexander (Chair...

  5. Randomly charged polymers in porous environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; C. von Ferber

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the conformational properties of charged polymers in a solvent in the presence of structural obstacles correlated according to a power law $\\sim x^{-a}$. We work within the continuous representation of a model of linear chain considered as a random sequence of charges $q_i=\\pm q_0$. Such a model captures the properties of polyampholytes -- heteropolymers comprising both positively and negatively charged monomers. We apply the direct polymer renormalization scheme and analyze the scaling behavior of charged polymers up to the first order of an $\\epsilon=6-d$, $\\delta=4-a$-expansion.

  6. Weakly interacting Bose gas in a random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falco, G. M.; Nattermann, T.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is added to the system. BEC in a random environment was observed in the superfluid phase of 4He in Vycor glass or aerogels,17 in 3He in aerogels,18 and in ultracold alkali atoms in disordered traps.19?26 Most of the papers concentrate on the possibility...

  7. Einstein relation for reversible diffusions in random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gantert, Nina

    Einstein relation for reversible diffusions in random environment N. Gantert P. Mathieu A the Einstein re- lation for this model. It says that the derivative at 0 of the effective velocity under an additional local drift equals the diffusivity of the model without drift. The Einstein rela- tion

  8. Testing in a combined vibration and acceleration environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jepsen, Richard Alan; Romero, Edward F.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has previously tested a capability to impose a 7.5 g-rms (30 g peak) radial vibration load up to 2 kHz on a 25 lb object with superimposed 50 g acceleration at its centrifuge facility. This was accomplished by attaching a 3,000 lb Unholtz-Dickie mechanical shaker at the end of the centrifuge arm to create a 'Vibrafuge'. However, the combination of non-radial vibration directions, and linear accelerations higher than 50g's are currently not possible because of the load capabilities of the shaker and the stresses on the internal shaker components due to the combined centrifuge acceleration. Therefore, a new technique using amplified piezo-electric actuators has been developed to surpass the limitations of the mechanical shaker system. They are lightweight, modular and would overcome several limitations presented by the current shaker. They are 'scalable', that is, adding more piezo-electric units in parallel or in series can support larger-weight test articles or displacement/frequency regimes. In addition, the units could be mounted on the centrifuge arm in various configurations to provide a variety of input directions. The design along with test results will be presented to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations of the new piezo-electric Vibrafuge.

  9. Mass fluctuations and diffusion in time-dependent random environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Krstulovic; Rehab Bitane; Jeremie Bec

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass ejection model in a time-dependent random environment with both temporal and spatial correlations is introduced. When the environment has a finite correlation length, individual particle trajectories are found to diffuse at large times with a displacement distribution that approaches a Gaussian. The collective dynamics of diffusing particles reaches a statistically stationary state, which is characterized in terms of a fluctuating mass density field. The probability distribution of density is studied numerically for both smooth and non-smooth scale-invariant random environments. A competition between trapping in the regions where the ejection rate of the environment vanishes and mixing due to its temporal dependence leads to large fluctuations of mass. These mechanisms are found to result in the presence of intermediate power-law tails in the probability distribution of the mass density. For spatially differentiable environments, the exponent of the right tail is shown to be universal and equal to -3/2. However, at small values, it is found to depend on the environment. Finally, spatial scaling properties of the mass distribution are investigated. The distribution of the coarse-grained density is shown to posses some rescaling properties that depend on the scale, the amplitude of the ejection rate, and the H\\"older exponent of the environment.

  10. Directed polymers in random environment with heavy tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Auffinger; Oren Louidor

    2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the model of Directed Polymers in Random Environment in 1+1 dimensions, where the distribution at a site has a tail which decays regularly polynomially with power \\alpha, where \\alpha \\in (0,2). After proper scaling of temperature \\beta^{-1}, we show strong localization of the polymer to a favorable region in the environment where energy and entropy are best balanced. We prove that this region has a weak limit under linear scaling and identify the limiting distribution as an (\\alpha, \\beta)-indexed family of measures on Lipschitz curves lying inside the 45-degrees-rotated square with unit diagonal. In particular, this shows order n transversal fluctuations of the polymer. If, and only if, \\alpha is small enough, we find that there exists a random critical temperature below which, but not above, the effect of the environment is macroscopic. The results carry over to d+1 dimensions for d>1 with minor modifications.

  11. Vibration Damping Control of Robot Arm Intended for Service Application in Human Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Vibration Damping Control of Robot Arm Intended for Service Application in Human Environment anthropomorphic robot arm enabling the torque measurement in each joint and tactile area recognition to ensure in heavily loaded joints have risen due to compliances introduced into each joint of the robot arm by means

  12. A Bell pair in a generic random matrix environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Pineda; Thomas H. Seligman

    2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Two non-interacting qubits are coupled to an environment. Both coupling and environment are represented by random matrix ensembles. The initial state of the pair is a Bell state, though we also consider arbitrary pure states. Decoherence of the pair is evaluated analytically in terms of purity; Monte Carlo calculations confirm these results and also yield the concurrence of the pair. Entanglement within the pair accelerates decoherence. Numerics display the relation between concurrence and purity known for Werner states, allowing us to give a formula for concurrence decay.

  13. Directed polymers in a random environment with a defect line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth S. Alexander; Gkhan Y?ld?r?m

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the depinning transition of the $1+1$ dimensional directed polymer in a random environment with a defect line. The random environment consists of i.i.d. potential values assigned to each site of $\\mathbb{Z}^2$; sites on the positive axis have the potential enhanced by a deterministic value $u$. We show that for small inverse temperature $\\beta$ the quenched and annealed free energies differ significantly at most in a small neighborhood (of size of order $\\beta$) of the annealed critical point $u_c^a=0$. For the case $u=0$, we show that the difference between quenched and annealed free energies is of order $\\beta^4$ as $\\beta\\to 0$, assuming only finiteness of exponential moments of the potential values, improving existing results which required stronger assumptions.

  14. Sharp critical behavior for pinning model in random correlated environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Berger; Hubert Lacoin

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates the effect for random pinning models of long range power-law decaying correlations in the environment. For a particular type of environment based on a renewal construction, we are able to sharply describe the phase transition from the delocalized phase to the localized one, giving the critical exponent for the (quenched) free-energy, and proving that at the critical point the trajectories are fully delocalized. These results contrast with what happens both for the pure model (i.e. without disorder) and for the widely studied case of i.i.d. disorder, where the relevance or irrelevance of disorder on the critical properties is decided via the so-called Harris Criterion.

  15. A forced response analysis and application of impact dampers to rotordynamic vibration suppression in a cryogenic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, James Jeffrey

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by JAMES JEFFREY MOORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A FORCED RESPONSE ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION OF IMPACT DAMPERS TO ROTORDYNAMIC VIBRATION SUPPRESSION IN A CRYOGENIC ENVIRONMENT A Thesis...

  16. Rings in Random Environments: Sensing Disorder Through Topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Michieletto; Marco Baiesi; Enzo Orlandini; Matthew S. Turner

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study the role of topology in DNA gel electrophoresis experiments via molecular dynamics simulations. The gel is modelled as a 3D array of obstacles from which half edges are removed at random with probability p, thereby generating a disordered environment. Changes in the microscopic structure of the gel are captured by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of ring polymers moving through the medium, while their linear counterparts provide a control system as we show they are insensitive to these changes. We show that ring polymers provide a novel non-invasive way of exploiting topology to sense microscopic disorder. Finally, we compare the results from the simulations with an analytical model for the non-equilibrium differential mobility, and find a striking agreement between simulation and theory

  17. A Note on the M/M/ Queue in Random Environment and Uri Yechiali 1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiali, Uri

    environment, the joint prob- ability distribution function (pdf) of the two variables: random phase and number random environment and show that the joint probability distribution function (pdf) of the environment. 2 The model and balance equations Consider an M/M/ type queue operating in 'random environment

  18. Long-Range Electronic-to-Vibrational Energy Transfer from Nanocrystals to Their Surrounding Matrix Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabani, Eran

    for the analysis, control, and optimization of energy storage and disposal in chemistry, physics, material sci radiationless electronic-to-vibrational energy conversion and vibrational energy exchange, which are centralLong-Range Electronic-to-Vibrational Energy Transfer from Nanocrystals to Their Surrounding Matrix

  19. Energy harvesting of random wide-band vibrations with applications to an electro-magnetic rotational energy harvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, A. Zachary

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, vibration energy harvesting is the scavenging of ambient vibration by transduction of mechanical kinetic energy into electrical energy. Many mechanical or electro-mechanical systems produce mechanical vibrations. ...

  20. Unzipping an adsorbed polymer in a dirty or random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajeev Kapri; Somendra M. Bhattacharjee

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase diagram of unzipping of an adsorbed directed polymer in two dimensions in a random medium has been determined. Both the hard-wall and the soft-wall cases are considered. Exact solutions for the pure problem with different affinities on the two sides are given. The results obtained by the numerical procedure adopted here are shown to agree with the exact results for the pure case. The characteristic exponents for unzipping for the random problem are different from the pure case. The distribution functions for the unzipped length, first bubble, and the spacer are determined.

  1. Mott law as lower bound for a random walk in a random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Faggionato; H. Schulz-Baldes; D. Spehner

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a random walk on the support of a stationary simple point process on $R^d$, $d\\geq 2$ which satisfies a mixing condition w.r.t.the translations or has a strictly positive density uniformly on large enough cubes. Furthermore the point process is furnished with independent random bounded energy marks. The transition rates of the random walk decay exponentially in the jump distances and depend on the energies through a factor of the Boltzmann-type. This is an effective model for the phonon-induced hopping of electrons in disordered solids within the regime of strong Anderson localization. We show that the rescaled random walk converges to a Brownian motion whose diffusion coefficient is bounded below by Mott's law for the variable range hopping conductivity at zero frequency. The proof of the lower bound involves estimates for the supercritical regime of an associated site percolation problem.

  2. Downhole vibration sensing by vibration energy harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, A. Zachary

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the design of a prototype electromagnetic induction vibration energy harvesting device for use in a downhole environment. First order models of the necessary components for a generic vibration energy ...

  3. Concentration phenomena for neutronic multigroup diffusion in random environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott N. Armstrong; Panagiotis E. Souganidis

    2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the asymptotic behavior of the principal eigenvalue of a weakly coupled, cooperative linear elliptic system in a stationary ergodic heterogeneous medium. The system arises as the so-called multigroup diffusion model for neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores, the principal eigenvalue determining the criticality of the reactor in a stationary state. Such systems have been well-studied in recent years in the periodic setting, and the purpose of this work is to obtain results in random media. Our approach connects the linear eigenvalue problem to a system of quasilinear viscous Hamilton-Jacobi equations. By homogenizing the latter, we characterize the asymptotic behavior of the eigenvalue of the linear problem and exhibit some concentration behavior of the eigenfunctions.

  4. Rotational-Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy for Measurements of Thermochemistry in Non-isobaric Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayeh, Alexander C.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work examines line measurements of pressure, temperature, and density in high speed, non-isobaric flows emanating from an underexpanded jet nozzle. Line images of rotational and vibrational Raman spectra are collected for a 8-mm linear...

  5. Pure-state dynamics of a pair of charge qubits in a random environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buric, Nikola [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Beograd, Vojvode Stepe 450, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of charge qubits in a random electromagnetic environment is studied, using the description of the random dynamics of its pure-state vector as given by quantum-state diffusion theory. It is shown by numerical computations that the pure-state dynamics provides a more detailed description than the density-matrix picture of the main effects such as phase dumping and depolarization.

  6. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion-pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. This new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determinedmorein the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.less

  7. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion-pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Grills, David C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miller, John R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. This new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  8. 2.017J / 1.015J Design of Systems Operating in Random Environments, Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hover, Franz

    This class covers the principles for optimal performance and survival of extreme events in a random environment; linear time invariant systems and Fourier transform; random processes, autocorrelation function, and power ...

  9. Large deviations for random walks in a random environment on a strip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathon Peterson

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 26, 2013 ... RWRE on the strip Z {1,2,...,d} x x + 1 x - 1 px(1, 2) rx(3, 5) qx(2, 2). Environment ?x = (qx ,rx ,px ) ? Rdd Rdd Rdd. Jonathon Peterson.

  10. Inverse problem for the identification of Chaos representa-tions of random fields using experimental vibrational tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    to be identified by using an experimental database constituted of vibrational tests related to 100 speci- mens in the frequency band [0-50]kHz. There are 60 sensors measuring accelerations. All the specimens are excited

  11. Limiting results for the free energy of directed polymers in random environment with unbounded jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Comets; Ryoki Fukushima; Shuta Nakajima; Nobuo Yoshida

    2015-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study asymptotic behaviors of the free energy for the directed polymer in random environment. The polymer is allowed to make unbounded jumps and the environment is given by the Bernoulli variables. We first establish the existence and continuity including the negative infinity value of the coupling constant $\\beta$. Our proof of existence at $\\beta=-\\infty$ differs from existing ones in that it avoids the direct use of subadditivity. Secondly, we identify the asymptotics of the free energy at $\\beta=-\\infty$ in the limit of the success probability of the Bernoulli variables tending to one. It is described by using the so-called time constant of a certain directed first passage percolation. Our proof relies on a certain continuity property of the time constant, which is of independent interest.

  12. Limiting results for the free energy of directed polymers in random environment with unbounded jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Comets; Ryoki Fukushima; Shuta Nakajima; Nobuo Yoshida

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study asymptotic behaviors of the free energy for the directed polymer in random environment. The polymer is allowed to make unbounded jumps and the environment is given by the Bernoulli variables. We first establish the existence and continuity including the negative infinity value of the coupling constant $\\beta$. Our proof of existence at $\\beta=-\\infty$ differs from existing ones in that it avoids the direct use of subadditivity. Secondly, we identify the asymptotics of the free energy at $\\beta=-\\infty$ in the limit of the success probability of the Bernoulli variables tending to one. It is described by using the so-called time constant of a certain directed first passage percolation. Our proof relies on a certain continuity property of the time constant, which is of independent interest.

  13. On the Equilibrium State of a Small System with Random Matrix Coupling to Its Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel L. Lebowitz; Leonid Pastur

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a random matrix model of interaction between a small $n$-level system, $S$, and its environment, a $N$-level heat reservoir, $R$. The interaction between $S$ and $R$ is modeled by a tensor product of a fixed $% n\\times n$ matrix and a $N\\times N$ hermitian Gaussian random matrix. We show that under certain "macroscopicity" conditions on $R$, the reduced density matrix of the system $\\rho _{S}=\\mathrm{Tr}_{R}\\rho _{S\\cup R}^{(eq)} $, is given by $\\rho _{S}^{(c)}\\sim \\exp {\\{-\\beta H_{S}\\}}$, where $H_{S}$ is the Hamiltonian of the isolated system. This holds for all strengths of the interaction and thus gives some justification for using $% \\rho _{S}^{(c)}$ to describe some nano-systems, like biopolymers, in equilibrium with their environment \\cite{Se:12}. Our results extend those obtained previously in \\cite{Le-Pa:03,Le-Co:07} for a special two-level system.

  14. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cericola, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Doggett, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Ernest, Terry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Priddy, Tommy G. (Rockville, MD)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  15. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Environment Our good neighbor pledge: to contribute to quality of life in Northern New Mexico through economic development, excellence in education, and active employee...

  17. Vibrational Coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By homing in on the distribution patterns of electrons around an atom, a team of scientists team with Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry showed how certain vibrations from benzene thiol cause electrical charge to "slosh" onto a gold surface (left), while others do not (right). The vibrations that cause this "sloshing" behavior yield a stronger SERS signal.

  18. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebbaEnvironment Environment A

  19. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cold C60- Anions. Vibrational Cooling in A Cold Ion Trap: Vibrationally Resolved...

  20. Path planning for autonomous parafoils using particle chance constrained rapidly-exploring random trees in a computationally constrained environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klerman, Shoshana

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle chance constrained rapidly-exploring random trees (PCC-RRT) is a sampling-based path-planning algorithm which uses particles to approximate an uncertainty distribution. In this thesis, we study the use of PCC-RRT ...

  1. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000ConsumptionInnovation PortalHanford SiteMonitoringEnvironment

  2. Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebba SignEconomicEnvironment

  3. System and method of active vibration control for an electro-mechanically cooled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA); Mauger, Joseph (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Eric H. (Mountain View, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method of active vibration control of an electro-mechanically cooled device is disclosed. A cryogenic cooling system is located within an environment. The cooling system is characterized by a vibration transfer function, which requires vibration transfer function coefficients. A vibration controller generates the vibration transfer function coefficients in response to various triggering events. The environments may differ by mounting apparatus, by proximity to vibration generating devices, or by temperature. The triggering event may be powering on the cooling system, reaching an operating temperature, or a reset action. A counterbalance responds to a drive signal generated by the vibration controller, based on the vibration signal and the vibration transfer function, which adjusts vibrations. The method first places a cryogenic cooling system within a first environment and then generates a first set of vibration transfer function coefficients, for a vibration transfer function of the cooling system. Next, the cryogenic cooling system is placed within a second environment and a second set of vibration transfer function coefficients are generated. Then, a counterbalance is driven, based on the vibration transfer function, to reduce vibrations received by a vibration sensitive element.

  4. Tripod vibration anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoecker, William V; Malters, Joseph M; Xu, Jin; Pikka, Jo

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A, Liu JF. Vibration anesthesia: a noninvasive method ofTripod vibration anesthesia William V Stoecker MD 1 , Josephfor cutaneous injection anesthesia. Most pain associated

  5. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The deep hard rock drilling environment induces severe vibrations into the drillstring, which can cause reduced rates of penetration (ROP) and premature failure of the equipment. The only current means of controlling vibration under varying conditions is to change either the rotary speed or the weight-on-bit (WOB). These changes often reduce drilling efficiency. Conventional shock subs are useful in some situations, but often exacerbate the problems. The objective of this project is development of a unique system to monitor and control drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drilling system. This system has two primary elements: (1) The first is an active vibration damper (AVD) to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations. The hardness of this damper will be continuously adjusted using a robust, fast-acting and reliable unique technology. (2) The second is a real-time system to monitor drillstring vibration, and related parameters. This monitor adjusts the damper according to local conditions. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. The AVD is implemented in a configuration using magnetorheological (MR) fluid. By applying a current to the magnetic coils in the damper, the viscosity of the fluid can be changed rapidly, thereby altering the damping coefficient in response to the measured motion of the tool. Phase I of this program entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype. Phase I of the project was completed by the revised end date of May 31, 2004. The objectives of this phase were met, and all prerequisites for Phase II have been completed.

  6. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING AND CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this program is to develop the Drilling Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) to both record and reduce drilling vibrations in a ''smart'' drill string. It is composed of two main elements. The first is a multi-axis active vibration damper to minimize harmful axial, lateral and torsional vibrations, and thereby increase both rate of penetration (ROP) and bit life, as well that the life of other drillstring components. The hydraulic impedance (hardness) of this damper will be continuously adjusted using unique technology that is robust, fast-acting and reliable. The second component is a real-time system to monitor 3-axis drillstring vibration, and related parameters including weight- and torque-on-bit (TOB) and temperature. This monitor will determine the current vibration environment and adjust the damper accordingly. In some configurations, it may also send diagnostic information to the surface via real-time telemetry. Phase I of this program addresses an evaluation of the environment in which the DVMCS will operate; modeling of a drillstring response including the active damper; a top-level design of the mechanical and electronic systems; analyzing the anticipated performance of the damper by modeling and laboratory testing of small prototypes; and doing preliminary economic, market, environmental and financing analyses. This phase is scheduled to last fourteen months, until November 30, 2003. During this first quarter, significant progress was achieved on the first two objectives, and work was begun on several others. Initial designs of the DVMCS are underway.

  7. Drag amplification and fatigue damage in vortex-induced vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage and drag force amplification due to Vortex-Induced-Vibrations (VIV) continue to cause significant problems in the design of structures which operate in ocean current environments. These problems are magnified ...

  8. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Chromatographic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeanne E. Pemberton

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromatographic separations play a central role in DOE-supported fundamental research related to energy, biological systems, the environment, and nuclear science. The overall portfolio of research activities in the Separations and Analysis Program within the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences includes support for activities designed to develop a molecular-level understanding of the chemical processes that underlie separations for both large-scale and analytical-scale purposes. The research effort funded by this grant award was a continuation of DOE-supported research to develop vibrational spectroscopic methods to characterize the interfacial details of separations processes at a molecular level.

  9. Active vibration control in a microgravity environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Myoung Soo

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 4046 K Because Uf is proportional to ?, , x term in above equation cancels out. Therei'ore Jf has a constant value under the assumption of a constant air jet pressure. From equation (38), 1 Jf = Jf = ? wD pUp 0 4 (42) In order to use equation (42.... 6 (Andersen, 1967), the final velocity is found (Figure 13), (APPENDIX B). 1 2k Pi Us = I( )[I ? ( ? ) )( ? )I k ? 1 P, pi (43) Now using'equations (42) and (43), calculated thrust force produced by jet. As 1 Jf = ? ?wD pUs As 4 (44) 28...

  10. 2011 Vibrations -1 VIBRATION OF PLATES & BARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    of plates of different shapes using Chladni patterns. APPARATUS: Function generator in FFTSCOPE, long and short flat bars, Chladni plates, salt, salt trays INTRODUCTION he equations of vibrational motion. The solutions become very complicated for the free boundary condition at the perimeter of the plate. The Chladni

  11. Vibrations in elemental amorphous semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meek, Peter Ernest

    1977-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ~lationG 0re pl'c.3cnted for four-fold coordinated contirluou:, random net',/orK (CR~'i J mocels of a-Ge I for a three-fold c08rdinated CRN n10dol of a-As and fOe isolated- and interacting-chain models of a-Se. In order to obtain a more realistic descripti... are summarised in the final part of this cha pter and n plan of the thesis is outlined. 5 1. 2 VI BRATIONAL CALCULATIONS To calculate the normal modes of vibration of an infinite cr ystal of ric;id !toms in the harmonic approximation, the interatomic force...

  12. NIF Ambient Vibration Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noble, C.R.; Hoehler, M.S., S.C. Sommer

    1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL has an ongoing research and development project that includes developing data acquisition systems with remote wireless communication for monitoring the vibrations of large civil engineering structures. In order to establish the capability of performing remote sensing over an extended period of time, the researchers needed to apply this technology to a real structure. The construction of the National Ignition Facility provided an opportunity to test the data acquisition system on a large structure to monitor whether the facility is remaining within the strict ambient vibration guidelines. This document will briefly discuss the NIF ambient vibration requirements and summarize the vibration measurements performed during the Spring and Summer of 1999. In addition, a brief description of the sensors and the data acquisition systems will be provided in Appendix B.

  13. Unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow and the vibration of nuclear reactor components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yih, Tien Sieh

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a twophase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe. Measured momentum flux data has been machine processed by standard random vibration techniques ...

  14. Hole interactions with molecular vibrations on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Omerzu; M. Licer; T. Mertelj; V. V. Kabanov; D. Mihailovic

    2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the interactions between holes and molecular vibrations on dry DNA using photoinduced infrared absorption spectroscopy. Laser photoexcited (PE) holes are found to have a room-temperature lifetime in excess of 1 ms, clearly indicating the presence of localization. However, from a quantitative model analysis of the frequency shifts of vibrational modes caused by the PE holes, we find the holevibrational coupling constant to be relatively small, 0.2. This interaction leads to a change in the conformational energy of 0.015 eV, which is too small to cause selftrapping at room temperature. We conclude that, at least in the dry (A) form, DNA is best understood in terms of a double chain of coupled quantum dots arising from the pseudo-random chain sequence of base pairs, in which Anderson localization prevents the formation of a metallic state.

  15. Orderly Spectra from Random Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Bertsch, G.F. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dean, D.J.; Dean, D.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the low-lying spectra of many-body systems with random two-body interactions, specifying that the ensemble be invariant under particle-hole conjugation. Surprisingly we find patterns reminiscent of more orderly interactions, such as a predominance of J=0 ground states separated by a gap from the excited states, and evidence of phonon vibrations in the low-lying spectra. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  17. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  18. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vincent, Ronald J. (Latham, NY)

    1987-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  19. Journal of Sound and Vibration ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    the ocean surface to the sea floor. With the trend towards oil and gas exploration in deeper watersJOURNAL OF SOUND AND VIBRATION Journal of Sound and Vibration ] (

  20. Nonlinear vibrational microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holtom, Gary R. (Richland, WA); Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Richland, WA); Zumbusch, Andreas (Munchen, DE)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for microscopic vibrational imaging using coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering or Sum Frequency Generation. Microscopic imaging with a vibrational spectroscopic contrast is achieved by generating signals in a nonlinear optical process and spatially resolved detection of the signals. The spatial resolution is attained by minimizing the spot size of the optical interrogation beams on the sample. Minimizing the spot size relies upon a. directing at least two substantially co-axial laser beams (interrogation beams) through a microscope objective providing a focal spot on the sample; b. collecting a signal beam together with a residual beam from the at least two co-axial laser beams after passing through the sample; c. removing the residual beam; and d. detecting the signal beam thereby creating said pixel. The method has significantly higher spatial resolution then IR microscopy and higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman microscopy with much lower average excitation powers. CARS and SFG microscopy does not rely on the presence of fluorophores, but retains the resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capability of confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Complementary to these techniques, CARS and SFG microscopy provides a contrast mechanism based on vibrational spectroscopy. This vibrational contrast mechanism, combined with an unprecedented high sensitivity at a tolerable laser power level, provides a new approach for microscopic investigations of chemical and biological samples.

  1. Vibration sensing method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barna, B.A.

    1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive evaluation of a structure are disclosed. Resonant audio frequency vibrations are excited in the structure to be evaluated and the vibrations are measured and characterized to obtain information about the structure. The vibrations are measured and characterized by reflecting a laser beam from the vibrating structure and directing a substantial portion of the reflected beam back into the laser device used to produce the beam which device is capable of producing an electric signal containing information about the vibration. 4 figs.

  2. Localized Surface Plasmons in Vibrating Graphene Nanodisks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Weihua; Mortensen, N Asger; Christensen, Johan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localized surface plasmons are confined collective oscillations of electrons in metallic nanoparticles. When driven by light, the optical response is dictated by geometrical parameters and the dielectric environment and plasmons are therefore extremely important for sensing applications. Plasmons in graphene disks have the additional benefit to be highly tunable via electrical stimulation. Mechanical vibrations create structural deformations in ways where the excitation of localized surface plasmons can be strongly modulated. We show that the spectral shift in such a scenario is determined by a complex interplay between the symmetry and shape of the modal vibrations and the plasmonic mode pattern. Tuning confined modes of light in graphene via acoustic excitations, paves new avenues in shaping the sensitivity of plasmonic detectors, and in the enhancement of the interaction with optical emitters, such as molecules, for future nanophotonic devices.

  3. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: novel findings using a simulated adult workplace environment design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with ADHD: a randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-et al. , Randomized, double-blind, placebo-con- trolled,Open Access Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled,

  4. Vibration damping method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redmond, J.M.; Barney, P.S.; Parker, G.G.; Smith, D.A.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides vibration damping method and apparatus that can damp vibration in more than one direction without requiring disassembly, that can accommodate varying tool dimensions without requiring re-tuning, and that does not interfere with tool tip operations and cooling. The present invention provides active dampening by generating bending moments internal to a structure such as a boring bar to dampen vibration thereof. 38 figs.

  5. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, Charles C. (San Diego, CA); Pytanowski, Gregory P. (San Diego, CA); Vendituoli, Jonathan S. (San Diego, CA)

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass "M" or combined mass "CM" of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics.

  6. Turbine blade vibration dampening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornelius, C.C.; Pytanowski, G.P.; Vendituoli, J.S.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present turbine wheel assembly increases component life and turbine engine longevity. The combination of the strap and the opening combined with the preestablished area of the outer surface of the opening and the preestablished area of the outer circumferential surface of the strap and the friction between the strap and the opening increases the life and longevity of the turbine wheel assembly. Furthermore, the mass ``M`` or combined mass ``CM`` of the strap or straps and the centrifugal force assist in controlling vibrations and damping characteristics. 5 figs.

  7. The vibrational Raman spectrum of CS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballard, Harold Noble

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CSp A Thesis By HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD Approved as to style and content by Chairman o| Committee THE VIBRATIONAL RAMAN SPECTRUM OF CS2 HAROLD NOBLE BALLARD A Thesis Suhmitted to the Graduate School... in the procurement of necessary equipment. SECTION I: INTRODUCTION. SECTION II: CLASSICAL THEORY OF RAHAM SCATTERING . SECTION III: THEORY OF NORMAL VIBRATIONS AND VIBRATIONAL WAVE EQUATIONS. A, Morsel Vibrations B. Vibrational Wave Eqnation and lhergy Levels...

