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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Permian {open_quotes}Wolfcamp{close_quotes} limestone reservoirs: Powell Ranch field, Eastern Midland Basin  

SciTech Connect

Deep-water carbonate channel reservoirs form important oil reservoirs along the toe of the Eastern Shelf of the Permian basin in west Texas. In northwestern Glasscock County, these `Wolfcamp` reservoirs are Leonardian (Early Permian) in age and define high-energy channels incised into surrounding carbonate detritus and basinal shale. Porous grain-flow material filling these channels, along with encasing detritus, was derived from the shallow shelf located six miles to the east. Reservoirs are in packstone and grainstone facies and have significant interparticle and moldic porosity. Relevant exploration began in the 1960s, but expanded slowly thereafter due to lack of success caused by complex patterns of channel occurrence. Results of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey conducted in 1990 have greatly enhanced the identification and mapping of productive channels in the Powell Ranch field complex. Wells in this complex are capable of flowing 400-1200 bbl of oil per day, and have reserves ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MBO. The new 3-D data have improved the relevant geologic model and dramatically increased rates of drilling success. Application of such data to this setting offers a potential model for other parts of the Permian basin.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Abandoned Texas oil fields  

SciTech Connect

Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Allison Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 79604 5451 Sector Wind energy Product Allison Ranch develops projects for wind energy industry. References Allison Ranch1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

5

Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Revitalizing an old oil field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Redevelopment of the Olney oil field in Illinois is described. First discovered in 1936, production peaked in 1941 when over 30,000 bopd were produced. In 1970, 600 wells in the Olney field pumped only 4000 bpd. Since the decontrol of crude oil prices, a redevelopment project has begun in the field. The project includes well stimulation techniques plus newly drilled or deepened wells. Present production in the Olney field has reached 5000 bopd.

Ortiz, S.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Clark Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch Geothermal Area Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Clark Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8569,"lon":-118.5453,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

8

Oil Field Management System  

The INL has developed a device for metering oil and gas streams that consist of both gas and liquid parts presents a significant challenge. Commonly used multi-phase flow meters reflect significant gains in this technology, but still have major flaws ...

9

Abandoned oil fields in Kansas and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect

Data on approximately 400 abandoned oil fields in Kansas and 90 abandoned oil fields in Nebraska are presented. The following information is obtained on each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; API gravity; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

11

Linden Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linden Ranch Linden Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Linden Ranch Facility Linden Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SCPPA Developer EnXco Location Klickitat County Coordinates 45.757°, -120.795998° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.757,"lon":-120.795998,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Perrin Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Perrin Ranch Perrin Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Perrin Ranch Facility Perrin Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Arizona Public Service Location Williams AZ Coordinates 35.39338814°, -112.2673988° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.39338814,"lon":-112.2673988,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Busch Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Busch Ranch Busch Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Busch Ranch Facility Busch Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Black Hills Colorado Electric (50%) - Altagas (50%) Developer EUI and Black Hills Colorado Electric Energy Purchaser Black Hills Energy Location Pueblo CO Coordinates 37.781886°, -104.471858° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.781886,"lon":-104.471858,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Engine Oil Aeration Test FIELD SERVICE SIMULATED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engine Oil Aeration Test OBJECTIVE FIELD SERVICE SIMULATED SPECIFICATIONS The objective of this test is to determine the effectiveness of engine lubricating oils at minimizing air entrainment oil. TEST FIXTURE The test engine is a 1994 International Truck 7.3 liter V-8, four- stroke

Chapman, Clark R.

15

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

16

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the top 100 liquids or gas fields by reserves or by ...

17

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008 The Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2008 ranks the United States largest oil and gas fields by their estimated

18

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009 ... The peak oil discovery decade reflects the 1967 discovery of Alaskas Prudhoe Bay Field. The gas discoveries ...

19

Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hot Springs Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.761,"lon":-117.492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

20

Solid fuel fired oil field steam generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased shortages being experienced in the domestic crude oil supply have forced attention on the production of heavy crude oils from proven reserves to supplement requirements for petroleum products. Since most heavy crudes require heat to facilitate their extraction, oil field steam generators appear to represent a key component in any heavy crude oil production program. Typical oil field steam generator experience in California indicates that approx. one out of every 3 bbl of crude oil produced by steam stimulation must be consumed as fuel in the steam generators to produce the injection steam. The scarcity and price of crude oil makes it desirable to substitute more readily available and less expensive solid fuels for the crude oil which is presently serving as the primary steam generator fuel. Solid fuel firing capability also is of importance because of the substantial amounts of high heating value and low cost petroleum coke available from the processing of heavy crude oil and suitable for use as a steam generator fuel.

Young, W.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Event detection in sensor networks for modern oil fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the experience of implementing event detection analytics to monitor and forewarn oil production failures in modern, digitized oil fields. Modern oil fields are equipped with thousands of sensors and gauges to measure various physical and chemical ... Keywords: digital oil field, event warning, gas, industry, near real time analytics, oil, petroleum, surveillance

Matthew Hill; Murray Campbell; Yuan-Chi Chang; Vijay Iyengar

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

NREL: Learning - Photovoltaics for Farms and Ranches  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farms and Ranches Farms and Ranches Photo of cows and a photovoltaic powered water pump. Photovoltaic power can be used to pump water for livestock. The following resources will provide you with more information on the uses of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems on farms and ranches, as well as guides to buying and installing a solar energy system. If you are unfamiliar with this technology, see the introduction to PV systems. General Information Energy Savers: Solar Energy Applications for Farms and Ranches Basic information about using solar energy on farms and ranches from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity This 16-page booklet from the U.S. Department of Energy provides information about how you can use solar energy at home.

23

Geology of Kuparuk River Oil Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kuparuk River Oil Field is located on the Alaskan Arctic North Slope in the Colville-Prudhoe Trough ca. 25 miles west of the Prudhoe Bay Field. The 23 API crude is similar in type to that in the Prudhoe Bay Field. However, the Kuparuk Reservoir is in early Cretaceous clastics of the Kuparuk River Formation, stratigraphically higher than at Prudhoe. The origin of the oil is believed to be predominantly from the Jurassic Kingak formation with migration occurring along the basal Cretaceous unconformity. The dominant trapping mechanism is stratigraphic pinch-out and truncation of the reservoir at an intraformational unconformity along the southern and western flanks of a southeast plunging antiform. Structural dip closure exists along the northern and eastern flanks with a tilted oil-water contact at ca. 6675 ft subsea. The reservoir sandstones occur within cleaning and coarsening-upward sequences which are interpreted as shallow-marine and sublittoral in origin.

Hardwick, P.; Carman, G.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 2000  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 2000 This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the top 100 oil and gas

25

Innovative technologies for managing oil field waste.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, the oil industry generates millions of barrels of wastes that need to be properly managed. For many years, most oil field wastes were disposed of at a significant cost. However, over the past decade, the industry has developed many processes and technologies to minimize the generation of wastes and to more safely and economically dispose of the waste that is generated. Many companies follow a three-tiered waste management approach. First, companies try to minimize waste generation when possible. Next, they try to find ways to reuse or recycle the wastes that are generated. Finally, the wastes that cannot be reused or recycled must be disposed of. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) has evaluated the feasibility of various oil field waste management technologies for the U.S. Department of Energy. This paper describes four of the technologies Argonne has reviewed. In the area of waste minimization, the industry has developed synthetic-based drilling muds (SBMs) that have the desired drilling properties of oil-based muds without the accompanying adverse environmental impacts. Use of SBMs avoids significant air pollution from work boats hauling offshore cuttings to shore for disposal and provides more efficient drilling than can be achieved with water-based muds. Downhole oil/water separators have been developed to separate produced water from oil at the bottom of wells. The produced water is directly injected to an underground formation without ever being lifted to the surface, thereby avoiding potential for groundwater or soil contamination. In the area of reuse/recycle, Argonne has worked with Southeastern Louisiana University and industry to develop a process to use treated drill cuttings to restore wetlands in coastal Louisiana. Finally, in an example of treatment and disposal, Argonne has conducted a series of four baseline studies to characterize the use of salt caverns for safe and economic disposal of oil field wastes.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Assessment

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. ? Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. ? The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

Walters, Mark A.

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Sheep Valley Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheep Valley Ranch Sheep Valley Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Sheep Valley Ranch Facility Sheep Valley Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Two Dot Wind LLC Location Wheatland MT Coordinates 46.45°, -110.07° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.45,"lon":-110.07,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Spinning Spur Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spur Wind Ranch Spur Wind Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Spinning Spur Wind Ranch Facility Spinning Spur Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner enXco Developer Cielo Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Vega TX Coordinates 35.28707069°, -102.3208666° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.28707069,"lon":-102.3208666,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

Caprock Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Caprock Wind Ranch Facility Caprock Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Quay County NM Coordinates 35.043532°, -103.583422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.043532,"lon":-103.583422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Lubbock Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Lubbock Wind Ranch Facility Lubbock Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Cielo Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Lubbock TX Coordinates 33.56932604°, -101.7623663° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.56932604,"lon":-101.7623663,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fly Ranch Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.86666667,"lon":-119.3483333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.761,"lon":-117.492,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.316,"lon":-116.433,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Preface The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2006 is the twenty-fifth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It ...

35

Development of Sirikit oil field, Thailand  

SciTech Connect

The Sirikit oil field, Thailand's first significant oil find, was discovered in late 1981 by Thai Shell Exploration and Production Company, Ltd., with its second exploration well. After deciding to develop the field (named after Thailand's queen), Thai Shell took only 1 year to design and install the production station, and organize an unconventional evacuation system (road tanker and railway) before oil came on stream in January 1983. A series of facility upgradings kept pace with the production buildup, to a plateau of about 21,000 b/d. The crude oil is waxy (pour point = about 35/sup 0/C), but it is light (40/sup 0/ API) and has an attractive refinery yield. Associated gas is sold to the nearby (specially installed) electricity generating station. Gas compression was commissioned in 1985 to increase utilization of gas, which previously was flared. The agricultural environment dictated the need for cluster drilling of deviated wells, as well as highlighting the importance of good relationships with the local population and authorities. Safety and security are of particular interest. The field is geologically complex, being very faulted in a lacustrine environment and extremely stratified and heterogeneous in reservoir quality. One of two major reservoirs has a gas cap. After some early surprises in delineating the field, a three-dimensional seismic survey was conducted, which better defined the structure and the reserve potential. Nevertheless, parallel appraisal and development continues on a careful step-by-step approach, using the latest production and pressure data to refine the reservoir geologic model. In November 1985, the Petroleum Authority of Thailand became a minority partner, with Shell remaining as operator.

Brooks, J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998 Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1998 is an addendum to the 1997 edition of the EIA publication Oil and Gas Field Code Master List, an annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. These updates represent the addition of new fields to the list and changes to the records of previously listed fields, including deletions. The current publication is based on field information collected through October 1998.

Robert F. King

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1999 Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1999 is an addendum to the 1998 edition of the EIA publication Oil and Gas Field Code Master List, an annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. These updates represent the addition of new fields to the list and changes to the records of previously listed fields, including deletions. The current publication is based on field information collected through November 1999.

Robert F. King

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Geology of the Tambaredjo oil field, Suriname  

SciTech Connect

After the initial discovery in the sixties of oil below the coastal plain of Suriname (S. America), the State Oil Company of Suriname started production of the unique Tambaredjo field in 1982. The heavy, biodegraded oil (14-16[degrees] API) is produced under compaction drive, from the Paleocene T-sand (average thickness 5 m) at a depth of about 300 m. More than 300 wells have been drilled in an area of about 200 km[sup 2]. High resolution seismics makes it possible to correlate units down to 2 m thick. This dense network of bore holes is very suitable for geological correlations and 3D modeling. The T-sand reservoir consists of angular, medium to coarse grained unconsolidated sands with interfingering clays and lignites. The sands are deposited on a well cemented erosional Cretaceous basement. The reservoir is sealed by locally continuous clays. The oil is trapped in structural highs created by syn-sedimentary rejuvenated basement faults. The depositional environment of the T-sand ranges from fluviatile to deltaic. Frequent avulsion and synsedimentary faulting created a highly compartmented reservoir. Although interconnectedness of the sand bodies is high, clay smears and silting out of the edges confine reservoir compartments. The best genetic sand units such as channel fills or mouth bar deposits hardly correlate over more than a few hundred meters. The Tambaredjo oil field offers an unique opportunity to study the detailed sedimentology and petroleum geology of a fluvio-deltaic transitional realm on the passive margin along the Guiana coast.

Dronkert, H. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Wong, T.E. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Haarlem (Netherlands))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Front Matter. Cover Page, Preface, Contents, Chapters, Maps and the Glossary: PDF.. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. Field code information for all ...

40

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995 is the fourteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gasfields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1995. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1996 is the fifteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gasfields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1996. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Oil and gas field code master list, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains data collected through October 1993 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service.

Not Available

1993-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Environmental Assessment : Muddy Ranch Point of Delivery.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) proposed action is to provide a new pint-of-delivery while Wasco Electric Cooperative (WEC, a preference customer of BPA) will build a new substation and transmission tapline for this new point-of-delivery as connected actions. If the action is not taken, system reliability in the area will be threatened in the near future. The load of the Clarno Basin, served by the Antelope substation, exclusive of the Muddy Ranch Development, is approximately 1000 kW. The connected load on the Muddy Ranch at present is approximately 2000 kW and recently has been growing at the rate of 400 kW per month. The Clarno load and the Muddy Ranch load, when totaled, is approximately 3000 kW at the present time. In an effort to maintain voltage on the system, WEC has installed three banks of regulators between Antelope and the Muddy Ranch, each of which boosts the voltage approximately 10%. Electrical service has been kept within usable standards through operation of these regulators and by voluntary curtailment of major uses on portions of the Muddy Ranch Development. However, the present condition does not meet normal standards expected under th American National Standards Institute for electrical service. With the load growth on the Muddy Ranch, and continued growth in electrical demand from the ranchers in the Clarno area, an extremely unstable operating condition is projected as early as the winter of 1982-1983. At that time, the existing facilities could be heavily overtaxed and damage could be caused to electrical pumps and other electrical applicances. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Sea Oil Field Satellite Monitoring: An Opera3onal View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Kashagan Field Kashagan Field is an oil field located in Kazakhstan of the larger discoveries in that decade, it is es:mated that the Kashagan billion barrels (2.5?109 m3) of oil. 9 M Migliaccio #12;Kashagan Field Isola

Kuligowski, Bob

45

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009 Introduction This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's summary of U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved...

46

Hueco Mountain Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hueco Mountain Wind Ranch Hueco Mountain Wind Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hueco Mountain Wind Ranch Facility Hueco Mountain Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner El Paso Electric Co Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser El Paso Electric Co Location El Paso County TX Coordinates 31.6966°, -106.295° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.6966,"lon":-106.295,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the seventeenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998 is the eighteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through October 1998. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000 is the nineteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2000. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001 is the twenty second annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2002. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001 is the twentieth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2001. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2001 is the twenty first annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States. It is updated with field information collected through November 2002. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry.

Robert F. King

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1996 Updates  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1996 represents a departure from past Energy Information Administration (EIA) practice. This publication does not provide a list of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States as did the fourteen prior annual volumes of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It provides updates to the Field Code Master File that were made subsequent to the publication of Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995, based on information collected through October 1996. These updates represent the addition of new fields to the list and changes to the records of previously listed fields, including deletions. This publication is therefore a supplement to theOil and Gas Field Code Master List 1995, which its recipients were requested to retain.

Robert F. King

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Oil-Grade Alloy 718 in Oil Field Drilling Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the performance of oil-grade alloy 718 for applications in bottom hole ... Additive Manufacturing for Superalloys - Producibility and Cost.

55

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the largest or top 100 ...

56

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.

Not Available

1991-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Method of determining interwell oil field fluid saturation distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining the oil and brine saturation distribution in an oil field by taking electrical current and potential measurements among a plurality of open-hole wells geometrically distributed throughout the oil field. Poisson's equation is utilized to develop fluid saturation distributions from the electrical current and potential measurement. Both signal generating equipment and chemical means are used to develop current flow among the several open-hole wells.

Donaldson, Erle C. (Bartlesville, OK); Sutterfield, F. Dexter (Bartlesville, OK)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Economic viability of rangeland based ranching enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ranch management's ability to cope with climate variability, especially drought, critically impacts the economic viability of rangeland based ranching enterprise alternatives. In rangeland ecosystems, drought is not uncommon and has become expected, but ranchers' management practices tend to be reactive to weather conditions rather than proactive. With increased availability and technological advancements of seasonal forecasts, this study investigates the potential for ranchers to increase the profitability of their enterprises by becoming more proactive in their management practices. An annual economic model is used to analyze the effects of using seasonal climate forecasts in cattle ranching enterprises in Sutton County, Texas. Unique to this study, is the use of stocking rate decision rules elicited from a focus group of ranchers, rather than decision rules derived from a modeling exercise. Decision rules from a previous focus group are used as the prior information scenario. A reconvened focus group was presented forecasts of forage deviations from a long-term average. Their input provided decision rules for the "with forecast" information scenario. Using an economic model and PHYGROW, a forage simulation model, the "with" and "without" forecast information scenarios are compared to evaluate the use of climate forecasts on net returns of a ranching enterprise. Results were then presented to the panel for their response. The focus group responded positively to participating in the study and to the study results. Results suggest in a market in which stocker cows are bought or sold at the same price, overall expected net returns from using seasonal climate forecasts are negative. A decrease in net returns does not necessarily imply the value of climate forecasts are negative. The single year model fails to capture improved long-term ecological conditions associated with the use of climate forecasts. If cattle prices differ for buying and selling cows (by 7-43% lower selling price depending on the scenario), the seasonal climate forecasts show a positive value. Generally, variability in expected net returns increases with the use of seasonal climate forecasts.

Jochec, Kristi Gayle

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Oil and Gas Field Code Master List With Data for 2012 | Release Date: May 8, 2013 | Next Release Date: April 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Comprehensive listing of U.S. oil and gas field names. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2012 Definition of a Field Afield is defined as "an area consisting of a single reservoir ormultiple reservoirs all grouped on, or related to, the same individual geological structural feature and/or stratigraphic condition. There may be two or more reservoirs in a field which are separated vertically by intervening impervious strata, or laterally by local geologic barriers, or by both." More › About the Field Code Master List Related Links

60

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Caldwell Ranch Exploration and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration...

62

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada...

63

An EOR Application @ Liaohe Oil Field in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AN EOR APPLICATION @ LIAOHE OIL AN EOR APPLICATION @ LIAOHE OIL FIELD IN CHINA Tests of Pumping Boiler Flue Gas into Oil Wells Chenglin Zhu (huafugs@sohu.com 011-86-427-7809254 ) Huafu Electrical Appliance Co., Ltd. Xing long Tai District City of Pan Jing, Lioning Province, PRC 124013 Zhang, Fengshan ( huafugs@sohu.com 011-86-427-7809254 ) Liaohe Petroleum Exploration Bureau Xing Long Tai District City of Pan Jing, Lioning Province, PRC 124013

64

Oil and Gas field code master list 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Horizontal well taps bypassed Dundee oil in Crystal field, Mich.  

SciTech Connect

The Dundee formation (Middle Devonian) has yielded more oil than any other producing interval in Michigan. The Dundee trend, which forms an east-west band across the central Michigan basin, consists of 137 fields which together have yielded more than 350 million bbl of oil. The first commercial Dundee production was established at Mt. Pleasant field in 1928, and most Dundee fields were discovered and brought on production during the 1930s--40s. Wells in many of the fields had very high initial production (IP) rates. IPs in excess of 1,000 b/d of oil were common, with values as high as 9,000 b/d reported. These high flow rates, combined with a thin (10--30 ft) oil column and a strong water drive, resulted in water coning that left significant volumes of oil unrecovered in some fields. One such field, Crystal field in Montcalm County, is the focus of a US Department of energy (DOE) Class 2 Reservoir Demonstration Project designed to demonstrate that horizontal drilling can recover significant volumes of this bypassed oil. The paper describes the demonstration project, regional setting, and the history of the Crystal field.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Evaluation of real options in an oil field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject of this paper is the application of real options models for valuing an offshore oil property in the North of Africa. Three different approaches were used - one based on the traditional Black-Scholes model, the Marketed Asset Disclaimer (MAD) ... Keywords: capital budgeting, decision analysis, investment appraisal, oil fields, real options

Joo Oliveira Soares; Diogo Baltazar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A reservoir management study of a mature oil field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An integrated geological, petrophysical and reservoir engineering review was performed for a mature, producing oil field. Like many older fields, important data are missing or were not collected. The techniques used in this thesis may be applied to other mature oil fields to make sound engineering and business decisions. I interpreted the geological structure and stratigaphy of the salt dome oil field. Structure, isopach and cross-sectional maps were constructed. Depositional environments of the producing horizons were identified. Potential for additional reserves was assessed. Well logs, core data, water resistivity and produced fluids data were analyzed. Average values of porosity, permeability, and oil saturation were determined for the field. Potential reserves behind casing were identified. Based on the revised geological and petrophysical data, the original oil in place was estimated from volumetrics to be 42.3 MMSTB. Cumulative oil production was determined for the first time since 1963. The field, individual reservoir, and individual well production performances were reviewed. Initial production histories of more than 220 wells were documented. I collected wellhead fluid samples and analyzed oil gravity and viscosity. Other fluid properties were estimated from correlations. Pressure data from the field was collated and analyzed. Primary production mechanisms and aquifer influx were estimated by reviewing early producing history and performing material balance calculations. Water influx was calculated. The performances of analogous salt dome reservoirs were compared to that of the field. All past well stimulations were reviewed and suggestions made for better implementation. Water injection in the field was reviewed. Problems of implementation and reservoir response were identified. The best areas in the field for waterflooding were identified and analyzed with an analytical model. Based on existing development, the oil ultimate recovery is estimated to be 14.4 MMSTB or 34.0 % of original oil in place. To determine whether oil recovery can be improved, incremental, after tax economic analysis was applied to several schemes. Infill drilling, hydraulic fracturing and waterflooding were analyzed. A course of action to maximize economic return is outlined for the field. Hydraulic fracturing appears to be the most viable technique to improve oil production from the field.

Peruzzi, Tave

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Federal Offshore PADD 5 Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Offshore PADD 5 Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 874: 800: 883: 984: 1,586: 1,748 ...

69

U.S. Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1850's: 2: 1860's: 500: 2,114 ...

70

California Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 30,297: 27,455: 30,515: 29,540: 31,203: 30,366 ...

71

California Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 365,370: 373,176 ...

72

North Dakota Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 45,424: 47,271 ...

73

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: ...

74

Ohio Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 13,551: 14,571: 14,971 ...

75

Oklahoma Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 12,139: 12,268: 13,290: 11,905: 13,000: 12,891 ...

76

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 932,350: 908,217: 882,911 ...

77

Oil and Gas Field Code Index - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

000174 LA Fox Lake 000175 MT Gilford North 000210 NM Springs 000213 NM Dog Town Draw ... Energy Information Administration/Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1998 343

78

Michigan Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 32,665: 31,462: 31,736 ...

79

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

View History: Monthly ... Download Data (XLS File) Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981 ...

80

California Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 977: 981: 984: 985: 1,007: 1,012 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alaska Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1970's: 198: 193: 191 ...

82

Montana Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 78: 84: 84: 83: 85: 86: 84: 85: 84: 88 ...

83

Colorado Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 81: 81: 82: 83: 81: 82: 81: 80: 82: 89 ...

84

Colorado Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 30,303: 30,545: 29,050 ...

85

South Dakota Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's: 973: 1,158: 1,172 ...

86

New Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 6,286: 5,593: 6,105: 5,902: ...

87

Cuttings Analysis At Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) Exploration Activity Details Location Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date 1976 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the geologic environment of the geothermal area Notes The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cuttings_Analysis_At_Bacca_Ranch_Geothermal_Area_(1976)&oldid=473907"

88

Del Ranch (Hoch) Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch (Hoch) Geothermal Facility Ranch (Hoch) Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Del Ranch (Hoch) Geothermal Facility General Information Name Del Ranch (Hoch) Geothermal Facility Facility Del Ranch (Hoch) Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 7029 Gentry Road Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.164175446318°, -115.61438798904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.164175446318,"lon":-115.61438798904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

89

EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, 9: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration and USDA Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, are jointly preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to construct and operate a coho salmon acclimation pond at Eightmile Ranch, which is owned and operated by the Forest Service. BPA's Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0425) addressed the overall coho restoration program, with 11 acclimation sites. Some of these sites proved infeasible, so the Yakama Nation is proposing a new site at Eightmile Ranch. Young coho would be held

90

Abandoned oil fields in Alaska, California, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication lists approximately 250 abandoned oil fields in Alaska, California, Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, Utah and Wyoming that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil before abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery data of field; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Formation of seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marof seep bubble plumes in the Coal Oil Point seep field Irameasurement system in the Coal Oil Point seep field in the

Leifer, Ira; Culling, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geologic control of natural marine hydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar Lett (2010) 30:331338 Fig. 3 Coal Oil Point seep field,hydrocarbon seeps near Coal Oil Point, California. Marhydrocarbon seep emissions, Coal Oil Point seep field,

Leifer, Ira; Kamerling, Marc J.; Luyendyk, Bruce P.; Wilson, Douglas S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Largest US oil and gas fields, August 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Largest US Oil and Gas Fields is a technical report and part of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) series presenting distributions of US crude oil and natural gas resources, developed using field-level data collected by EIA`s annual survey of oil and gas proved reserves. The series` objective is to provide useful information beyond that routinely presented in the EIA annual report on crude oil and natural gas reserves. These special reports also will provide oil and gas resource analysts with a fuller understanding of the nature of US crude oil and natural gas occurrence, both at the macro level and with respect to the specific subjects addressed. The series` approach is to integrate EIA`s crude oil and natural gas survey data with related data obtained from other authoritative sources, and then to present illustrations and analyses of interest to a broad spectrum of energy information users ranging from the general public to oil and gas industry personnel.

Not Available

1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Oil and gas field code master list 1994  

SciTech Connect

This is the thirteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1994 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. The master field name spellings and codes are to be used by respondents when filing the following Department of Energy (DOE) forms: Form EIA-23, {open_quotes}Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves,{close_quotes} filed by oil and gas well operators (field codes are required from larger operators only); Forms FERC 8 and EIA-191, {open_quotes}Underground Gas Storage Report,{close_quotes} filed by natural gas producers and distributors who operate underground natural gas storage facilities. Other Federal and State government agencies, as well as industry, use the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List as the standard for field identification. A machine-readable version of the Oil and Gas Field Code Master List is available from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161, (703) 487-4650. In order for the Master List to be useful, it must be accurate and remain current. To accomplish this, EIA constantly reviews and revises this list. The EIA welcomes all comments, corrections, and additions to the Master List. All such information should be given to the EIA Field Code Coordinator at (214) 953-1858. EIA gratefully acknowledges the assistance provides by numerous State organizations and trade associations in verifying the existence of fields and their official nomenclature.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Oil and gas field code master list 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Field development options for a waterflooded heavy-oil reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battrum Unit 4 is a moderately heavy-oil reservoir in Saskatchewan producing under waterflood from a thin sand. This paper describes a history match of previous field behavior and systematically analyzes through the use of numerical simulation the potential benefits to production of further waterflooding (with and without infill drilling), steamflooding, and horizontal drilling. It is found that the remaining oil recovery potential of a steamflood with horizontal well is significantly higher than that of any of the waterflood options.

Kasraie, M. (Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Sammon, P.H. (Computer Modelling Group, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Jespersen, P.J. (Sceptre Resources Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hudson Ranch Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Hudson Ranch Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 33.333055555556°, -115.83416666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.333055555556,"lon":-115.83416666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

99

Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 1999 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields for 1999 This appendix presents estimates of the proved reserves and production of the top 100 oil and gas

100

U.S. Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual : Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) ... Crude Oil Supply and Disposition;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Golden Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Golden Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch Facility Golden Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Developer Cielo Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Wildarado TX Coordinates 35.22770741°, -102.2323751° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.22770741,"lon":-102.2323751,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

102

High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant Facility High Plains Ranch Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Sun Power Location Carizzo Plain, California Coordinates 35.1913858°, -119.7260983° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1913858,"lon":-119.7260983,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

Geothermometry At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The brine from the drill holes, hot springs, seepages, and irrigation wells was sampled, as well as water from two nearby creeks, (total of 13 samples) and sent for analysis to Thermochem Inc. For sample locations refer to Figure 35; the geochemical data are presented in Appendix C. Geochemical results indicate the presence of two distinct waters in this group of samples (Tom Powell of Thermochem Inc., personal communication, 2005).

104

Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Boise County, Idaho Coordinates 43.9604787°, -115.8563106° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

105

AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant Facility AV Solar Ranch I Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer NextLight Renewable Power Location Antelope Valley, California Coordinates 38.70833°, -121.32889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.70833,"lon":-121.32889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

106

Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Warner Springs Ranch Resort Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location San Diego, California Coordinates 32.7153292°, -117.1572551° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

107

Taking stock of renewables: NREL teaches farm and ranch appliations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NREL workshop leaders find a receptive audience for renewable energy technologies among farmers and ranchers. As an exhibitor/participant in Denver`s National Western Stock Show, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of Golden, Colorado sponsored an educational workshop to demonstrate applications of solar and wind energy on the farm and ranch, offering a very non-traditional energy approach to people who pride themselves in tradition. This article describes solar and wind energy applications to farms and ranches.