  8. Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy Sum Frequency Generation for Surface Vibrational Spectroscopy This customized SFG-VS spectrometer incorporates unique...

  9. Application of Random Vibration Theory Methodology for Seismic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply

  10. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  11. Quantum correlation dynamics in photosynthetic processes assisted by molecular vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Giorgi; M. Roncaglia; F. A. Raffa; M. Genovese

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the long course of evolution, nature has learnt how to exploit quantum effects. In fact, recent experiments reveal the existence of quantum processes whose coherence extends over unexpectedly long time and space ranges. In particular, photosynthetic processes in light-harvesting complexes display a typical oscillatory dynamics ascribed to quantum coherence. Here, we consider the simple model where a dimer made of two chromophores is strongly coupled with a quasi-resonant vibrational mode. We observe the occurrence of wide oscillations of genuine quantum correlations, between electronic excitations and the environment, represented by vibrational bosonic modes. Such a quantum dynamics has been unveiled through the calculation of the negativity of entanglement and the discord, indicators widely used in quantum information for quantifying the resources needed to realize quantum technologies. We also discuss the possibility of approximating additional weakly-coupled off-resonant vibrational modes, simulating the disturbances induced by the rest of the environment, by a single vibrational mode. Within this approximation, one can show that the off-resonant bath behaves like a classical source of noise.

  12. Randomized metarounding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARR,ROBERT D.; VEMPALA,SANTOSH

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a new technique for the design of approximation algorithms that can be viewed as a generalization of randomized rounding. They derive new or improved approximation guarantees for a class of generalized congestion problems such as multicast congestion, multiple TSP etc. Their main mathematical tool is a structural decomposition theorem related to the integrality gap of a relaxation.

  13. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. The purpose of this sensing system is to monitor, in real time, the status of railcars by burying an optical fiber underground beside the rails. Using a coherent homodyne technique...

  14. Vibrations of circular steel plates with damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheth, Prafulchandra Naginlal

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed. Usually, the prime objection to vibrations produced by machines is their effect on humans. These are high frequency vibrations that produce troublesome noise. Low frequency vibrations are often trans- mitted and these may damage nearby... materials used with fans, motors, engines, presses, turbines and similar machines. Byars (1)* studied vibrations of a circular plate on three supports for node patterns, amplitudes and frequencies. Ballentine (2) investigated the vibrations of circular...

  15. Multi-Gaussian Modes of Diffusion in a Quenched Random Medium Tapio Simula1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-Gaussian Modes of Diffusion in a Quenched Random Medium Tapio Simula1 and Mikko Stenlund2,3 1 University of Helsinki, Finland We have studied a model of a random walk in a quenched random environment environments (RWRE) [3, 9­11]. In these models the environment describes the local propagation laws, which

  16. Edge-reinforced random walk on a ladder 1 2 Franz Merkl 3 Silke W.W. Rolles 4 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    walk, recurrence, random environment, Gibbs measure, transfer operator. 3 Mathematical Institute] in the special case of reversible chains. The distribution of the environment is given by a joint density which of the ladder as a random walk in a random environment. This environment is given by a marginal of a multi

  17. Visualization of vibration experienced in offshore platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrikalakis, Alexander Marinos Charles

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I design and evaluate methods to optimize the visualization of vortex-induced vibration (VIV) in marine risers. VIV is vibration experienced by marine risers in offshore drilling platforms due to ocean ...

  18. Method for enriching a middle isotope using vibration-vibration pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rich, Joseph W. (East Aurora, NY); Homicz, Gregory F. (Getzville, NY); Bergman, Richard C. (Corfu, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing isotopically enriched material by vibration-vibration excitation of gaseous molecules wherein a middle mass isotope of an isotopic mixture including lighter and heavier mass isotopes preferentially populates a higher vibrational mode and chemically reacts to provide a product in which it is enriched. The method can be used for vibration-vibration enrichment of .sup.17 O in a CO reactant mixture.

  19. Distributed optical fiber vibration sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hui

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the system measures Rayleigh scattering whose phase is modulated by vibrations. In order to obtain a large sensing area, an external cavity ring laser is used as the light source for a high degree of coherence. The linewidth of this laser light can...

  20. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the efficacy and safety of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: novel findings using a simulated adult workplace environment design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wigal, Timothy; Brams, Matthew; Gasior, Maria; Gao, Joseph; Squires, Liza; Giblin, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ablon JS, Lapey K: A double-blind, crossover comparison ofin children with ADHD: a double-blind, placebo- controlled,randomized, double-blind, forced-dose, parallel-group study.

  1. Redistribution of vibrational population in a molecular ion with nonresonant strong-field laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, W. A.; Nemeth, G. R. A. J. [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Calvert, C. R.; King, R. B.; Alexander, J. D.; Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Froud, C. A.; Turcu, I. C. E.; Springate, E. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Newell, W. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental demonstration of nonresonant manipulation of vibrational states in a molecule by an intense ultrashort laser pulse. A vibrational wave packet is generated in D{sub 2}{sup +} through tunnel ionization of D{sub 2} by a few-cycle pump pulse. A similar control pulse is applied as the wave packet begins to dephase so that the dynamic Stark effect distorts the electronic environment of the nuclei, transferring vibrational population. The time evolution of the modified wave packet is probed via the D{sub 2}{sup +} photodissociation yield that results from the application of an intense probe pulse. Comparing the measured yield with a quasiclassical trajectory model allows us to determine the redistribution of vibrational population caused by the control pulse.

  2. A nondeterministic shock and vibration application using polynomial chaos expansions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD JR.,RICHARD V.; RED-HORSE,JOHN R.; PAEZ,THOMAS L.

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the current study, the generality of the key underpinnings of the Stochastic Finite Element (SFEM) method is exploited in a nonlinear shock and vibration application where parametric uncertainty enters through random variables with probabilistic descriptions assumed to be known. The system output is represented as a vector containing Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) data at a predetermined number of frequency points. In contrast to many reliability-based methods, the goal of the current approach is to provide a means to address more general (vector) output entities, to provide this output as a random process, and to assess characteristics of the response which allow one to avoid issues of statistical dependence among its vector components.

  3. Reduced-vibration tube array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruck, Gerald J.; Bartolomeo, Daniel R.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduced-vibration tube array is disclosed. The array includes a plurality of tubes in a fixed arrangement and a plurality of damping members positioned within the tubes. The damping members include contoured interface regions characterized by bracing points that selectively contact the inner surface of an associated tube. Each interface region is sized and shaped in accordance with the associated tube, so that the damping member bracing points are spaced apart a vibration-reducing distance from the associated tube inner surfaces at equilibrium. During operation, mechanical interaction between the bracing points and the tube inner surfaces reduces vibration by a damage-reducing degree. In one embodiment, the interface regions are serpentine shaped. In another embodiment, the interface regions are helical in shape. The interface regions may be simultaneously helical and serpentine in shape. The damping members may be fixed within the associated tubes, and damping member may be customized several interference regions having attributes chosen in accordance with desired flow characteristics and associated tube properties.

  4. Structure and vibrational spectra of H ,,H2O...8: Is the excess proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Structure and vibrational spectra of H ,,H2O...8: Is the excess proton in a symmetrical hydrogen environment of the excess proton sometimes resembles a symmetric H5O2 structure and sometimes H3O , but many to which the excess proton resembles H5O2 or H3O . Other bond lengths and, perhaps most useful

  5. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  6. High force vibration testing with wide frequency range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Gregory, Danny Lynn

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shaker assembly for vibration testing includes first and second shakers, where the first shaker includes a piezo-electric material for generating vibration. A support structure permits a test object to be supported for vibration of the test object by both shakers. An input permits an external vibration controller to control vibration of the shakers.

  7. Testing Skyrme energy-density functionals with the QRPA in low-lying vibrational states of rare-earth nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Terasaki; J. Engel

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Although nuclear energy density functionals are determined primarily by fitting to ground state properties, they are often applied in nuclear astrophysics to excited states, usually through the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). Here we test the Skyrme functionals SkM* and SLy4 along with the self-consistent QRPA by calculating properties of low-lying vibrational states in a large number of well-deformed even-even rare-earth nuclei. We reproduce trends in energies and transition probabilities associated with gamma-vibrational states, but our results are not perfect and indicate the presences of multi-particle-hole correlations that are not included in the QRPA. The Skyrme functional SkM* performs noticeably better than SLy4. In a few nuclei, changes in the treatment of the pairing energy functional have a significant effect. The QRPA is less successful with "beta-vibrational" states than with the gamma-vibrational states.

  8. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruce, Jesse R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erwin, Jenny R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remick, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornwell, Phillip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menegini, R. Michael [INDIANA UNIV.; Racanelli, Joe [STRYKER ORTHOPARDICS

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer and force response data from an instrumented stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing was conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem was instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs were compared: a monolithic impactor and a two-piece impactor, each with an integrated load cell and accelerometer. Acceleration and force measurements were taken in the direction of impaction. Comparisons between different methods of applying an impacting force were made, including a drop tower and a surgical hammer. The effect of varying compliance on the data was also investigated. The ultimate goal of this study was to assist in the design of an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental setup and the subsequent results of the comparisons made between impactors, prosthetic geometries, compliances, and impact methods. The results of this study can be used for both future replicate testing as well as in a cadaveric environment.

  9. Roland Kruse, Tiedo Meyer: Vibration platform for the calibration of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    Roland Kruse, Tiedo Meyer: Vibration platform for the calibration of optical sensors #12;Roland Kruse, Tiedo Meyer (Oldenburg University): Vibration platform for the calibration of optical sensors Meyer (Oldenburg University): Vibration platform for the calibration of optical sensors The project

  10. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the last report. Most of the components have been received and assembly has begun. Testing is expected to resume in August. In April, a paper was presented at the American Association of Drilling Engineers National Technical Conference in Houston. The paper was well received, and several oilfield service and supply companies sent inquiries regarding commercial distribution of the system. These are currently being pursued, but none have yet been finalized.

  11. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the previous quarter. Efforts this quarter have focused on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The delivery date for five critical parts from one supplier has slipped to late November, which will preclude deployment for a field test before late December or early January. We are exploring whether we can take the partially made parts and complete them earlier in our own shop.

  12. TIME-RESOLVED VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrei Tokmakoff, MIT (Conference Chair) [Conference Chair; Paul Champion, Northeastern University; Edwin J. Heilweil, NIST; Keith A. Nelson, MIT; Larry Ziegler, Boston University

    2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the Proceedings from the 14th International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, which was held in Meredith, NH from May 9-14, 2009. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time-resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOEâ??s Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time-resolved spectroscopy is central to all five of DOEâ??s grand challenges for fundamental energy science. The Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy conference is organized biennially to bring the leaders in this field from around the globe together with young scientists to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, Raman, and terahertz spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  13. RESEARCH LETTERS Vibrating insoles and balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    , and such changes have been associated with diminished motor performance. Input noise can enhance sensory and motor be substantially reduced through the application of mechanical noise to the feet via vibrating insoles. We usedRESEARCH LETTERS Vibrating insoles and balance control in elderly people Attila A Priplata, James B

  14. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectrosco...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear Spectroscopy: A Comparison with the AirDMSO Liquid Interface. Coherent Vibrational Dynamics and High-Resolution Nonlinear...

  15. active dynamic vibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Active Vibration Control on A 3-DOF Parallel Platform Based on Kane's Dynamics Method Engineering Websites Summary: - 2783 - Active Vibration Control on A 3-DOF...

  16. Capturing inhomogeneous broadening of the -CN stretch vibration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by mapping the decay of the vibrational polarization using ultrafast lasers, due to the lack of SFG vibrational spectra with high enough spectral resolution and accurate enough...

  17. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  18. Peace Corps / Environment Environment Volunteers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    Peace Corps / Environment Environment Volunteers Environmental damage can have enormous choices about how to best protect and preserve the local environment. Programs and Sample Projects and communications technology, agriculture, and environment. We are looking for applicants with a variety of skills

  19. Energy scavenging from environmental vibration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galchev, Tzeno (University of Michigan); Apblett, Christopher Alan; Najafi, Khalil (University of Michigan)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop an efficient energy scavenger for converting ambient low-frequency vibrations into electrical power. In order to achieve this a novel inertial micro power generator architecture has been developed that utilizes the bi-stable motion of a mechanical mass to convert a broad range of low-frequency (< 30Hz), and large-deflection (>250 {micro}m) ambient vibrations into high-frequency electrical output energy. The generator incorporates a bi-stable mechanical structure to initiate high-frequency mechanical oscillations in an electromagnetic scavenger. This frequency up-conversion technique enhances the electromechanical coupling and increases the generated power. This architecture is called the Parametric Frequency Increased Generator (PFIG). Three generations of the device have been fabricated. It was first demonstrated using a larger bench-top prototype that had a functional volume of 3.7cm3. It generated a peak power of 558{micro}W and an average power of 39.5{micro}W at an input acceleration of 1g applied at 10 Hz. The performance of this device has still not been matched by any other reported work. It yielded the best power density and efficiency for any scavenger operating from low-frequency (<10Hz) vibrations. A second-generation device was then fabricated. It generated a peak power of 288{micro}W and an average power of 5.8{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup 2} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 20Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 2.1cm{sup 3} (3.7cm{sup 3} including casing), half of a standard AA battery. Lastly, a piezoelectric version of the PFIG is currently being developed. This device clearly demonstrates one of the key features of the PFIG architecture, namely that it is suitable for MEMS integration, more so than resonant generators, by incorporating a brittle bulk piezoelectric ceramic. This is the first micro-scale piezoelectric generator capable of <10Hz operation. The fabricated device currently generates a peak power of 25.9{micro}W and an average power of 1.21{micro}W from an input acceleration of 9.8m/s{sup -} at 10Hz. The device operates over a frequency range of 23Hz. The internal volume of the generator is 1.2cm{sup 3}.

  20. Random solutions of random problems...are not just random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achlioptas, Dimitris

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let I(n,m) denote a uniformly random instance of some constraint satisfaction problem CSP with n variables and m constraints. Assume that the density r=m/n is small enough so that with high probability I(n,m) has a solution, and consider the experiment of first choosing an instance I=I(n,m) at random, and then sampling a random solution sigma of I (if one exists). For many CSPs (e.g., k-SAT, k-NAE, or k-coloring), this experiment appears difficult both to implement and to analyze; in fact, for a large range of r, no efficient algorithm is known to even compute a single solution of I. In the present paper we show that for many CSPs the above experiment is essentially equivalent to first choosing a random assignment sigma to the n variables, and then drawing a random instance satisfied by sigma uniformly. In general, this second experiment is very easy to implement and amenable to a rigorous analysis. In fact, using this equivalence, we can analyze the solution space of random CSPs. Thus, we can achieve the lon...

  1. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006. The month of January was devoted to the final preparations for, and conducting of testing of the DVMCS at TerraTek laboratories in Salt Lake City. This testing was concluded on January 27, 2006. Much of the effort in this period was then devoted to the analysis of the data and the preparation of the Phase II final report. The report was issued after the close of the period. Work on Phase III of the project began during this quarter. It has consisted of making some modifications in the prototype design to make it more suitable for field testing an more practical for commercial use. This work is continuing. The redesign effort, coupled with the current extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components, will delay the deployment of the field prototypes. The precommercial prototypes are being developed in parallel, so the project should be completed per the current schedule.

  2. Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and the Phase II final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006. Efforts the current quarter have continued to focus on the manufacture of the prototype and precommercial parts, field test planning and commercialization. The continued extreme lead times quoted by oilfield machine shops for collar components significantly delayed the deployment of the prototype and precommercial units. All parts have now been received for two units, and all but one for the third. Mechanical assembly of the first two systems is complete and the electronics installation and laboratory testing will be finished in April. We have entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with a major US oilfield equipment supplier, which calls for their assisting with our field tests, in cash and in kind. We are close to signing a definitive agreement which includes the purchase of the three precommercial units. We had also signed a CRADA with the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC), and scheduled a test at their site, The RMOTC drilling schedule continues to slip, and the test cannot begin until the first week of May. Based on these factors, we have requested a no-cost extension to July 31, 2007.

  3. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. As a result of the lower than expected performance of the MR damper noted last quarter, several additional tests were conducted. These dealt with possible causes of the lack of dynamic range observed in the testing: additional damping from the oil in the Belleville springs; changes in properties of the MR fluid; and, residual magnetization of the valve components. Of these, only the last was found to be significant. By using a laboratory demagnetization apparatus between runs, a dynamic range of 10:1 was achieved for the damper, more than adequate to produce the needed improvements in drilling. Additional modeling was also performed to identify a method of increasing the magnetic field in the damper. As a result of the above, several changes were made in the design. Additional circuitry was added to demagnetize the valve as the field is lowered. The valve was located to above the Belleville springs to reduce the load placed upon it and offer a greater range of materials for its construction. In addition, to further increase the field strength, the coils were relocated from the mandrel to the outer housing. At the end of the quarter, the redesign was complete and new parts were on order. The project is approximately three months behind schedule at this time.

  4. Low cost subpixel method for vibration measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrer, Belen [Department of Civil Engineering, Univ. Alicante P.O. Box, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Espinosa, Julian; Perez, Jorge; Acevedo, Pablo; Mas, David [Inst. of Physics Applied to the Sciences and Technologies, Univ. Alicante P.O. Box, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Roig, Ana B. [Department of Optics, Univ. Alicante P.O. Box, 99, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional vibration measurement methods are based on devices that acquire local data by direct contact (accelerometers, GPS) or by laser beams (Doppler vibrometers). Our proposal uses video processing to obtain the vibration frequency directly from the scene, without the need of auxiliary targets or devices. Our video-vibrometer can obtain the vibration frequency at any point in the scene and can be implemented with low-cost devices, such as commercial cameras. Here we present the underlying theory and some experiments that support our technique.

  5. Surface Vibrations in a Model Hcp Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; DEWITTE, FW.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and F. W. de Wette, Phys. Rev. B4, 1661 (1971). PHYSICA L RE VIE W 8 VOLUME 6, NUMBE R 2 15 JULY 1972 Surface Vibrations in a Model hcp Crystal R. E. Allen Department of Physics, Texas A @ M University, College Station, Texas 77843 and G. P.... Alldredge and F. %. de bette Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 16 February 1972) The surface relaxation, vibrational modes, mean-square amplitudes of vibration, etc. , have been calculated for the (0001) surface...

  6. 2012 VIBRATIONAL SPECTROSCOPY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, Franz

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vibrational Spectroscopy conference brings together experimentalists and theoreticians working at the frontiers of modern vibrational spectroscopy, with a special emphasis on spectroscopies that probe the structure and dynamics of molecules in gases, liquids, and at interfaces. The conference explores the wide range of state-of-the-art techniques based on vibrational motion. These techniques span the fields of time-domain, high-resolution frequency-domain, spatially-resolved, nonlinear, and multidimensional spectroscopies. The conference highlights both the application of these techniques in chemistry, materials, biology, the environment, and medicine as well as the development of theoretical models that enable one to connect spectroscopic signatures to underlying molecular motions including chemical reaction dynamics. The conference goal is to advance the field of vibrational spectroscopy by bringing together a collection of researchers who share common interests and who will gain from discussing work at the forefront of several connected areas. The intent is to emphasize the insights and understanding that studies of vibrations provide about a variety of molecular systems ranging from small polyatomic molecules to large biomolecules, nanomaterials, and environmental systems.

  7. On the neutron noise diagnostics of pressurized water reactor control rod vibrations II. Stochastic vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazsit, I.; Glockler, O.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an earlier publication, using the theory of neutron fluctuations induced by a vibrating control rod, a complete formal solution of rod vibration diagnostics based on neutron noise measurements was given in terms of Fourier-transformed neutron detector time signals. The suggested procedure was checked in numerical simulation tests where only periodic vibrations could be considered. The procedure and its numerical testing are elaborated for stochastic two-dimensional vibrations. A simple stochastic theory of two-dimensional flow-induced vibrations is given; then the diagnostic method is formulated in the stochastic case, that is, in terms of neutron detector auto- and crosspower spectra. A previously suggested approximate rod localization technique is also formulated in the stochastic case. Applicability of the methods is then investigated in numerical simulation tests, using the proposed model of stochastic two-dimensional vibrations when generating neutron detector spectra that simulate measured data.

  8. On the neutron noise diagnostics of pressurized water reactor control rod vibrations. 1. periodic vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pazsit, I.; Glockler, O.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the theory of neutron noise arising from the vibration of a localized absorber, the possibility of rod vibration diagnostics is investigated. It is found that noise source characteristics, namely rod position and vibration trajectory and spectra, can be unfolded from measured neutron noise signals. For the localization process, the first and more difficult part of the diagnostics, a procedure is suggested whose novelty is that it is applicable in case of arbitrary vibration trajectories. Applicability of the method is investigated in numerical experiments where effects of background noise are also accounted for.

  9. Electrostatic vibration-to-electric energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mur Miranda, Jos Oscar, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-Low-Power electronics can perform useful functions with power levels as low as 170 nW. This makes them amenable to powering from ambient sources such as vibration. In this case, they can become autonomous. Motivated ...

  10. Drops bouncing on a vibrating bath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of millimetric droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrating fluid bath. We first characterize the system experimentally, deducing the dependence ...

  11. Simulations of Vibrational Frequencies of Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    analytical model Euler-Bernoulli theory Frequencies of the modes of the lateral vibration 8 fn ~ 1/L2 fn close to global or local buckling instabilities. 19 The results of this study are relevant fo

  12. Multi-frequency cable vibration experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggins, Andrew (Andrew Dale)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of Multi-Frequency cable vibration experiments at Reynolds number 7600 were carried out at the MIT Tow Tank using the Virtual Cable Towing Apparatus (VCTA). Motions observed in a Direct Numerical Simulation of a ...

  13. Harvesting energy from non-ideal vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Samuel C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy harvesting has drawn significant interest for its potential to power autonomous low-power applications. Vibration energy harvesting is particularly well suited to industrial condition sensing, environmental monitoring ...

  14. Method and apparatus for vibrating a substrate during material formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeffrey A. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Roger, Johnson N. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; John, Munley T. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA; Walter, Park R. (Benton City, WA) [Benton City, WA

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for affecting the properties of a material include vibrating the material during its formation (i.e., "surface sifting"). The method includes the steps of providing a material formation device and applying a plurality of vibrations to the material during formation, which vibrations are oscillations having dissimilar, non-harmonic frequencies and at least two different directions. The apparatus includes a plurality of vibration sources that impart vibrations to the material.

  15. Collective Motion of Vibrated Polar Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien Deseigne; Olivier Dauchot; Hugues Chat

    2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study a monolayer of vibrated disks with a built-in polar asymmetry which enables them to move quasi-balistically on a large persistence length. Alignment occurs during collisions as a result of self-propulsion and hard core repulsion. Varying the amplitude of the vibration, we observe the onset of large-scale collective motion and the existence of giant number fluctuations with a scaling exponent in agreement with the predicted theoretical value.

  16. Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.; Alldredg, GP; WETTE, FWD.

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B VOLUME 2, NUMBER 7 1 OCTOB ER, 1970 Lattice Vibrations and Superconductivity in Layered Structures* B. E. Allen, G. P. Alldredge, and F. W. de bette DePartment of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 18... May 1970) In order to estimate the influence of both surface and interface effects on phonon frequencies and superconducting transition temperatures in layered structures, we have calculated the vibrational modes of structures composed...

  17. Active vibration control using piezoceramic transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stjernstrom, Scott Christopher

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL ESIVG PIEZOCERAVIIC TRAiVSDI. CERS A Thesis bv SCOTT CHRISTOPHER STJERNSTRO'vl Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Ak?~I L niversity in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of i...XIASTER OF SCIEVCE December 198i Xlajor Subject: iXIechanical Engineering ACTIVE VIBRATION CONTROL USING PIEZOCERAkIIC TRANSDUCERS A Thesis by SCOTT CHRISTOPHER STJERNSTROM Approved as to style and content by: /j': ~R. M. Alexander (Chairman of Committee...

  18. Superdiffusivity for a Brownian polymer in a continuous Gaussian environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tindel, Samy - Institut de Mathématiques ?lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    environment (random medium) which can be briefly described as follows: the polymer itself, in the absenceSuperdiffusivity for a Brownian polymer in a continuous Gaussian environment S´ergio Bezerra Samy the asymptotic behavior of a one-dimen- sional Brownian polymer in random medium represented by a Gaussian field

  19. Press-in piling: Ground vibration and noise during pile installation David White*, Tim Finlay**, Malcolm Bolton*** and Grant Bearss****

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolton, Malcolm

    of press-in piling makes use of hydraulic rams to provide the force necessary to jack pre-formed piles1 Press-in piling: Ground vibration and noise during pile installation David White*, Tim Finlay-suited to the urban environment. The press- in method offers an alternative technique of pile installation, which

  20. Random coincidence of $2\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Chernyak; F. A. Danevich; A. Giuliani; E. Olivieri; M. Tenconi; V. I. Tretyak

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Two neutrino double $\\beta$ decay can create irremovable background even in high energy resolution detectors searching for neutrinoless double $\\beta$ decay due to random coincidence of $2\

  1. sustainable environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainable resource management environment fisheries aquaculture Cefas capability statement #12 that they can manage their environments and resources in a responsible, effective and sustainable manner. Our costs · Understand, assess and develop opportunities in the short, medium and long-term · Build

  2. Vibration monitoring system for drill string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wassell, M.E.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration monitoring system is described for use in monitoring lateral and torsional vibrations in a drill string comprising: a drill string component having an outer surface; first accelerometer means A[sub 1] for measuring tangential acceleration; second accelerometer means A[sub 2] for measuring tangential acceleration; third accelerometer means A[sub 3] for measuring tangential acceleration; said first, second and third accelerometer means A[sub 1], A[sub 2] and A[sub 3] being mounted in said drill string component and being spaced from one another to measure acceleration forces on said drill string component tangentially with respect to the outer surface of said component wherein said first, second and third accelerometer means are adapted to measure and distinguish between lateral and torsional vibrations exerted on said drill string component.

  3. DSW Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pdf) Section 2 - Proposed Action and Alternatives (6.8 MB pdf) Section 3 - Affected Environment for the extension of the right of way to the Harry Allen Substation and for the...

  4. TEST SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL BENDING STIFFNESS AND VIBRATION INTEGRITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL] [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL] [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL; Flanagan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements specified by federal regulations. For normal conditions of transport, vibration loads incident to transport must be considered. This is particularly relevant for high-burnup fuel (>45 GWd/MTU). As the burnup of the fuel increases, a number of changes occur that may affect the performance of the fuel and cladding in storage and during transportation. The mechanical properties of high-burnup de-fueled cladding have been previously studied by subjecting defueled cladding tubes to longitudinal (axial) tensile tests, ring-stretch tests, ring-compression tests, and biaxial tube burst tests. The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanical properties and behavior of both the cladding and the fuel in it under vibration/cyclic loads similar to the sustained vibration loads experienced during normal transport. The vibration loads to SNF rods during transportation can be characterized by dynamic, cyclic, bending loads. The transient vibration signals in a specified transport environment can be analyzed, and frequency, amplitude and phase components can be identified. The methodology being implemented is a novel approach to study the vibration integrity of actual SNF rod segments through testing and evaluating the fatigue performance of SNF rods at defined frequencies. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a bending fatigue system to evaluate the response of the SNF rods to vibration loads. A three-point deflection measurement technique using linear variable differential transformers is used to characterize the bending rod curvature, and electromagnetic force linear motors are used as the driving system for mechanical loading. ORNL plans to use the test system in a hot cell for SNF vibration testing on high burnup, irradiated fuel to evaluate the pellet-clad interaction and bonding on the effective lifetime of fuel-clad structure bending fatigue performance. Technical challenges include pure bending implementation, remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, test specimen deformation measurement, and identification of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. Surrogate test specimens have been used to calibrate the test setup and conduct systematic cyclic tests. The calibration and systematic cyclic tests have been used to identify test protocol issues prior to implementation in the hot cell. In addition, cyclic hardening in unidirectional bending and softening in reverse bending were observed in the surrogate test specimens. The interface bonding between the surrogate clad and pellets was found to impact the bending response of the surrogate rods; confirming this behavior in the actual spent fuel segments will be an important aspect of the hot cell test implementation,

  5. Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

  6. MONITORING OF VIBRATIONS FOR THE PROTECTION OF ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MONITORING OF VIBRATIONS FOR THE PROTECTION OF ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE Andrea E. Del Grosso1 , Paolo the integrity and conservation of architectural heritage buildings. The paper reviews the main issues : Structural Health Monitoring, vibration measurements, interpretation models, historical buildings

  7. Structure and vibrations of different charge Ge impurity in ?-quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kislov, A. N., E-mail: a.n.kislov@urfu.ru; Mikhailovich, A. P., E-mail: a.n.kislov@urfu.ru; Zatsepin, A. F., E-mail: a.n.kislov@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira St., Yekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic structure and localized vibrations of ??SiO{sub 2}:Ge are studied using computer modeling techniques. The simulation was carried out by the lattice dynamics calculation of the local density of vibrational states. Local structures parameters are calculated, localized symmetrized vibrations frequency caused by Ge impurity in different charge states are defined. The movements of atoms located near Ge impurity are analyzed and their contribution into localized vibrations of different type is evaluated.