Marsh, M.G. [NREL, Golden, CO (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oil field rejuvenation work starts at 14 project sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that the U.S. Department of Energy and oil and gas companies have released more information about a joint effort to rejuvenate aging U.S. oil fields in danger of abandonment. Work is starting on 14 demonstration projects that could recover 21 million bbl of oil from the fluvial dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs in which they are conducted. Wider application of the same techniques, if they are successful, could results in addition of 6.3 billion bbl of reserves, nearly 25% of U.S. crude oil reserves. A multidisciplinary team approach is to be used, with as many as 11 operators, service companies, universities, or state agencies participating in each project. All of the projects will culminate in extensive technology transfer activities. Here are descriptions of the projects gleaned from public abstracts provided by the DOE contractors.

Petzet, G.A. (Oil and Gas Journal (US))

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

109

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives are listed and technical progress is summarized for contracts for field projects and supporting research on: chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, extraction technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version The VBA code provided at the bottom of this document is an updated version (from ArcGIS 9.0 to ArcGIS 9.2) of the polygon smoothing algorithm described below. A bug that occurred when multiple wells had the same location was also fixed. SMOOTH OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINE POLYGONS MADE FROM BUFFERED WELLS Why smooth buffered field outlines? See the issues in the figure below: [pic] The smoothing application provided as VBA code below does the following: Adds area to the concave portions; doesn't add area to convex portions to maintain buffer spacing Fills in non-field "islands" smaller than buffer size Joins separate polygon rings with a "bridge" if sufficiently close Minimizes increase in total field area Methodology: creates trapezoids between neighboring wells within an oil/gas

111

Utah Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 2,150: 2,170: 2,150: 2,160: 2,150: 2,160: 2,150 ...

112

Ohio Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 1,148: 1,036: 1,148: 1,111: 1,148: 1,111: 1,148 ...

113

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 2,600: 2,593: 2,604: 2,578: 2,577: 2,568 ...

114

U.S. Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1920: 34,008: 33,193: 36,171: 34,945: 36,622: 36,663 ...

115

Michigan Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 2,827: 2,493: 2,807: 2,720: 2,763: 2,682: 2,779 ...

116

North Dakota Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 3,787: 3,493: 3,790: 3,805: 3,974: 3,839 ...

117

Colorado Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 2,506: 2,255: 2,527: 2,478: 2,498: 2,445: 2,523 ...

118

Oil and gas field code master list, 1983. [Glossary included  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the United States with field information collected through November 1983. The purpose of the publication is to provide codes for easy identification of domestic fields. A standardization of these field codes will foster consistency in field identification by government and industry. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on the survey forms and reports regarding field-specific data for the Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. A glossary of the terms is provided to assist the readers in more fully understanding the information in this Field Code Master List. 8 figures, 4 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Numerical Simulation of Flow Field in Diesel Centrifugal Gas-Oil Separator Basing on CFD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aiming at the low efficiency problem of the traditional gas-oil separator, this paper put forward a centrifugal gas-oil separator. In order to identify out the interior fluid field character of centrifugal gas-oil separator, RANS equation, RNG k-e model ... Keywords: Diesel, Centrifugal Gas-oil Separator, Flow Field, Separation Efficiency

Zhiguo Zhao

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Comparison of Permian basin giant oil fields with giant oil fields of other U. S. productive areas  

SciTech Connect

Covering over 40 million ac, the Permian basin is the fourth largest of the 28 productive areas containing giant fields. The 56 giant fields in the basin compare with the total of 264 giant oil fields in 27 other productive areas. Cumulative production figures of 18 billion bbl from the giant fields in the Permian basin are the largest cumulative production figures from giant fields in any of the productive areas. An estimated 1.9 billion bbl of remaining reserves in giant fields rank the basin third among these areas and the 19.9 billion bbl total reserves in giant fields in the basin are the largest total reserves in giant fields in any of the productive areas. The 1990 production figures from giant fields place the basin second in production among areas with giant fields. However, converting these figures to by-basin averages for the giant fields places the Permian basin 12th in field size among the areas with giant fields. Based on average reserves per well, the basin ranks 18th. Average 1990 production per giant field place the basin seventh and the average 1990 production per well in giant fields place the Permian basin 14th among the areas with giant fields.

Haeberle, F.R. (Consultant Geologist, Dallas, TX (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE tallies Class III oil recovery field projects  

SciTech Connect

Here are details from midterm proposals submitted as part of the US Department of Energy's Class 3 oil recovery field demonstration candidate projects. All of the proposals emphasize dissemination of project details so that the results, if successful, can be applied widely in similar reservoirs. Project results will also be fed into a national petroleum technology transfer network. The proposals include: Gulf of Mexico, Gulf coast, offshore California, a California thermal, immiscible CO[sub 2], produced/potable water, microbial EOR, California diatomite, West Texas Spraberry field, and other Permian Basin fields.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wake deficit measurements on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is ninth in a series of documents presenting the findings of field test under DOE's Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) with the wind industry. This report provides results of a project conducted by Altamont Energy Corp. (AEC) to measure wake deficits on the Jess and Sousa Ranches in Altamont Pass, CA. This research enhances and complements other DOE-funded projects to refine estimates of wind turbine array effects. This project will help explain turbine performance variability caused by wake effects. 4 refs., 28 figs., 106 tabs.

Nierenburg, R. (Altamont Energy Corp., San Rafael, CA (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Crosshole EM for oil field characterization and EOR monitoring: Field examples from Lost Hills, California  

SciTech Connect

A steamflood recently initiated by Mobil Development and Production U.S. at the Lost Hills No 3 oil field in California is notable for its shallow depth and the application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques to monitor the subsurface steam flow. Steam was injected into three stacked eastward-dipping unconsolidated oil sands at depths from 60 to 120 m; the plume is expected to develop as an ellipsoid aligned with the regional northwest-southeast strike. Because of the shallow depth of the sands and the high viscosity of the heavy oil, it is important to track the steam in the unconsolidated sediments for both economic and safety reasons. Crosshole and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic imaging were applied for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. The crosshole EM data were collected to map the interwell distribution of the high-resistivity oil sands and to track the injected steam and hot water. Measurements were made in two fiberglass-cased observation wells straddling the steam injector on a northeast-southwest profile. Field data were collected before the steam drive, to map the distribution of the oil sands, and then 6 and 10 months after steam was injected, to monitor the expansion of the steam chest. Resistivity images derived from the collected data clearly delineated the distribution and dipping structure of the target oil sands. Difference images from data collected before and during steamflooding indicate that the steam chest has developed only in the middle and lower oil sands, and it has preferentially migrated westward in the middle oil sand and eastward in the deeper sand. Surface-to-borehole field data sets at Lost Hills were responsive to the large-scale subsurface structure but insufficiently sensitive to model steam chest development in the middle and lower oil sands. As the steam chest develops further, these data will be of more use for process monitoring.

Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Wratcher, M.; Lambert, I.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Tseng H.W.

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch October 31, 2013 - 4:14pm Addthis The California Valley Solar Ranch produces clean, renewable electricity at the scale of traditional power plants. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. The California Valley Solar Ranch produces clean, renewable electricity at the scale of traditional power plants. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. Aerial shot of the California Valley Solar Ranch in San Luis Obispo County, California. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. Aerial shot of the California Valley Solar Ranch in San Luis Obispo County, California. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. According to NRG Energy, the California Solar Valley Ranch project has created thousands of jobs and put an estimated $315 million into the local economy. | Photo courtesy of SunPower.

125

A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: oil or gas field exploration, decision making under uncertainty, multistage stochastic be addressed. E-mail: grossmann@cmu.edu #12;2 1. Introduction Oil and gas field exploration and production1 A Multistage Stochastic Programming Approach for the Planning of Offshore Oil or Gas Field

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

126

Oliktok Dock allows quick offloading of oil field modules  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of the design and construction of the Oliktok Dock, which serves the Kuparuk River oil fields of the Alaskan North Slope, was presented. The dockhead construction required 18,000 linear ft of HZ 800-16 Arbed sheetpile walls which extended from an elevation of -40 to +10 ft. The project began in mid-summer and was completed in November and cost $5 million.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Crosshole EM for oil field characterization and EOR monitoring: Field examples  

SciTech Connect

Crosshole and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic (EM) imaging is applied to reservoir characterization and steam flood monitoring in a central California oil field. Steam was injected into three stacked, eastward-dipping, unconsolidated oil sands within the upper 200 in. The steam plume is expected to develop as an ellipse aligned with the regional northwest-southeast strike. EM measurements were made from two flberglass-cased observation wells straddling the steam injector on a northeast-southwest profile. Field data were collected before the initiation of a steam drive to map the distribution of the oil sands and then six months after the steam was injected to monitor the progress of the steam chest. Resisitivity images derived from the EM data collected before steam injection clearly delineate the distribution and dipping structure on the target oil sands. Difference images from data collected before and after steam flooding indicate that the steam chest has developed only in the deeper oil sands, and it has preferentially migrated eastward. Surface-to-borehole measurements were useful in mapping the distribution of the major oil sands, but they were insensitive to resisitivity changes in the early stages of the steam flood.

Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Torres-Verdin, C. [Schlumberger-Doll Research Center, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Lee, Ki Ha [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tseng, Hung-Wen [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Oil gravity distribution in the diatomite at South Belridge Field, Kern County, CA: Implications for oil sourcing and migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding oil gravity distribution in the Belridge Diatomite has led to economic infill development and specific enhanced recovery methods for targeted oil properties. To date more than 100 wells have provided samples used to determining vertical and areal distribution of oil gravity in the field. Detailed geochemical analyses were also conducted on many of the oil samples to establish different oil types, relative maturities, and to identify transformed oils. The geochemical analysis also helped identify source rock expulsion temperatures and depositional environments. The data suggests that the Belridge diatomite has been charged by a single hydrocarbon source rock type and was generated over a relatively wide range of temperatures. Map and statistical data support two distinct oil segregation processes occurring post expulsion. Normal gravity segregation within depositional cycles of diatomite have caused lightest oils to migrate to the crests of individual cycle structures. Some data suggests a loss of the light end oils in the uppermost cycles to the Tulare Formation above, or through early biodegradation. Structural rotation post early oil expulsion has also left older, heavier oils concentrated on the east flank of the structure. With the addition of other samples from the south central San Joaquin area, we have been able to tie the Belridge diatomite hydrocarbon charge into a regional framework. We have also enhanced our ability to predict oil gravity and well primary recovery by unraveling some key components of the diatomite oil source and migration history.

Hill, D.W.; Sande, J.J. [Shell Western E& P Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States); Doe, P.H. [Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Optimal Planning of Reactive Power Compensators for Oil Field Distribution Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristic behavior of the loads of oil pumps is analyzed. An approach for low-voltage side reactive power compensators of oil field distribution networks is put forward. Based on the supplied loads of transformers, the index of maximum reduction ... Keywords: Genetic Algorithm, distribution network, oil field, reactive power compensation

Wu Xiaomeng; Yan Suli

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Brazos Wind Ranch Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Ranch Wind Farm Wind Ranch Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazos Wind Ranch Wind Farm Facility Brazos Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy/Mitsui Developer Cielo Wind Power/Orion Energy Energy Purchaser Green Mountain Power/ TXU Location Near Fluvanna TX Coordinates 32.94914°, -101.144357° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.94914,"lon":-101.144357,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

King Mountain Wind Ranch I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch I Ranch I Jump to: navigation, search Name King Mountain Wind Ranch I Facility King Mountain Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Cielo Wind Power/Renewable Energy Systems Energy Purchaser Texas-New Mexico Power- Reliant Energy- Austin Energy Location Upton County TX Coordinates 31.280873°, -102.195861° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.280873,"lon":-102.195861,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

133

Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at White Deer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estacado Wind Ranch at White Deer Estacado Wind Ranch at White Deer Jump to: navigation, search Name Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at White Deer Facility Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at White Deer Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location White Deer TX Coordinates 35.4613°, -101.238° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4613,"lon":-101.238,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

134

Long life seen for giant Wilmington oil field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The outlook for the offshore portion of giant Wilmington field is good, says the president of ARCO Long Beach Co., which since 1992 has played a key role in the field`s future. With 8 billion bbl of oil originally in place, wilmington field is the third largest in the US, topped by Alaska`s Prudhoe Bay field and East Texas field. As provided by the optimized Waterflood Agreement, the field contractor`s agreement has been extended. Under its terms, ARCO, the City of Long Beach, and the state of California agreed to a forecast of base profits, i.e., what would have happened without an expanded waterflood. ARCO agreed to provide access to technology needed to design an optimized waterflood and committed to support an investment of $100 million over and above what would have been spent without the program. In exchange, the state agreed to share half of any incremental profits with ARCO. The paper discusses how the agreement has worked, improvements in infrastructure, and safety.

NONE

1996-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Correlating field and laboratory data for crude oil fouling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil fouling in a laboratory fouling unit was investigated. The study focused on the preheat-train heat exchangers located just before the crude unit furnace and operating at temperatures in excess of 200 C. A fouling rate model developed using laboratory data from crude blends was used to predict the threshold conditions where negligible fouling was expected under refinery conditions. The results from the model were compared to actual data from a fouling unit located at a refinery. The article discusses factors that may explain the performance of the model and the observed discrepancies between fouling data obtained in the laboratory and the field.

Asomaning, S.; Panchal, C.B.; Liao, C.F.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

NETL: News Release - Leveling the Playing (Oil) Field For Small...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considerably more expensive than conventional methods, but is expected to reduce drilling costs, increase oil discovery rates, and improve the recovery of bypassed oil. Vecta...

137

Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a field study performed on the Mazari oil field located in Sind province, Pakistan. We used an integrated reservoir characterization technique to incorporate the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data to interpret historical reservoir performance, to assess and refine reservoir management activities, and to make plans for future reservoir developments. We used a modified approach to characterize within the mappable geological facies. Our approach is based on the Kozeny-Carmen equation and uses the concept of mean hydraulic radius. As part of our objective to characterize the reservoir, we tabulated reservoir characteristics for each hydraulic flow unit, and we presented estimates of in-place reserves. We evaluated reservoir performance potential using the production history, well tests and cased-hole well log surveys. Suggestions for reservoir management activities in conjunction with the evaluation of the reservoir performance are discussed in detail. Finally, we give recommendations for activities in reservoir development particularly infill drilling considerations and secondary recovery efforts.