  8. Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Flowserve Vibration Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Flowserve Vibration Energy Harvesting of these vibrations, Flowseve is looking at using vibration absorbers coupled with energy harvesting technology a steady state DC output The prototype was created using water jet cutting and milling to create the parts

  9. DOE/ANL/HTRI heat exchanger tube vibration data bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This addendum to the DOE/ANL/HTRI Heat Exchanger Tube Vibration Data Bank includes 16 new case histories of field experiences. The cases include several exchangers that did not experience vibration problems and several for which acoustic vibration was reported.

  10. Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1 Page 1 of 26 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Distribution authorized to all. Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report at the University of Southern California #12;Active Automobile Engine Vibration Analysis Technical Report Number 1

  11. Directed random testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Carlos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Random testing can quickly generate many tests, is easy to implement, scales to large software applications, and reveals software errors. But it tends to generate many tests that are illegal or that exercise the same parts ...

  12. Exponential Random Simplicial Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exponential random graph models have attracted significant research attention over the past decades. These models are maximum-entropy ensembles under the constraints that the expected values of a set of graph observables are equal to given values. Here we extend these maximum-entropy ensembles to random simplicial complexes, which are more adequate and versatile constructions to model complex systems in many applications. We show that many random simplicial complex models considered in the literature can be casted as maximum-entropy ensembles under certain constraints. We introduce and analyze the most general random simplicial complex ensemble $\\mathbf{\\Delta}$ with statistically independent simplices. Our analysis is simplified by the observation that any distribution $\\mathbb{P}(O)$ on any collection of objects $\\mathcal{O}=\\{O\\}$, including graphs and simplicial complexes, is maximum-entropy under the constraint that the expected value of $-\\ln \\mathbb{P}(O)$ is equal to the entropy of the distribution. W...

  13. HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    HYDROGEN LOCAL VIBRATIONAL MODES IN COMPOUND SEMICONDUCTORS M.D. MCCLUSKEY* University) spectroscopy of hydrogen and deuterium in GaP, AlSb, ZnSe, and GaN has provided important information about the structures of dopant- hydrogen complexes and their interaction with the host lattice. In GaN:Mg, for example

  14. Vibration damping required for overhead lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, A.S. Jr. [Research Consulting Associates, Lexington, MA (United States)] [Research Consulting Associates, Lexington, MA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission line engineers have sought an easy method for evaluating if external dampers are required on any new transmission line. In the past this question has been given to the damper manufacturer who has a vested interest in a affirmative answer. For single conductors (and for bundled conductors) the vibration level of a power line conductor is the result of a complicated aerodynamic process in which energy is taken into the motion from vortex action on the lee side of the conductor. The amount of energy taken in is a non-linear function of vibration amplitude, frequency, conductor diameter, and wind speed. The amount of energy taken out is a non-linear function of vibration amplitude, frequency, conductor mass, conductor tension, and a certain friction constant that varies from conductor to conductor. It is known that a small amount of vibration is allowed without endangering the conductor. This has been called the IEEE limit loop velocity, and is numerically equal to 200 mm/second. This paper explains a simple procedure, applicable to single conductors, which calculates a comparison of energy in vs. energy out. From this process it is shown how to select the initial tension in the conductor so that no external dampers are required.

  15. SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SEISMIC VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT USING AMBIENT VIBRATIONS: METHOD AND VALIDATION Clotaire Michel, France cmichel@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr Abstract Seismic vulnerability in wide areas is usually assessed like USA or Italy. France is a country with moderate seismicity so that it requires lower-cost methods

  16. Random array grid collimator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  17. Recycle of random sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuyasu Ito; Macoto Kikuchi; Yutaka Okabe

    1993-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The correlation between a random sequence and its transformed sequences is studied. In the case of a permutation operation or, in other word, the shuffling operation, it is shown that the correlation can be so small that the sequences can be regarded as independent random sequences. The applications to the Monte Carlo simulations are also given. This method is especially useful in the Ising Monte Carlo simulation.

  18. Apparatus and methods for determining at least one characteristic of a proximate environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Michael J. (Troy, ID)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and an apparatus for determining at least one characteristic of an environment are disclosed. A vibrational energy may be imparted into an environment and a magnitude of damping of the vibrational energy may be measured and at least one characteristic of the environment may be determined. Particularly, a vibratory source may be operated and coupled to an environment. At least one characteristic of the environment may be determined based on a shift in at least one steady-state frequency of oscillation of the vibratory source. An apparatus may include at least one vibratory source and a structure for positioning the at least one vibratory source proximate to an environment. Further, the apparatus may include an analysis device for determining at least one characteristic of the environment based at least partially upon shift in a steady-state oscillation frequency of the vibratory source for the given impetus.

  19. Random multiparty entanglement distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Fortescue; Hoi-Kwong Lo

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe various results related to the random distillation of multiparty entangled states - that is, conversion of such states into entangled states shared between fewer parties, where those parties are not predetermined. In previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 260501 (2007)] we showed that certain output states (namely Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) pairs) could be reliably acquired from a prescribed initial multipartite state (namely the W state) via random distillation that could not be reliably created between predetermined parties. Here we provide a more rigorous definition of what constitutes ``advantageous'' random distillation. We show that random distillation is always advantageous for W-class three-qubit states (but only sometimes for Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)-class states). We show that the general class of multiparty states known as symmetric Dicke states can be readily converted to many other states in the class via random distillation. Finally we show that random distillation is provably not advantageous in the limit of multiple copies of pure states.

  20. Downhole Vibration Monitoring and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. The key feature of this system is its use of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF) to allow the damping coefficient to be changed extensively, rapidly and reversibly without the use of mechanical valves, but only by the application of a current. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. Much of the effort was devoted to the design and testing of the MRF damper, itself. The principal objectives of Phase II were: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in a drilling laboratory. Phase II concluded on January 31, 2006, and a final report was issued. Work on Phase III of the project began during the first quarter, 2006, with the objectives of building precommercial prototypes, testing them in a drilling laboratory and the field; developing and implementing a commercialization plan. All of these have been accomplished. The Downhole Vibration Monitoring & Control System (DVMCS) prototypes have been successfully proven in testing at the TerraTek drilling facility and at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Test Center (RMOTC.) Based on the results of these tests, we have signed a definitive development and distribution agreement with Smith, and commercial deployment is underway. This current version of the DVMCS monitors and controls axial vibrations. Due to time and budget constraints of this program, it was not possible to complete a system that would also deal with lateral and torsional (stick-slip) vibrations as originally planned; however, this effort is continuing without DOE funding.

  1. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  2. Methods of performing downhole operations using orbital vibrator energy sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Jack H.; Weinberg, David M.; Wilson, Dennis R.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of performing down hole operations in a wellbore. A vibrational source is positioned within a tubular member such that an annulus is formed between the vibrational source and an interior surface of the tubular member. A fluid medium, such as high bulk modulus drilling mud, is disposed within the annulus. The vibrational source forms a fluid coupling with the tubular member through the fluid medium to transfer vibrational energy to the tubular member. The vibrational energy may be used, for example, to free a stuck tubular, consolidate a cement slurry and/or detect voids within a cement slurry prior to the curing thereof.

  3. Vertical vibration and shape oscillation of acoustically levitated water drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, D. L.; Xie, W. J.; Yan, N.; Wei, B., E-mail: bbwei@nwpu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the vertical harmonic vibration of levitated water drops within ultrasound field. The restoring force to maintain such a vibration mode is provided by the resultant force of acoustic radiation force and drop gravity. Experiments reveal that the vibration frequency increases with the aspect ratio for drops with the same volume, which agrees with the theoretical prediction for those cases of nearly equiaxed drops. During the vertical vibration, the floating drops undergo the second order shape oscillation. The shape oscillation frequency is determined to be twice the vibration frequency.

  4. Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accadia, T; Astone, P; Ballardin, G; Barone, F; Barsuglia, M; Basti, A; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beker, M G; Belletoile, A; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Blom, M; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Boschi, V; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Branchesi, M; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brisson, V; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Canuel, B; Carbognani, F; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Cuoco, E; DAntonio, S; Dattilo, V; Davier, M; Day, R; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Dietz, A; Drago, M; Endroczi, G; Fafone, V; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Forte, L A; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Giazotto, A; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Greverie, C; Guidi, G M; Hayau, J -F; Heidmann, A; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Jaranowski, P; Kowalska, I; Krolak, A; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, T G F; Liguori, N; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Losurdo, G; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Man, N; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Masserot, A; Michel, C; Milano, L; Minenkov, Y; Mohan, M; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Mosca, S; Mours, B; Naticchioni, L; Nocera, F; Pagliaroli, G; Palladino, L; Palomba, C; Paoletti, F; Parisi, M; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Persichetti, G; Piergiovanni, F; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Poggiani, R; Prato, M; Prodi, G A; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Rabeling, D S; Racz, I; Rapagnani, P; Re, V; Regimbau, T; Ricci, F; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Romano, R; Rosinska, D; Ruggi, P; Sassolas, B; Sentenac, D; Sperandio, L; Sturani, R; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Taffarello, L; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torre, O; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Vajente, G; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Putten, S; Vasuth, M; Vavoulidis, M; Vedovato, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicere, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vocca, H; Ward, R L; Was, M; Yvert, M; Zadrozny, A; Zendri, J -P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence ana...

  5. Adjustable Nonlinear Springs to Improve Efficiency of Vibration Energy Harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Boisseau; G. Despesse; B. Ahmed Seddik

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration Energy Harvesting is an emerging technology aimed at turning mechanical energy from vibrations into electricity to power microsystems of the future. Most of present vibration energy harvesters are based on a mass spring structure introducing a resonance phenomenon that allows to increase the output power compared to non-resonant systems, but limits the working frequency bandwidth. Therefore, they are not able to harvest energy when ambient vibrations' frequencies shift. To follow shifts of ambient vibration frequencies and to increase the frequency band where energy can be harvested, one solution consists in using nonlinear springs. We present in this paper a model of adjustable nonlinear springs (H-shaped springs) and their benefits to improve velocity-damped vibration energy harvesters' (VEH) output powers. A simulation on a real vibration source proves that the output power can be higher in nonlinear devices compared to linear systems (up to +48%).

  6. A discrete fractional random transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

    2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  7. Directed polymer in random environment and last passage percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    3, C contains a neighborhood of the origin (see [3, 9]). The main theorem The connection between principle with good rate function the Legendre transform of the free energy of the associated directed (energy, reward) of a path is the sum of weights of visited sites: Hn = Hn(, ) = n k=1 (k, k) (n 1, n

  8. Weakly interacting Bose gas in a random environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falco, G. M.; Nattermann, T.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ization transition remains beyond the frameworks of the theory. The metal-insulator transition in two dimensions was observed in experiments9 suggesting the decisive role of in- teraction. The physical picture changes drastically for bosons.... The noninteracting bosons condense at a single-particle state with the lowest energy. In a homogeneous system it leads to a coherent quantum state known as the Bose-Einstein conden- sate #1;BEC#2;. Examples are superfluid phases of He,10 superconductors,11 BEC...

  9. Lagrangian observations of homogeneous random environments Craig L. Zirbel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirbel, Craig L.

    of Mathematics and Statistics Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403-0221 September 25, 2001

  10. anisotropic random environment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of heat or diffusion of matter through a medium. However, in many practical cases the medium is highly irregular due to defects, impurities, fluctuations etc., and it is...

  11. Conditional Random Fields for Activity Recognition in Smart Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    recognition. Our focus is on using CRFs to recognize activities performed by an inhabitant in a smart home with HMMs using data collected in a real smart home. Categories and Subject Descriptors I.2.6 [Computing. The Georgia Tech Aware Home [3] identifies people based on pressure sensors embedded into the smart floor

  12. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  13. Transportation Shock and Vibration Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Lahti, Erik A.; Ross, Steven B.

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone M4FT-13OR08220112, "Report Documenting Experimental Activities." The purpose of this report is to document the results of a literature review conducted of studies related to the vibration and shock associated with the normal conditions of transport for rail shipments of used nuclear fuel from commercial light-water reactors. As discussed in Adkins (2013), the objective of this report is to determine if adequate data exist that would enable the impacts of the shock and vibration associated with the normal conditions of transport on commercial light-water reactor used nuclear fuel shipped in current generation rail transportation casks to be realistically modeled.

  14. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  15. BENEFITS OF VIBRATION ANALYSIS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT IN HLW TANKS - 12341

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Herbert, J.

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration analyses of equipment intended for use in the Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive liquid waste storage tanks are performed during pre-deployment testing and has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing the life-cycle costs of the equipment. Benefits of using vibration analysis to identify rotating machinery problems prior to deployment in radioactive service will be presented in this paper. Problems encountered at SRS and actions to correct or lessen the severity of the problem are discussed. In short, multi-million dollar cost saving have been realized at SRS as a direct result of vibration analysis on existing equipment. Vibration analysis of equipment prior to installation can potentially reduce inservice failures, and increases reliability. High-level radioactive waste is currently stored in underground carbon steel waste tanks at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and at the Hanford Site, WA. Various types of rotating machinery (pumps and separations equipment) are used to manage and retrieve the tank contents. Installation, maintenance, and repair of these pumps and other equipment are expensive. In fact, costs to remove and replace a single pump can be as high as a half million dollars due to requirements for radioactive containment. Problems that lead to in-service maintenance and/or equipment replacement can quickly exceed the initial investment, increase radiological exposure, generate additional waste, and risk contamination of personnel and the work environment. Several different types of equipment are considered in this paper, but pumps provide an initial example for the use of vibration analysis. Long-shaft (45 foot long) and short-shaft (5-10 feet long) equipment arrangements are used for 25-350 horsepower slurry mixing and transfer pumps in the SRS HLW tanks. Each pump has a unique design, operating characteristics and associated costs, sometimes exceeding a million dollars. Vibration data are routinely collected during pre-installation tests and screened for: Critical speeds or resonance, Imbalance of rotating parts, Shaft misalignment, Fluid whirl or lubrication break down, Bearing damages, and Other component abnormalities. Examples of previous changes in operating parameters and fabrication tolerances and extension of equipment life resulting from the SRS vibration analysis program include: (1) Limiting operational speeds for some pumps to extend service life without design or part changes; (2) Modifying manufacturing methods (tightening tolerances) for impellers on slurry mixing pumps based on vibration data that indicated hydraulic imbalance; (3) Identifying rolling element mounting defects and replacing those components in pump seals before installation; and (4) Identifying the need for bearing design modification for SRS long-shaft mixing pump designs to eliminate fluid whirl and critical speeds which significantly increased the equipment service life. In addition, vibration analyses and related analyses have been used during new equipment scale-up tests to identify the need for design improvements for full-scale operation / deployment of the equipment in the full size tanks. For example, vibration analyses were recently included in the rotary micro-filtration scale-up test program at SRNL.

  16. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins at Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holinga, George J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 2 Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy2.1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational SpectroscopyIntroduction Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational

  17. Diagnosing subsynchronous vibrations in turbomachinery - stable or unstable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopalan, Vinayaka Narayanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    friction whip defies the general rules of thumb for diagnosing a true instability and at the same time is a very violent one as well. The last phenomenon to be studied is coupled lateral-torsional vibrations. A special test rig was built to study... this effect, and clear indicators have been identified to distinguish the response as resulting from torsional vibrations and also classify it as a benign source of subsynchronous vibration. The test rig is also mathematically modeled to predict its...

  18. Random Walks with Lookahead in Power Law Random Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihail, Milena

    1 Random Walks with Lookahead in Power Law Random Graphs Milena Mihail Amin Saberi Prasad Tetali Georgia Institute of Technology Email: mihail, saberi @cc.gatech.edu tetali@math.cc.gatech.edu Abstract

  19. Randomization vs. Nondeterminisma What are the differences between randomized algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    Inequalitya Lemma 61 Let x be a random variable taking nonnegative integer values. Then for any k > 0, prob[ x

  20. APS Protocol for Reporting Construction Vibration Issues for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that shown in the online version. Advanced Photon Source APS Protocol for Reporting Construction Vibration Issues for Beamlines Section where used: This procedure describes the...

  1. VIBRATION CHARACTERISTICS OF AN APS LAB FACILITY IN BUILDING...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VIBRATION CHARACTERISTICS OF AN APS LAB FACILITY IN BUILDING 401 by T. J. Royston, Summer Faculty Participant Experimental Facilities Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne...

  2. Explicit Correlated Exciton-Vibrational Dynamics of the FMO Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Jan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupled exciton-vibrational dynamics of a 3-site FMO model is investigated using the numerically exact multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree approach. Thereby the vibrational mode specific coupling to local electronic transitions is adapted from a discretized experimental spectral density. The solution of the resulting time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation including three electronic and 450 vibrational degrees of freedom is analyzed in terms of excitonic populations and coherences. Emphasis is put onto the role of specific ranges of vibrational frequencies. It is observed that modes between 160 and 300 cm$^{-1}$ are responsible for the subpicosecond population and coherence decay.

  3. Vibrational energy transfer in ultracold molecule - molecule collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulven Qumner; Naduvalath Balakrishnan; Roman V. Krems

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a rigorous study of vibrational relaxation in p-H2 + p-H2 collisions at cold and ultracold temperatures and identify an efficient mechanism of ro-vibrational energy transfer. If the colliding molecules are in different rotational and vibrational levels, the internal energy may be transferred between the molecules through an extremely state-selective process involving simultaneous conservation of internal energy and total rotational angular momentum. The same transition in collisions of distinguishable molecules corresponds to the rotational energy transfer from one vibrational state of the colliding molecules to another.

  4. active vibration isolation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ultra-precision instruments such as the MITCaltech Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory ... Zuo, Lei, 1974- 2005-01-01 5 Active vibration isolation of a...

  5. aqueous solution vibrational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase liquids in porous media. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Acoustic wave stimulation, such as vibration-induced mobilization, is a promising enhancement...

  6. Coal storage hopper with vibrating-screen agitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daw, C.S.; Lackey, M.E.; Sy, R.L.

    1982-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a vibrating screen agitator in a coal storage hopper for assuring the uniform feed of coal having sufficient moisture content to effect agglomeration and bridging thereof in the coal hopper from the latter onto a conveyer mechanism. The vibrating scrren agitator is provided by a plurality of transversely oriented and vertically spaced apart screens in the storage hopper with a plurality of vertically oriented rods attached to the screens. The rods are vibrated to effect the vibration of the screens and the breaking up of agglomerates in the coal which might impede the uniform flow of the coal from the hopper onto a conveyer.

  7. Device Independent Random Number Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mataj Pivoluska; Martin Plesch

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is an invaluable resource in today's life with a broad use reaching from numerical simulations through randomized algorithms to cryptography. However, on the classical level no true randomness is available and even the use of simple quantum devices in a prepare-measure setting suffers from lack of stability and controllability. This gave rise to a group of quantum protocols that provide randomness certified by classical statistical tests -- Device Independent Quantum Random Number Generators. In this paper we review the most relevant results in this field, which allow the production of almost perfect randomness with help of quantum devices, supplemented with an arbitrary weak source of additional randomness. This is in fact the best one could hope for to achieve, as with no starting randomness (corresponding to no free will in a different concept) even a quantum world would have a fully deterministic description.

  8. Superdi usivity for a Brownian polymer in a continuous Gaussian environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viens, Frederi G.

    environment (random medium) which can be brie y described as follows: the polymer itself, in the absenceSuperdi usivity for a Brownian polymer in a continuous Gaussian environment Sergio Bezerra Samy the asymptotic behavior of a one-dimen- sional Brownian polymer in random medium represented by a Gaussian eld W

  9. Vibration Power Harvesting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report | DepartmentTRU PassiveNovember 1,Vibration Power

  10. Experimental Vibrational Zero-Point Energies: Diatomic Molecules Karl K. Irikuraa...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Experimental Vibrational Zero-Point Energies: Diatomic Molecules Karl K. Irikuraa... Physical online 18 April 2007 Vibrational zero-point energies ZPEs , as determined from published spectroscopic: molecular energetics; uncertainty; vibrational spectroscopy; zero-point energy. CONTENTS 1. Introduction

  11. A multi-frequency induction heating system for a thermally triggered gel polymer dynamic vibration absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, John Israel, 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its invention in the early part of the twentieth century, the dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) has played an important role in vibration suppression. In its simplest form, a dynamic vibration absorber is a mechanical ...

  12. Random Selection for Drug Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple random sampling is generally the starting point for a random sampling process. This sampling technique ensures that each individual within a group (population) has an equal chance of being selected. There are a variety of ways to implement random sampling in a practical situation.

  13. anharmonic vibrational dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anharmonic vibrational dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Anharmonic Vibrational...

  14. ambient vibration test: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vibration test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ambient Vibration Tests and Modal...

  15. Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium P. M. Scheifele Department significant levels of background noise due to pumps and motors. This noise, together with pool architecture to quantify the ambient noise levels in the water from machine vibration and from in-air performance speaker

  16. VIBRATION CONTROL IN A SMART BEAM Daniel R. Fay*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Mayuresh

    activity and nearby motorized equipment. In this case, disturbance is produced using a white noise signal for vibration suppression, stability augmentation, and noise reduction in beam-like aerodynamic surfacesVIBRATION CONTROL IN A SMART BEAM Daniel R. Fay* Widener University, Chester, Pennsylvania Abstract

  17. Electromagnetic actuator to reduce vibration sources Thibaut Chailloux*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in an FE- Tuned Magnetic Equivalent Circuit of an Electromagnetic Relay, Sixdenier F., Raulet M.-A., MarionElectromagnetic actuator to reduce vibration sources Thibaut Chailloux* , L. Morel* , F. Sixdenier In order to improve passenger comfort, a reduction of vibration sources in vehicles is being considered

  18. Electromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    an equivalent circuit by application of network theory. The Mason equivalent circuit, shown in Fig. 1 for a oneElectromechanical properties of thin strip piezoelectric vibrators at high frequency Timothy Ritter the electromechanical properties of high frequency 20 MHz piezoelectric strip vibrators. A nonlinear regression

  19. Imaging photorefractive optical vibration measurement method and device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hale, Thomas C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for characterizing a vibrating image of an object of interest. The method includes providing a sensing media having a detection resolution within a limited bandwidth and providing an object of interest having a vibrating medium. Two or more wavefronts are provided, with at least one of the wavefronts being modulated by interacting the one wavefront with the vibrating medium of the object of interest. The another wavefront is modulated such that the difference frequency between the one wavefront and the another wavefront is within a response range of the sensing media. The modulated one wavefront and another wavefront are combined in association with the sensing media to interfere and produce simultaneous vibration measurements that are distributed over the object so as to provide an image of the vibrating medium. The image has an output intensity that is substantially linear with small physical variations within the vibrating medium. Furthermore, the method includes detecting the image. In one implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration spectrum analyzer having an emitter, a modulator, sensing media and a detector configured so as to realize such method. According to another implementation, the apparatus comprises a vibration imaging device.

  20. ME 355K Engineering Vibrations ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    of contemporary issues in engineering practice, including economic, social, political, and environmental issues. Apply principles of engineering, basic science, and mathematics (including multivariate calculusME 355K Engineering Vibrations Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 355K Engineering Vibrations

  1. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational Nano-Spectroscopy: From Monolayer Towards Single molecule sensitivity. Pushing The Sample-Size Limit Of Infrared Vibrational...

  2. THE EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION ON THE DYNAMICS OF ION-MOLECULE REACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, S.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Research Division THE/EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION ON THE DYNAMICSmolecular charge transfer. 'J i THE EFFECT OF VIBRATIONAL EXCITATION ON THE DYNAMICS

  3. Characterization of the Virgo Seismic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Virgo Collaboration; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; P. Astone; G. Ballardin; F. Barone; M. Barsuglia; A. Basti; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; M. G. Beker; A. Belletoile; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; M. Blom; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; V. Boschi; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; M. Branchesi; T. Briant; A. Brillet; V. Brisson; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; B. Canuel; F. Carbognani; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; E. Chassande-Mottin; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; E. Cuoco; S. DAntonio; V. Dattilo; M. Davier; R. Day; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; A. Dietz; M. Drago; G. Endroczi; V. Fafone; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; I. Fiori; R. Flaminio; L. A. Forte; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; A. Giazotto; R. Gouaty; M. Granata; C. Greverie; G. M. Guidi; J. -F. Hayau; A. Heidmann; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; P. Jaranowski; I. Kowalska; A. Krolak; N. Leroy; N. Letendre; T. G. F. Li; N. Liguori; M. Lorenzini; V. Loriette; G. Losurdo; E. Majorana; I. Maksimovic; N. Man; M. Mantovani; F. Marchesoni; F. Marion; J. Marque; F. Martelli; A. Masserot; C. Michel; L. Milano; Y. Minenkov; M. Mohan; N. Morgado; A. Morgia; S. Mosca; B. Mours; L. Naticchioni; F. Nocera; G. Pagliaroli; L. Palladino; C. Palomba; F. Paoletti; M. Parisi; A. Pasqualetti; R. Passaquieti; D. Passuello; G. Persichetti; F. Piergiovanni; M. Pietka; L. Pinard; R. Poggiani; M. Prato; G. A. Prodi; M. Punturo; P. Puppo; D. S. Rabeling; I. Racz; P. Rapagnani; V. Re; T. Regimbau; F. Ricci; F. Robinet; A. Rocchi; L. Rolland; R. Romano; D. Rosinska; P. Ruggi; B. Sassolas; D. Sentenac; L. Sperandio; R. Sturani; B. Swinkels; M. Tacca; L. Taffarello; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; O. Torre; E. Tournefier; F. Travasso; G. Vajente; J. F. J. van den Brand; C. Van Den Broeck; S. van der Putten; M. Vasuth; M. Vavoulidis; G. Vedovato; D. Verkindt; F. Vetrano; A. Vicere; J. -Y. Vinet; S. Vitale; H. Vocca; R. L. Ward; M. Was; M. Yvert; A. Zadrozny; J. -P. Zendri

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virgo gravitational wave detector is an interferometer (ITF) with 3km arms located in Pisa, Italy. From July to October 2010, Virgo performed its third science run (VSR3) in coincidence with the LIGO detectors. Despite several techniques adopted to isolate the interferometer from the environment, seismic noise remains an important issue for Virgo. Vibrations produced by the detector infrastructure (such as air conditioning units, water chillers/heaters, pumps) are found to affect Virgo's sensitivity, with the main coupling mechanisms being through beam jitter and scattered light processes. The Advanced Virgo (AdV) design seeks to reduce ITF couplings to environmental noise by having most vibration-sensitive components suspended and in-vacuum, as well as muffle and relocate loud machines. During the months of June and July 2010, a Guralp-3TD seismometer was stationed at various locations around the Virgo site hosting major infrastructure machines. Seismic data were examined using spectral and coherence analysis with seismic probes close to the detector. The primary aim of this study was to identify noisy machines which seismically affect the ITF environment and thus require mitigation attention. Analyzed machines are located at various distances from the experimental halls, ranging from 10m to 100m. An attempt is made to measure the attenuation of emitted noise at the ITF and correlate it to the distance from the source and to seismic attenuation models in soil.

  4. Random one-of-N selector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for selecting at random one item of N items on the average comprising counter and reset elements for counting repeatedly between zero and N, a number selected by the user, a circuit for activating and deactivating the counter, a comparator to determine if the counter stopped at a count of zero, an output to indicate an item has been selected when the count is zero or not selected if the count is not zero. Randomness is provided by having the counter cycle very often while varying the relatively longer duration between activation and deactivation of the count. The passive circuit components of the activating/deactivating circuit and those of the counter are selected for the sensitivity of their response to variations in temperature and other physical characteristics of the environment so that the response time of the circuitry varies. Additionally, the items themselves, which may be people, may vary in shape or the time they press a pushbutton, so that, for example, an ultrasonic beam broken by the item or person passing through it will add to the duration of the count and thus to the randomness of the selection.