Ashraf, Ejaz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Carbon Dioxide Enhanced Oil Recovery and Sequestration Projects --Wellington Field,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and seismic contractors TBN Dawson-Markwell Exploration Co. #12;20 MM bbls oil produced ~40 MM bbls oil and deeply buried Arbuckle Aquifer ­ Overlying Mississippian carbonates contain large oil and gas reservoirs freshwater aquifers, and very limited oil and gas production. ­ Published estimates of CO2 sequestration

Peterson, Blake R.

139

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2008 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pipelines Annual Report of Gas Supply, began ... length on DOE forms and by the field naming authority, usually the State oil and gas regulatory ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2007 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pipelines Annual Report of Gas Supply, began ... length on DOE forms and by the field naming authority, usually the State oil and gas regulatory ...

142

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Brief descriptions of research programs are included. (CBS)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF 2D/3D SEISMIC DATA OVER DHURNAL OIL FIELD, NORTHERN PAKISTAN.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The study area, Dhurnal oil field, is located 74 km southwest of Islamabad in the Potwar basin of Pakistan. Discovered in March 1984, the (more)

Afsar, Fatima

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

,"U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels)",1,"Annual",2011...

145

Preliminary Assessment for CAU 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site CAS No. TA-39-001-TAGR: Soil Contamination, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 485, Corrective Action Site TA-39-001-TAGR, the Cactus Spring Ranch Soil Contamination Area, is located approximately six miles southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the eastern mouth of Sleeping Column Canyon in the Cactus Range on the Tonopah Test Range. This site was used in conjunction with animal studies involving the biological effects of radionuclides (specifically plutonium) associated with Operation Roofer Coaster. The location had been used as a ranch by private citizens prior to government control of the area. According to historical records, Operation Roofer Coaster activities involved assessing the inhalation uptake of plutonium in animals from the nonnuclear detonation of nuclear weapons. Operation Roofer Coaster consisted of four nonnuclear destruction tests of a nuclear device. The four tests all took place during May and June 1963 and consisted of Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1, 11, and 111. Eighty-four dogs, 84 burros, and 136 sheep were used for the Double Tracks test, and ten sheep and ten dogs were used for Clean Slate 11. These animals were housed at Cactus Spring Ranch. Before detonation, all animals were placed in cages and transported to the field. After the shot, they were taken to the decontamination area where some may have been sacrificed immediately. All animals, including those sacrificed, were returned to Cactus Spring Ranch at this point to have autopsies performed or to await being sacrificed at a later date. A description of the Cactus Spring Ranch activities found in project files indicates the ranch was used solely for the purpose of the Roofer Coaster tests and bioaccumulation studies and was never used for any other project. No decontamination or cleanup had been conducted at Cactus Spring Ranch prior to the start of the project. When the project was complete, the pits at Cactus Spring Ranch were filled with soil, and trailers where dogs were housed and animal autopsies had been performed were removed. Additional pens and sheds were built to house and manage livestock involved with the Operation Roofer Coaster activities in 1963.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School;1 Introduction M. King Hubbert [5] used curve fitting to predict that the peak of oil produc- tion in the U.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been

Stark, Dudley

147

Understanding Sectoral Labor Market Dynamics: An Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas ...eld services industry to changes the dynamic response of wages and employment in the U.S. Oil and Gas Field Services (OGFS) industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using quarterly data from 1972 to 2002. The oil industry provides an important

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

148

Caprock Wind Ranch phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

phase II phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Caprock Wind Ranch phase II Facility Caprock Wind Ranch phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Quay County NM Coordinates 35.043532°, -103.583422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.043532,"lon":-103.583422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Hillsboro Ranches, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranches, Florida: Energy Resources Ranches, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.3218881°, -80.181578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.3218881,"lon":-80.181578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.426248°, -110.79844° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.426248,"lon":-110.79844,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

151

Cinco Ranch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ranch, Texas: Energy Resources Ranch, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.7388418°, -95.7580048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.7388418,"lon":-95.7580048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

152

Hyder Ranch Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hyder Ranch Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hyder Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Gila Bend & Yuma, Arizona Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

153

Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texico Texico Jump to: navigation, search Name Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico Facility Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Cielo Wind Power Developer Cielo Wind Power- RES Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Curry County NM Coordinates 34.6283°, -103.387° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6283,"lon":-103.387,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration and USDA Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, are jointly preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to construct and operate a coho salmon acclimation pond at Eightmile Ranch, which is owned and operated by the Forest Service. BPA's Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0425) addressed the overall coho restoration program, with 11 acclimation sites. Some of these sites proved infeasible, so the Yakama Nation is proposing a new site at Eightmile Ranch. Young coho would be held in the pond from March to May and then released into the Chewuch River approximately 10 miles above its confluence with the Methow River.

155

AV Solar Ranch AV Solar Ranch One Site One Site P A C I F I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

58 58 AV Solar Ranch AV Solar Ranch One Site One Site P A C I F I C O C E A N E d w a r d s A F B E d w a r d s A F B K e r n C o u n t y L o s A n g e l e s C o u n t y Ve n t u r a C o u n t y S a n B e r n a r d i n o C o u n t y S a n t a B a r b a r a C o u n t y S . L . O . Red Rock Red Rock Canyon Canyon State Rec Area State Rec Area P i t M St t P k T St t P k H e s p e r i H e s p e r i C a m a r i l l o C a m a r i l l o V i c t o r v i l l V i c t o r v i l l A r v i n A r v i n A g o u r a A g o u r a M o o r p a r k M o o r p a r k A d e l a n t o A d e l a n t o F i l l m o r e F i l l m o r e C a l a b a s a s C a l a b a s a s T e h a c h a p i T e h a c h a p i C a r p i n t e r i a C a r p i n t e r i a S a n t a S a n t a P a u l a P a u l a S i e r r a S i e r r a M a d r e M a d r e P o r t P o r t H u e n e m e H u e n e m e L a L a C a n a d a C a n a d a F l i n t r i d g e F l i n t r i d g e Piru Taft Somis Boron Lebec Keene Muscoy Devore Summit Saugus Gorman Mojave Atolia Cantil Lamont Edison El Rio Saticoy Garlock Montalvo Rosamond Monolith Maricopa Caliente Rosedale De Verdemont Crestline Helendale Oak View Wrightwood Littlerock Val Verde ummerland

156

Chemically bonded phosphate ceramic sealant formulations for oil field applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sealant for an oil or geothermal well capable of setting within about 3 to about 6 hours at temperatures less than about 250.degree. F. for shallow wells less than about 10,000 feet and deep wells greater than about 10,000 feet having MgO present in the range of from about 9.9 to about 14.5%, KH.sub.2PO.sub.4 present in the range of from about 29.7 to about 27.2%, class C fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 36.3%, class F fly ash present in the range of from about 19.8 to about 0%, boric acid or borax present in the range of from about 0.39 to about 1.45%, and water present in the range of from about 20.3 to about 21.86% by weight of the sealant.A method of sealing wells is disclosed as are compositions for very high temperature wells is disclosed as is a composition for treating oil field wastes.

Wagh, Arun S. (Naperville, IL); Jeong, Seung-Young (Taejon, KR); McDaniel, Richard (Crest Hill, IL)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Indexes of pumps for oil field pumping units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As reported previously, a series of oil field pumping units has been developed with power outputs of 125, 250, 500, and 1000 kW, designed for injecting working fluids in cementing operations in oil and gas wells, hydraulic fracturing of formations, washing out sand plugs, and other production operations. The units are designed for the use of three-plunger pumps with individual power outputs of 125 or 500 kW. In the 250- and 1000-kW units, two such pumps are used. The 1000-kW pumping unit serves mainly for deep-penetration hydraulic fracturing of formations, and also for fracturing deep formations. The hydraulic fracturing process does not require the use of units with two pumps; this has been demonstrated by experience, both here and in other countries. All units intended for use in hydraulic fracturing are built with a single pump, transmission, and drive. Pumping units for well cementing must have two pumps that will give a high delivery rate. At the start of the operation, a single pump can be used to feed water into the cement mixer, with the second pump used to transfer the cement slurry to the well. Then both pumps are connected to the slurry injection line. The operation of these pumps is described.

Ibragimov, E.S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Tax effects upon oil field development in Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Important reforms have been made to the oil sector tax code in Venezuela. Given its diversity of oil resources, there was a concern that some resources were not being exploited because of the structure of the tax code. ...

Manzano, Osmel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

About the EIA Oil and Gas Field Code Master List  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Colorado Department of Natural Resources, Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Florida Florida Geology Survey, Department of Environmental ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Microsoft Word - FONSI_CalValleySolarRanch_Final For Silver Sig_8-2-11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO HIGH PLAINS RANCH II, LLC FOR THE CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH PROJECT IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Loan Programs Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the California Valley Solar Ranch (CVSR) project, a 250-megawatt (MW) gross output commercial solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant project proposed by High Plains Ranch II, LLC (HPR II) in southeastern San Luis Obispo County, California. The CVSR Project would include the construction, operation, maintenance, and

162

Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8% of US oil and gas production, respectively. With increasing energy demand and current high oil and gas prices, integrated reservoir studies, secondary and tertiary recovery methods, and infill drilling are becoming more common as operators strive to increase recovery from stripper oil and gas fields. The primary objective of this research was to support optimized production of oil and gas from stripper well fields by evaluating one stripper gas field and one stripper oil field. For the stripper gas field, I integrated geologic and engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization model of the Second White Specks (SSPK) reservoir in Garden Plains field, Alberta, Canada. The objectives of this model were to provide insights to controls on gas production and to validate a simulation-based method of infill drilling assessment. SSPK was subdivided into Units A ? D using well-log facies. Units A and B are the main producing units. Unit A has better reservoir quality and lateral continuity than Unit B. Gas production is related primarily to porosity-netthickness product and permeability and secondarily to structural position, minor structural features, and initial reservoir pressure. For the stripper oil field, I evaluated the Green River formation in the Wells Draw area of Monument Butte field, Utah, to determine interwell connectivity and to assess optimal recovery strategies. A 3D geostatistical model was built, and geological realizations were ranked using production history matching with streamline simulation. Interwell connectivity was demonstrated for only major sands and it increases as well spacing decreases. Overall connectivity is low for the 22 reservoir zones in the study area. A water-flood-only strategy provides more oil recovery than a primary-then-waterflood strategy over the life of the field. For new development areas, water flooding or converting producers to injectors should start within 6 months of initial production. Infill drilling may effectively produce unswept oil and double oil recovery. CO2 injection is much more efficient than N2 and CH4 injection. Water-alternating-CO2 injection is superior to continuous CO2 injection in oil recovery. The results of this study can be used to optimize production from Garden Plains and Monument Butte fields. Moreover, these results should be applicable to similar stripper gas and oil field fields. Together, the two studies demonstrate the utility of integrated reservoir studies (from geology to engineering) for improving oil and gas recovery.

Wang, Jianwei

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

164

Application of oil-field well log interpretation techniques to the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An example is presented of the application of oil-field techniques to the Cerro Prieto Field, Mexico. The lithology in this field (sand-shale lithology) is relatively similar to oil-field systems. The study was undertaken as a part of the first series of case studies supported by the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program (GLIP) of the US Department of Energy. The suites of logs for individual wells were far from complete. This was partly because of adverse borehole conditions but mostly because of unavailability of high-temperature tools. The most complete set of logs was a combination of Dual Induction Laterolog, Compensated Formation Density Gamma Ray, Compensated Neutron Log, and Saraband. Temperature data about the wells were sketchy, and the logs had been run under pre-cooled mud condition. A system of interpretation consisting of a combination of graphic and numerical studies was used to study the logs. From graphical studies, evidence of hydrothermal alteration may be established from the trend analysis of SP (self potential) and ILD (deep induction log). Furthermore, the cross plot techniques using data from density and neutron logs may help in establishing compaction as well as rock density profile with depth. In the numerical method, R/sub wa/ values from three different resistivity logs were computed and brought into agreement. From this approach, values of formation temperature and mud filtrate resistivity effective at the time of logging were established.

Ershaghi, I.; Phillips, L.B.; Dougherty, E.L.; Handy, L.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NETL: News Release - DOE Project Revives Oil Production in Abandoned Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 , 2006 4 , 2006 DOE Project Revives Oil Production in Abandoned Fields on Osage Tribal Lands Novel Oil Recovery Technique Developed Under DOE's Native American Initiative WASHINGTON, DC - A technology developed with U.S. Department of Energy funding has revived oil production in two abandoned oilfields on Osage Indian tribal lands in northeastern Oklahoma, and demonstrated a technology that could add billions of barrels of additional domestic oil production in declining fields. Production has jumped from zero to more than 100 barrels of oil per day in the two Osage County, Okla., fields, one of which is more than 100 years old. The technology was successfully pilot-tested in the century-old field, and using the knowledge gained, the technology was applied to a neighboring field with comparable success. This suggests that such approaches could revitalize thousands of other seemingly depleted oilfields across America's Midcontinent region.

166

Rapid assessment of redevelopment potential in marginal oil fields, application to the cut bank field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying infill potential in marginal oil fields often involves several challenges. These include highly heterogeneous reservoir quality both horizontally and vertically, incomplete reservoir databases, considerably large amounts of data involving numerous wells, and different production and completion practices. The most accurate way to estimate infill potential is to conduct a detailed integrated reservoir study, which is often time-consuming and expensive for operators of marginal oil fields. Hence, there is a need for less-demanding methods that characterize and predict heterogeneity and production variability. As an alternative approach, various authors have used empirical or statistical analyses to model variable well performance. Many of the methods are based solely on the analysis of well location, production and time data. My objective is to develop an enhanced method for rapid assessment of infill-drilling potential that would combine increased accuracy of simulation-based methods with times and costs associated with statistical methods. My proposed solution is to use reservoir simulation combined with automatic history matching to regress production data to determine the permeability distribution. Instead of matching on individual cell values of reservoir properties, I match on constant values of permeability within regions around each well. I then use the permeability distribution and an array of automated simulation predictions to determine infill drilling potential throughout the reservoir. Infill predictions on a single-phase synthetic case showed greater accuracy than results from statistical techniques. The methodology successfully identified infill well locations on a synthetic case derived from Cut Bank field, a water-flooded oil reservoir. Analysis of the actual production and injection data from Cut Bank field was unsuccessful, mainly because of an incomplete production database and limitations in the commercial regression software I used. In addition to providing more accurate results than previous empirical and statistical methods, the proposed method can also incorporate other types of data, such as geological data and fluid properties. The method can be applied in multiphase fluid situations and, since it is simulation based, it provides a platform for easy transition to more detailed analysis. Thus, the method can serve as a valuable reservoir management tool for operators of stripper oil fields.