  5. Accelerated Randomized Benchmarking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Granade; Christopher Ferrie; D. G. Cory

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum information processing offers promising advances for a wide range of fields and applications, provided that we can efficiently assess the performance of the control applied in candidate systems. That is, we must be able to determine whether we have implemented a desired gate, and refine accordingly. Randomized benchmarking reduces the difficulty of this task by exploiting symmetries in quantum operations. Here, we bound the resources required for benchmarking and show that, with prior information, we can achieve several orders of magnitude better accuracy than in traditional approaches to benchmarking. Moreover, by building on state-of-the-art classical algorithms, we reach these accuracies with near-optimal resources. Our approach requires an order of magnitude less data to achieve the same accuracies and to provide online estimates of the errors in the reported fidelities. We also show that our approach is useful for physical devices by comparing to simulations. Our results thus enable the application of randomized benchmarking in new regimes, and dramatically reduce the experimental effort required to assess control fidelities in quantum systems. Finally, our work is based on open-source scientific libraries, and can readily be applied in systems of interest.

  6. Random rectangular Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalization of the random geometric graph (RGG) model is proposed by considering a set of points uniformly and independently distributed on a rectangle of unit area instead of on a unit square \\left[0,1\\right]^{2}. The topological properties, such as connectivity, average degree, average path length and clustering, of the random rectangular graphs (RRGs) generated by this model are then studied as a function of the rectangle sides lengths a and b=1/a, and the radius r used to connect the nodes. When a=1 we recover the RGG, and when a\\rightarrow\\infty the very elongated rectangle generated resembles a one-dimensional RGG. We provided computational and analytical evidence that the topological properties of the RRG differ significantly from those of the RGG. The connectivity of the RRG depends not only on the number of nodes as in the case of the RGG, but also on the side length of the rectangle. As the rectangle is more elongated the critical radius for connectivity increases following first a power-law an...

  7. Reusable vibration resistant integrated circuit mounting socket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Craig N. (Irwin, PA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention discloses a novel form of socket for integrated circuits to be mounted on printed circuit boards. The socket uses a novel contact which is fabricated out of a bimetallic strip with a shape which makes the end of the strip move laterally as temperature changes. The end of the strip forms a barb which digs into an integrated circuit lead at normal temperatures and holds it firmly in the contact, preventing loosening and open circuits from vibration. By cooling the contact containing the bimetallic strip the barb end can be made to release so that the integrated circuit lead can be removed from the socket without damage either to the lead or to the socket components.

  8. A vibration model for centrifugal contactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, R.A.; Wasserman, M.O.; Wygmans, D.G.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the transfer matrix method, we created the Excel worksheet ``Beam`` for analyzing vibrations in centrifugal contactors. With this worksheet, a user can calculate the first natural frequency of the motor/rotor system for a centrifugal contactor. We determined a typical value for the bearing stiffness (k{sub B}) of a motor after measuring the k{sub B} value for three different motors. The k{sub B} value is an important parameter in this model, but it is not normally available for motors. The assumptions that we made in creating the Beam worksheet were verified by comparing the calculated results with those from a VAX computer program, BEAM IV. The Beam worksheet was applied to several contactor designs for which we have experimental data and found to work well.

  9. FORTE spacecraft vibration mitigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maly, J.R.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents work that was performed by CSA Engineering, Inc., for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to reduce vibrations of the FORTE spacecraft by retrofitting damped structural components into the spacecraft structure. The technical objective of the work was reduction of response at the location of payload components when the structure is subjected to the dynamic loading associated with launch and proto-qualification testing. FORTE is a small satellite that will be placed in orbit in 1996. The structure weighs approximately 425 lb, and is roughly 80 inches high and 40 inches in diameter. It was developed and built by LANL in conjunction with Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque for the United States Department of Energy. The FORTE primary structure was fabricated primarily with graphite epoxy, using aluminum honeycomb core material for equipment decks and solar panel substrates. Equipment decks were bonded and bolted through aluminum mounting blocks to adjoining structure.

  10. Damping of Quantum Vibrations Revealed in Deep Sub-barrier Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Ichikawa; Kenichi Matsuyanagi

    2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that when two colliding nuclei approach each other, their quantum vibrations are damped near the touching point. We show that this damping is responsible for the fusion hindrance phenomena measured in the deep sub-barrier fusion reactions. To show those, we for the first time apply the random-phase-approximation (RPA) method to the two-body $^{16}$O + $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca + $^{40}$Ca systems. We calculate the octupole transition strengths for the two nuclei adiabatically approaching each other. The calculated transition strength drastically decreases near the touching point, strongly suggesting the vanishing of the quantum couplings between the relative motion and the vibrational intrinsic degrees of freedom of each nucleus. Based on this picture, we also calculate the fusion cross section for the $^{40}$Ca + $^{40}$Ca system using the coupled-channel method with the damping factor simulating the vanishing of the couplings. The calculated results reproduce well the experimental data, indicating that the smooth transition from the sudden to adiabatic processes indeed occurs in the deep sub-barrier fusion reactions.

  11. Size separation in vibrated granular matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kudrolli

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent developments in size separation in vibrated granular materials. Motivated by a need in industry to efficiently handle granular materials and a desire to make fundamental advances in non-equilibrium physics, experimental and theoretical investigations have shown size separation to be a complex phenomena. Large particles in a vibrated granular system invariably rise to the top. However, they may also sink to the bottom, or show other patterns depending on subtle variations in physical conditions. While size ratio is a dominant factor, particle specific properties such as density, inelasticity and friction can play an important role. The nature of the energy input, boundary conditions and interstitial air have been also shown to be significant factors in determining spatial distributions. The presence of convection can enhance mixing or lead to size separation. Experimental techniques including direct visualization and magnetic resonance imaging are being used to investigate these properties. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulation techniques have been developed to probe size separation. Analytical methods such as kinetic theory are being used to study the interplay between particle size and density in the vibro-fluidized regime, and geometric models have been proposed to describe size separation for deep beds. Besides discussing these studies, we will also review the impact of inelastic collision and friction on the density and velocity distributions to gain a deeper appreciation of the non-equilibrium nature of the system. While a substantial number of studies have been accomplished, considerable work is still required to achieve a firm description of the phenomena.

  12. Analysis of wind turbine vibrations based on SCADA data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Kusiak; Zijun Zhang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrations of a wind turbine have a negative impact on its performance. Mitigating this undesirable impact requires knowledge of the relationship between the vibrations and other wind turbine parameters that could be potentially modified. Three approaches for ranking the impact importance of measurable turbine parameters on the vibrations of the drive train and the tower are discussed. They include the predictor importance analysis, the global sensitivity analysis, and the correlation coefficient analysis versed in data mining and statistics. To decouple the impact of wind speed on the vibrations of the drive train and the tower, the analysis is performed on data sets with narrow speed ranges. Wavelet analysis is applied to filter noisy accelerometer data. To exclude the impact malfunctions on the vibration analysis, the data are analyzed in a frequency domain. Data-mining algorithms are used to build models with turbine parameters of interest as inputs, and the vibrations of drive train and tower as outputs. The performance of each model is thoroughly evaluated based on metrics widely used in the wind industry. The neural network algorithm outperforms other classifiers and is considered to be the most promising approach to study wind turbine vibrations. ?DOI: 10.1115/1.4001461?

  13. Particle-vibration coupling effect on the $\\beta$-decay of magic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Yifei; Colo, Gianluca; Vigezzi, Enrico

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear $\\beta$-decay in magic nuclei is investigated, taking into account the coupling between particle and collective vibrations,on top of self-consistent random phase approximation calculations based on Skyrme density functionals. The low-lying Gamow-Teller strength is shifted downwards and at times becomes fragmented; as a consequence, the $\\beta$-decay half-lives are reduced due to the increase of the phase space available for the decay. In some cases, this leads to a very good agreement between theoretical and experimental lifetimes: this happens, in particular, in the case of the Skyrme force SkM*, that can also reproduce the line shape of the high energy Gamow-Teller resonance as it was previously shown.

  14. Ecology and environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Ecology and environment Essentials Courses MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment MSci (Hons) in Ecology and Environment (research placement) BSc (Hons) in Ecology and Environment Foundation year for UK for the MSci in Ecology and Environment (research placement): AAA Typical A level offer range for the other

  15. The vibration by analogy of certain trusses, beams and plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Lee Price

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the positive sense of rotation. In this paper, the torsional vibration equation was replaced by a finite difference equation for the nth node in the form n which was regarded as a statement of Kirchhoff's current law and led to the following equivalent...THE VIBRATION BY ANALOGY OF CERTAIN TRUSSES, THEVI EBR AOENHI A Dissertation By LEE PRICE THOMPSON Approved as to style and content by: Ciiairman of Committee 6 . . 7 T . Head of Department May 1953 THE VIBRATION BY ANALOGY OF CERTAIN...

  16. Self-ratcheting Stokes drops driven by oblique vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin John; Uwe Thiele

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop and analyze a minimal hydrodynamic model in the overdamped limit to understand why a drop climbs a smooth homogeneous incline that is harmonically vibrated at an angle different from the substrate normal [Brunet, Eggers and Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007)]. We find that the vibration component orthogonal to the substrate induces a nonlinear (anharmonic) response in the drop shape. This results in an asymmetric response of the drop to the parallel vibration and, in consequence, in the observed net motion. Beside establishing the basic mechanism, we identify scaling laws valid in a broad frequency range and a flow reversal at high frequencies.

  17. Gerotor and bearing system for whirling mass orbital vibrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brett, James Ford; Westermark, Robert Victor; Turner Jr., Joey Earl; Lovin, Samuel Scott; Cole, Jack Howard; Myers, Will

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A gerotor and bearing apparatus for a whirling mass orbital vibrator which generates vibration in a borehole. The apparatus includes a gerotor with an inner gear rotated by a shaft having one less lobe than an outer gear. A whirling mass is attached to the shaft. At least one bearing is attached to the shaft so that the bearing engages at least one sleeve. A mechanism is provided to rotate the inner gear, the mass and the bearing in a selected rotational direction in order to cause the mass, the inner gear, and the bearing to backwards whirl in an opposite rotational direction. The backwards whirling mass creates seismic vibrations.

  18. An experimental study of the vibration of modified cantilever plates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, James McPherson

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wings and larger sweep angles. For complete vibration and flutter anal- ysis of these components it is necessary that the modes and frequencies of natural vibration be closely established. Flat cantilever plates (I). serve as a good analogy... of the wings for vibration study. The wings, however, are not usually true cantilevers but are fastened along two lines. One of these lines is along the skin of the fuselage and the other is along the center line of the craft. JL moment is applied...

  19. Airbus Toulouse Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    Airbus Toulouse ­ Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data. The trainee will work within flight test vibration analysis team.The main missions and activities on flight test vibration data; - Implement and test in LMS Test.Lab (vibration data processing software

  20. Particle-particle random phase approximation applied to Beryllium isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Blanchon; Nicole Vinh Mau; Angela Bonaccorso; Marc Dupuis; Nathalie Pillet

    2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is dedicated to the study of even-even 8-14 Be isotopes using the particle-particle Random Phase Approximation that accounts for two-body correlations in the core nucleus. A better description of energies and two-particle amplitudes is obtained in comparison with models assuming a neutron closed-shell (or subshell) core. A Wood-Saxon potential corrected by a phenomenological particle-vibration coupling term has been used for the neutron-core interaction and the D1S Gogny force for the neutron-neutron interaction. Calculated ground state properties as well as excited state ones are discussed and compared to experimental data. In particular, results suggest the same 2s_1/2-1p_1/2 shell inversion in 13Be as in 11Be.

  1. Random Curves by Conformal Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Astala; P. Jones; A. Kupiainen; E. Saksman

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle given in terms of the exponential of Gaussian Free Field. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

  2. Random Curves by Conformal Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astala, K; Kupiainen, A; Saksman, E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle given in terms of the exponential of Gaussian Free Field. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

  3. Better Randomness with Single Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oberreiter, Lukas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is one of the most important resources in modern information science, since encryption founds upon the trust in random numbers. Since it is impossible to prove if an existing random bit string is truly random, it is relevant that they be generated in a trust worthy process. This requires specialized hardware for random numbers, for example a die or a tossed coin. But when all input parameters are known, their outcome might still be predicted. A quantum mechanical superposition allows for provably true random bit generation. In the past decade many quantum random number generators (QRNGs) were realized. A photonic implementation is described as a photon which impinges on a beam splitter, but such a protocol is rarely realized with non-classical light or anti-bunched single photons. Instead, laser sources or light emitting diodes are used. Here we analyze the difference in generating a true random bit string with a laser and with anti-bunched light. We show that a single photon source provides more r...

  4. Nonlinear Optimal Control Techniques for Vibration Attenuation Using Magnetostrictive Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of vibrations in aeronautic, aerospace, automotive, and industrial systems constitutes a fundamental component compounds, and shape memory alloys (SMA) -- have emerged as viable alternatives for both passive and active

  5. Orientational relaxation and vibrational excitation transfer in methanolcarbon tetrachloride solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Orientational relaxation and vibrational excitation transfer in methanol­carbon tetrachloride spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of methanol in carbon tetrachloride solutions to study orientational excitation transfer. For concentrated methanol in carbon tetrachloride solu- tions, like those used

  6. Vortex-induced vibration of slender structures in unsteady flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Jung-Chi, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) results in fatigue damage of offshore oil exploration and production structures. In recent years, the offshore industry has begun to employ curved slender structures such as steel catenary ...

  7. Active vibration cancellation of tonal disturbance using orthogonal eigenstructure control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastgaar Aagaah, Mohammad

    Orthogonal Eigenstructure Control (OEC) is a novel control method that can be used for active vibration cancellation. OEC is an output feedback control method applicable to multiple-input, multiple-output linear systems. ...

  8. Vibration Isolation of a Locomotive Mounted Energy Storage Flywheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaohua

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing flywheels to store and reuse energy from regenerative braking on locomotives is a new technology being developed in the Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab at Texas A&M. This thesis focuses on the motion analysis of a locomotive...

  9. A preferential vibration dissociation coupling model for nonequilibrium hypersonic flowfields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGough, David Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preferential vibration-dissociation coupling model is incorporated into a radiatively coupled viscous shock layer code that also includes chemical, radiative, and thermal nonequilibrium. Stagnation point flow profiles are obtained for several...

  10. Design and vibration testing of a flexible seal whisker model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Christopher D

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harbor seal whiskers have a unique surface structure that dramatically reduces vortex induced vibrations as they move through the water. Concurrently with rigid whisker experiments, this project focuses on the design and ...

  11. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  12. Modeling and design of a MEMS piezoelectric vibration energy harvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du Toit, Nol Eduard

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling and design of MEMS-scale piezoelectric-based vibration energy harvesters (MPVEH) are presented. The work is motivated by the need for pervasive and limitless power for wireless sensor nodes that have application ...

  13. attached vibrational probe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the site energy of the acceptor chromophore is lower than that of the donor. Jason D. Biggs; Jeffrey A. Cina 2009-10-12 34 Model-Based Vibration Suppression in Piezoelectric Tube...

  14. Order preserving vibrating strings and applications to Electrodynamics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenier, Yann

    time. It has been advertised as a possible model for dark energy [GKMP]. From a mathematical point specifically to its shallow water version. Then, each vibrating string can be interpreted as a magnetic line

  15. Good vibrations give electrons excitations that rock an insulator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    online issue of Nature. "We proved that phonons-the vibrations of the atoms-provide the driving force that stabilizes the metal phase when the material is heated," said John...

  16. Vibration Isolation of a Locomotive Mounted Energy Storage Flywheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaohua

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing flywheels to store and reuse energy from regenerative braking on locomotives is a new technology being developed in the Vibration Control and Electromechanics Lab at Texas A&M. This thesis focuses on the motion ...

  17. Element and system design for active and passive vibration isolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lei, 1974-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focusses on broadband vibration isolation, with an emphasis on control of absolute payload motion for ultra-precision instruments such as the MIT/Caltech Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatory ...

  18. Magnetic induction systems to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonnalagadda, Aparna S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the design process for magnetic induction systems to harvest energy from mechanical vibrations. Two styles of magnetic induction systems - magnet-through-coil and magnet-across-coils - were analyzed. ...

  19. Energy harvesting from wind-induced vibration of suspension bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Miao, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, an extensive amount of research has been focused on energy harvesting from structural vibration sources for wireless self-powered microsystem applications. One method of energy harvesting is using electromagnetic ...

  20. An experimental study of torsional vibration measurement / b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Robert Sheldon

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF TORSIONAL VIBRATION MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ROBERT SHELDON FRENCH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uniuersity in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981... biajor Subject: Mechanical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF TORSIONAL VIBRATION MEASUREMENT A Thesis by ROBERT SHELDON FRENCH Approved as to style and content by: , ' (Chairman of Committee) (Mem ) ( er) (Member) (H d of Department) August...

  1. Harsh environments electronics : downhole applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operational sustainment of renewable (geothermal) and non-renewable (fossil fuel) energy resources will be accompanied by increasingly higher costs factors: exploration and site preparation, operational maintenance and repair. Increased government oversight in the wake of the Gulf oil spill will only add to the cost burden. It is important to understand that downhole conditions are not just about elevated temperatures. It is often construed that military electronics are exposed to the upper limit in terms of extreme service environments. Probably the harshest of all service conditions for electronics and electrical equipment are those in oil, gas, and geothermal wells. From the technology perspective, advanced materials, sensors, and microelectronics devices are benefificial to the exploration and sustainment of energy resources, especially in terms of lower costs. Besides the need for the science that creates these breakthroughs - there is also a need for sustained engineering development and testing. Downhole oil, gas, and geothermal well applications can have a wide range of environments and reliability requirements: Temperature, Pressure, Vibration, Corrosion, and Service duration. All too frequently, these conditions are not well-defifined because the application is labeled as 'high temperature'. This ambiguity is problematic when the investigation turns to new approaches for electronic packaging solutions. The objective is to develop harsh environment, electronic packaging that meets customer requirements of cost, performance, and reliability. There are a number of challenges: (1) Materials sets - solder alloys, substrate materials; (2) Manufacturing process - low to middle volumes, low defect counts, new equipment technologies; and (3) Reliability testing - requirements documents, test methods and modeling, relevant standards documents. The cost to develop and sustain renewable and non-renewable energy resources will continue to escalate within the industry. Downhole electronics can provide a very cost-effective approach for well exploration and sustainment (data logging). However, the harsh environments are a 'game-changer' in terms defining materials, assembly processes and the long-term reliability of downhole electronic systems. The system-level approach will enable the integration of each of these contributors - materials, processes, and reliability - in order to deliver cost-effective electronics that meet customer requirements.

  2. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  3. Vibration monitoring of EDF rotating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Hamon, L.; Lefevre, F. (Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration monitoring of components in nuclear power plants has been used for a number of years. This technique involves the analysis of vibration data coming from vital components of the plant to detect features which reflect the operational state of machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. Earlydetection is important because it can decrease the probability of catastrophic failures, reduce forced outgage, maximize utilization of available assets, increase the life of the plant, and reduce maintenance costs. This paper documents our work on the design of a vibration monitoring methodology based on neural network technology. This technology provides an attractive complement to traditional vibration analysis because of the potential of neural networks to operate in real-time mode and to handle data which may be distorted or noisy. Our efforts have been concentrated on the analysis and classification of vibration signatures collected by Electricite de France (EDF). Two neural networks algorithms were used in our project: the Recirculation algorithm and the Backpropagation algorithm. Although this project is in the early stages of development it indicates that neural networks may provide a viable methodology for monitoring and diagnostics of vibrating components. Our results are very encouraging.

  4. Vibration monitoring of EDF rotating machinery using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Hamon, L.; Lefevre, F. [Electricite de France, 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration monitoring of components in nuclear power plants has been used for a number of years. This technique involves the analysis of vibration data coming from vital components of the plant to detect features which reflect the operational state of machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. Earlydetection is important because it can decrease the probability of catastrophic failures, reduce forced outgage, maximize utilization of available assets, increase the life of the plant, and reduce maintenance costs. This paper documents our work on the design of a vibration monitoring methodology based on neural network technology. This technology provides an attractive complement to traditional vibration analysis because of the potential of neural networks to operate in real-time mode and to handle data which may be distorted or noisy. Our efforts have been concentrated on the analysis and classification of vibration signatures collected by Electricite de France (EDF). Two neural networks algorithms were used in our project: the Recirculation algorithm and the Backpropagation algorithm. Although this project is in the early stages of development it indicates that neural networks may provide a viable methodology for monitoring and diagnostics of vibrating components. Our results are very encouraging.

  5. Peri-prosthetic fracture vibration testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruce, Jesse R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Erwin, Jenny R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Remick, Kevin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cornwell, Phillip J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menegini, R. Michael [INDIANA UNIV.; Racanelli, Joe [STRYKER ORTHOPAEDICS

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to establish a test setup and vibration analysis method to predict femoral stem seating and prevent bone fracture using accelerometer or force response data from an instrument stem and impactor. This study builds upon earlier studies to identify a means to supplement a surgeon's tactile and auditory senses by using damage identification techniques normally used for civil and mechanical structures. Testing will be conducted using foam cortical shell sawbones prepared for stems of different geometries. Each stem will be instrumented with an accelerometer. Two impactor designs will be compared: a monolithic impactor with an integrated load cell and accelerometer and a two piece impactor. Acceleration and force measurements will be taken in the direction of impaction. Signal processing techniques will be applied to the acceleration time histories to determine features that can be used to assess device seating and potential fracture. A consistent energy input will be applied using a drop tower. The effect of introducing compliance under the bone support vise will also be investigated. The ultimate goal of this study is to design an integrated portable data acquisition system capable of being used in future cadaveric testing. This paper will discuss the experimental set-up, the signal processing techniques used and the subsequent results.

  6. UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 2015 ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COME AND YOUR F I N D PLACE UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES 2015 EARTH and ENVIRONMENT #12;| CONTENTS | www OF EARTH AND ENVIRONMENT Why study earth and environment at Leeds? 2 Why study an earth science course? 4 Why study an environment course? 8 Choosing the right degree 12 Four-year industrial degrees (BA

  7. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ten-Ming, E-mail: tmw@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Physics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  8. Coherent instabilities in random lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Sebbah, Patrick; Vanneste, Christian [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, CNRS UMR 6622, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06108, Nice Cedex 02 (France)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study is presented of random lasers as a function of the pumping rate above the threshold for lasing. Depending on the leakiness of the system resonances, which is typically larger in random lasers compared to conventional lasers, we observe that the stationary lasing regime becomes unstable above a second threshold. Coherent instabilities are observed as self pulsation at a single frequency of the output intensity, population inversion, as well as the atomic polarization. We find these Rabi oscillations have the same frequency everywhere in the random laser despite the fact that the field intensity strongly depends on the spatial location.

  9. Multidimensional Random Polymers : A Renewal Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitry Ioffe

    2014-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lecture notes, which are based on the mini-course given at 2013 Prague School on Mathematical Statistical Physics, we discuss ballistic phase of quenched and annealed stretched polymers in random environment on ${\\mathbb Z}^d$ with an emphasis on the natural renormalized renewal structures which appear in such models. In the ballistic regime an irreducible decomposition of typical polymers leads to an effectiverandom walk reinterpretation of the latter. In the annealed casethe Ornstein-Zernike theory based on this approach paves the way to an essentially complete control on the level of local limit results and invariance principles. In the quenched case, the renewal structure maps the model of stretched polymers into an effective model of directed polymers. As a result one is able to use techniques and ideas developed in the context of directed polymers in order to address issues like strong disorder in low dimensions and weak disorder in higher dimensions. Among the topics addressed: Thermodynamics of quenched and annealed models, multi-dimensional renewal theory (under Cramer's condition), renormalization and effective random walk structure of annealed polymers, very weak disorder in dimensions $d\\geq 4$ and strong disorder in dimensions $d=1,2$.

  10. Random Selection for Drug Screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling is the process of choosing some members out of a group or population. Probablity sampling, or random sampling, is the process of selecting members by chance with a known probability of each individual being chosen.

  11. Randomized algorithms for reliable broadcast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaikuntanathan, Vinod

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we design randomized algorithms for classical problems in fault tolerant distributed computing in the full-information model. The full-information model is a strong adversarial model which imposes no ...

  12. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCluskey, M D [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  13. On the Consistency of Approximate Quantum Dynamics Simulation Methods for Vibrational Spectra in the Condensed Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Mariana; Paesani, Francesco; Bowman, Joel; Ceriotti, Michele

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Including quantum mechanical effects on the dynamics of nuclei in the condensed phase is challenging, because the complexity of exact methods grows exponentially with the number of quantum degrees of freedom. Efforts to circumvent these limitations can be traced down to two approaches: methods that treat a small subset of the degrees of freedom with rigorous quantum mechanics, considering the rest of the system as a static or classical environment, and methods that treat the whole system quantum mechanically, but using approximate dynamics. Here we perform a systematic comparison between these two philosophies for the description of quantum effects in vibrational spectroscopy, taking the Embedded Local Monomer (LMon) model and a mixed quantum-classical (MQC) model as representatives of the first family of methods, and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics (TRPMD) as examples of the latter. We use as benchmarks D$_2$O doped with HOD and pure H$_2$O at three distinc...

  14. Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellstrm, Hedvig

    Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning Beloningsbaserad Inlarning Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements 1 Defining the Problem Framework Role of Reward Simplifying Assumptions Central Concepts 2 Known Environment Bellmans

  15. Measurement of rabbit eardrum vibration through stroboscopic digital holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Greef, Danil; Dirckx, Joris J. J. [University of Antwerp, Laboratory of BioMedical Physics, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a setup for high-power single shot stroboscopic digital holography and demonstrate it in an application on rabbit eardrum vibration measurement. The setup is able to make full-field time-resolved measurements of vibrating surfaces with a precision in the nanometer range in a broad frequency range. The height displacement of the measured object is visualized over the entire surface as a function of time. Vibration magnitude and phase maps can be extracted from these data, the latter proving to be very useful to reveal phase delays across the surface. Such deviations from modal motion indicate energy losses due to internal damping, in contrast to purely elastic mechanics. This is of great interest in middle ear mechanics and finite element modelling. In our setup, short laser pulses are fired at selected instants within the surface vibration period and are recorded by a CCD camera. The timing of the pulses and the exposure of the camera are synchronized to the vibration phase by a microprocessor. The high-power frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser produces pulses containing up to 5 mJ of energy, which is amply sufficient to record single-shot holograms. As the laser pulse length is 8 ns and the smallest time step of the trigger electronics is 1 ?s, vibration measurements of frequencies up to 250 kHz are achievable through this method, provided that the maximum vibration amplitude exceeds a few nanometers. In our application, middle ear mechanics, measuring frequencies extend from 5 Hz to 20 kHz. The experimental setup will be presented, as well as results of measurements on a stretched circular rubber membrane and a rabbit's eardrum. Two of the challenges when measuring biological tissues, such as the eardrum, are low reflectivity and fast dehydration. To increase reflectivity, a coating is applied and to counteract the undesirable effects of tissue dehydration, the measurement setup and software have been optimized for speed without compromising on the quality. Results of a repeatability test will be presented as well. Since the method measures the membrane motion as a function of time in small time steps, we do not only measure vibration amplitude like in time-average holography, but we can also measure non-linear elastic and transient behaviour. In conclusion, the combination of good spatial, depth and time resolution with the fast data acquisition and very wide frequency range make our technique applicable in a number of fields, including biological tissue vibrations.

  16. Coherent exciton dynamics in the presence of underdamped vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arend G. Dijkstra; Chen Wang; Jianshu Cao; Graham R. Fleming

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent ultrafast optical experiments show that excitons in large biological light-harvesting complexes are coupled to molecular vibration modes. These high-frequency vibrations will not only affect the optical response, but also drive the exciton transport. Here, using a model dimer system, the frequency of the underdamped vibration is shown to have a strong effect on the exciton dynamics such that quantum coherent oscillations in the system can be present even in the case of strong noise. Two mechanisms are identified to be responsible for the enhanced transport efficiency: critical damping due to the tunable effective strength of the coupling to the bath, and resonance coupling where the vibrational frequency coincides with the energy gap in the system. The interplay of these two mechanisms determines parameters responsible for the most efficient transport, and these optimal control parameters are comparable to those in realistic light-harvesting complexes. Interestingly, oscillations in the excitonic coherence at resonance are suppressed in comparison to the case of an off-resonant vibration.

  17. Scaling of convective velocity in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya M. Yamada; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection which is a possible mechanism of the regolith migration on the surface of small asteroids. In order to evaluate the contribution of granular convection to the regolith migration, the velocity of granular convection under the microgravity condition has to be revealed. Although it is hard to control the gravitational acceleration in laboratory experiments, scaling relations involving the gravitational effect can be evaluated by systematic experiments. Therefore, we perform such a systematic experiment of the vibration-induced granular convection. From the experimental data, a scaling form for the granular convective velocity is obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be decomposed into two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity $v$ depends on the gravitational acceleration $g$ as $v \\propto g^{0.97}$ when the normalized vibrational acceleration is fixed.

  18. Degassing of molten alloys with the assistance of ultrasonic vibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou (Knoxville, TN); Xu, Hanbing (Knoxville, TN); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed in which ultrasonic vibration is used to assist the degassing of molten metals or metal alloys thereby reducing gas content in the molten metals or alloys. High-intensity ultrasonic vibration is applied to a radiator that creates cavitation bubbles, induces acoustic streaming in the melt, and breaks up purge gas (e.g., argon or nitrogen) which is intentionally introduced in a small amount into the melt in order to collect the cavitation bubbles and to make the cavitation bubbles survive in the melt. The molten metal or alloy in one version of the invention is an aluminum alloy. The ultrasonic vibrations create cavitation bubbles and break up the large purge gas bubbles into small bubbles and disperse the bubbles in the molten metal or alloy more uniformly, resulting in a fast and clean degassing.

  19. Non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-linear optical crystal vibration sensing device including a photorefractive crystal and a laser is disclosed. The laser produces a coherent light beam which is split by a beam splitter into a first laser beam and a second laser beam. After passing through the crystal the first laser beam is counter-propagated back upon itself by a retro-mirror, creating a third laser beam. The laser beams are modulated, due to the mixing effect within the crystal by vibration of the crystal. In the third laser beam, modulation is stable and such modulation is converted by a photodetector into a usable electrical output, intensity modulated in accordance with vibration applied to the crystal. 3 figs.

  20. Proposal of thermal neutron flux monitors based on vibrating wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arutunian, S G; Chung, M; Harutyunyan, G S; Lazareva, E G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of neutron monitors with fine spatial resolution are proposed based on vibrating wire. In the first type, neutrons interact with the vibrating wire, heat it, and lead to the change of natural frequency, which can be precisely measured. To increase the heat deposition during the neutron scattering, use of gadolinium layer which has the highest thermal neutron capture cross section among all elements is proposed. The second type of the monitor uses vibrating wire as a resonant target. Besides the measurement of beam profile according to the average signal, the differential signal synchronized with the wire oscillations defines the gradient of beam profile. Spatial resolution of the monitor is defined by the diameter of the wire.

  1. Lesson 34a: Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasifiki [Pacific Ocean] Bahari Aktiki [Arctic Ocean] Bahari ya Mediterani [Mediterranean Sea] Bahari yaLesson 34a: Environment Environment [mazingira] bahari / bahari [ocean / sea / oceans / seas / farms] Bahari [ocean / sea] Bahari Hindi [Indian Ocean] Bahari Atlantiki [Atlantic Ocean] Bahari

  2. Superdiffusion in a Model for Diffusion in a Molecularly Crowded Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich Stauffer; Christian Schulze; Dieter W. Heermann

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for diffusion in a molecularly crowded environment. The model consists of random barriers in percolation network. Random walks in the presence of slowly moving barriers show normal diffusion for long times, but anomalous diffusion at intermediate times. The effective exponents for square distance versus time usually are below one at these intermediate times, but can be also larger than one for high barrier concentrations. Thus we observe sub- as well as super-diffusion in a crowded environment.

  3. System-environment correlations and Non-Markovian dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Pernice; Julius Helm; Walter T. Strunz

    2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the total state dynamics of a dephasing open quantum system using the standard environment of harmonic oscillators. Of particular interest are random unitary approaches to the same reduced dynamics and system-environment correlations in the full model. Concentrating on a model with an at times negative dephasing rate, the issue of "non-Markovianity" will also be addressed. Crucially, given the quantum environment, the appearance of non-Markovian dynamics turns out to be accompanied by a loss of system-environment correlations. Depending on the initial purity of the qubit state, these system-environment correlations may be purely classical over the whole relevant time scale, or there may be intervals of genuine system-environment entanglement. In the latter case, we see no obvious relation between the build-up or decay of these quantum correlations and "Non-Markovianity".

  4. Computing environment logbook

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osbourn, Gordon C; Bouchard, Ann M

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A computing environment logbook logs events occurring within a computing environment. The events are displayed as a history of past events within the logbook of the computing environment. The logbook provides search functionality to search through the history of past events to find one or more selected past events, and further, enables an undo of the one or more selected past events.

  5. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth; Turner, William Evans; Burgess, Daniel E; Perry, Carl Allison

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  6. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingwood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  7. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingswood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  8. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingwood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  9. System and method for damping vibration in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wassell, Mark Ellsworth (Kingwood, TX); Turner, William Evans (Durham, CT); Burgess, Daniel E. (Middletown, CT); Perry, Carl Allison (Middletown, CT)

    2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for damping vibration in a drill string can include a valve assembly having a supply of a fluid, a first member, and a second member capable of moving in relation to first member in response to vibration of the drill bit. The first and second members define a first and a second chamber for holding the fluid. Fluid can flow between the first and second chambers in response to the movement of the second member in relation to the first member. The valve assembly can also include a coil or a valve for varying a resistance of the fluid to flow between the first and second chambers.

  10. Homogeneous Random Measures and Strongly Supermedian Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Patrick J.

    . Keywords and phrases: Homogeneous random measure, additive functional, Kuznets* *ov measure, potential

  11. The Effect of Whole Body Horizontal Vibration in Position Sense and Dynamic Stability of the Spine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamis, Farhana

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    at the 5 Hz frequency. These results would suggest that horizontal vibration may be less of a factor in whole-body vibration induced injuries. This work was supported by University of Kansas Transportation Research Institute Grant Program....

  12. MATLAB implementation of an operational modal analysis technique for vibration-based structural health monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojeda, Alejandro P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration-based structural health monitoring (SHM) has become an attractive solution for the global monitoring and evaluation of damage in structures. Numerous damage detection schemes used in vibration-based SHM require ...

  13. Vibration damping using low-wave-speed media with applications to precision machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varanasi, Kripa K. (Kripa Kiran), 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration and noise are an ever-present problem in the majority of mechanical systems, from consumer products to precision manufacturing systems. But most approaches for vibration suppression are expensive and invasive, ...

  14. Non-intrusive vibration monitoring in US Naval and US Coast Guard ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerhard, Katherine Leigh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2011, the Laboratory for Electromagnetic and Electronic Systems proposed a new type of vibration monitoring system, entitled vibration assessment monitoring point with integrated recovery of energy or VAMPRIE, in their ...

  15. Modeling and Vibration Control with a Nanopositioning Magnetic-Levitation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young Ha

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation demonstrates that a magnetic-levitation (maglev) stage has the capabilities to control movements and reject vibration simultaneously. The mathematical model and vibration control scheme with a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) maglev...

  16. Vibration control in plates by uniformly distributed PZT actuators interconnected via electric networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    improve the performances of piezoelectric actuation. internal resonance / equivalent circuits 1Vibration control in plates by uniformly distributed PZT actuators interconnected via electric vibrations of plates by means of a set of electrically-interconnected piezoelectric actuators is described

  17. Optimization of Passive Constrained Layer Damping Treatments for Vibration Control of Cylindrical Shells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, H.

    This paper presents the layout optimization of passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatment for vibration control of cylindrical shells under a broadband force excitation. The equations governing the vibration responses ...

  18. Characterization of a synthetic peroxodiiron(III) protein model complex by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do, Loi Hung

    The vibrational spectrum of an ?[superscript 1],?[superscript 1]-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex was measured by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy and fit using an empirical force field analysis. Isotopic 18O2 ...

  19. Vibration and crack detection in gas turbine engine compressor blades using Eddy current sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lackner, Matthew, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) in the ECS signal, no definitive method for sensing blade vibration using an ECS has yet been developed.

  20. Minimax design of vibration absorbers for linear damped systems Brandon Brown, Tarunraj Singh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Tarunraj

    motion of transmission line towers [3]. Since the vibration absorber was introduced in 1909 by Frahm [4

  1. Random sequential adsorption of tetramers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Cie?la

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption of tetramer built of four identical spheres was studied numerically using the Random Sequential Adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Tetramers were adsorbed on a two dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Two different models of the adsorbate were investigated: a rhomboid and a square one; monomer centres were put on vertices of rhomboids and squares, respectively. Numerical simulations allow to establish the maximal random coverage ratio as well as the Available Surface Function (ASF), which is crucial for determining kinetics of the adsorption process. These results were compared with data obtained experimentally for KfrA plasmid adsorption. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured.

  2. EddyViscosity Time Reversing Waves a Dissipative Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    where linear shallow water speed is given o o . The kinematic viscosity denoted parameter ratio been shown [6] nonlinear (inviscid) shallow water waves pres­ ence a random topography and alsoEddyViscosity Time Reversing Waves a Dissipative Environment Josselin Garnier Laboratoire

  3. Surface Science Letters Surface vibrations of a highly ordered low-density alkanethiol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    ; Surface structure, morphology, roughness, and topography; Vibrations of adsorbed molecules; Gold; LowSurface Science Letters Surface vibrations of a highly ordered low-density alkanethiol monolayer-energy surface vibrational structure of the 11:5 p 3 striped phase of 1-decanethiol (C10H21SH) chemi- sorbed

  4. Vibrationally resolved transitions in ion-molecule and atom-molecular ion slow collisions

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The data tables and interactive graphs made available here contain theoretical integral cross sections for vibrational excitation and vibrationally resolved charge transfer from vibrationally excited states of H2 and H2+ with protons and hydrogen atoms, respectively. [From http://www-cfadc.phy.ornl.gov/h2mol/home.html] (Specialized Interface)

  5. Temperature-dependent vibrational relaxation in polyatomic liquids: Picosecond infrared pump-probe experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    , California 94305 (Received 24 November 1993; accepted 10 March 1994) Vibrational lifetimes of metal carbonyl those in CHCls. A decrease in the vibrational lifetime with temperature is seen for both metal carbonyls a detailed study of the temperature-dependent relax- ation of a vibrational mode of two molecules, tungsten

  6. Vibration Isolation with High Strain Shape Memory Alloy Actuators: Case of the impulse disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    disturbance, while an active stage is used to aug- ment low frequency damping and provide attenuationVibration Isolation with High Strain Shape Memory Alloy Actuators: Case of the impulse disturbance disturbance on a mass to be isolated from vibrations. The vibration isolation testbed consists of a `strong

  7. Listening to the noise: random fluctuations reveal gene network parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munsky, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khammash, Mustafa [UCSB

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cellular environment is abuzz with noise. The origin of this noise is attributed to the inherent random motion of reacting molecules that take part in gene expression and post expression interactions. In this noisy environment, clonal populations of cells exhibit cell-to-cell variability that frequently manifests as significant phenotypic differences within the cellular population. The stochastic fluctuations in cellular constituents induced by noise can be measured and their statistics quantified. We show that these random fluctuations carry within them valuable information about the underlying genetic network. Far from being a nuisance, the ever-present cellular noise acts as a rich source of excitation that, when processed through a gene network, carries its distinctive fingerprint that encodes a wealth of information about that network. We demonstrate that in some cases the analysis of these random fluctuations enables the full identification of network parameters, including those that may otherwise be difficult to measure. This establishes a potentially powerful approach for the identification of gene networks and offers a new window into the workings of these networks.

  8. Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation Chandra Prakash Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phani, A. Srikantha

    Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation by Chandra Prakash Sharma B. Tech., Sardar;Abstract Controlling friction at the wheel-rail interface is indispensable for extending track life implementation of friction modifier system consists of a stick-tube assembly, attached through a bracket which

  9. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Aluminum Nitride Laurie E. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Raman and Brillouin scattering, infrared absorption, neutron scattering, and ultrasonics can be used to probe the vibrational spectrum. Although Raman and Brillouin scattering probe only long-wavelength modes, they have the advantage that much smaller crystals are required than for neutron or ultra- sonic studies

  10. Ab Initio Study of Vibrational Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab Initio Study of Vibrational Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in Semiconducting Carbon Engineering, UniVersity of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan Received May 7, 2007; Revised Manuscript Received August 1, 2007 ABSTRACT Phonon-induced dephasing of electronic transitions

  11. Grinding media oscillation: effect on torsional vibrations in tumble mills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toram, Kiran Kumar

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of oscillation of grinding media on torsional vibrations of the mill. A theoretical model was developed to determine the oscillating frequency of the grinding media. A 12" (0.3 m) diameter tumble mill test rig was built with a 0.5 hp DC motor. The rig is tested...

  12. Thermally Induced Vibrations of a Solar Wing with Bowed STEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagler, Shawn 1983-

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    undergo thermal excitations due to a thermal gradient through the cross-section when entering and exiting solar eclipse. These vibrations can greatly reduce pointing accuracy and lead to mission failure. Boeing obtained a patent in 2006 for the High Power...

  13. Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharkey, Amanda

    Vibration signatures, wavelets and principal components analysis in diesel engine diagnostics G of a normally aspirated diesel engine contain valu able information on the health of the combustion chamber induced in a 4stroke diesel engine and the ensuing vi bration signals recorded. Three different feature

  14. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kloucek, Petr (Houston, TX); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Oakland, CA)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  15. Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy of High-temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Vibrational Raman Spectroscopy of High-temperature Superconductors C. Thomsen and G. Kaczmarczyk-temperature Superconductors C. Thomsen and G. Kaczmarczyk Technical University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany 1 INTRODUCTION Raman after the discovery of high- critical-temperature Tc superconductors:2 while reports on Raman scattering

  16. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  17. absorption va vibrational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption va vibrational First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 LE JOURNAL DE .PHYSIQUE...

  18. Vibrational properties of double-walled carbon J. Maultzsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    , University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 368, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia Abstract. We study the vibrational properties, the change in phonon frequencies due to the wall interaction is larger for the high-energy optical phonon. Total energy per carbon atom after relaxation of the atomic positions. Etot eV/atom radius Etot e

  19. Random Deployment of Data Collectors for Serving Randomly-Located Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Taesoo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, wireless communication industries have begun to extend their services to machine-type communication devices as well as to the user equipment. Such machine-type communication devices as meters and sensors need intermittent uplink resources to report measured or sensed data to their serving data collector. It is however hard to dedicate limited uplink resources to each of them. Thus, efficient service of a tremendous number of devices with low activities may consider simple random access as a solution. The data collectors receiving the measured data from many sensors simultaneously can successfully decode only signals with signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) above a certain value. The main design issues for this environment become how many data collectors are needed, how much power sensor nodes transmit with, and how wireless channels affect the performance. This paper provides answers to those questions through a stochastic analysis based on a spatial point process and on simulations.

  20. Supersymmetry in Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Guhr

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetry is nowadays indispensable for many problems in Random Matrix Theory. It is presented here with an emphasis on conceptual and structural issues. An introduction to supermathematics is given. The Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation as well as its generalization and superbosonization are explained. The supersymmetric non-linear sigma model, Brownian motion in superspace and the color-flavor transformation are discussed.

  1. Co-adapted coupling Random walk on Zn 2 Random walk on Gn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co-adapted coupling Random walk on Zn 2 Random walk on Gn d Optimal co-adapted coupling Stephen Connor sbc502@york.ac.uk #12;Co-adapted coupling Random walk on Zn 2 Random walk on Gn d Outline 1 Co-adapted coupling 2 Simple random walk on the hypercube, Zn 2 3 Simple random walk on Gn d #12;Co-adapted coupling

  2. Environment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Ecological Resources and Systems Environmental Security and Restoration Land and Renewable Resources Radiation and Chemical Risk Management Environment True energy...

  3. Climate Change, Drought & Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Afternoon Plenary Session: Current Trends in the Advanced Bioindustry Climate Change, Drought, and EnvironmentMichael Champ, Executive Director, The Sustainable Water Challenge

  4. Mode-selective vibrational control of charge transport in $?$-conjugated molecular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artem A. Bakulin; Robert Lovrin?i?; Yu Xi; Oleg Selig; Huib J. Bakker; Yves L. A. Rezus; Pabitra K. Nayak; Alexandr Fonari; Veaceslav Coropceanu; Jean-Luc Brdas; David Cahen

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to control charge transport in organic electronic devices by inducing molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such control has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be controlled by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1500-1700 cm$^{-1}$ region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. Vibrational control thus presents a new tool for studying electron-phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  5. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  6. Apparatus for measuring surface movement of an object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  7. Random access wireless networks with controlled mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modiano, Eytan H.

    This paper considers wireless networks where messages arriving randomly (in time and space) are collected by a mobile receiver. The messages are transmitted to the mobile receiver according to a random access scheme and ...

  8. Semi-device-independent randomness expansion with partially free random sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Qian Zhou; Hong-Wei Li; Yu-Kun Wang; Dan-Dan Li; Fei Gao; Qiao-Yan Wen

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    By proposing device-independent protocols, S. Pironio et al. [Nature 464, 1021-1024 (2010)] and R. Colbeck et al. [Nature Physics 8, 450-453 (2012)] proved that new randomness can be generated by using perfectly free random sources or partially free ones as seed. Subsequently, Li et al. [Phys. Rev. A 84, 034301 (2011)] studied this topic in the framework of semi-device-independent and proved that new randomness can be obtained from perfectly free random sources. Here we discuss whether and how partially free random sources bring us new randomness in semi-device-independent scenario. We propose a semi-device-independent randomness expansion protocol with partially free random sources, and obtain the condition that the partially free random sources should satisfy to generate new randomness. In the process of analysis, we acquire a new 2-dimensional quantum witness. Furthermore, we get the analytic relationship between the generated randomness and the 2-dimensional quantum witness violation.

  9. environment and agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment and agriculture environmentagriculture.curtin.edu.au Bachelor of Science - majorS in agriculture, environmental Biology or coaStal Zone management Science and engineering #12;t he department of environment and agriculture caters for students who are passionate about agriculture, biology, conserving

  10. Sustainability Statement Environment Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metropolitan University www.mmu.ac.uk/environment MMU Annual Sustainability Statement 2008/2009 CO2 2 Contents 6 MMU Environment Strategy 7 Key Area 1 Environmental Management Systems & Reporting 8 9 Key Area 2 Energy and Carbon Emissions 10 11 Key Area 3 Sustainable Buildings 12 Key Area 4 Water

  11. Forests and historic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forests and historic environment UK Forestry Standard Guidelines #12;Key to symbols UKFS Reference number #12;Forests and historic environment Forestry Commission: Edinburgh UK Forestry Standard in any format or medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence. To view this licence, visit: www

  12. High speed optical quantum random number generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    .3351 (2009). 6. I. Reidler, Y. Aviad, M. Rosenbluh, and I. Kanter, "Ultrahigh-speed random number generation

  13. Random Fractal Measures via the Contraction Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    Random Fractal Measures via the Contraction Method John E. Hutchinson Australian National mapping method to prove various existence and uniqueness properties of (self­similar) random fractal in order to establish a.s. exponential convergence to the unique random fractal measure. The arguments used

  14. Introduction to Network Science 1 Random Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safro, Ilya

    to the degree distribution in random model ... #12;Introduction to Network Science 4 In contrast to the degree distribution in random model ... #12;Introduction to Network Science 5 Newman, "Random graphs as models of vertices. Average component size #12;Introduction to Network Science 15 Distribution of component sizes #12;

  15. Nonlinear behavior of vibrating molecules on suspended graphene waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Amrita

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspended graphene waveguides were deposited on micron-scale periodic metal (plasmonic) structures. Raman scattering of test molecules (B. Megaterium), deposited on the waveguides' surface, exhibited azimuthal cycles upon rotation: at these micron scales, spontaneous Raman ought to be independent of phase matching conditions. In addition, we observed angular-selective quadratic intensity dependence contrary to the typical linear behavior of spontaneous Raman. The effects were observed at very modest pump laser intensities (<10 MW/cm2 at the sample surface, oftenly used in Raman experiments). We attributed these observations to nonlinear coupling between the vibrating molecules and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes at the molecular vibration frequency. It was assessed that the polariton mode propagates through fairly long distances (over 100 microns).

  16. Resonant vibrational excitation of CO by low-energy electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poparic, G. B.; Belic, D. S.; Vicic, M. D. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, P.O. Box 368, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Washington University School of Medicine, 4921 Parkview Place, Campus Box 8224, St. Louis, Missouri 63110-1093 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron impact vibrational excitation of the CO molecule, via the {sup 2}{pi} resonance, in the 0-4 eV energy region has been investigated. The energy dependence of the resonant excitation of the first ten vibrational levels, v=1 to v=10, has been measured by use of a crossed-beams double trochoidal electron spectrometer. Obtained relative differential cross sections are normalized to the absolute values. Integral cross sections are determined by using our recent results on scattered electrons angular distributions, which demonstrate clear p-partial wave character of this resonance. Substructures appear in the {sup 2}{pi} resonant excitation of the CO molecule which have not been previously observed.

  17. Optical properties of C{sub 60} vibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsch, G.F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Nuclear Theory, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States); Smith, A. [Department of Chemistry, BG-10, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, BG-10, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98915 (United States); Yabana, K. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-21 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-21 (Japan)

    1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The tight-binding and local-density approximation (LDA) models of the electronic structure for C{sub 60} are applied to calculate the transition strength of the four infrared-active vibrations. The tight-binding results are of the correct order of magntiude, but not accurate enough to have predictive power. The LDA results give a much better description of the relative and absolute strengths of the four modes.

  18. Memory in the system: trajectory-environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Budaev

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper the memory effect in the system consisting from a trajectory of process and an environment is considered. The environment is presented by scalar potential and noise. The evolution of system is interpreted as process of the continuous "measurement" of a trajectory by an environment and\\or on the contrary. In this sense the measured value is entropy-the information about embedding of the trajectory into configurations space. The concepts "measurement" and "interaction" are identified alike in quantum theory. Thus, the entropy evolution is not only the effect of dynamics, but also its cause, if it is possible to speak about causality in this case. It is shown, that such non-elastic interaction leads to occurrence of memory in the system. The reflex memory mechanism is realized as a real conformal dynamic metrics. The metastable event (attractor) is defined and time of its life is estimated. It is shown, that in the system there is a change of dynamic modes from spatial localization to random walk (fluctuation, relaxation). On scale of the attractors dynamics the memory is appearing as a semi-regular (in some information sense) drift of the image of fluctuations in a power spectrum of environment to absolute minimum. The latter properties (topological convergence) attract the attention to algorithmic aspect of a considered system.

  19. Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellstrm, Hedvig

    Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning Beloningsbaserad Inlarning #12;Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements 1 Defining the Problem Framework Role of Reward Simplifying Assumptions Central Concepts 2 Known Environment Bellman

  20. Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjellstrm, Hedvig

    Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements Reinforcement Learning Beloningsbaserad Inlarning #12;Defining the Problem Known Environment Unknown Environment Improvements 1 Defining the Problem Framework Role of Reward Simplifying Assumptions Central Concepts 2 Known Environment Bellmans

  1. A vacuum microgripping tool with integrated vibration releasing capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong, Weibin; Fan, Zenghua, E-mail: zenghua-fan@163.com; Wang, Lefeng; Xie, Hui; Sun, Lining [State Key Laboratory of Robotics and System, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang (China)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pick-and-place of micro-objects is a basic task in various micromanipulation demands. Reliable releasing of micro-objects is usually disturbed due to strong scale effects. This paper focuses on a vacuum micro-gripper with vibration releasing functionality, which was designed and assembled for reliable micromanipulation tasks. Accordingly, a vibration releasing strategy of implementing a piezoelectric actuator on the vacuum microgripping tool is presented to address the releasing problem. The releasing mechanism was illustrated using a dynamic micro contact model. This model was developed via theoretical analysis, simulations and pull-off force measurement using atomic force microscopy. Micromanipulation experiments were conducted to verify the performance of the vacuum micro-gripper. The results show that, with the assistance of the vibration releasing, the vacuum microgripping tool can achieve reliable release of micro-objects. A releasing location accuracy of 4.50.5 ?m and a successful releasing rate of around 100% (which is based on 110 trials) were achieved for manipulating polystyrene microspheres with radius of 35100 ?m.

  2. Dynamics of a Simple Quantum System in a Complex Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aurel Bulgac; Gui DoDang; Dimitri Kusnezov

    1997-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theory for the dynamical evolution of a quantum system coupled to a complex many-body intrinsic system/environment. By modelling the intrinsic many-body system with parametric random matrices, we study the types of effective stochastic models which emerge from random matrix theory. Using the Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism, we derive the influence functional and obtain either analytical or numerical solutions for the time evolution of the entire quantum system. We discuss thoroughly the structure of the solutions for some representative cases and make connections to well known limiting results, particularly to Brownian motion, Kramers classical limit and the Caldeira-Leggett approach.

  3. Random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes use a sequence of pseudorandom numbers to sample from probability distributions. A common practice is to start each source particle a predetermined number of random numbers up the pseudorandom number sequence. This number of random numbers skipped between each source particles the random number stride, S. Consequently, the jth source particle always starts with the j{center dot}Sth random number providing correlated sampling'' between similar calculations. A new machine-portable random number generator has been written for the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP providing user's control of the random number stride. First the new MCNP random number generator algorithm will be described and then the effects of varying the stride will be presented. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Quantum random walks without walking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manouchehri, K.; Wang, J. B. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum random walks have received much interest due to their nonintuitive dynamics, which may hold the key to a new generation of quantum algorithms. What remains a major challenge is a physical realization that is experimentally viable and not limited to special connectivity criteria. We present a scheme for walking on arbitrarily complex graphs, which can be realized using a variety of quantum systems such as a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped inside an optical lattice. This scheme is particularly elegant since the walker is not required to physically step between the nodes; only flipping coins is sufficient.

  5. Photographs of MIT environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strand, C. Mark

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is based on an exhibition of 43 photographs shown in a visual thesis exhibition at the Creative Photography Gallery November 15-December 15, 1983. The photographs document MIT environments with special categories ...

  6. Environment induced incoherent controllability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffaele Romano; Domenico D'Alessandro

    2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that the environment induced entanglement between two non interacting, two-dimensional quantum systems S and P can be used to control the dynamics of S by means of the initial state of P. Using a simple, exactly solvable model, we show that both accessibility and controllability of S can be achieved under suitable conditions on the interaction of S and P with the environment.

  7. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Hardcastle

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  8. Polymers in disordered environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Blavatska; N. Fricke; W. Janke

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief review of our recent studies aiming at a better understanding of the scaling behaviour of polymers in disordered environments is given. The main emphasis is on a simple generic model where the polymers are represented by (interacting) self-avoiding walks and the disordered environment by critical percolation clusters. The scaling behaviour of the number of conformations and their average spatial extent as a function of the number of monomers and the associated critical exponents $\\gamma$ and $\

  9. Energy/Environment/Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakahara, N.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    / Energy / Environment/ SutainabilitySutainability Resource/ Energy System TheoryPreserve/Degrade Man Economy/SocietyHealth/Hygiene Enviro nment Global Env.Urban Env. Environm- ent ModelChemical/Thermal PollutionRecycle Diffused Energy Active System... Energy Use Pattern Global Env. Pollution Urban Environment ? Demand Control Optimization Humanism Maintenance/Moral ? Renewable Energy Energy Recycle Proper Evaluation ? High Efficiency Energy Conservation PrincipleEnergy Conservation Principle Reflection...

  10. Vibrationally induced center reconfiguration in co-doped GaN:Eu, Mg epitaxial layers: Local hydrogen migration vs. activation of non-radiative channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, B.; Dierolf, V. [Lehigh University, 16 Memorial Dr. E, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)] [Lehigh University, 16 Memorial Dr. E, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Lee, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave L-413, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave L-413, California 94550 (United States); Lee, D.; Fujiwara, Y. [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium doped gallium nitride (GaN:Eu) is a promising candidate as a material for red light emitting diodes. When Mg was co-doped into GaN:Eu, additional incorporation environments were discovered that show high excitation efficiency at room temperature and have been attributed to the coupling of Mg-H complexes to the majority Eu site. Electron beam irradiation, indirect and resonant (direct) laser excitation were found to modify these complexes, indicating that vibrational energy alone can trigger the migration of the H while the presence of additional charges and excess energy controls the type of reconfiguration and the activation of non-radiative decay channels.

  11. Interfacial Water Organization and Ion Distributions Investigated with Vibrational Sum Frequency Spectroscopy: Answering Fundamental Questions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sum frequency generation (VSFG) and heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (HD above their counterions. However, high valency anions exist below their counter cations, #12;iv causing

  12. Vibration-assisted coherent excitation energy transfer in a detuning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin Wang; Hao Chen; Hong-rong Li

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The roles of the vibration motions played in the excitation energy transfer process are studied. It is found that a strong coherent transfer in the hybrid system emerges when the detuning between the donor and the acceptor equals the intrinsic frequency of the vibrational mode, and as a result the energy can be transferred into the acceptor much effectively. Three cases of the donor and the acceptor coupling with vibrational modes are investigated respectively. We find that the quantum interference between the two different transfer channels via the vibrational modes can affects the dynamics of the system significantly.