Chavez Ballesteros, Luis Eladio

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate New Field Discoveries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, ... Michigan : 10: 0: 8: 2009-2011: Mississippi : 1: 0: 1: 2009-2011: Montana : 0: ...

168

Excess water production diagnosis in oil fields using ensemble classifiers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In hydrocarbon production, more often than not, oil is produced commingled with water. As long as the water production rate is below the economic level (more)

Rabiei, Minou

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Forrest Ranch Management and Implementation, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

Smith, Brent

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Forrest Ranch Acquisition, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The contract period was the first year of the program with December 2001 through July 2nd 2002 being previous to acquisition of the property. The majority of the activities conducted under the contract period were spent on O&M and pre acquisition activities.

Smith, Brent

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

172

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

INCREASED OIL RECOVERY FROM MATURE OIL FIELDS USING GELLED POLYMER TREATMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Gelled polymer treatments are applied to oil reservoirs to increase oil production and to reduce water production by altering the fluid movement within the reservoir. This report describes the results of a three-year research program aimed at reducing barriers to the widespread use of gelled polymer treatments by (1) developing methods to predict gel behavior during placement in matrix rock and fractures, (2) determining the persistence of permeability reduction after gel placement, and (3) developing methods to design production well treatments to control water production. The work focused on the gel system composed of polyacrylamide and chromium acetate. The molar mass of the polymer was about six million. Chromium(III) acetate reacted and formed crosslinks between polymer molecules. The crosslinked polymer molecules, or pre-gel aggregates, combine and grow to eventually form a 3-dimensional gel. A fundamental study to characterize the formation and growth of pre-gel aggregates was conducted. Two methods, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) and multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) were used. Studies using FFFF were inconclusive. Data taken using MALLS showed that at the gel time the average molar mass of gel aggregates increased by a factor of about three while the average size increase was approximately 50%. Increased acetate concentration in the gelant increases the gel time. The in situ performance of an added-acetate system was investigated to determine the applicability for in-depth treatments. Increased acetate concentrations delayed the development of increased flow resistance during gelant injection in short sandpacks. The development of increased flow resistance (in situ gelation) was extended from 2 to 34 days by increasing the acetate-to-chromium ratio from 38 to 153. In situ gelation occurred at a time that was approximately 22% of the bulk gelation time. When carbonate rocks are treated with gel, chromium retention in the rock may limit in-depth treatment. Chromium retention due to precipitation was investigated by flowing chromium acetate solutions through carbonate rock. Chromium precipitated faster in the rocks than in beaker experiments at similar conditions. A mathematical model previously developed fit the precipitation data reasonably well. The stability of gels when subjected to stress was investigated by experiments with gels placed in tubes and in laboratory-scale fractures. Rupture pressures for gels placed in small diameter tubes were correlated with the ratio of tube length to tube ID. In fractures, fluid leakoff from the fracture to adjacent matrix rock affected gel formation and gel stability in a positive way. Disproportionate permeability reduction (DPR) was studied in unconsolidated sandpacks and in Berea sandstone cores. A conceptual model was developed to explain the presence of DPR. The effect of a pressure gradient, imposed by injection of oil or brine, on the permeability of gel-treated cores was investigated. DPR increased significantly as the pressure gradient was decreased. The magnitude of the pressure gradient had a much larger effect on water permeability than on oil permeability.

G.P. Willhite; D.W. Green; C.S. McCool

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Absorbents for Mineral Oil Spill Cleanup, Phase 3: Field Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual mineral oil on the ground surface following electrical equipment spills is often removed using a surface application of an absorbent material. Traditional absorbent products include clays, sawdust-like products, silica-based products, and various organic industry byproduct materials. This project was performed in three phases. Phase 1 included testing to measure overall mineral oil absorption efficiency of 24 absorbents. In Phase 2, absorbents studied in Phase 1 were further ...

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Abandoned oil fields in Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Tennessee and West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented for approximately 240 abandoned oil fields in Alabama, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Tennessee, and West Virginia. Production data were not available on a majority of abandoned fields in New York, Missouri, and Kentucky. Consequently, some fields with less than 10,000 barrels cumulative production are included. The following information is presented for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1980's:

177

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1981: 22,166: 20,084: 22,467 ...

178

Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams County, North Dakota...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

collaborated with Eagle Operating, Inc. to complete the test in the Northwest McGregor Oil Field in Williams County, North Dakota. The "huff-and-puff" EOR method consists of three...

179

Real option analysis as a decision tool in oil field developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis shows the applicability and value of real options analysis in developing an oil field, and how its use along with decision analysis can maximize the returns on a given project and minimize the losses. It focuses ...

Babajide, Abisoye (Abisoye E.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Energy Conservation and Efficiency Improvement for the Electric Motors Operating in U.S. Oil Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of its versatility, electricity consumption continues to grow all over the world more rapidly than any other energy form. The portion of the United States' primary energy supply used as electricity has expanded from near zero at the turn of the century to 38 percent in 1987. Electric motors use as input about 64% of all electricity in the U.S. and many other countries. The cost of powering motors in the U.S. is estimated to be roughly $90 billion a year. In terms of primary energy input, motor energy use in the U.S. is comparable to all auto energy use. Electric motors are the largest users of energy in all mineral extraction activities. In oil fields, electric motors drive the pumping units used for lifting the oil and water to the surface. To find out actual efficiencies of operating motors in the oil fields, the University of Wyoming and the U.S. Department of Energy -Denver Support Office have been working for the last twelve months on two Naval Petroleum Reserve oil fields -one each in California and Wyoming. So far, actual motor loading of all operating oil fields motors has been determined by actual field measurements. We have also completed the analysis of economy of operation of existing motors and evaluating the candidate replacement motors. In this paper, we will present these results along with the methodologies and protocol developed for motor energy efficiency improvement in oil field applications.

Ula, S.; Cain, W.; Nichols, T.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reconstructing the past: architectural analysis of communal structures at the NAN Ranch ruin (LA2465), Grant County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eleven seasons of field work at the NAN Ranch ruin (LA 2465), a multicomponent Mimbres site in Grant County, New Mexico, have allowed researchers to reconstruct a detailed sequence of architectural development stretching from the Three Circle phase (A.D. 750-900) to the Classic period (A.D. 1000-1130). During the course of excavation, investigators exposed a number of structures that are believed to have served in a communal or integrative capacity. This structure type served as the focus for this work. The purpose of this study was threefold: a) to present detailed descriptions of those structures believed to have served in a communal or integrative capacity; b) to trace the development of this structure type from its first known manifestations at the NAN Ranch ruin in the Three Circle phase to its latest forms at the end of the Classic period; and c) to analyze these structures as a distinct social space, both at the intramural and site level. Eleven structures are described in detail in this text. Six other spaces are also briefly described. Careful attention to detail has allowed this study to address whether previous judgements about the function of the rooms noted herein are in fact supportable. Scrutiny of architectural features also permitted a consideration of how well generally accepted indicators of communal space apply in the case of the NAN Ranch ruin. Finally, the structure provided by the architectural descriptions served as a foundation on which to base a number of inferences concerning population-guided socio-cultural change. Whereas architectural data suggest a shift away from a site-inclusive to a more privatized, lineage-based communal organization during the Late Pithouse/Classic period transition, the appearance of a new structure type at the end of the Classic period suggests that population pressures fostered social reorganization at the room block level around A.D. 1100.

Burden, Damon Andrew

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List, 1995  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as ... order to uniquely identify a particular field, the field

183

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List Updates 1996  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 1 presents a flow chart of the activities necessary to process new field information. All new field information received by EIA goes through this cycle, ...

184

Fairbanks Ranch, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fairbanks Ranch, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.9939331°, -117.1872572° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.9939331,"lon":-117.1872572,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

Hudson Ranch Power I LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

I LLC I LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Hudson Ranch Power I, LLC Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75204 Sector Geothermal energy Product A company proposing to build a 49.9MW geothermal energy plant in southern California. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

186

Update on cavern disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. Argonne National Laboratory has previously evaluated the feasibility, legality, risk and economics of disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes, other than NORM waste, in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste, other than NORM waste, is occurring at four Texas facilities, in several Canadian facilities, and reportedly in Europe. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns as well. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, a review of federal regulations and regulations from several states indicated that there are no outright prohibitions against NORM disposal in salt caverns or other Class II wells, except for Louisiana which prohibits disposal of radioactive wastes or other radioactive materials in salt domes. Currently, however, only Texas and New Mexico are working on disposal cavern regulations, and no states have issued permits to allow cavern disposal of NORM waste. On the basis of the costs currently charged for cavern disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal in caverns is likely to be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J. A.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste into salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caverns can be readily formed in salt formations through solution mining. The caverns may be formed incidentally, as a result of salt recovery, or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or compressed air or disposing of wastes. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the feasibility, suitability, and legality of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns. Chapter 2 provides background information on: types and locations of US subsurface salt deposits; basic solution mining techniques used to create caverns; and ways in which salt caverns are used. Later chapters provide discussion of: federal and state regulatory requirements concerning disposal of oil field waste, including which wastes are considered eligible for cavern disposal; waste streams that are considered to be oil field waste; and an evaluation of technical issues concerning the suitability of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field waste. Separate chapters present: types of oil field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location; disposal operations; and closure and remediation. This report does not suggest specific numerical limits for such factors or variables as distance to neighboring activities, depths for casings, pressure testing, or size and shape of cavern. The intent is to raise issues and general approaches that will contribute to the growing body of information on this subject.

Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.; Ayers, R.C. Jr.; Grunewald, B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

Umekwe, Pascal, E-mail: wpascals@gmail.com [Baker Hughes (United States)] [Baker Hughes (United States); Mongrain, Joanna, E-mail: Joanna.Mongrain@shell.com [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States)] [Shell International Exploration and Production Co (United States); Ahmadi, Mohabbat, E-mail: mahmadi@alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Petroleum Engineering Department (United States); Hanks, Catherine, E-mail: chanks@gi.alaska.edu [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)] [University of Alaska Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute (United States)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress Review No. 39, quarter ending June 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 41, quarter ending December 31, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress Review No. 42, quarter ending March 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Prairie City, Oregon Coordinates 44.4632135°, -118.7099477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

195

Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Drakesbad Guest Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Mineral, California Coordinates 40.3476588°, -121.5949804° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

196

4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility 4 UR Guest Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Creede, Colorado Coordinates 37.8491662°, -106.9264345° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

197

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Crested Butte, Colorado Coordinates 38.8697146°, -106.9878231° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

198

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. References Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Exploration Of The Upper Hot

199

Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Gunnison, Colorado Coordinates 38.5458246°, -106.9253207° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

200

Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some

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201

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley

202

Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500' deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400' encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The

203

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Free-flow variability on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A central monitoring computer was installed on each ranch. The computers were connected by communication cables to 50 turbines on the Souza Ranch and 150 turbines on the Jess Ranch. Anemometers were installed on every other turbine on 12-foot booms at 35 feet above ground level (AGL). Spacing between anemometers was approximately 200 feet in the crosswind direction by 500 feet in the parallel direction. A total of 23 turbines on the Souza Ranch was instrumented in this fashion, as well as two multi-level meteorological towers. On the Jess Ranch, 77 turbines were instrumented; about half at 35 feet AGL and half at 50 feet AGL, plus four additional towers. Wind data were collected for approximately a 100 hour period on each ranch. All turbines were shut down during these periods so that no turbine wakes would be present. The data periods were selected by the meteorologist to insure that they occurred during typical spring-summer flow regimes. The terrain features upwind of the site appear to play as significant a role in the flow variability as terrain features within the site.

Nierenberg, R.

1988-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Free-flow variability on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass. [Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A central monitoring computer was installed on each ranch. The computers were connected by communication cables to 50 turbines on the Souza Ranch and 150 turbines on the Jess Ranch. Anemometers were installed on every other turbine on 12-foot booms at 35 feet above ground level (AGL). Spacing between anemometers was approximately 200 feet in the crosswind direction by 500 feet in the parallel direction. A total of 23 turbines on the Souza Ranch was instrumented in this fashion, as well as two multi-level meteorological towers. On the Jess Ranch, 77 turbines were instrumented; about half at 35 feet AGL and half at 50 feet AGL, plus four additional towers. Wind data were collected for approximately a 100 hour period on each ranch. All turbines were shut down during these periods so that no turbine wakes would be present. The data periods were selected by the meteorologist to insure that they occurred during typical spring-summer flow regimes. The terrain features upwind of the site appear to play as significant a role in the flow variability as terrain features within the site.

Nierenberg, R.

1988-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

Spitler, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

South Belridge Field reaches milestone with its billionth barrel of crude oil  

SciTech Connect

An 84-year-old California oil field which for at least the first two decades of its life was regarded as one of the minor fields of Kern County in May reached a plateau attained previously by only 11 fields in the United States. The South Belridge field 35 miles west of Bakersfield produced its one billionth barrel of oil, thus qualifying for membership in oil production`s most exclusive club. The other billion-barrel fields are Alaska`s Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk River; California`s Wilmington and Huntington Beach; Oklahoma`s ShoVel-Tum; and Texas` East Texas, Yates, Kelly-Snyder, Slaughter, Wasson and Panhandle. California`s Ventura field presently is believed to be the only other field in the United States with the potential to produce one billion barrels. The field, to the first of this year had produced 930.2 MMbo and had estimated reserves of 81.8 MMbo. Production in the South Belridge field last year totaled 43.8 MMbo, or an average of 120 Mbo/d, which was enough to make the field the fifth most productive in the United States.

Rintoul, B.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Reporting period July--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on accomplishments completed during July through September 1997 on contracts for field projects and supporting research on Enhanced Oil Recovery.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved methane distributions and air-sea flux in the plume of a massive seep field, Coal Oil coastal ocean near Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara Channel, California. Methane was quantified in the down originating from Coal Oil Point enters the atmosphere within the study area. Most of it appears

California at Santa Barbara, University of

212

Utah Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Reserves New Field Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves New Field Discoveries (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 2010's 0 0 - No Data Reported; -- Not...

213

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Simulation of the ghost ranch greenhouse-residence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The greenhouse-residence unit of the Sundwellings Demonstration Center at Ghost Ranch, Abiguice, New Mexico, has been studied by computer modeling and simulation techniques. A thermal network model of the building has been developed in the framework of PASOLE, the Los Alamos passive solar energy simulation program. Simulation studied based on hourly weather data recorded during the 1977--78 heating season leave been done. Model validation was done by hourly comparisons of simulation predicted temperatures in the building with measured values of corresponding temperatures. The building model was used to predict a 12-month performance with the 1976--77 Los Alamos weather data. A solar fraction, the ratio of the solar portion of the residence heat input to the total heating load, was computed to be 60%. Other performance and design questions studies with 12-month Los Alamos simulation runs include the importance of the thermocirculation vents, the effect of external insulation on the residence walls, and the effect of nighttime insulation on the greenhouse glazing.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, July--September, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. A geological study of 72 Minnelusa field surrounding the West Kiehl is complete. Of the 72 fields, 35 were studied in detail and, from these 35 fields, Prairie Creek South and Simpson Ranch were selected for numerical simulation as representative of Minnelusa waterfloods and polymer floods, respectively. This report documents the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl, Simpson Ranch and Prairie Creek South fields.

Pitts, M.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Citronelle Oil Field north of Mobile, Alabama. The project will capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Citronelle Oil Field north of Mobile, Alabama. The project will capture Citronelle Oil Field north of Mobile, Alabama. The project will capture approximately 150,000 tons of CO 2 per year from Alabama Power's Plant Barry (a total equivalent to the emissions from 25 megawatts of the plant's generating capacity) and inject the CO 2 into a deep saline reservoir 9,000 feet beneath the surface. Under the plan, the CO 2 will be transported by pipeline and injected into the saline formation, which has oil-bearing formations both above and below its location. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program will be conducted to track the movement of the injected CO 2 and ensure that it is safely and permanently stored. The project will commence in 2011 and is expected to last up to four years. This test site was selected by

217

Exploration and Development of U.S. Oil and Gas Fields, 1955-2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the exploration and development of oil and gas fields in the United States over the period 1955-2002. We make four contributions to explaining the economic evolution of the oil and gas industry during this period. First, we derive a testable model of the dynamics of competitive oil and gas field exploration and development. Second, we show how to empirically distinguish Hotelling scarcity effects from effects due to technological change. Third, we test these hypotheses using statewide panel data of exploration and development drilling. We find that the time paths of exploration, development and total wells drilled are dominated by Hotelling scarcity effects. Our final contribution is to offer an explanation for why fixed costs from exploration can make the contracting equilibrium in the mineral rights market efficient.

John R. Boyce; Linda Nstbakken

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Equilibrium Analysis of the Oil and Gas Field Services Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the response of employment and wages in the US oil and gas eld services industry to changes in the price of crude petroleum using a time series of quarterly data spanning the period 1972-2002. I nd that labor quickly reallocates across sectors in response to price shocks but that substantial wage premia are necessary to induce such reallocation. The timing of these premia is at odds with the predictions of standard models wage premia emerge quite slowly, peaking only as labor adjustment ends and then slowly dissipating. After considering alternative explanations, I argue that a dynamic market clearing model with sluggish movements in industry wide labor demand is capable of rationalizing these ndings. I proceed to structurally estimate the parameters of the model by minimum distance and nd that simulated impulse responses match key features of the estimated dynamics. I also provide auxiliary evidence corroborating the implied dynamics of some important unobserved variables. I conclude with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the model and implications for future research. I am deeply indebted to Chris House for sharing with me the art of formulating and solving dynamic

Patrick Kline; Patrick Kline

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this DOE sponsored project are to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to test these improved models and guidelines in the field.

Terralog Technologies USA Inc.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of this project have was to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to apply these improved models and guidelines in the field.

Terralog Technologies

2002-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

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221

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

Special ESP configurations designed to test and produce Yemen oil field. [Electric-Submersible Pump  

SciTech Connect

Innovative electric-submersible-pump (ESP) configurations were used in the exploration phase of a Yemen oil field discovered by Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd. Because of subnormal reservoir pressure, CanOxy developed the field with ESPs and had to install surface components that could operate at the high, 130 F., ambient temperatures common in Yemen. The field is in a remote area that has seen very little development. The reservoirs produce a medium-to-heavy crude with a low gas/oil ratio, typically less than 20 scf/bbl. Problems faced in evaluating the field included drilling through unconsolidated sands with high flow capacity and subnormal reservoir pressure. CanOxy had to develop the technology to test the wells during the exploration phase, and intends to use new, or at least uncommon technology, for producing the wells. The paper describes testing the wells, the electric generators and variable speed drives, and the use of these pumps on production wells.

Wilkie, D.I. (Canadian Occidental Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

Enhanced oil recovery. Byron Field polymer waterflood will achieve two important firsts  

SciTech Connect

When Marathon Oil Co. starts up its long-awaited, Byron Field Tensleep-Embar Unit polymer waterflood this December 2, firsts will have been achieved: the Big-Horn basin will see its first full-field commercial tertiary flood, and Marathon also will see its first full-field commercial tertiary flood. Marathon's flood will use a massive amount of polymer. Seventy percent of pore volume will be injected. Big Horn basin fields usually have been subjected only to infill drilling and waterflood because the thicker than average crude lies in heterogeneous formations, yielding a situation whereby, even 60 to 70 yr after discovery, simple infill drilling can cause virgin oil to flow to the well bore. In some cases, 20-, 10-, or 5-acre spacing might be required to drain a reservoir adequately, giving long effective lift to simple primary production techniques. In addition, a natural water drive often is present.

Gill, D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Preliminary Technical and Legal Evaluation of Disposing of Nonhazardous Oil Field Waste into Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an initial evaluation of the suitability, feasibility, and legality of using salt caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes. Given the preliminary and general nature of this report, we recognize that some of our findings and conclusions maybe speculative and subject to change upon further research on this topic.

Ayers, Robert C.; Caudle, Dan; Elcock, Deborah; Raivel, Mary; Veil, John; and Grunewald, Ben

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

228

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Comparison of selected oil-field brines from fields in the Permian basin, West Texas-southeast New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Stiff diagrams of oil-field brines from the west Texas Permian basin are identifiable within the geological framework. Plotted from a simple analysis of three cations and three anions, older Paleozoic waters can be categorized as either 'pristine' or modified, usually by a later influx of Permian or early Pennsylvanian water. These different plots can be segregated by geologic province. The Permian brines differ by age and also by environment (shelf, basin, etc.).

White, H.G. III

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Low-Salinity Waterflooding to Improve Oil Recovery - Historical Field Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of wa-terfloods. Laboratory water-flood tests and single-well tracer tests have shown that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery, but work designed to test the method on a field scale has not yet been undertaken. Historical waterflood records could unintentionally provide some evidence of improved recovery from waterflooding with lower salinity brine. Nu-merous fields in the Powder River basin of Wyoming have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) obtained from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Three Minnelusa formation fields in the basin were identified as potential candidates for waterflood comparisons based on the salinity of the connate and injection water. Historical pro-duction and injection data for these fields were obtained from the public record. Field waterflood data were manipulated to be displayed in the same format as laboratory coreflood re-sults. Recovery from fields using lower salinity injection wa-ter was greater than that using higher salinity injection wa-termatching recovery trends for laboratory and single-well tests.

Eric P. Robertson

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Status of Libyan Loading Ports and Oil and Natural Gas Fields Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 10:00AM EST Overview During July and August 2013, protests at major oil loading ports in the central-eastern region of Libya forced the complete or partial shut-in of oil fields linked to the ports. As a result of protests at ports and at some oil fields, crude oil production fell to 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in July and 600,000 bbl/d in August, although the production level at the end of August was far lower. At the end of August, an armed group blocked pipelines that connect the El Sharara and El Feel (Elephant) fields to the Zawiya and Mellitah export terminals, respectively, forcing the shutdown of those fields. El Sharara had been

232

Reservoir simulation of co2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery in Tensleep Formation, Teapot Dome field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Teapot Dome field is located 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming in Natrona County. This field has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy to implement a field-size CO2 storage project. With a projected storage of 2.6 million tons of carbon dioxide a year under fully operational conditions in 2006, the multiple-partner Teapot Dome project could be one of the world's largest CO2 storage sites. CO2 injection has been used for decades to improve oil recovery from depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs. In the CO2 sequestration technique, the aim is to "co-optimize" CO2 storage and oil recovery. In order to achieve the goal of CO2 sequestration, this study uses reservoir simulation to predict the amount of CO2 that can be stored in the Tensleep Formation and the amount of oil that can be produced as a side benefit of CO2 injection. This research discusses the effects of using different reservoir fluid models from EOS regression and fracture permeability in dual porosity models on enhanced oil recovery and CO2 storage in the Tensleep Formation. Oil and gas production behavior obtained from the fluid models were completely different. Fully compositional and pseudo-miscible black oil fluid models were tested in a quarter of a five spot pattern. Compositional fluid model is more convenient for enhanced oil recovery evaluation. Detailed reservoir characterization was performed to represent the complex characteristics of the reservoir. A 3D black oil reservoir simulation model was used to evaluate the effects of fractures in reservoir fluids production. Single porosity simulation model results were compared with those from the dual porosity model. Based on the results obtained from each simulation model, it has been concluded that the pseudo-miscible model can not be used to represent the CO2 injection process in Teapot Dome. Dual porosity models with variable fracture permeability provided a better reproduction of oil and water rates in the highly fractured Tensleep Formation.

Gaviria Garcia, Ricardo

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration in Oil Fields: A Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces Grant S. Bromhal, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880, gbromhal@netl.doe.gov, M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, and Duane H. Smith, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Underground injection of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is a common practice in the oil and gas industry and has often been cited as a proven method of sequestering CO 2 (US DOE, 1999). Of all sequestration methods, this is probably the best understood, as carbon dioxide has been used in the oil industry for many years. Additionally, most oil fields have been relatively well characterized geologically, and

234

Cuttings Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuttings Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area Cuttings Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The author was on the site throughout the drilling operations to log the drill cuttings and coordinate with the drilling staff. Small representative samples of the gravel and/or chips were collected approximately every 3m, sieved and washed by the geological technician, and examined by the author. A preliminary written description of the cuttings was prepared. Afterwards, the samples were packed in small cotton bags, transported to the warehouse located at the Nevada Geothermal office in Winnemucca and dried. Dry samples were split and a portion of each sample was placed in chip trays

235

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The brine from the drill holes, hot springs, seepages, and irrigation wells was sampled, as well as water from two nearby creeks, (total of 13 samples) and sent for analysis to Thermochem Inc. For sample locations refer to Figure 35; the geochemical data are presented in Appendix C. Geochemical results indicate the presence of two distinct waters in this group of samples (Tom Powell of Thermochem Inc., personal communication, 2005). Powell found that MDH, TRS-1 and TRS-6 are the most prospective waters and tend to be more bicarbonate rich with much higher proportions of B, Li and

236

,"Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)" Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","nga_epg0_irp_ygrt-nmx_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/nga_epg0_irp_ygrt-nmx_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

237

Furnace Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Furnace Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Furnace Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Furnace Creek Ranch Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Death Valley, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

238

Field Instruments for Real Time In-Situ Crude Oil Concentration Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Water Resources Institute awarded a Mill Scholarship to M.C. Sterling, Jr in 2002. This project describes five sensors for rapid monitoring of crude oil concentrations in an aquatic system. These measurements are critical for monitoring plume transport. They are also useful for estimating polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) exposure concentrations as a component of toxicity risk assessments. A submersible multi-angle laser scattering instrument (LISST-100, Sequoia Instruments), an ex-situ single wavelength fluorometer (AU-10 field fluorometer, Turner Designs), an in-situ single wavelength fluorometer (Flashlamp, WET Labs), and two in-situ multiple wavelength fluorometers (ECO-FL3 and SAFire, WET Labs) are evaluated for sensitivity and bias. For each instrument, a brief discussion of its operating principles is presented. Crude oil emulsions of various concentrations were analyzed using the above instruments. The implications of potential interferences and instrument limits are discussed relative to their importance for real time monitoring of crude oil spills.

Fuller, C. B.; Bonner, J. S.; Page, C. A.; Arrambide, G.; Sterling Jr., M. C.; Ojo, T.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Oil fields and new plays in the Rioni foreland basin, Republic of Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rioni Basin in West Georgia is an Oligocene foredeep that evolved into a Miocene to Pliocene foreland basin, north of the Achara-Trialeti thrust belt and south of the Greater Caucasus. It extends to the west into the Black Sea. A large number of exploration wildcats have been drilled onshore since the nineteenth century and have led to the discovery of three fields. Exploration was prompted by seeps and restricted to frontal ramp anticlines mapped at surface. No wells have been drilled offshore. Supsa (discovered 1889) contains 29 MMbbl oil in clastic Sarmatian reservoirs. The field has around 50 wells but less than 0.5 MMbbl have been produced. Shromisubani (discovered 1973) contains oil within Maeotian and Pontian clastic reservoirs, Chaladidi oil within Upper Cretaceous chalk. Despite this long and apparently intensive exploration effort, several factors make the basin an exciting target for field redevelopment and further exploration. The quality of existing seismic is very poor both on-and offshore. Reinterpretation of the structure of the fold and thrust belt has suggested the presence of new targets and plays which may be imaged by modern seismic methods. In addition, due to problems associated with central planning, discovered fields have not been optimally developed or even fully appraised. The application of new technology, geological interpretation and investment promises to delineate substantial remaining reserves even after more than one hundred years of exploration.

Robinson, A.G.; Griffith, E.T. (JKX Oil and Gas, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Sargeant, J. (RES-Source Limited, Banchory (United Kingdom))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Bohai Oil corporation conceptual engineering of overall development scheme for SZ 36-1 oil field. Final report. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

SZ 36-1 oil field is located in the Liaodong Bay in the northeastern section of Bohai Bay, in approximately 32 meters water depth, 46 kilometers offshore the Suizhong Coast. The reservoir is highly heterogeneous and unconsolidated, and the crude has high viscosity, high specific gravity, and requires artificial lift for production. A phased development of the field is planned. The U.S. Trade and Development Program (TDP) contracted for engineering services to perform conceptual engineering of the overall development scheme for the SZ 36-1 oil field. The study consisted of two parts: (1) concept selection, to assess various schemes for developing the SZ 36-1 field and selecting one to recommend to the Bohai oil corporation (BOC); (2) conceptual engineering of the recommended development concept. The final report covers both the concept selection and concept engineering phases of the study.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) into salt caverns. That study concluded that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and legal. If caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they can be a suitable means of disposing of NOW (Veil et al. 1996). Considering these findings and the increased U.S. interest in using salt caverns for NOW disposal, the Office of Fossil Energy asked Argonne to conduct further research on the cost of cavern disposal compared with the cost of more traditional NOW disposal methods and on preliminary identification and investigation of the risks associated with such disposal. The cost study (Veil 1997) found that disposal costs at the four permitted disposal caverns in the United States were comparable to or lower than the costs of other disposal facilities in the same geographic area. The risk study (Tomasko et al. 1997) estimated that both cancer and noncancer human health risks from drinking water that had been contaminated by releases of cavern contents were significantly lower than the accepted risk thresholds. Since 1992, DOE has funded Argonne to conduct a series of studies evaluating issues related to management and disposal of oil field wastes contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Included among these studies were radiological dose assessments of several different NORM disposal options (Smith et al. 1996). In 1997, DOE asked Argonne to conduct additional analyses on waste disposal in salt caverns, except that this time the wastes to be evaluated would be those types of oil field wastes that are contaminated by NORM. This report describes these analyses. Throughout the remainder of this report, the term ''NORM waste'' is used to mean ''oil field waste contaminated by NORM''.