  13. Randomness and Earth climate variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinshtein, Michael E; Dmitriev, Alexander P; Shmakov, Pavel M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleo-Sciences including palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology have accumulated numerous records related to climatic changes. The researchers have usually tried to identify periodic and quasi-periodic processes in these paleoscientific records. In this paper, we show that this analysis is incomplete. As follows from our results, random processes, namely processes with a single-time-constant (noise with a Lorentzian noise spectrum), play a very important and, perhaps, a decisive role in numerous natural phenomena. For several of very important natural phenomena the characteristic time constants are very similar and equal to (5-8)x10^3 years. However, this value is not universal. For example, the spectral density fluctuations of the atmospheric radiocarbon 14C are characterized by a Lorentzian with time constant 300 years. The frequency dependence of spectral density fluctuations for benthic 18O records contains two Lorentzians with time constans 8000 years and > 105 years.

  14. The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiss, Steven P.

    The Desert Environment January 26, 1999 1 The Desert Environment Revised Paper Steven P. Reiss1@cs.brown.edu Abstract The Desert software engineering environment is a suite of tools developed to enhance pro- grammer virtual files on demand to address specific tasks. All this is done in an open and extensible environment

  15. A Maxwell Construction for Phase Separation in Vibrated Granular Matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James P. D. Clewett; Jack Wade; R. M. Bowley; Stephan Herminghaus; Michael R. Swift; Marco G. Mazza

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments and computer simulations are carried out to investigate ordering principles in a granular gas which phase separates under vibration. The densities of the dilute and the dense phase are found to follow a lever rule. A Maxwell construction is found to predict both the coexisting pressure and binodal densities remarkably well, despite the fact that the pressure-volume characteristic $P(v)$ is not an isotherm. Although the system is far from equilibrium and energy conservation is strongly violated, we derive the construction from the minimization of mechanical work and fluctuating particle currents.

  16. Damping element for reducing the vibration of an airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Christian X; Marra, John J

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An airfoil (10) is provided with a tip (12) having an opening (14) to a center channel (24). A damping element (16) is inserted within the opening of the center channel, to reduce an induced vibration of the airfoil. The mass of the damping element, a spring constant of the damping element within the center channel, and/or a mounting location (58) of the damping element within the center channel may be adjustably varied, to shift a resonance frequency of the airfoil outside a natural operating frequency of the airfoil.

  17. Structural vibration measurement and analysis using a novel digital sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minier, Elizabeth Altagracia

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the sensors into the laminae of a composite material. The primary uses of these sensors include providing feedback signals to active vibration dampers and reporting the occurance of damage. It is the purview of the conceptual designer to exploit new.../QB = BN3903 NPN Transistor Figure 8. Schematic diagram of digital sensor circuit 24 will snap "high". Similarly as the signal falls below the reference level, the outputs will snap "low". The resulting signals are near-square wave outputs at two logic...

  18. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  19. The random lattice as a regularization scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alles

    1994-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A semi-analytic method to compute the first coefficients of the renormalization group functions on a random lattice is introduced. It is used to show that the two-dimensional $O(N)$ non-linear $\\sigma$-model regularized on a random lattice has the correct continuum limit. A degree $\\kappa$ of ``randomness'' in the lattice is introduced and an estimate of the ratio $\\Lambda_{random}/\\Lambda_{regular}$ for two rather opposite values of $\\kappa$ in the $\\sigma$-model is also given. This ratio turns out to depend on $\\kappa$.

  20. Logarithmic Opinion Pools for Conditional Random Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Andrew

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Since their recent introduction, conditional random fields (CRFs) have been successfully applied to a multitude of structured labelling tasks in many different domains. Examples include natural language processing ...

  1. True random numbers from amplified quantum vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jofre; M. Curty; F. Steinlechner; G. Anzolin; J. P. Torres; M. W. Mitchell; V. Pruneri

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Random numbers are essential for applications ranging from secure communications to numerical simulation and quantitative finance. Algorithms can rapidly produce pseudo-random outcomes, series of numbers that mimic most properties of true random numbers while quantum random number generators (QRNGs) exploit intrinsic quantum randomness to produce true random numbers. Single-photon QRNGs are conceptually simple but produce few random bits per detection. In contrast, vacuum fluctuations are a vast resource for QRNGs: they are broad-band and thus can encode many random bits per second. Direct recording of vacuum fluctuations is possible, but requires shot-noise-limited detectors, at the cost of bandwidth. We demonstrate efficient conversion of vacuum fluctuations to true random bits using optical amplification of vacuum and interferometry. Using commercially-available optical components we demonstrate a QRNG at a bit rate of 1.11 Gbps. The proposed scheme has the potential to be extended to 10 Gbps and even up to 100 Gbps by taking advantage of high speed modulation sources and detectors for optical fiber telecommunication devices.

  2. Characterization of the molecular structure and mechanical properties of polymer surfaces and protein/polymer interfaces by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koffas, Telly Stelianos

    2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and other complementary surface-sensitive techniques have been used to study the surface molecular structure and surface mechanical behavior of biologically-relevant polymer systems. SFG and AFM have emerged as powerful analytical tools to deduce structure/property relationships, in situ, for polymers at air, liquid and solid interfaces. The experiments described in this dissertation have been performed to understand how polymer surface properties are linked to polymer bulk composition, substrate hydrophobicity, changes in the ambient environment (e.g., humidity and temperature), or the adsorption of macromolecules. The correlation of spectroscopic and mechanical data by SFG and AFM can become a powerful methodology to study and engineer materials with tailored surface properties. The overarching theme of this research is the interrogation of systems of increasing structural complexity, which allows us to extend conclusions made on simpler model systems. We begin by systematically describing the surface molecular composition and mechanical properties of polymers, copolymers, and blends having simple linear architectures. Subsequent chapters focus on networked hydrogel materials used as soft contact lenses and the adsorption of protein and surfactant at the polymer/liquid interface. The power of SFG is immediately demonstrated in experiments which identify the chemical parameters that influence the molecular composition and ordering of a polymer chain's side groups at the polymer/air and polymer/liquid interfaces. In general, side groups with increasingly greater hydrophobic character will be more surface active in air. Larger side groups impose steric restrictions, thus they will tend to be more randomly ordered than smaller hydrophobic groups. If exposed to a hydrophilic environment, such as water, the polymer chain will attempt to orient more of its hydrophilic groups to the surface in order to minimize the total surface energy. With an understanding of the structural and environmental parameters which govern polymer surface structure, SFG is then used to explore the effects of surface hydrophobicity and solvent polarity on the orientation and ordering of amphiphilic neutral polymers adsorbed at the solid/liquid interface. SFG spectra show that poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) adsorb with their hydrophobic moieties preferentially oriented toward hydrophobic polystyrene surfaces. These same moieties, however, disorder when adsorbed onto a hydrophilic silica/water interface. Water is identified as a critical factor for mediating the orientation and ordering of hydrophobic moieties in polymers adsorbed at hydrophobic interfaces. The role of bulk water content and water vapor, as they influence hydrogel surface structure and mechanics, continues to be explored in the next series of experiments. A method was developed to probe the surface viscoelastic properties of hydroxylethyl methacrylate (HEMA) based contact lens materials by analyzing AFM force-distance curves. AFM analysis indicates that the interfacial region is dehydrated, relative to the bulk. Experiments performed on poly(HEMA+MA) (MA = methacrylic acid), a more hydrophilic copolymer with greater bulk water content, show even greater water depletion at the surface. SFG spectra, as well as surface energy arguments, suggest that the more hydrophilic polymer component (such as MA) is not favored at the air interface; this may explain anomalies in water retention at the hydrogel surface. Adsorption of lysozyme onto poly(HEMA+MA) was found to further reduce near-surface viscous behavior, suggesting lower surface water content. Lastly, protein adsorption is studied using a model polymer system of polystyrene covalently bound with a monolayer of bovine serum albumin. SFG results indicate that some amino acid residues in proteins adopt preferred orientations. SFG spectra also show that the phenyl rings of the bare polystyrene substrate in contact with air or

  3. Environment scattering in GADRAS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoreson, Gregory G.; Mitchell, Dean James; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Harding, Lee T.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation transport calculations were performed to compute the angular tallies for scattered gamma-rays as a function of distance, height, and environment. Green's Functions were then used to encapsulate the results a reusable transformation function. The calculations represent the transport of photons throughout scattering surfaces that surround sources and detectors, such as the ground and walls. Utilization of these calculations in GADRAS (Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software) enables accurate computation of environmental scattering for a variety of environments and source configurations. This capability, which agrees well with numerous experimental benchmark measurements, is now deployed with GADRAS Version 18.2 as the basis for the computation of scattered radiation.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateEnvironment ClimateEnvironment On January 27, 2011, in ClimateEnvironment Sensing and Monitoring Modeling and Analysis Carbon Management Water & Environment Publications...

  5. Particle-particle random-phase approximation applied to beryllium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Pillet, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France); Mau, N. Vinh [CEA, DAM, DIF F-91297 Arpajon (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91406, Orsay Cedex (France); Bonaccorso, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is dedicated to the study of even-even {sup 8-14}Be isotopes, which uses the particle-particle random-phase approximation that accounts for two-body correlations in the core nucleus. A better description of energies and two-particle amplitudes is obtained in comparison with models that assume a neutron closed-shell (or subshell) core. A Woods-Saxon potential corrected by a phenomenological particle-vibration coupling term has been used for the neutron-core interaction and the D1S Gogny force for the neutron-neutron interaction. Calculated ground-state properties as well as excited-state ones are discussed and are compared to experimental data. In particular, results suggest the same 2s{sub 1/2}-1p{sub 1/2} shell inversion in {sup 13}Be as in {sup 11}Be.

  6. Sample Environment Plans and Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sample Environment Plans and Progress at the SNS & HFIR SNS HFIR User Group Meeting American Conference on Neutron Scattering Ottawa, Canada June 26 30, 2010 Lou Santodonato Sample Environment Group our sample environment capabilities Feedback SHUG meetings User surveys Sample Environment Steering

  7. DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    1 DISTRIBUTED AND COLLABORATIVE SYNTHETIC ENVIRONMENTS Chandrajit L. Bajaj and Fausto Bernardini with synthetic environments1,2,3,4,5,6 . A synthetic environment system is generally characterized and the synthetic environment generated by the computer. Several degrees of immersion are possible, ranging from

  8. Research Articles Holistic Programming Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Gary

    Research Articles Holistic Programming Environments Gary Marsden a Harold Thimbleby b a Department a development environment. Of course, we can scoff at the distinction and say that a development environment to the development of programming environments and suggest ways in which this may be achieved. Keywords: Programming

  9. Author's personal copy Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    . The easternmost main islands of the Canary archipelago (Fuerteventura and Lanzarote, North Atlantic Ocean, Spain Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Arid environments; Canary islands; Cream-coloured courser) harbour a stable population. The species showed an intense habitat selection pattern in these islands. Its

  10. Environment US Army Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Asia, Europe and the U. S. An environment once pristine and rich in biological diversity now suffers Pentagon official lauds services for energy strategies Corps among winners at `GOVgreen' 16 Sustainability Awards coming soon Corps team earns international recognition Regulators discuss mitigation

  11. Interactive Virtual Environments Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    sensor data or by animation scripts. Human users can interact and directly manipulate objects within Reality Interactive Virtual Reality Virtualized Reality Augmented Reality #12;HUMAN PERCEPTION OF REALITY REAL WORLD / ENVIRONMENT HUMAN (sentient living animal able of sensible reasoning) #12;Real

  12. Multiprocessor programming environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.B.; Fornaro, R.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Programming tools and techniques have been well developed for traditional uniprocessor computer systems. The focus of this research project is on the development of a programming environment for a high speed real time heterogeneous multiprocessor system, with special emphasis on languages and compilers. The new tools and techniques will allow a smooth transition for programmers with experience only on single processor systems.

  13. save energy, environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    was especially emphasized dur- ing the 1970s to combat the energy crisis caused by Arab oil embargoes. The recentsave energy, money, and the environment Windbreaks and shade trees #12;PrePared by Bryan R trees is based on their potential to save money from subsequent energy re- ductions. Winter heating

  14. Transient grating spectroscopy of SF6 molecular vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferr, Amlie; Burgy, Frdric; Dagan, Michal; Descamps, Dominique; Dudovich, Nirit; Petit, Stphane; Soifer, Hadas; Blanchet, Valrie; Mairesse, Yann

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong field transient grating spectroscopy has shown to be a very versatile tool in time-resolved molecular spectroscopy. Here we use this technique to investigate the high-order harmonic generation from SF6 molecules vibrationally excited by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. Transient grating spectroscopy enables us to reveal clear modulations of the harmonic emission. This heterodyne detection shows that the harmonic emission generated between 14 to 26 eV is mainly sensitive to two among the three active Raman modes in SF6, i.e. the strongest and fully symmetric nu 1-A1g mode (774 cm-1, 43 fs) and the slowest mode nu5-T2g (524 cm-1, 63 fs). A time-frequency analysis of the harmonic emission reveals additional dynamics: the strength and central frequency of the nu 1 mode oscillate with a frequency of 52 cm-1 (640 fs). This could be a signature of the vibration of dimers in the generating medium. Harmonic 11 shows a remarkable behavior, oscillating in opposite phase, both on the fast (774 cm-1) and slow...

  15. Combined passive magnetic bearing element and vibration damper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium and dampen transversely directed vibrations. Mechanical stabilizers are provided to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. In a improvement over U.S. Pat. No. 5,495,221, a magnetic bearing element is combined with a vibration damping element to provide a single upper stationary dual-function element. The magnetic forces exerted by such an element, enhances levitation of the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations, and suppresses the effects of unbalance or inhibits the onset of whirl-type rotor-dynamic instabilities. Concurrently, this equilibrium is made stable against displacement-dependent drag forces of the rotating object from its equilibrium position.

  16. Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin Study - Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) tested two identical gearboxes. One was tested on the NWTCs 2.5 MW dynamometer and the other was field tested in a turbine in a nearby wind plant. In the field, the test gearbox experienced two oil loss events that resulted in damage to its internal bearings and gears. Since the damage was not severe, the test gearbox was removed from the field and retested in the NWTCs dynamometer before it was disassembled. During the dynamometer retest, some vibration data along with testing condition information were collected. These data enabled NREL to launch a Wind Turbine Gearbox Condition Monitoring Round Robin project, as described in this report. The main objective of this project was to evaluate different vibration analysis algorithms used in wind turbine condition monitoring (CM) and find out whether the typical practices are effective. With involvement of both academic researchers and industrial partners, the project sets an example on providing cutting edge research results back to industry.

  17. Vibration atomic layer deposition for conformal nanoparticle coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Suk Won; Woo Kim, Jun; Jong Choi, Hyung; Hyung Shim, Joon, E-mail: shimm@korea.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration atomic layer deposition reactor was developed for fabricating a conformal thin-film coating on nanosize particles. In this study, atomic layer deposition of 1015-nm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films was conducted on a high-surface-area acetylene black powder with particle diameters of 200250?nm. Intense vibration during the deposition resulted in the effective separation of particles, overcoming the interparticle agglomeration force and enabling effective diffusion of the precursor into the powder chunk; this phenomenon led to the formation of a conformal film coating on the nanopowder particles. It was also confirmed that the atomic layer deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films initially grew on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder particles as discrete islands, presumably because chemisorption of the precursor and water occurred only on a few sites on the high-surface-area acetylene black powder surface. Relatively sluggish growth of the films during the initial atomic layer deposition cycles was identified from composition analysis.

  18. Journal of Sound and Vibration 298 (2006) 108131 Elastic wave radiation from a high frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    JOURNAL OF SOUND AND VIBRATION Journal of Sound and Vibration 298 (2006) 108­131 Elastic wave. Introduction Problems concerning the propagation, refraction and diffraction of waves are the subject method to detect defects is to analyse the scattering of the elastic waves generated by ultrasonic

  19. The Effect of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias, Damian Octavio

    The Effect of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves of Surface Wave Propagation on Neural Responses to Vibration in Primate Glabrous Skin. PLoS ONE 7(2): e31203

  20. Vibration Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade , S.Tullis 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Vibration Analysis of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade K. Mc Laren 1 , S.Tullis 2 and S.Ziada 3 1 vibration source of a small-scale vertical axis wind turbine currently undergoing field-testing. The turbine at a blade-tip speed ratio (the ratio of the blade rotational velocity to the ambient wind velocity) of 1

  1. ACTIVE CONTROL OF FLOW SEPARATION AND STRUCTURAL VIBRATIONS OF WIND TURBINE BLADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    ACTIVE CONTROL OF FLOW SEPARATION AND STRUCTURAL VIBRATIONS OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Sponsor: Ney actuators embedded inside the wind turbine blade to provide an efficient, rapid and compact means to alter the ability to shed excess wind loads off the blade. 3. Reduce vibration in the turbine blades by selectively

  2. Control of Drilling Vibrations: A Time-Delay System-Based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Control of Drilling Vibrations: A Time-Delay System-Based Approach Islam Boussaada , Arben Cela and torsional vibrations occurring along a rotary oilwell drilling system. This work completes a previous author of a rotary drilling system with a drag bit, using a model that takes into consideration the axial

  3. ESTIMATING DAMPING PARAMETERS IN MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM VIBRATION SYSTEMS BY BALANCING ENERGY0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    ESTIMATING DAMPING PARAMETERS IN MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM VIBRATION SYSTEMS BY BALANCING ENERGY0 B is outlined, involving a balance of dissipated and supplied energies over a cycle of pe- riodic vibration a damping estimation method based on the balance of energy. The idea is to compute the energy input per

  4. INVESTIGATION OF A COMPRESSOR ROTOR NON-SYNCHRONOUS VIBRATION WITH AND WITHOUT FLUID-STRUCTURE INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Gecheng

    INVESTIGATION OF A COMPRESSOR ROTOR NON-SYNCHRONOUS VIBRATION WITH AND WITHOUT FLUID) of a high speed multistage axial compressor using rigid blade and vibrating blade with fluid blades of a high-speed compressor showing the frequency lock-in near the 1st torsional mode (1T) during

  5. Abstract--This paper presents ambient mechanical vibrations as an alternative source for energy harvesting, especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Abstract--This paper presents ambient mechanical vibrations as an alternative source for energy harvesting, especially beneficial where alternatives such as light, wind, biomass and thermal energy are limited, e.g., powering underground sensors. Transduction of ambient kinetic energy, e.g., the vibrations

  6. Active vibration control of a fluid/plate system using a pole placement controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Active vibration control of a fluid/plate system using a pole placement controller Bogdan Robu reduction of the structural vibrations induced by the sloshing of large masses of fuel inside a partly full, published in "International Journal of Control 85, 6 (2012) 684-694" #12;Keywords Flexible system, fluid

  7. An hp adaptive strategy to compute the vibration modes of a fluid-solid coupled system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrguez, Rodolfo

    )], for the operational state, the fuel assembly in nuclear plants should be designed so that they cannot be unacceptablyAn hp adaptive strategy to compute the vibration modes of a fluid-solid coupled system M element method to solve a two- dimensional fluid-structure vibration problem. This problem arises from

  8. A digital vibrating magnetic gyrometer using a control motor DSP TMS320F243

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudoin, Geneviève

    A digital vibrating magnetic gyrometer using a control motor DSP TMS320F243 G. Baudoin(1) , O processing system to control a vibrating magnetic gyrometer (VMG). This low cost angular speed sensor has to the limitations of analog systems (temperature drift, noise, bias). A digital control and signal processing system

  9. Stresa, Italy, 25-27 April 2007 STEP-UP CONVERTER FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC VIBRATIONAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    micro-machined vibration based power generator with diode based voltage multiplier (VM) circuits which the piezoceramic composite beam coupled with a flyback converter circuit and also derived the equivalent circuits and the EM vibration harvesting device. The measured and calculated results of the VM circuits for the

  10. Continuum modelling of piezoelectromechanical truss beams: an application to vibration damping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are connected to the electrical line so that their equivalent circuits are to be regarded as part of the modularContinuum modelling of piezoelectromechanical truss beams: an application to vibration damping F modular truss beam, electric transmission line, piezoelectromechanical coupling, vibration control 1

  11. Sensor-less Vibration Suppression and Scan Compensation for Piezoelectric Tube Nanopositioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, Andrew J.

    ) (b) Fig. 2. (a) Charge driven tube scanner. (b) Voltage equivalent circuit. introduces two simple nonSensor-less Vibration Suppression and Scan Compensation for Piezoelectric Tube Nanopositioners-fabrication. Much research has proceeded with the aim of reducing hysteresis and vibration, the foremost problems

  12. Transition state vibrational level thresholds for the dissociation of triplet ketene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Transition state vibrational level thresholds for the dissociation of triplet ketene Sang Kyu Kim of a unimolecular reaction is controlled by flux through quantized transition-state thresholds at each energy levelRamspergerKasselMarcus RRKM theory. The vibrational frequencies at the transition state obtained from the fits are compared

  13. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models Keywords: Damage location Ambient vibration Vector Autoregressive model Statistical pattern recognition Bridges Structural health monitoring a b s t r a c t This paper presents a study for identifying damage

  14. Vibrational Spectra of Water Solutions of Azoles from QM/MM Calculations: Effects of Solvation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidoni, Leonardo

    the decomposition of the vibrational density of states of the gas phase and solution dynamics. The calculated shifts the structural and dynamical aspects of water solutions. X-ray as well as neutron diffraction are the main source and electronic structure of the molecule.1 We expect therefore that also its vibrational properties could

  15. Enhanced vibration energy harvesting using dual-mass systems Xiudong Tang, Lei Zuo n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Lei

    of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA a r t i c l eEnhanced vibration energy harvesting using dual-mass systems Xiudong Tang, Lei Zuo n Department-mass vibration energy harvester, where two masses are connected in series with the energy transducer and spring

  16. Polymer surface and thin film vibrational dynamics of poly,,methyl methacrylate..., polybutadiene,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    Polymer surface and thin film vibrational dynamics of poly,,methyl methacrylate..., polybutadiene atom scattering has been used to investigate the vibrational dynamics at the polymer vacuum interface polymers. The broad multiphonon feature that arises in the inelastic scattering spectra at surface

  17. Simulating Vibrational Energy Flow in Proteins: Relaxation Rate and Mechanism for Heme Cooling in Cytochrome c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straub, John E.

    Simulating Vibrational Energy Flow in Proteins: Relaxation Rate and Mechanism for Heme Cooling dynamics simulation. The kinetic energy relaxation was found to be a biphasic exponential decay process in the heme protein myoglobin. Computer simulation of vibrational energy relaxation in heme proteins began

  18. Dynamics of Nanoscopic Water: Vibrational Echo and Infrared Pump-Probe Studies of Reverse Micelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Dynamics of Nanoscopic Water: Vibrational Echo and Infrared Pump-Probe Studies of Reverse MicellesVersity, Stanford, California 94305 ReceiVed: April 8, 2005; In Final Form: May 12, 2005 The dynamics of water of the hydrogen-bond network dynamics. Pump-probe experiments show that the vibrational lifetime of the OD stretch

  19. Micro-meter Crack Response to Rock Blast Vibrations, Wind Gusts & Weather Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro-meter Crack Response to Rock Blast Vibrations, Wind Gusts & Weather Effects C. H. Dowding,1 effects. These measurements substantiate the conservancy of the 12.5 mm/s (0.5 in./s) blasting vibration blasting. Measurements in this case study now extend weather effects to include wind. While it has been

  20. Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Doron

    OFFPRINT Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating traps A. Stotland, D;Europhysics Letters (EPL) has a new online home at www.epljournal.org Take a look for the latest journal news.epljournal.org doi: 10.1209/0295-5075/86/10004 Semilinear response for the heating rate of cold atoms in vibrating

  1. Group Theoretical Analysis of the Vibrational and Electronic Spectrum of Benzene Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    Group Theoretical Analysis of the Vibrational and Electronic Spectrum of Benzene Frank Rioux CSB|SJU This tutorial deals with the interpretation of the vibrational and electronic spectra of benzene using group benzene's electrons. The symmetry of the relevant -electron molecular orbitals is determined by examining

  2. www.elsevier.com/locate/jsvi Journal of Sound and Vibration ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, Dryver R.

    at a reduced weight and cost when compared to present passive vibration damping systems. ECBs used of aerospace electronic systems. This includes bulky mounting fixtures, reinforcing ribs, and passive vibration to 1015%. Also, the space required to house and mount the electronics would be significantly reduced

  3. The XY Spin Chain Random Block Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Paul

    The XY Spin Chain Random Block Operators Proof of Main Result Open Questions Localization for Random Block Operators Related to the XY Spin Chain Jacob W. Chapman Division of Science Southern Wesleyan University Central, SC Joint work with G¨unter Stolz UAB NSF-CBMS Conference on Quantum Spin

  4. Selfattractive random polymers Remco van der Hofstad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klenke, Achim

    Self­attractive random polymers Remco van der Hofstad Stieltjes Institute of Mathematics Delft polymer of finite length in Zd . Its law is that of a finite simple random walk path in Zd receiving that for > the attraction dominates the repulsion, i.e., with high probability the polymer is contained in a finite box

  5. Contagious Sets in Random Graphs Uriel Feige

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contagious Sets in Random Graphs Uriel Feige Michael Krivelevich Daniel Reichman August 10, 2014. A contagious set is a set whose activation results with the entire graph being active. Given a graph G, let m(G, 2) be the minimal size of a contagious set. We consider the binomial random graph G := G(n, p

  6. On the Use of Non-Additive Entropy to Determine the Presence of Vibrations in the Videos of JET Cameras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Use of Non-Additive Entropy to Determine the Presence of Vibrations in the Videos of JET Cameras

  7. Organization of growing random networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  8. Experimental Studies on Dynamic Vibration Absorber using Shape Memory Alloy (NiTi) Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, V. Raj; Kumar, M. B. Bharathi Raj; Kumar, M. Senthil [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) springs have been used as actuators in many applications although their use in the vibration control area is very recent. Since shape memory alloys differ from conventional alloy materials in many ways, the traditional design approach for springs is not completely suitable for designing SMA springs. Some vibration control concepts utilizing unique characteristics of SMA's will be presented in this paper.A dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) using shape memory alloy (SMA) actuator is developed for attenuation of vibration in a cantilever beam. The design procedure of the DVA is presented. The system consists of a cantilever beam which is considered to generate the real-time vibration using shaker. A SMA spring is used with a mass attached to its end. The stiffness of the SMA spring is dynamically varied in such a way to attenuate the vibration. Both simulation and experimentation are carried out using PID controller. The experiments were carried out by interfacing the experimental setup with a computer using LabVIEW software, Data acquisition and control are implemented using a PCI data acquisition card. Standard PID controllers have been used to control the vibration of the beam. Experimental results are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the controllers designed and the usefulness of the proposed test platform by exciting the structure at resonance. In experimental setup, an accelerometer is used to measure the vibration which is fed to computer and correspondingly the SMA spring is actuated to change its stiffness to control the vibration. The results obtained illustrate that the developed DVA using SMA actuator is very effective in reducing structural response and have great potential to be an active vibration control medium.

  9. Non-Equilibrium Vibrational Kinetics in Radiofrequency H2 Plasmas: a Comparison Between Theoretical and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capitelli, M. [Department of Chemistry-University of Bari (Italy); IMIP CNR - Bari (Italy); De Pascale, O. [IMIP CNR - Bari (Italy); Shakatov, V. [Centro Laser s.r.l. - Valenzano (Italy); Hassouni, K.; Lombardi, G.; Gicquel, A. [LIMHP-CNRS Universite Paris Nord - Villetaneuse (France)

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibrational and rotational experimental temperatures of molecular hydrogen obtained by Coherent Anti-Stokes Spectroscopy (CARS) in Radiofrequency Inductive Plasmas have been analyzed and interpreted in terms of vibration, electron, dissociation-recombination and attachment kinetics. The analysis clarifies the role of atomic hydrogen and its heterogeneous recombination in affecting the vibrational content of the molecules.

  10. HIGH-VOLTAGE LOW POWER ANALOGUE-TO-DIGITAL CONVERSION FOR ADAPTIVE ARCHITECTURES OF CAPACITIVE VIBRATION ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    VIBRATION ENERGY HARVESTERS R. Khalil1* , A. Dudka1 , D. Galayko1 , P. Basset2 1 University Paris 6, LIP6 harvester for vibration energy. A smart energy management in the harvester is needed to achieve an optimal conversion of the vibration energy. This block is achieved with a successive approximation analogue

  11. Contraindications and Potential Dangers of the Use of Vibration as a Treatment for Osteoporosis and other Musculoskeletal Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contraindications and Potential Dangers of the Use of Vibration as a Treatment for Osteoporosis and perhaps curb osteoporosis. Just because some vibration may be beneficial, however, does not mean that a lot is better. Before considering vibration as an avenue of intervention for osteoporosis

  12. The nature of the exalted Kekule vibration of styrene and other benzene derivatives in the S1 state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Yehuda

    The nature of the exalted Kekule vibration of styrene and other benzene derivatives in the S1 state vibrational frequency of several benzene derivatives in the rst excited state S1. It is found of benzene are treated as `twin states'. The physical nature of this vibration is discussed in view

  13. Environment and Protostellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yichen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even today in our Galaxy, stars form from gas cores in a variety of environments, which may affect the properties of resulting star and planetary systems. Here we study the role of pressure, parameterized via ambient clump mass surface density, on protostellar evolution and appearance, focussing on low-mass, Sun-like stars and considering a range of conditions from relatively low pressure filaments in Taurus, to intermediate pressures of cluster-forming clumps like the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), to very high pressures that may be found in the densest Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) or in the Galactic Center (GC). We present unified analytic and numerical models for collapse of prestellar cores, accretion disks, protostellar evolution and bipolar outflows, coupled to radiative transfer (RT) calculations and a simple astrochemical model to predict CO gas phase abundances. Prestellar cores in high pressure environments are smaller and denser and thus collapse with higher accretion rates and efficiencies, resulting...

  14. Sustainable Environment Technologies (4578)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposed Action Title: Sustainable Environment Technologies

  15. USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a casks internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

  16. Galaxy Evolution and Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieter van Dokkum; Ryan Quadri

    2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of galaxies are strongly correlated with their environment, with red galaxies dominating galaxy clusters and blue galaxies dominating the general field. However, not all field galaxies are young: studies of the colors, line strengths, and M/L ratios of massive early-type galaxies at 0environment. There is good evidence that the growth of these galaxies does continue longer in the field than in clusters, via (nearly) dissipationless mergers of already old galaxies. These results are consistent with predictions of recent galaxy formation models, which incorporate AGN feedback to suppress star formation in the most massive halos. Systematic studies of the relation of galaxies with their environment beyond z=1 are difficult, and still somewhat contradictory. Intriguingly both the DEEP2 and VVDS surveys find that the color-density relation disappears at z~1.3, unfortunately just at the point where both surveys become highly incomplete. On the other hand, clustering studies at z~2.5 have shown that red galaxies cluster more strongly than blue galaxies, implying that the color-density relation was already in place at that redshift.

  17. Ecology and environment What ecology and environment course is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Ecology and environment Essentials What ecology and environment course is there? Ecology 01273 876787 Why ecology and environment at Sussex? You will be taught by lecturers who are leaders in research, with a broad range of experience and expertise including plant, bird and insect ecology, climate

  18. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  19. Nature of the Frequency Shift of Hydrogen Valence Vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhyganiuk, I V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical nature of a frequency shift of hydrogen valence vibrations in a water molecule due to its interaction with neighbor molecules has been studied. Electrostatic forces connected with the multipole moments of molecules are supposed to give a dominating contribution to the intermolecular interaction. The frequency shift was calculated in the case where two neighbor molecules form a dimer. The obtained result is in qualitative agreement with the frequency shifts observed for water vapor, hexagonal ice, and liquid water, as well as for aqueous solutions of alcohols. This fact testifies to the electrostatic nature of H-bonds used to describe both the specific features of the intermolecular interaction in water and the macroscopic properties of the latter.

  20. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; ,

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  1. Vibration-based energy harvesting with stacked piezoelectrets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pondrom, P., E-mail: ppondrom@nt.tu-darmstadt.de [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); System Reliability and Machine Acoustics SzM, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Magdalenenstr. 4, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Hillenbrand, J.; Sessler, G. M. [Institute for Telecommunications Technology, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Merckstr. 25, 64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Bs, J.; Melz, T. [System Reliability and Machine Acoustics SzM, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Magdalenenstr. 4, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration-based energy harvesters with multi-layer piezoelectrets (ferroelectrets) are presented. Using a simple setup with nine layers and a seismic mass of 8?g, it is possible to generate a power up to 1.3?W at 140?Hz with an input acceleration of 1g. With better coupling between seismic mass and piezoelectret, and thus reduced damping, the power output of a single-layer system is increased to 5?W at 700?Hz. Simulations indicate that for such improved setups with 10-layer stacks, utilizing seismic masses of 80?g, power levels of 0.1 to 1 mW can be expected below 100?Hz.

  2. Free vibrations of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A., E-mail: jaturner@unl.edu [Mechanical and Materials Engineering, W342 Nebraska Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact resonance atomic force microscope (AFM) methods have been used to quantify the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a variety of materials such as polymers, ceramics, biological materials, and metals with spatial resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. This approach involves measurement of the resonant frequencies of the AFM probe both for the free case and the case for which the tip is in contact with a sample. Vibration models of the probe and tip-sample contact models are then used to determine the sample properties from the frequency behavior and to create images of the sample properties. This work has been primarily focused on rectangular, single-beam probes for which the vibration models are relatively simple. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have been developed to allow local heating of samples and the resonances of these probes are much more complex. In this article, a simplified analytical model of these U-shaped probes is described. This three beam model includes two beams clamped at one end and connected with a perpendicular cross beam at the other end. The beams are assumed only to bend in flexure and twist but their coupling allows a wide range of possible dynamic behavior. Results are presented for the first ten modes and the mode shapes are shown to have complex coupling between the flexure and twisting of the beams, particularly for the higher modes. All resonant frequency results are in good agreement with finite element results for the three probe designs and two values of thickness considered (all wavenumbers are within 3.0%). This work is anticipated to allow U-shaped probes to be used eventually for quantitative measurements of sample material properties during heating using a contact resonance approach.

  3. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Environment and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    and industrial research in chemistry, biology, environmental science and biotechnology. Our research is carried: environmental biotechnology and sustainability bioremediation, water quality, microbial ecology and inorganicn CAPABILITY STATEMENT Environment and Biotechnology Centre Overview The Environment

  4. Painting in a sonic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greated, Marianne

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis explores how painting is affected by its sonic environment. The research stems from an artistic response to noise in the environment and how this can be explored through artistic practice. The boundaries of ...

  5. Guest Editors' Introduction: Hostile Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukowicz, Paul

    Pervasive computing technology can save lives by both eliminating the need for humans to work in hostile environments and supporting them when they do. In general, environments that are hazardous to humans are hard on ...

  6. Thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet with quantum effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lifeng, E-mail: walfe@nuaa.edu.cn; Hu, Haiyan [State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 210016 Nanjing (China)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet is investigated by using a rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with quantum effects taken into account when the law of energy equipartition is unreliable. The relation between the temperature and the Root of Mean Squared (RMS) amplitude of vibration at any point of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet in simply supported case is derived first from the rectangular nonlocal elastic plate model with the strain gradient of the second order taken into consideration so as to characterize the effect of microstructure of the graphene sheet. Then, the RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet simply supported on an elastic foundation is derived. The study shows that the RMS amplitude of the rectangular single-layered graphene sheet predicted from the quantum theory is lower than that predicted from the law of energy equipartition. The maximal relative difference of RMS amplitude of thermal vibration appears at the sheet corners. The microstructure of the graphene sheet has a little effect on the thermal vibrations of lower modes, but exhibits an obvious effect on the thermal vibrations of higher modes. The quantum effect is more important for the thermal vibration of higher modes in the case of smaller sides and lower temperature. The relative difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet decreases monotonically with an increase of temperature. The absolute difference of maximal RMS amplitude of thermal vibration of a rectangular single-layered graphene sheet increases slowly with the rising of Winkler foundation modulus.

  7. Contaminants in Vadose Zone Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Miracle, Ann L.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants in vadose zone environments pose a long-term source and threat to groundwater resources, human health, and the environment. Several technical, regulatory, and policy challenges and opportunities are associated with contamination in vadose zone environments, particularly in remediation. In this special issue, ten papers present novel approaches to characterize, monitor, remediate, and predict the transport and fate of contaminants in vadose zone environments.

  8. QCD in Extreme Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John B. Kogut

    2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I review present challenges that QCD in extreme environments presents to lattice gauge theory. Recent data and impressions from RHIC are emphasized. Physical pictures of heavy ion wavefunctions, collisions and the generation of the Quark Gluon Plasma are discussed, with an eye toward engaging the lattice and its numerical methods in more interaction with the experimental and phenomenological developments. Controversial, but stimulating scenarios which can be confirmed or dismissed by lattice methods are covered. In the second half of the talk, several promising developments presented at the conference Lattice 2002 are reviewed.

  9. Environment Induced Time Arrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janos Polonyi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

  10. Environment Feature Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeeches EnergyActive for Life"Environment Feature

  11. Geoscience/Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall ATours,DioxideGeoscience/Environment

  12. NERSC Modules Software Environment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal:Ott2006.jpgEnvironment » Modules

  13. School of Environment and Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    School of Environment and Sustainability Room 323, Kirk Hall 117 Science Place Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8 Telephone: (306) 966-1985 E-mail: sens.info@usask.ca Master of Environment and Sustainability (MES) Opportunity Sustainability Science in the Delta Dialogue Network The School of Environment and Sustainability

  14. Random Walks and Electrical Networks Electrical Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathon Peterson

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 4, 2008 ... Random Walks and Electrical Networks. Hitting Probabilities and Voltage. Voltage. Connect a 1V battery to nodes a and b. ix,y is the current...

  15. MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a finite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classification: 60J80

  16. MOMENT ASYMPTOTICS FOR MULTITYPE BRANCHING RANDOM WALKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    of Montenegro 29 October, 2013 Abstract. We study a discrete time multitype branching random walk on a #28;nite of Montenegro, Cetinjska 2, 81 000 Podgorica, Montenegro, ozrens@t-com.me AMS 2010 Subject Classi#28;cation: 60J

  17. How Can Random Noise Help Us

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Basics of Random Walk 2. 0. 5. 10. 15. 20. 25. 30. 35. 40. 45. 50. ?5. ?4. ?3. ?2. ?1. 0 ..... Back to Parrondo's Paradox. Playing Game A. . winning prob = 0.495.

  18. Chaotic generation of pseudo-random numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dornbusch, Andrew Wesley

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of repeatable pseudo-random sequences with chaotic analog electronics is not feasible using standard circuit topologies. Component variation caused by imperfect fabrication causes the same divergence of output sequences as does varying...

  19. Flow induced vibration of a cantilever column jet: a spectral analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilling, Roy Bryant

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , both the pump and the test di scharge pipe were mounted on a carriage whiLh oscil]ated on the track above a water sump. They were connected from the suction end by two-inch I. D. gal- vanized pipe joined in the center by a 1. 5 inch orifice plate... SPECTRUM AT 3. 5 HZ, EMPTY PIPE . FORCED VIBRATION SPECTRUM AT 3. 5 HZ, 47 fps FLOW VELOCITY- FROCED VIBRATION SPECTRUM AT 4. 58 HZ EMPTY PIPE . FORCED VIBRATION SPECTRUM AT 4. 58 HZ 10 fps FLOW VELOCITY . MIDRANGE DYNAMICS . INTENSITY RESPONSE...

  20. Potential Effect of Interfacial Bonding on Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This summary abstract describes the methodology used to evaluate the effect of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions with consideration of the interfacial bonding efficiency on UNF vibration integrity. This methodology provides a solid roadmap for further protocol development with respect to effective lifetime prediction of a UNF system under normal transportation vibration. The proposed methodology that couples FEA simulations and experimental exploration efforts is also under development. The current methodology is focused on assessing the influence of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and the pellet clad interfaces on UNF vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also calibrated and benchmarked with the fatigue aging data obtained from reversible bending fatigue testing.

  1. Spectral statistics for weakly correlated random potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frdric Klopp

    2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study localization and derive stochastic estimates (in particular, Wegner and Minami estimates) for the eigenvalues of weakly correlated random discrete Schr\\"odinger operators in the localized phase. We apply these results to obtain spectral statistics for general discrete alloy type models where the single site perturbation is neither of finite rank nor of fixed sign. In particular, for the models under study, the random potential exhibits correlations at any range.

  2. Enhanced Elasticity and Soft Glassy Rheology of a Smectic in a Random Porous Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjini Bandyopadhyay; Dennis Liang; Ralph H. Colby; James L. Harden; Robert L. Leheny

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report studies of the frequency dependent shear modulus, $G^*(\\omega)=G'(\\omega)+iG''(\\omega)$, of the liquid crystal octylcyanobiphenyl (8CB) confined in a colloidal aerosil gel. With the onset of smectic order, $G'$ grows approximately linearly with decreasing temperature, reaching values that exceed by more than three orders of magnitude the values for pure 8CB. The modulus at low temperatures possesses a power-law component, $G^*(\\omega) \\sim \\omega^\\alpha$, with exponent $\\alpha$ that approaches zero with increasing gel density. The amplitude of $G'$ and its variation with temperature and gel density indicate that the low temperature response is dominated by a dense population of defects in the smectic. In contrast, when the 8CB is isotropic or nematic, the modulus is controlled by the elastic behavior of the colloidal gel.

  3. activity monitor randomized: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    restricted randomization procedures and then apply this technique to approximate the joint distribution of sequentially computed conditional randomization tests. We also...

  4. A Natural Definition of Random Language Keith Wansbrough*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wansbrough, Keith

    Introduction Algorithmic Information Theory (AIT) provides definitions of randomness for strings A Natural Definition of Random Language Keith Wansbrough* October 13, 1995 Abstract We propose a natural definition

  5. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Thomas J. (Maumee, OH); Kotidis, Petros A. (Waban, MA); Woodroffe, Jaime A. (North Reading, MA); Rostler, Peter S. (Newton, MA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading.

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring surface movement of a solid object that is subjected to external vibrations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, T.J.; Kotidis, P.A.; Woodroffe, J.A.; Rostler, P.S.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for non-destructively measuring an object and controlling industrial processes in response to the measurement is disclosed in which an impulse laser generates a plurality of sound waves over timed increments in an object. A polarizing interferometer is used to measure surface movement of the object caused by the sound waves and sensed by phase shifts in the signal beam. A photon multiplier senses the phase shift and develops an electrical signal. A signal conditioning arrangement modifies the electrical signals to generate an average signal correlated to the sound waves which in turn is correlated to a physical or metallurgical property of the object, such as temperature, which property may then be used to control the process. External, random vibrations of the workpiece are utilized to develop discernible signals which can be sensed in the interferometer by only one photon multiplier. In addition the interferometer includes an arrangement for optimizing its sensitivity so that movement attributed to various waves can be detected in opaque objects. The interferometer also includes a mechanism for sensing objects with rough surfaces which produce speckle light patterns. Finally the interferometer per se, with the addition of a second photon multiplier is capable of accurately recording beam length distance differences with only one reading. 38 figs.

  7. ANL-85-51 ANL-85-51 FLOW-INDUCED VIBRATION OF CIRCULAR CYLINDRICAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    leakage signaled the beginning of a troublesome period for a series of 1-3 Table i.l U.S. Power Reactor Field Experience with Flow-induced Vibration Year Reactor Type Component...

  8. The low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djamal, Mitra; Sanjaya, Edi; Islahudin; Ramli [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics, UIN Syarif Hidayatullah, Jl. Ir.H. Djuanda 95 Ciputat 15412 (Indonesia); MTs NW Nurul Iman Kembang Kerang, Jl. Raya Mataram - Lb.Lombok, NTB (Indonesia); Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung 40116 (Indonesia) and Department of Physics,Universitas Negeri Padang, Jl. Prof. Hamka, Padang 25132 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Vibration like an earthquake is a phenomenon of physics. The characteristics of these vibrations can be used as an early warning system so as to reduce the loss or damage caused by earthquakes. In this paper, we introduced a new type of low frequency 2D vibration sensor based on flat coil element that we have developed. Its working principle is based on position change of a seismic mass that put in front of a flat coil element. The flat coil is a part of a LC oscillator; therefore, the change of seismic mass position will change its resonance frequency. The results of measurements of low frequency vibration sensor in the direction of the x axis and y axis gives the frequency range between 0.2 to 1.0 Hz.

  9. Microscopic derivation of nuclear rotation-vibration model, axially symmetric case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulshani, Parviz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive from first principles the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude, and provides microscopic expressions for the interaction operators among the rotation, vibration, and intrinsic motions, for the moment of inertia, vibration mass, and for the deformation variables. The method uses canonical transformations to collective co-ordinates, followed by a constrained variational method, with the associated constraints imposed on the wavefunction rather than on the particle co-ordinates. The approach yields three self-consistent, time-reversal invariant, cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the rotation-vibration and intrinsic motions, and a self-consistency equation. For deformed harmonic oscillator mean-field potentials, these equations are solved in closed forms for the energies, moments of inertia, quadrupole moments and transition...

  10. Nonlinear plate vibrations: A modal approach with application to cymbals and gongs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nonlinear plate vibrations: A modal approach with application to cymbals and gongs M. Ducceschia- sides in their ability to simulate the sound of more realis- tic percussive instruments such as gongs

  11. Dynamic failure prediction of cross-rolled beryllium sheets subjected to vibration loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serna, Oscar R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this investigation is to develop and verify a numerical method for prediction of failure for cross-rolled beryllium sheet structures that are subjected to vibration loads. To this end, complementary laboratory experiments...

  12. Design of a non-contact vibration measurement and analysis system for electronic board testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arn, Krissa Elizabeth, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional vibration measurement methods involve placing accelerometers at discrete locations on a test object. In cases where the test specimen is small in mass, the addition of these measurement transducers can alter ...

  13. A Lyapunov Exponent Approach for Identifying Chaotic Behavior in a Finite Element Based Drillstring Vibration Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mongkolcheep, Kathira

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to present a methodology to predict vibrations of drilllstrings for oil recovery service. The work extends a previous model of the drill collar between two stabilizers in the literature to include drill collar flexibility...

  14. Usage of Friction-damped Braced Frames for Seismic Vibration Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Brynnan 1992-

    2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the results of experimental work that examines the functionality of friction-damped braced frames during seismic events. The simplicity and efficacy of this friction device as a means of passive vibration control suggest...

  15. Vibration suppression of laminated composite plates using embedded smart material layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Sivasubramaniam

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a complete theoretical formulation of laminated composite plates with integrated smart material layers that serve as sensors and/or actuators is presented for the vibration suppression of laminated composite plates. The third...

  16. Vibration Suppression and Flywheel Energy Storage in a Drillstring Bottom-Hole-Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saeed, Ahmed

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , and environmental disposal. Extreme and harsh downhole conditions necessitate that the flywheel module withstands temperatures and pressures exceeding 300 ?F and 20 kpsi, respectively, as well as violent vibrations encountered during drilling. Moreover, the flywheel...

  17. Suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for vibration isolation with application to launch vehicle payloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayes, John Jeramy

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work details an investigation into the suitability of Shape Memory Alloys for the task of vibration isolation based on the similarities between the Shape Memory Alloy pseudoelastic behavior and the softening response of isolators whose response...

  18. Vibration sensors utilizing fiber fabry-perot interferometers and permanent magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, Andrew P.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique set of vibration sensors was designed that incorporate the fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) and permanent magnets. Feasibility of the design and its advantages over traditional sensors were verified by experiments. The new sensors...

  19. Spectroscopic investigations of the vibrational potential energy surfaces in electronic ground and excited states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Juan

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The vibrational potential energy surfaces in electronic ground and excited states of several ring molecules were investigated using several different spectroscopic methods, including far-infrared (IR), Raman, ultraviolet (UV) absorption...

  20. Effects of Induced Acoustic Vibrations on Droplet Shedding on Hybrid Micro-structured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Chen-Ling

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . In an effort to circumvent the pinning effect, a vibration-induced droplet shedding method has been explored to overcome contact angle hysteresis and facilitate droplet shedding at lower rolling angles. To understand the effects of hybrid surface morphology...

  1. Experimental Investigations of Vortex Induced Vibration of A Flat Plate in Pitch Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A bluff structure placed in a flowing fluid, may be subjected to vortex-induced vibrations (VIV). For a flat plate with only rotational degree of freedom, the VIV is rotational oscillation. Based on the experimental investigation, vortex...

  2. Vibrational and Theoretical Investigations of Molecular Conformations and Intramolecular pi-Type Hydrogen Bonding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocola, Esther

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular conformations, potential energy functions and vibrational spectra of several cyclic molecules have been investigated by ab initio and density functional theory calculations and by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The ab initio...

  3. Vibration-to-electric energy conversion using a mechanically-varied capacitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Bernard Chih-Hsun, 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past research in vibration energy harvesting has focused on the use of variable capacitors, magnets, or piezoelectric materials as the basis of energy transduction. How- ever, few of these studies have explored the detailed ...

  4. Effect of traveling waves on Vortex-Induced Vibration of long flexible cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaiswal, Vivek, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore marine risers and pipelines, exposed to ocean currents, are susceptible to Vortex-Induced Vibration (VIV). Accurate prediction of VIV is necessary for estimating the fatigue life as well as for taking corrective ...

  5. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hougen, J.T. [NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  6. Three Phase Erosion Testing and Vibration Analysis of an Electrical Submersible Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Dezhi

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    a crucial problem of slurry erosion which may affect life and cost significantly. The wear caused by slurry erosion may bring the issue such as unbalanced side loads, severe vibration and decreased pressure head. Eventually, this phenomenon will lead...

  7. Production of a beam of highly vibrationally excited CO using perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Nils

    An intense molecular beam of CO (X[superscript 1]?[superscript +]) in high vibrational states (v = 17, 18) was produced by a new approach that we call PUMP PUMP PERTURB and DUMP. The basic idea is to access high ...

  8. Design of compliant mechanisms for attenuation of unidirectional vibrations in rotational systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szczesny, Spencer E., 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research was to generate the knowledge required to design compliant mechanisms that (1) attenuate undesired small-motion angular vibrations in rotational power transmission systems and (2) preserve the ...

  9. Vortex-induced vibration of marine risers : motion and force reconstruction from field and experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Harish

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of long flexible cylindrical structures enduring ocean currents is ubiquitous in the offshore industry. Though significant effort has gone into understanding this complicated fluid-structure ...

  10. Vortex-induced vibration of flexible cylinders in time-varying flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resvanis, Themistocles L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates two aspects of Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) on long flexible cylinders. The work is split into a minor and major part. The minor part addresses the effect of Reynolds number on flexible cylinder ...

  11. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts of presentations made at the Fourteenth International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS XIV) held May 9-14, 2009 in Meredith, New Hampshire. TRVS is a series of biennial conferences ...

  12. A tale of coupled vibrations in solution told by coherent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Munira, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy is used as a tool for investigating the molecular structure and dynamics of coupled vibrations in solution on a picosecond timescale. The strongly coupled asymmetric ...

  13. Vortex Induced Vibrations of cylinders : experiments in reducing drag force and amplitude of motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, David Emmanuel

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reducing the deleterious effect of Vortex Induced Vibrations (VIV) in marine risers is an important task for ocean engineers; and many competing factors exist in the design of VIV suppression devices. This thesis explores ...

  14. Vortex-induced vibrations of a long flexible cylinder in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triantafyllou, Michael S.

    We investigate the in-line and cross-flow vortex-induced vibrations of a long cylindrical tensioned beam, with length to diameter ratio L/D = 200, placed within a linearly sheared oncoming flow, using three-dimensional ...

  15. Multicomponent stimulus interactions observed in basilar-membrane vibration in the basal region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czajkowski, Cynthia

    of the chinchilla cochlea William S. Rhodea) and Alberto Recio Department of Physiology, University of Wisconsin-membrane vibration at the 34-mm region of the chinchilla cochlea with a characteristic frequency between 6.5 and 8

  16. Exploring the randomness of Directed Acyclic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joaqun Goi; Bernat Corominas-Murtra; Ricard V. Sol; Carlos Rodrguez-Caso

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The feed-forward relationship naturally observed in time-dependent processes and in a diverse number of real systems -such as some food-webs and electronic and neural wiring- can be described in terms of so-called directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). An important ingredient of the analysis of such networks is a proper comparison of their observed architecture against an ensemble of randomized graphs, thereby quantifying the {\\em randomness} of the real systems with respect to suitable null models. This approximation is particularly relevant when the finite size and/or large connectivity of real systems make inadequate a comparison with the predictions obtained from the so-called {\\em configuration model}. In this paper we analyze four methods of DAG randomization as defined by the desired combination of topological invariants (directed and undirected degree sequence and component distributions) aimed to be preserved. A highly ordered DAG, called \\textit{snake}-graph and a Erd\\:os-R\\'enyi DAG were used to validate the performance of the algorithms. Finally, three real case studies, namely, the \\textit{C. elegans} cell lineage network, a PhD student-advisor network and the Milgram's citation network were analyzed using each randomization method. Results show how the interpretation of degree-degree relations in DAGs respect to their randomized ensembles depend on the topological invariants imposed. In general, real DAGs provide disordered values, lower than the expected by chance when the directedness of the links is not preserved in the randomization process. Conversely, if the direction of the links is conserved throughout the randomization process, disorder indicators are close to the obtained from the null-model ensemble, although some deviations are observed.

  17. Random selection as a confidence building tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hauck, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. The first concern can be addressed by performing the measurements within the host facility using instruments under the host's control. Because the data output in this measurement scenario is also under host control, it is difficult for the monitoring party to have confidence in that data. One technique for addressing this difficulty is random selection. The concept of random selection can be thought of as four steps: (1) The host presents several 'identical' copies of a component or system to the monitor. (2) One (or more) of these copies is randomly chosen by the monitors for use in the measurement system. (3) Similarly, one or more is randomly chosen to be validated further at a later date in a monitor-controlled facility. (4) Because the two components or systems are identical, validation of the 'validation copy' is equivalent to validation of the measurement system. This procedure sounds straightforward, but effective application may be quite difficult. Although random selection is often viewed as a panacea for confidence building, the amount of confidence generated depends on the monitor's continuity of knowledge for both validation and measurement systems. In this presentation, we will discuss the random selection technique, as well as where and how this technique might be applied to generate maximum confidence. In addition, we will discuss the role of modular measurement-system design in facilitating random selection and describe a simple modular measurement system incorporating six small {sup 3}He neutron detectors and a single high-purity germanium gamma detector.

  18. On the ro-vibrational energies for the lithium dimer; maximum-possible rotational levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Mustafa

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deng-Fan potential is used to discuss the reliability of the improved Greene-Aldrich approximation and the factorization recipe of Badawi et al.'s [17] for the central attractive/repulsive core. The factorization recipe is shown to be a more reliable approximation and is used to obtain the ro-vibrational energies for the lithium dimer. For each vibrational state only a limited number of the rotational levels are found to be supported by the lithium dimer.

  19. A comparative study of vibrational relaxation models for the aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle flight regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Derek Scott

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION MODELS FOR AEROASSISTED ORBITAL TRANSFER VEHICLE FLIGHT REGIME A Thesis by DEREK SCOTI' GREEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION MODELS FOR AEROASSISTED ORBITAL TRANSFER VEHICLE FLIGHT REGIME A Thesis by DEREK SCOTT GREEN Approved...

  20. A comparative study of vibrational relaxation and chemical reaction models for the Martian entry vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koteshwar, Rajeev

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION AND CHEMICAL REACTION MODELS FOR THE MARTIAN ENTRY VEHICLE A Thesis by RAJEEV KOTESHWAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION AND CHEMICAL REACTION MODELS FOR THE MARTIAN ENTRY VEHICLE A Thesis by RAJEEV KOTESHWAR Approved as to style...

  1. Analysis and experimental study of a plate-type hydraulic vibration damper for cryogenic rotating machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olan, Emmanuel Angustia

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF A PLATE-TYPE HYDRAULIC VIBRATION DAMPER FOR CRYOGENIC ROTATING MACHINERY A Thesis by EMMANUEL ANGUSTIA OLAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF A PLATE-TYPE HYDRAULIC VIBRATION DAMPER FOR CRYOGENIC ROTATING MACHINERY A Thesis by EMMANUEL ANGUSTIA OLAN Approved...

  2. Evaluation of Transportation Vibration Associated with Relocation of Work in Process As Part of KCRIMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, Troy

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During relocation of the Kansas City Plant (KCP) from the site at Bannister Road to the site at Botts Road, work in process (WIP) within a production department must be transported. This report recommends packaging to mitigate vibration levels experienced by products during between-facility transportation. Measurements and analysis demonstrate that this mitigation results in vibration levels less than those experienced by the product during routine production processes within potentially damaging frequency ranges.