Blunt, D.L.; Elcock, D.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Viel, J.A.; and Williams, G.P.

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Risk analyses for disposing nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns have been used for several decades to store various hydrocarbon products. In the past few years, four facilities in the US have been permitted to dispose nonhazardous oil field wastes in salt caverns. Several other disposal caverns have been permitted in Canada and Europe. This report evaluates the possibility that adverse human health effects could result from exposure to contaminants released from the caverns in domal salt formations used for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal. The evaluation assumes normal operations but considers the possibility of leaks in cavern seals and cavern walls during the post-closure phase of operation. In this assessment, several steps were followed to identify possible human health risks. At the broadest level, these steps include identifying a reasonable set of contaminants of possible concern, identifying how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing the toxicities of these contaminants, estimating their intakes, and characterizing their associated human health risks. The contaminants of concern for the assessment are benzene, cadmium, arsenic, and chromium. These were selected as being components of oil field waste and having a likelihood to remain in solution for a long enough time to reach a human receptor.

Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Veil, J.; Caudle, D.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Facility Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Cielo Wind Power Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Curry County NM Coordinates 34.6283°, -103.387° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6283,"lon":-103.387,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

250

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

SciTech Connect

This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

251

Integrated reservoir study of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is the development of a reservoir characterization of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama, using petrophysical data, reservoir performance data and reservoir simulation. Appleton Field is comprised of two producing zones, the "Smackover" and the "Reef," which, as the names imply, are presumed to be separate and distinct geological sequences. In particular, the previous work of several authors delineated a marked difference in these zones based on the quality of the reservoir rocks and their productivity. In one particular study of the Appleton Field, the authors utilized only two wells in their analysis. In contrast, our study involves the use of all five producing wells in the field. The data available for these five wells confirms the differences in reservoir quality between the "Smackover" and the "Reef" producing intervals, although such differences vary from well to well. In this study we also provide a detailed description of Appleton Field using production data analysis and reservoir simulation, both of which reveal possible untapped oil reserves. The volumes of oil in place obtained from our analyses exceed those reported in literature for this field. However, the previous literature noted specifically a possible underestimation of the reported oil in place and the use of infill drilling to exploit these untapped resources The original oil in place (OOIP) using production data was estimated to be 78.8 million STB, which exceeds the reported value of 3.8 million STB by more than a factor of 20. An average recovery factor of 3.4 percent (using production to date) was calculated using the estimated ultimate recovery (or EUR) technique. This result is much lower than the 68 percent reported in literature. The history matched reservoir simulation model utilized an oil-in-place of 11.84 million STB and we obtained a recovery factor of 23 percent (using production to date). We recognize this extremely large variation in computed in-place volume, and it is our contention that an aquifer system is providing this "extra" energy (hence, extra volume). The energy from the aquifer appears to be provided in the form of fluid expansion and water influx (i.e., the production data show no clear "water influx" signal). Based on the variation of OOIP computed from our analysis, we have estimated a lower limit of 5 million STB and an upper limit of 30 million STB OOIP, and we believe that the true OOIP lies somewhere in between (most likely on the order of 20 million STB of oil). Resolution of this issue will require additional data. In particular, we require pressure data to calibrate the simulation, as well as the well performance analysis. We would also like to have a modern fluid sample (oil) made available for a complete PVT analysis.

Chijuka, Ekene F

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that were being addressed in 2001. As the fluid production is hot, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001.

Scott Hara

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being addressed in 2001.

Scott Hara

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Focal mechanism determination of induced microearthquakes in an oil field using full waveforms from shallow and deep seismic networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new, relatively high frequency, full waveform matching method was used to study the focal mechanisms of small, local earthquakes induced in an oil field, which are monitored by a sparse near-surface network and a deep ...

Li, Junlun

255

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 45, Quarter ending December 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal methods; resource assessment; environmental technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery. (AT)

Not Available

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 51 quarter ending June 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Progress review on enhanced oil recovery covers: Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Field Projects; Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Supporting Research; Gas Displacement /emdash/ Supporting Research; Thermal Recovery /emdash/ Supporting Research; Resource Assessment Technology; Geoscience; Environmental Technology; Microbial Technology.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 40, quarter ending September 30, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; and microbial technology.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 43, quarter ending June 30, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: (1) chemical flooding; gas displacement thermal recovery/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology;environmental technology; and microbial technology. (AT)

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An agent-based soft computing society with application in the management of establishment of hydraulic fracture in oil field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Establishment of Hydraulic Fracture in Oil field is a complicated system. The process of establishment of project involves many departments, which frequently interact each other. In general, The Orient-Object technology is not suitable to construct this ...

Fu hua Shang; Xiao feng Li; Jian Xu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Simulation studies of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir in the SSB1 field, Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional simulation studies have been carried out to investigate the performance of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir, X3/X4 in the SSBI field, Malaysia. A heterogeneous model was used which honored the reservoir heterogeneity as deduced from logs. Simulation results indicate that gas and water cresting are inevitable even at low oil production rate of 100 STB/D because of the thin oil column of only 45 feet. Continued production under the current gas/oil ratio limit of 1500 SCF/STB results in an oil recovery at 15 years production of 6% OOIP, compared to 7% OOIP if the gas/oil ratio limit is increased to 10,000 SCF/STB, with negligible oil resaturation losses into the gascap. Simulation results indicate that oil recovery from the X3/X4 reservoir would be increased if wells are produced at gas/oil ratios higher than 1500 SCF/STB, and the horizontal wells are completed at, or as near as possible to, the oil-water contact.

Abdul Hakim, Hazlan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Reasons for production decline in the diatomite, Belridge oil field: a rock mechanics view  

SciTech Connect

This work summarized research conducted on diatomite cores from the Belridge oil field in Kern County. The study was undertaken to try to explain the rapid decline in oil production in diatomite wells. Characterization of the rock showed that the rock was composed principally of amorphous opaline silica diatoms with only a trace of crystoballite quartz or chert quartz. Physical properties tests showed the diatomite to be of low strength and plastic. Finally, it was established that long-term creep of diatomite into a propped fracture proceeds at a rate of approximately 6 x 10-5 in./day, a phenomenon which may be a primary cause of rapid production declines. The testing program also revealed a matrix stength for the formation of calculated 1325 PSI, a value to consider when depleting the reservoir. This also may help to explain the phase transformation of opal ct at calculated 2000 to 2500 ft depth.

Strickland, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

264

Disposal of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns -- Legality, technical feasibility, economics, and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approaching cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Crude Oil Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

266

Borehole gravity surveys in the Cretaceous-Tertiary Sagavanirktok Formation, Kuparuk River oil field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Detailed borehole gravity surveys (sponsored by the US Department of Energy) were made in three wells in the Kuparuk River and westernmost Prudhoe Bay oil fields, Alaska from depths as shallow as 15 m to as great as 1,340 m through permafrost and underlying heavy oil bearing sandstones of the Sagavanirktok Formation. A subbituminous coal-bearing sequence and the stability field for methane hydrate occur partly within and partly below the permafrost zone, whose base, defined by the 0{degree}C isotherm, varies from 464 to 564 m. The surveys provided accurate, large-volume estimates of in-situ bulk density from which equivalent porosity was calculated using independent grain and pore-fluid density information. This density and porosity data helped to define the rock mass properties within the hydrate stability field and the thermal conductivity, seismic character, and compaction history of the permafrost. Bulk density of the unconsolidated to poorly consolidated sections ranges mostly from 1.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}. The shallow permafrost section appears to be slightly overcompacted in comparison to similar sedimentary sequences in nonpermafrost regions. The cause of this apparent overcompaction is unknown but may be due to freeze-thaw processes that have similarly affected sea floor and surficial deposits elsewhere in the Arctic. Fluctuations of bulk density appear to be controlled principally by (1) textural variations of the sediments, possibly exaggerated locally within the permafrost zone by excess ice, (2) presence or absence of carbonaceous material, and (3) type of pore-fluid (water-ice vs. water vs. hydrocarbons). As hypothetical models predict bulk-density is slightly lower opposite one interval of possible methane hydrate. Porosity may be as high as 40-45% for selected coarser grained units within the permafrost zone, and as high as 30-35% in a series of well sorted, heavy oil-bearing sandstones.

Beyer, L.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 21, quarter ending December 31, 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual report are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, CO/sub 2/ injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, improved drilling technology, residual oil, environment, and petroleum technology. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 26, quarter ending March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Objectives and technical progress are summarized for field projects and supporting research in chemical flooding, CO/sub 2/ injection, thermal/heavy oil recovery, resource assessment, extraction technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and improved drilling technology. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Earth stress measurements in the South Belridge oil field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

The authors report earth stress magnitudes in the South Belridge oil field, determined from integrated density logs and microhydraulic fracturing test. They indicate that the vertical stress is generally the intermediate principal stress, except possibly at the deepest zone tested (2,100 ft (640 m)), where it is approximately equal to the lesser compressive horizontal stress. Azimuth of the greater horizontal stress and of induced hydraulic fractures, as measured or inferred by several different techniques, is N15{sup 0}E+-15{sup 0}.

Hansen, K.S.; Purcell, W.R. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (US))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Final environmental statement related to the United Nuclear Corporation, Morton Ranch, Wyoming Uranium Mill (Converse County, Wyoming)  

SciTech Connect

Impacts from Morton Ranch Uranium Mill will result in: alterations of up to 270 acres occupied by the mill facilities; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Glenrock and Douglas, Wyoming. Solid waste material (tailings solids) from the mill will be deposited onsite in exhausted surface mine pits. Any license issued for the Morton Ranch mill will be subject to conditions for the protection of the environment.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Microsoft Word - CX-HorseRanchTap_FY13_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dustin Liebhaber Project Manager - TELP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Capacity Increase on Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Horse Ranch Tap Line PP&A Project No.: 2,707 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Snohomish County, Washington Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a new disconnect switch and associated modifications on the Horse Ranch Tap line in Snohomish County, Washington. BPA owns and maintains the line disconnect switch and the first 0.34 miles of the Tap line, while Puget Sound Energy (PSE) owns and operates the remaining 3.48 miles of the H-frame, wood

274

A synthesis of the pithouse architectural sequence of the Nan Ranch Ruin, Grant County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from twenty-one pithouses recovered beneath a large surf ace pueblo, the NAN Ranch Ruin located in the middle Mimbres River Valley in Southwestern New Mexico, was analyzed to construct an architectural sequence. The architectural style of a round or oval shaped structure gradually evolved to structures that were rectangular or square. In addition to the evolution of the architecture there were other changes found to co-occur in the construction of hearths, ceramic styles, and mortuary customs. It was found that the chronological changes in architectural style and material culture that have been proposed for this region are supported by the documented changes found at the NAN Ranch Ruin. However, the abrupt change from pithouse structures to surface pueblos did not exist. The description of these structures and their contents document the gradual changes in form and material culture through time.

Wigington, Paula Jean

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 28  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of progress during the quarter ending September 30, 1981 are summarized. Field projects and supporting research in the following areas are reported: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal processes/heavy oil (steam and in-situ combustion); resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. A list of BETC publications with abstracts, published during the quarter is included. (DMC)

Linville, B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ORIGINAL ARTICLE On the origin of oil-field water in the Biyang Depression of China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources and migration path- ways of oil/gas reservoirs. Such an effort is very useful for exploration Springer-Verlag 2008 Abstract We have surveyed groundwater samples col- lected from oil and gas reservoirs of energy requires more efficient recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs and better understanding of oil

Zhan, Hongbin

277

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Reservoir characterization helping to sustain oil production in Thailand's Sirikit Field  

SciTech Connect

Sirikit field is located in the Phitsanulok basin of Thailand's north-central plains. The main reservoir sequence is some 400 m thick and comprises thin interbedded fluvio-lacustrine clay and sandstones. Initial oil volumes after exploration and appraisal drilling in 1981-1984 were estimated at some 180 million bbl. However, further development/appraisal drilling and the following up of new opportunities allowed a better delineation of the reservoirs, resulting in an increased STOIIP and recovery. Total in-place oil volumes were increased to 791 million bbl and the expectation of ultimate recovery to 133 million bbl. To date, 131 wells have been drilled, 65 MMstb have been produced, and production stands at 23,000 bbl/day. Extensive reservoir studies were among the techniques and methods used to assess whether water injection would be a viable further development option. A reservoir geological model was set up through (1) core studies, (2) a detailed sand correlation, and (3) reservoir quality mapping. This model showed that despite considerable heterogeneity most sands are continuous. Reservoir simulation indicated that water injection is viable in the north-central part of the field and that it will increase the Sirikit field reserves by 12 million; this is now part of Thai Shell's reserves portfolio. Injection will start in 1994. New up-to-date seismic and mapping techniques (still) using the old 3-D seismic data acquired in 1983 are being used for further reservoir delineation. This work is expected to result in a further reserve increase.

Shaafsma, C.E.; Phuthithammakul, S. (Thai Shell Exploration and Production Co. Ltd., Bangkok (Thailand))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well. The Boles and Franks model is compatible with a steady supply of original mixed-layer I/S during the depositional history of the McAllen Ranch area. The constant content with depth of calcite, quartz, and potassium feldspar indicates that limited material, if any, is supplied by the shales to surrounding sands. The ions generated by changes within the clay minerals are involved in further clay mineral reactions as outlined above. In addition, magnesium and iron are involved in forming chlorite within the shales.