  3. Effect of age on vibration sensitivity and motor nerve conduction among females

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crumpton, Lesia LaWon

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF AGE ON VIBRATION SENSITIVITY AND MOTOR NERVE CONDUCTION AMONG FEMALES A Thesis by LES IA LA WON CRUMPTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering EFFECT OF AGE ON VIBRATION SENS~ AND MOTOR NERVE CONDUCTION AlvIONG FEMALES A Thesis by LESIA LAWON CRUMPTON Approved as to style and content by: erome J. nglet (Chair...

  4. Vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Wei; Yang, Yu; Zheng, Fawei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China) [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on density functional theory and density functional perturbation theory calculations, we systematically investigate the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strains. It is found that under hole doping, the phonon frequencies of the ZO and TO branches at different wave vector q shift linearly with different slopes. Under electron doping, although the phonon frequencies shift irregularly, the shifting values are different at different phonon wave vectors. Interestingly, we find that external strain can restrain the irregular vibration responses of h-BN sheet to electron doping. The critical factor is revealed to be the relative position of the nearly free electron and boron p{sub z} states of h-BN sheet. Under external strains, the vibration responses of h-BN sheet are also found to be highly dependent on the phonon branches. Different vibration modes at different q points are revealed to be responsible for the vibration responses of h-BN sheet to charge doping and external strain. Our results point out a new way to detect the doping or strain status of h-BN sheet by measuring the vibration frequencies at different wave vector.

  5. Flow-induced tube vibration thresholds in heat exchangers from shellside water tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical industrial shell-and-tube heat exchanger configurations are investigated experimentally for the occurrence of potentially damaging tube vibration as a function of flowrate. The effort is part of a program to develop vibration avoidance criteria to be integrated and optimized with the advanced thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical design methods now available. The tests use a 0.6-m (2-ft)-diameter, 3.7-m (12-ft)-long shell containing a removable tube bundle whose components are readily rearranged or replaced. The 15 different full tube bundle configurations tested represent various combinations of parameters: triangular or square tube layout patterns with different orientations to the flow, number of crosspasses, sizes of nozzles, plain or finned tubes. All bundles have 19-mm (0.75-in.)-diameter tubes spaced with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25. The heat exchanger is tested with waterflow on the shellside to determine a critical threshold, above which a small increase in the flowrate initiates a fluidelastic instability resulting in large amplitude vibration. The test conditions, the critical flowrates, the vibration frequencies, and the locations of the tubes most susceptible to vibration are presented. The given data are used for a comparison with a presently recognized method of vibration prediction and will permit updated evaluations as more advanced methods become available in the future.

  6. Low frequency long duration blast vibrations and their effect on residential structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, M.P.; Sirveiya, A.K.; Singh, P.K. [Central Mining Research Institute, Dhanbad (India). Blasting Dept.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted at a coal mine in India which produces 10 million tonne of coal and 27 million cubic meter of overburden per annum. Detonation of 100 tonnes of explosives in a blasting round is a common practice of the mine. These large sized blasts often led to complaints from the nearby inhabitants regarding ground vibrations and their affects on their houses. Eighteen dragline blasts were conducted and their impacts on nearby structures were investigated. Extended seismic arrays were used to identify the vibration characteristics within a few tens of meters of the blasts and also as modified by the media at distances over 5 km. 10 to 12 seismographs were deployed in an array to gather the time histories of vibrations. A signature blast was conducted to know the fundamental frequency of the particular transmitting media between the blast face and the structures. The faster decay of high frequency components was observed. It was also observed that at distances of 5 km, the persistence of vibrations in the structures was substantially increased by more than 10 seconds. The proximity of the frequency of the ground vibration to the structure's fundamental frequencies produced the resonance in the structures. On the basis of the fundamental frequency of the structures, the delay interval was optimized, which resulted in lower amplitude and reduced persistence of vibration in the structures. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. LARGE DEVIATIONS FOR THE LOCAL TIMES OF A RANDOM WALK AMONG RANDOM CONDUCTANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    König, Wolfgang

    .1) This operator is symmetric and generates the continuous-time random walk (X t ) t#[0,#) in Z d , the random walk AND TILMAN WOLFF In some recent publications (see, e.g., [BD10]), the above walk is called variable-speed times of the walk. The speed and the rate function of our principle are explicit in terms of the lower

  8. Random drift and large shifts in popularity of dog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Matthew

    citations of scien- tific authors (Simkin & Roychowdhury 2003). We report that the neutral model of random

  9. A Natural Definition of Random Language Keith Wansbrough \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wansbrough, Keith

    definition. 1 Introduction Algorithmic Information Theory (AIT) provides definitions of randomnessA Natural Definition of Random Language Keith Wansbrough \\Lambda October 13, 1995 Abstract We propose a natural definition of random language, based on the standard AIT definitions of random string

  10. Couplings between dipole and quadrupole vibrations in tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cdric Simenel; Philippe Chomaz

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the couplings between collective vibrations such as the isovector giant dipole and isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in tin isotopes in the framework of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory with a Skyrme energy density functional. These couplings are a source of anharmonicity in the multiphonon spectrum. In particular, the residual interaction is known to couple the isovector giant dipole resonance with the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance built on top of it, inducing a nonlinear evolution of the quadrupole moment after a dipole boost. This coupling also affects the dipole motion in a nucleus with a static or dynamical deformation induced by a quadrupole constraint or boost respectively. Three methods associated with these different manifestations of the coupling are proposed to extract the corresponding matrix elements of the residual interaction. Numerical applications of the different methods to 132Sn are in good agreement with each other. Finally, several tin isotopes are considered to investigate the role of isospin and mass number on this coupling. A simple 1/A dependence of the residual matrix elements is found with no noticeable contribution from the isospin. This result is interpreted within the Goldhaber-Teller model.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy for online monitoring of extraction solvent degradation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.; Robinson, T.; Bryan, S.A.; Levitskaia, T.G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd, PO Box 999, MSIN P7-25 Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In our research, we are exploring the potential of online monitoring of the organic solvents for the flowsheets relevant to the used nuclear fuel reprocessing and tributyl phosphate (TBP)- based extraction processes in particular. Utilization of vibrational spectroscopic techniques permits the discrimination of the degradation products from the primary constituents of the loaded extraction solvent. Multivariate analysis of the spectral data facilitates development of the regression models for their quantification in real time and potentially enables online implementation of a monitoring system. Raman and FTIR spectral databases were created and used to develop the regression partial least squares (PLS) chemometric models for the quantitative prediction of HDBP (dibutyl phosphoric acid) degradation product, TBP, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} extraction organic product phase. It was demonstrated that both these spectroscopic techniques are suitable for the quantification of the Purex solvent components in the presence of UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Developed PLS models successfully predicted HDBP and TBP organic concentrations in simulated Purex solutions.

  12. Determination of stepsize parameters for intermolecular vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tardy, D.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intermolecular energy transfer of highly excited polyatomic molecules plays an important role in many complex chemical systems: combustion, high temperature and atmospheric chemistry. By monitoring the relaxation of internal energy we have observed trends in the collisional efficiency ({beta}) for energy transfer as a function of the substrate's excitation energy and the complexities of substrate and deactivator. For a given substrate {beta} increases as the deactivator's mass increase to {approximately}30 amu and then exhibits a nearly constant value; this is due to a mass mismatch between the atoms of the colliders. In a homologous series of substrate molecules (C{sub 3}{minus}C{sub 8}) {beta} decreases as the number of atoms in the substrate increases; replacing F with H increases {beta}. All substrates, except for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CF{sub 2}HCl below 10,000 cm{sup {minus}1}, exhibited that {beta} is independent of energy, i.e. <{Delta}E>{sub all} is linear with energy. The results are interpreted with a simple model which considers that {beta} is a function of the ocillators energy and its vibrational frequency. Limitations of current approximations used in high temperature unimolecular reactions were evaluated and better approximations were developed. The importance of energy transfer in product yields was observed for the photoactivation of perfluorocyclopropene and the photoproduction of difluoroethyne. 3 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. A simple example of "Quantum Darwinism": Redundant information storage in many-spin environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robin Blume-Kohout; Wojciech H. Zurek

    2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    As quantum information science approaches the goal of constructing quantum computers, understanding loss of information through decoherence becomes increasingly important. The information about a system that can be obtained from its environment can facilitate quantum control and error correction. Moreover, observers gain most of their information indirectly, by monitoring (primarily photon) environments of the "objects of interest." Exactly how this information is inscribed in the environment is essential for the emergence of "the classical" from the quantum substrate. In this paper, we examine how many-qubit (or many-spin) environments can store information about a single system. The information lost to the environment can be stored redundantly, or it can be encoded in entangled modes of the environment. We go on to show that randomly chosen states of the environment almost always encode the information so that an observer must capture a majority of the environment to deduce the system's state. Conversely, in the states produced by a typical decoherence process, information about a particular observable of the system is stored redundantly. This selective proliferation of "the fittest information" (known as Quantum Darwinism) plays a key role in choosing the preferred, effectively classical observables of macroscopic systems. The developing appreciation that the environment functions not just as a garbage dump, but as a communication channel, is extending our understanding of the environment's role in the quantum-classical transition beyond the traditional paradigm of decoherence.

  14. Quantum random-walk search algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenvi, Neil; Whaley, K. Birgitta [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kempe, Julia [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Computer Science Division, EECS, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); CNRS-LRI, UMR 8623, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum random walks on graphs have been shown to display many interesting properties, including exponentially fast hitting times when compared with their classical counterparts. However, it is still unclear how to use these novel properties to gain an algorithmic speedup over classical algorithms. In this paper, we present a quantum search algorithm based on the quantum random-walk architecture that provides such a speedup. It will be shown that this algorithm performs an oracle search on a database of N items with O({radical}(N)) calls to the oracle, yielding a speedup similar to other quantum search algorithms. It appears that the quantum random-walk formulation has considerable flexibility, presenting interesting opportunities for development of other, possibly novel quantum algorithms.

  15. Alaska Forum on the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Forum on the Environment is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals from government agencies, non-profit and for-profit businesses, community leaders, Alaskan...

  16. Alaska Forum on the Environment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Alaska Forum on the Environment (AFE) is Alaska's largest statewide gathering of environmental professionals from government agencies, non-profit and for-profit businesses, community leaders,...

  17. Modified discrete random walk with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo van Uem

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain expected number of arrivals, probability of arrival, absorption probabilities and expected time before absorption for a modified discrete random walk on the (sub)set of integers. In a [pqrs] random walk the particle can move one step forward or backward, stay for a moment in the same state or it can be absorbed immediately in the current state. M[pqrs] is a modified version, where probabilities on both sides of a multiple function barrier M are of different [pqrs] type.

  18. Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142156

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Arid Environments Journal of Arid Environments 67 (2006) 142156 Carbon sequestration, afforestation added $50% more C to the initial ecosystem carbon pool, with annual sequestration rate ranging 0 and suitable for tree planting, afforesting this area could result in a carbon sequestration rate of 1.7 Tg C

  19. Fast neutron environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Lu, Ping; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Goods, Steven Howard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Foiles, Stephen Martin; Puskar, Joseph David; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Boyce, Brad Lee; Clark, Blythe G.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this LDRD project is to develop a rapid first-order experimental procedure for the testing of advanced cladding materials that may be considered for generation IV nuclear reactors. In order to investigate this, a technique was developed to expose the coupons of potential materials to high displacement damage at elevated temperatures to simulate the neutron environment expected in Generation IV reactors. This was completed through a high temperature high-energy heavy-ion implantation. The mechanical properties of the ion irradiated region were tested by either micropillar compression or nanoindentation to determine the local properties, as a function of the implantation dose and exposure temperature. In order to directly compare the microstructural evolution and property degradation from the accelerated testing and classical neutron testing, 316L, 409, and 420 stainless steels were tested. In addition, two sets of diffusion couples from 316L and HT9 stainless steels with various refractory metals. This study has shown that if the ion irradiation size scale is taken into consideration when developing and analyzing the mechanical property data, significant insight into the structural properties of the potential cladding materials can be gained in about a week.

  20. Market Design Test Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

    2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

  1. Relativistic Point Coupling Model for Vibrational Excitations in the Continuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ring, P.; Daoutidis, J. [Physics Department Technical University Munich, 85748 Garching (Germany); Litvinova, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Niksic, T.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An implementation of the relativistic random phase approximation with the proper treatment of the continuum has been developed for the relativistic point coupling model and applied to investigate collective excitations in spherical nuclei. The results are compared with the spectral implementation of the same model. In heavy nuclei, where the escape width is negligible, we find an excellent agreement between both methods in the region of giant resonance and some discrepancies in the region of low-lying pygmy resonance. The differences are more pronounced in light nuclei due to the larger values of the escape widths.

  2. Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2002 RIFE - 8 2003 #12;1 ENVIRONMENT AGENCY ENVIRONMENT AND HERITAGE SERVICE FOOD STANDARDS AGENCY SCOTTISH ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION AGENCY Radioactivity in Food and the Environment, 2002 RIFE - 8 October 2003 #12;2 This report was compiled by the Centre for Environment

  3. Terahertz vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the water tetramer-d8: Combined analysis of vibrational bands at 4.1 and 2.0 THz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Terahertz vibration-rotation-tunneling spectroscopy of the water tetramer-d8: Combined analysis in the global fit of the water trimer. The detailed understanding of the water tetramer evolving from this work calculated concentrations of water trimers, tetramers, and pentamers of 1012 , 1011 , and 1010 cm-3

  4. REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 CHAPTER 1: REMOTE SENSING OF THE ENVIRONMENT REFERENCE: Remote Sensing of the Environment John R. Jensen (2007) Second Edition Pearson Prentice Hall What is Remote Sensing? #12;2 Photogrammetry the art of identifying objects and judging their significance (Colwell, 1966). Remote Sensing the measurement

  5. Performance Characterization of Random Proximity Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Grant J.

    Performance Characterization of Random Proximity Sensor Networks Agostino Capponi Department-- In this paper, we characterize the localization per- formance and connectivity of sensors networks consisting for signal processing. Each sensor has severe constraints on the battery power, and can only communicate

  6. Diffusive limit for the random Lorentz gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessia Nota

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We review some recent results concerning the derivation of the diffusion equation and the validation of Fick's law for the microscopic model given by the random Lorentz Gas. These results are achieved by using a linear kinetic equation as an intermediate level of description between our original mechanical system and the diffusion equation.

  7. Purity distribution for bipartite random pure states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Giraud

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytic expressions for the probability density distribution of the linear entropy and the purity are derived for bipartite pure random quantum states. The explicit distributions for a state belonging to a product of Hilbert spaces of dimensions p and q are given for p=3 and any q>=3, as well as for p=q=4.

  8. Random Parking and Rubber Elasticity Mathew Penrose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penrose, Mathew

    Random Parking and Rubber Elasticity Mathew Penrose (University of Bath) Joint work with Antoine), Imperial January 2013 #12;Rubber Elasticity Let d, n N (e.g. d = n = 3). Suppose D Rd is a bounded domain. D represents a piece of rubber. Let L Rd be a locally finite point process. L D the locations

  9. Positive Lyapunov exponent by a random perturbation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng Lian; Mikko Stenlund

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of a random perturbation on a one-parameter family of dynamical systems whose behavior in the absence of perturbation is ill understood. We provide conditions under which the perturbed system is ergodic and admits a positive Lyapunov exponent, with an explicit lower bound, for a large and controlled set of parameter values.

  10. Rolling motion of a rigid sphere on a structured rubber substrate aided by a random noise and an external bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partho S. Goohpattader; Srinivas Mettu; Manoj K. Chaudhury

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the rolling motion of a small solid sphere on a surface patterned rubber substrate in an external field with and without a noise. In the absence of the noise, the ball does not move below a threshold force above which it accelerates sub-linearly with the applied field. In the presence of a random noise, the ball exhibits a stochastic rolling with a net drift, the velocity of which increases non-linearly with the strength of the noise (K). From the evolution of the displacement distribution, it is evident that the rolling is controlled by a Coulomb like friction at a very low velocity, a super-linear friction at an intermediate velocity and a linear kinematic friction at a large velocity. This transition from a non-linear to a linear friction control of motion can be discerned from another experiment in which the ball is subjected to a small amplitude periodic asymmetric vibration in conjunction with a random noise. Here, as opposed to that of a fixed external force, the rolling velocity decreases with the increase of the strength of the noise suggesting a progressive fluidization of the interface. Furthermore, the ball exhibits a flow reversal with the increase of the amplitude of the asymmetric vibration, which is indicative of a profile of friction that first descends and then ascends with velocity. An approximate non-linear friction model with the non-linearity decreasing with K is somewhat consistent with the evolution of the displacement fluctuation that also explains the sigmoidal variation of the drift velocity with the strength of the noise. This research sets the stage for studying friction in a new way, in which it is submitted to a noise and then its dynamic response is studied using the tools of statistical mechanics.

  11. Randomization and the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedran Sohinger; Gigliola Staffilani

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy on the spatial domain $\\mathbb{T}^3$. By using an appropriate randomization of the Fourier coefficients in the collision operator, we prove an averaged form of the main estimate which is used in order to contract the Duhamel terms that occur in the study of the hierarchy. In the averaged estimate, we do not need to integrate in the time variable. An averaged spacetime estimate for this range of regularity exponents then follows as a direct corollary. The range of regularity exponents that we obtain is $\\alpha>\\frac{3}{4}$. It was shown in our previous joint work with Gressman that the range $\\alpha>1$ is sharp in the corresponding deterministic spacetime estimate. This is in contrast to the non-periodic setting, which was studied by Klainerman and Machedon, in which the spacetime estimate is known to hold whenever $\\alpha \\geq 1$. The goal of our paper is to extend the range of $\\alpha$ in this class of estimates in a \\emph{probabilistic sense}. We use the new estimate and the ideas from its proof in order to study randomized forms of the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy. More precisely, we consider hierarchies similar to the Gross-Pitaevskii hierarchy, but in which the collision operator has been randomized. For these hierarchies, we show convergence to zero in low regularity Sobolev spaces of Duhamel expansions of fixed deterministic density matrices. We believe that the study of the randomized collision operators could be the first step in the understanding of a nonlinear form of randomization.

  12. On the Unification of Random Matrix Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert A Small

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method involving particle diagrams is introduced and developed into a rigorous framework for carrying out embedded random matrix calculations. Using particle diagrams and the attendant methodology including loop counting it becomes possible to calculate the fourth, sixth and eighth moments of embedded ensembles in a straightforward way. The method, which will be called the method of particle diagrams, proves useful firstly by providing a means of classifying the components of moments into particle paths, or loops, and secondly by giving a simple algorithm for calculating the magnitude of combinatorial expressions prior to calculating them explicitly. By confining calculations to the limit case $m \\ll l\\to\\infty$ this in many cases provides a sufficient excuse not to calculate certain terms at all, since it can be foretold using the method of particle diagrams that they will not survive in this asymptotic regime. Applying the method of particle diagrams washes out a great deal of the complexity intrinsic to the problem, with sufficient mathematical structure remaining to yield limiting statistics for the unified phase space of random matrix theories. Finally, since the unified form of random matrix theory is essentially the set of all randomised k-body potentials, it should be no surprise that the early statistics calculated for the unified random matrix theories in some instances resemble the statistics currently being discovered for quantum spin hypergraphs and other randomised potentials on graphs [HMH05,ES14,KLW14]. This is just the beginning for studies into the field of unified random matrix theories, or embedded ensembles, and the applicability of the method of particle diagrams to a wide range of questions as well as to the more exotic symmetry classes, such as the symplectic ensembles, is still an area of open-ended research.

  13. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Downhole Vibration Stimulation in Osage County Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ford Brett; Robert V. Westermark

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate the impact of downhole vibration stimulation on oil production rates in a mature waterflood field. Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc. (OGCI) will manage the project in close cooperation with the Osage Tribe as the tests will be conducted in Osage County, Oklahoma, the mineral estate of the Osage Tribe. The field is owned and operated by Calumet Oil Company. Phillips Petroleum Company will contribute their proprietary vibration core analysis of cores recovered from the pilot test area. To achieve the project objectives, the work has been divided into nine tasks, some are concurrent, while other tasks rely on completion of previous steps. The operator, Calumet Oil Company operates several field in Osage County Oklahoma. The North Burbank Unit will be the site of the test. The team will then determine where within the field to optimally locate the vibration test well. With the location determined, the test well will be drilled, cored, logged and 7-inch production casing run and cemented. In a parallel effort, OGCI will be designing, building, and testing a new version of the downhole vibration tool based on their patented and field proven whirling orbital vibrator. With the field test tool built to run in 7-inch casing. Reliability testing of the downhole tool and surface power source will be conducted in nearby field operated by Calumet Oil Company. After the core is recovered, Phillips Petroleum Company will be conducting laboratory tests utilizing their proprietary sonic core apparatus to determine fluid flow response to a range of vibration frequencies. These results, in turn, will allow final adjustments to the frequency generation mechanisms of the downhole vibration tool. One or more offset wells, near to the vibration test well, will be equipped with downhole geophones and or hydro-phones to determine the strength of signal and if the producing formation has a characteristic resonant frequency response. Surface geophones will also be set out and arranged to pick up the signal generated by the downhole vibration tool. The downhole vibrator will be installed in the test well. Monitoring the production and injection for the pilot test area will continue. As the frequency of the downhole tool is changed, the recording of seismic signals, both on the surface and downhole, will also be conducted. The results of the data collection will be a matrix of varying vibration stimulation conditions corresponding to changes in production fluid rates and seismic responses. The report on the results of the downhole vibration stimulation will be prepared and delivered using several venues. Technical papers will be submitted to the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Workshops are planned to be held for operators in Osage County and surrounding areas. A dedicated technical session on vibration stimulation may be offered at the 2002 SPE/DOE/IOR Conference, bringing together the world's experts in this emerging technology. The final task will be to close out the project.

  14. The fundamental role of quantized vibrations in coherent light harvesting by cryptophyte algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avinash Kolli; Edward J. O'Reilly; Gregory D. Scholes; Alexandra Olaya-Castro

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of fast vibrations on energy transfer and conversion in natural molecular aggregates is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of high-energy quantized vibrations and their non-equilibrium dynamics for energy transfer in photosynthetic systems with highly localized excitonic states. We consider the cryptophyte antennae protein phycoerythrin 545 and show that coupling to quantized vibrations which are quasi-resonant with excitonic transitions is fundamental for biological function as it generates non-cascaded transport with rapid and wider spatial distribution of excitation energy. Our work also indicates that the non-equilibrium dynamics of such vibrations can manifest itself in ultrafast beating of both excitonic populations and coherences at room temperature, with time scales in agreement with those reported in experiments. Moreover, we show that mechanisms supporting coherent excitonic dynamics assist coupling to selected modes that channel energy to preferential sites in the complex. We therefore argue that, in the presence of strong coupling between electronic excitations and quantized vibrations, a concrete and important advantage of quantum coherent dynamics is precisely to tune resonances that promote fast and effective energy distribution.

  15. Design and optimization of a bi-axial vibration-driven electromagnetic generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jin, E-mail: yangjin@cqu.edu.cn; Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Zhao, Nian; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping; Qiu, Jing [Department of Optoelectronic Engineering, Research Center of Sensors and Instruments, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To scavenge energy from ambient vibrations with arbitrary in-plane motion directions and over a wide frequency range, a novel electromagnetic vibration energy harvester is designed and optimized. In the harvester, a circular cross-section elastic rod, not a traditional thin cantilever beam, is used to extract ambient vibration energy because of its capability to collect vibration from arbitrary in-plane motion directions. The magnetic interaction between magnets and the iron core contributes to a nonlinear oscillation of the rod with increased frequency bandwidth. The influences of the structure configurations on the electrical output and the working bandwidth of the harvester are investigated using Ansoft's Maxwell 3D to achieve optimal performance. The experimental results show that the harvester is sensitive to vibrations from arbitrary in-plane directions and it exhibits a bandwidth of 5.7 Hz and a maximum power of 13.4 mW at an acceleration of 0.6 g (with g=9.8 ms?).

  16. The Airborne Metagenome in an Indoor Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xuguo; Yu, Yiting; Lee, Wah Heng; Yap, Jennifer; Yao, Fei; Suan, Sim Tiow; Ing, Seah Keng; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Wei, Chia Lin; Tan, Patrick; Bristow, James; Rubin, Edward M.; Ruan, Yijun

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The indoor atmosphere is an ecological unit that impacts on public health. To investigate the composition of organisms in this space, we applied culture-independent approaches to microbes harvested from the air of two densely populated urban buildings, from which we analyzed 80 megabases genomic DNA sequence and 6000 16S rDNA clones. The air microbiota is primarily bacteria, including potential opportunistic pathogens commonly isolated from human-inhabited environments such as hospitals, but none of the data contain matches to virulent pathogens or bioterror agents. Comparison of air samples with each other and nearby environments suggested that the indoor air microbes are not random transients from surrounding outdoor environments, but rather originate from indoor niches. Sequence annotation by gene function revealed specific adaptive capabilities enriched in the air environment, including genes potentially involved in resistance to desiccation and oxidative damage. This baseline index of air microbiota will be valuable for improving designs of surveillance for natural or man-made release of virulent pathogens.

  17. Prediction and Adaptation in an Evolving Chaotic Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfred Hbler; David Pines

    1993-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the results of analytic calculations and computer simulations of adaptive predictors (predictive agents) responding to an evolving chaotic environment and to one another. Our simulations are designed to quantify adaptation and to explore co-adaptation for a simple calculable model of a complex adaptive system. We first consider the ability of a single agent, exposed to a chaotic environment, to model, control, and predict the future states of that environment. We then introduce a second agent which, in attempting to model and control both the chaotic environment and the first agent, modifies the extent to which that agent can identify patterns and exercise control. We find that (i) optimal adaptive predictors have an optimal memory and an optimal complexity, which are small for a rapidly changing map dynamics and (ii) that the predictive power can be increased by imposing chaos or random noise onto the map dynamics. The competition between the two predictive agents can lead either to chaos, or to metastable emergent behavior, best described as a leader-follower relationship. Our results suggest a correlation between optimal adaptation, optimal complexity, and emergent behavior, and provide preliminary support for the concept of optimal co-adaptation near the edge of chaos.

  18. Regulatory Considerations Of Waste Emplacement Within The WIPP Repository: Random Versus Non-Random Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, S. C.; Patterson, R. L.; Gross, M.; Lickliter, K.; Stein, J. S.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. As part of that responsibility, DOE must comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) radiation protection standards in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Parts 191 and 194. This paper addresses compliance with the criteria of 40 CFR Section 194.24(d) and 194.24(f) that require DOE to either provide a waste loading scheme for the WIPP repository or to assume random emplacement in the mandated performance and compliance assessments. The DOE established a position on waste loading schemes during the process of obtaining the EPA's initial Certification in 1998. The justification for utilizing a random waste emplacement distribution within the WIPP repository was provided to the EPA. During the EPA rulemaking process for the initial certification, the EPA questioned DOE on whether waste would be loaded randomly as modeled in long-term performance assessment (PA) and the impact, if any, of nonrandom loading. In response, DOE conducted an impact assessment for non-random waste loading. The results of this assessment supported the contention that it does not matter whether random or non-random waste loading is assumed for the PA. The EPA determined that a waste loading plan was unnecessary because DOE had assumed random waste loading and evaluated the potential consequences of non-random loading for a very high activity waste stream. In other words, the EPA determined that DOE was not required to provide a waste loading scheme because compliance is not affected by the actual distribution of waste containers in the WIPP.

  19. The rule for a subdiffusive particle in an extremely diverse environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ophir Flomenbom

    2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of a subdiffusive continuous time random walker in an inhomogeneous environment is analyzed. In each microscopic jump, a random time is drawn from a waiting time probability density function (WT-PDF) that decays as a power law: phi(t;k)~k/(1+kt)^(1+beta), 0 beta;, mu=beta, but when 1-gammaenvironment made of many slow local regions. These two different mechanisms for subdiffusion are not additive, and compete each other. The reported transition is dimension independent, and disappears when the power beta is also distributed, in the range, 0

  20. Spiral Structure and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidney van den Bergh

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Among 330 normal spirals of types Sa-Sc the fraction of objects exhibiting ``ring'', ``intermediate'' and ``spiral'' arm varieties does not correlated with environment. A similar conclusion appears to apply to the arm varieties of 123 barred spirals of types SBa-SBc. It is concluded that, among the northern Shapley-Ames galaxies, the distinction between the spiral and ring varieties of spiral arms is, within the accuracy of presently available data, independent of galaxy environment. This result suggests that the detailed morphology of spiral arms depends primarily on parent galaxy characteristics, rather than on the galactic environment.