Freed, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Additional Reserve Recovery Using New Polymer Treatment on High Water Oil Ratio Wells in Alameda Field, Kingman County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Flooding process, like a polymer treatment, as a tertiary (enhanced) oil recovery process can be a very good solution based on the condition of this field and its low cost compared to the drilling of new wells. It is an improved water flooding method in which high molecular-weight (macro-size molecules) and water-soluble polymers are added to the injection water to improve the mobility ratio by enhancing the viscosity of the water and by reducing permeability in invaded zones during the process. In other words, it can improve the sweep efficiency by reducing the water mobility. This polymer treatment can be performed on the same active oil producer well rather than on an injector well in the existence of strong water drive in the formation. Some parameters must be considered before any polymer job is performed such as: formation temperature, permeability, oil gravity and viscosity, location and formation thickness of the well, amount of remaining recoverable oil, fluid levels, well productivity, water oil ratio (WOR) and existence of water drive. This improved oil recovery technique has been used widely and has significant potential to extend reservoir life by increasing the oil production and decreasing the water cut. This new technology has the greatest potential in reservoirs that are moderately heterogeneous, contain moderately viscous oils, and have adverse water-oil mobility ratios. For example, many wells in Kansas's Arbuckle formation had similar treatments and we have seen very effective results. In addition, there were previous polymer treatments conducted by Texaco in Alameda Field on a number of wells throughout the Viola-Simpson formation in the early 70's. Most of the treatments proved to be very successful.

James Spillane

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC???????¢????????????????s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot???????¢????????????????s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF UPPER DEVONIAN GORDON SANDSTONE, JACKSONBURG STRINGTOWN OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN WEST VIRGINIA  

SciTech Connect

The Jacksonburg-Stringtown oil field contained an estimated 88,500,000 barrels of oil in place, of which approximately 20,000,000 barrels were produced during primary recovery operations. A gas injection project, initiated in 1934, and a pilot waterflood, begun in 1981, yielded additional production from limited portions of the field. The pilot was successful enough to warrant development of a full-scale waterflood in 1990, involving approximately 8,900 acres in three units, with a target of 1,500 barrels of oil per acre recovery. Historical patterns of drilling and development within the field suggests that the Gordon reservoir is heterogeneous, and that detailed reservoir characterization is necessary for understanding well performance and addressing problems observed by the operators. The purpose of this work is to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production. Conventional stratigraphic correlation and core description shows that the Gordon sandstone is composed of three parasequences, formed along the Late Devonian shoreline of the Appalachian Basin. The parasequences comprise five lithofacies, of which one includes reservoir sandstones. Pay sandstones were found to have permeabilities in core ranging from 10 to 200 mD, whereas non-pay sandstones have permeabilities ranging from below the level of instrumental detection to 5 mD; Conglomeratic zones could take on the permeability characteristics of enclosing materials, or could exhibit extremely low values in pay sandstone and high values in non-pay or low permeability pay sandstone. Four electrofacies based on a linear combination of density and scaled gamma ray best matched correlations made independently based on visual comparison of geophysical logs. Electrofacies 4 with relatively high permeability (mean value > 45 mD) was determined to be equivalent to the pay sandstone within the Gordon reservoir. Three-dimensional models of the electrofacies in the pilot waterflood showed that electrofacies 4 is present throughout this area, and the other electrofacies are more disconnected. A three-layer, back-propagation artificial neural network with three slabs in the middle layer can be used to predict permeability and porosity from gamma ray and bulk density logs, the first and the second derivatives of the log data with respect to depth, well location, and log baselines. Two flow units were defined based on the stratigraphic model and geophysical logs. A three-dimensional reservoir model including the flow units, values of permeability calculated through the artificial neural network and injection pressure-rate information were then used as inputs for a reservoir simulator to predict oil production performance for the center producers in the pilot area. This description of the reservoir provided significantly better simulation results than earlier results obtained using simple reservoir models. Bulk density and gamma ray logs were used to identify flow units throughout the field. As predicted by the stratigraphic analysis, one of the flow units crosses stratigraphic units in the reservoir. A neural network was used to predict permeability values for each flow unit in producer and injection wells. The reservoir simulator was utilized to predict the performance of two flood patterns located to the north of the pilot area. Considering the simple model utilized for simulation, the results are in very good agreement with the field history.

S. Ameri; K. Aminian; K.L. Avary; H.I. Bilgesu; M.E. Hohn; R.R. McDowell; D.L. Matchen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 33, quarter ending December 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental and safety, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress Review No. 31, quarter ending June 30, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental, petroleum technology, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 32, quarter ending September 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, resource assessment technology, extraction technology, environmental and safety, microbial enhanced oil recovery, oil recovery by gravity mining, improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 34, quarter ending March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Progress achieved for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; and thermal/heavy oil. In addition, progress reports are presented for: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovered by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 36 for quarter ending September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports for the quarter ending September 30, 1983, are presented for field projects and supported research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; oil recovery by gravity mining; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Reasons for production decline in the diatomite, Belridge oil field: a rock mechanics view  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes research conducted on diatomite cores from the Belridge oil field in Kern County, CA. The study was undertaken to explain the rapid decline in oil production in diatomite wells by investigating three of six possible reasons. Characterization of the rock indicated that the rock was composed of principally amorphous opaline silica diatoms with only a trace of crystoballite quartz or chert quartz. Physical properties tests showed the diatomite to be of very low strength and plastic. It was established that longterm creep of diatomite into a propped fracture proceeds at a rate of approximately 1.5 microns/D (1.5 ..mu..m/d), a phenomenon that may contribute to rapid production declines. Also revealed was a matrix strength for the formation of about 1,325 psi (9136 kPa), a critical value to consider when depleting the reservoir. This also may help to explain the phase transformation to Opal CT around 2,000to 2,500-ft (610- to 762-m) depth.

Strickland, F.G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Oil Field Electrical Energy Savings Through Energy-Efficient Motor Retrofits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wyoming Electric Motor Training and Testing Center (WEMTTC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy-Denver Support Office and the Naval Petroleum Reserve #3 (NPR-3), has conducted an extensive study of electric motor efficiency at the Reserve's oil field near Casper, Wyoming. As a result of this project, WEMTTC has developed a new test method for estimating an electric motor's operating efficiency, and the instrumentation to implement this test method. Using the new test method and instrumentation, several oversized or inefficient motors were replaced with new generation, high-efficiency motors, and the savings documented. This paper describes the test method and instrumentation developed by WEMTTC. The results obtained from the actual energy-efficient motor retrofits are also presented.

Ula, S.; Bershinsky, V.; Cain, W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Simulation studies of steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Simulation studies were performed to evaluate a novel technology, steam-propane injection, for the heavy Hamaca crude oil. The oil has a gravity of 9.3?API and (more)

Venturini, Gilberto Jose

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period January--March 1991  

SciTech Connect

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on Enhanced Oil Recovery for the quarter ending March 31, 1991 are reviewed. A list of available publications is listed. Research topics include microbial EOR, foam injection, thermal recovery, surfactant flooding, reservoir rock characterization, and more.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Prehistoric jewelry of the NAN Ranch Ruin (LA15049), Grant County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jewelry from the NAN Ranch Ruin (A.D. 600/650-1140), southwestern New Mexico, is analyzed with the following research goals: to describe the physical properties of the jewelry, to provide a contextual analysis in the form of mortuary and spatial patterning, and to interpret the social and ceremonial roles that jewelry played for the Mimbres at the NAN Ruin. Comparative data are provided, when available, from additional sites in the Mimbres Valley and the greater Southwest. The jewelry from the NAN Ruin is of two main material types, marine shell and stone. The most common jewelry types made from these materials are beads, pendants, and bracelets. In total, 1,970 individual pieces of marine shell jewelry, both whole and fragmentary, were recovered from the site. These materials include unidentified white shell, unidentified shell, Glycymeris, Nassarius, Pecten, Haliotis, Spondylus, Olivella, Conus, Coral, Strombus, Turritella, Architectonicidae, and Columbella. The majority of the marine shell originated in the Gulf of California. Shell jewelry was likely imported into the NAN Ranch Ruin from the Hohokam, who controlled the trade of marine shell throughout the region. In total, 10, 185 individual items of stone jewelry and materials, whole and fragmentary, were present at the NAN Ruin. These materials include talc, kaolinite, turquoise, galena, unidentified stone, quartz, slate, malachite, hematite, limestone, pumice, rhyolite, copper, jadeite, and basalt. All of these materials were available locally or within a short distance from the Mimbres Valley. A little over a quarter of the mortuary population (28.1%) at the NAN Ranch Ruin was associated with jewelry. Based on the application of two statistical tests, binomial distribution and factor analysis, there is no strong evidence that the presence of jewelry in the mortuary record is indicative of particular social categories, lineage affiliations, or vertical social stratification. The association of jewelry with specific architectural features, as well as cached deposits, indicate that jewelry was included in non-mortuary ceremonial contexts. Ethnographic data supports this archaeological inference.

Parks-Barrett, Maria Shannon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Enhanced oil recovery using water as a driving fluid - 10. field applications of surfactant/polymer flooding  

SciTech Connect

Selection of a suitable reservoir, studies required to support a field application, pilot testing, minifield tests and a review of field applications to date are discussed. It is concluded that surfactant/polymer flooding has a greater potential than other chemical flood processes to mobilize and recover waterflood residual oil. However, the process is complex and costly and requires the utmost in technical expertise and economic incentives to be made to work profitably. 9 refs.

Mungan, N.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications: North Sea oil field example  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain  

SciTech Connect

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Estimating attenuation properties of bentonite layer in Cut Bank oil field, Glacier County, Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acquisition and interpretation of 3-D seismic data led DeAngelo and Hardage (2001) to describe the channel system in the south central Cut Bank area in Glacier County, Montana. The presence of a low velocity layer called Bentonite was also discovered in the area with the help of well-logs. Bentonite is a volcanic ash, which lies on both sides of the channel system and is absent within the channel. DeAngelo and Hardage (2001) shot a vertical seismic profiling (VSP) survey at well # 54-8 to analyze the formation structure in depth, since seismic signals around the reservoir area were unclear in the 3-D survey. This research attempts to estimate the attenuation properties of the Bentonite layer in the Cut Bank oil field. VSP data is processed for velocity information and estimation of seismic Q using the spectral ratios method (SRM). The SRM theoretically assumes that the propagating signal is a plane seismic wave traveling vertically from one point to another in a homogeneous model. The amplitudes at the start and end points are known and relate to each other with the attenuation coefficient in a frequency range. The relation between the seismic amplitudes at z distance from each other can be expressed as a linear function of frequency after a few modifications. SRM uses the linearity of the logarithmic ratio of the seismic amplitudes over a frequency range. In theory, ratios plotted against a frequency range must produce a flat line. However, in practice, the logarithmic ratios are expected to draw an approximate line (curve), where some of the data points deviate from the origin of the line. Thus fitting a line to the ratios curve and calculating the slope of this curve are necessary. Slope of the curve relates to the seismic attenuation coefficient and further to the seismic Q. The SRM results suggest that Bentonite may have a Q value as low as 5. This highly attenuative and thin (20 to 40 feet throughout the south central Cut Bank Unit) layer alters seismic signals propagating through it. A thorough analysis of the amplitude spectra suggests that seismic signals dramatically lose their energy when they pass through Bentonite. Low energy content of the signals below the Bentonite layer highlights that the recovery of the seismic energy is less likely despite the presence of multiples, which are known to affect the seismic signals constructively. Therefore, separation of reflected events is a greater challenge for the thin reservoir sand units lying underneath the Bentonite layer. Thus the Bentonite layer in the Cut Bank oil field has to be taken seriously and data processing should be done accordingly for better accuracy.

Karakurt, Necdet

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Recovery efficiency of enhanced oil recovery methods: a review of significant field tests  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes past enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects to determine how well they have performed as a function of reservoir and process variables. In total, over 100 key tests covering the following six major enhanced oil recovery techniques are analyzed: Steam Drive, In-Situ Combustion, Carbon Dioxide Flooding, Polymer Flooding, Surfactant/Polymer Flooding, and Alkaline Flooding. The analysis includes, by technique and geographical area: the range of oil recovery due to EOR in barrels per acre-foot and as a percentage of oil remaining in-place; a comparison between predicted performance and actual oil recovery; an examination of the performance of different EOR processes within each of the six techniques; and an analysis of the relation of reservoir parameters and process variables to oil recovery.

Hammershaimb, E.C.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Stosur, G.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Recovery efficiency of enhanced oil recovery methods: a review of significant field tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study analyzes past enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects to determine how well they have performed as a function of reservoir and process variables. In total, over 100 key tests covering the following 6 major enhanced oil recovery techniques are analyzed: steam drive, in situ combustion, carbon dioxide flooding, polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, and alkaline flooding. The analysis includes, by technique and geographic area, (1) the range of oil recovery due to EOR in barrels per acre-foot and as a percentage of oil remaining in-place; (2) a comparison between predicted performance and actual oil recovery; (3) an examination of the performance of different EOR processes within each of the 6 techniques; and (4) an analysis of the relation of reservoir parameters and process variables to oil recovery.

Hammershaimb, E.C.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Stosur, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request for a cultural resources review from Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Action Plan for Characterization of McGee Ranch Soil, Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Hanford Cultural Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey of the McGee Ranch vicinity, located in the northwest portion of the Hanford Site. Staff members covered 8.4 km{sup 2} and recorded 42 cultural resources; 22 sites, and 20 isolated artifacts. Only 2 sites and 3 isolates were attributed to a prehistoric Native American occupation. The historic sites date from the turn of the century to the 1940s and are representative of the settlement patterns that occurred throughout the Columbia Basin. In addition to an archaeological pedestrian survey of the project area, we conducted literature and records searches and examined available aerial photographs. Records kept at HCRL were reviewed to determine if any archaeological survey had been conducted previously within the project area. Although no survey had been conducted, portions of the area adjacent to project boundaries were surveyed in 1988 and 1990. During those surveys, historic and prehistoric cultural resources were observed, increasing the possibility that similar land usage had taken place within the current project boundaries. Literature searches established a general historical sequence for this area. Aerial photographs alerted researchers to homesteads and linear features, such as roads and irrigation ditches, that might not be apparent from ground level.

Gard, H.A.; Poet, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Analysis of Data from a Downhole Oil/Water Separator Field Trial in East Texas  

SciTech Connect

Downhole oil/water separator (DOWS) technology is available to separate oil from produced water at the bottom of an oil well. Produced water can be injected directly to a disposal formation rather than lifting it to the surface, treating it there, and reinjecting it. Because of a lack of detailed performance data on DOWS systems, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided funding to secure DOWS performance data. A large U.S. oil and gas operator offered to share its data with Argonne National Laboratory. This report summarizes data from the DOWS installation in eastern Texas.

Veil, John A.; Layne, Arthur Langhus

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

303

Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Identifying distribution of remaining oil in the reservoir is vital for evaluation of existing waterflood, design of tertiary recovery projects, and location of infill drilling (more)

Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In order for it to be useful, ... After the establishment of the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1977, the requirement to gather annual, verifiable oil and

305

Disposal of oil field wastes and NORM wastes into salt caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), the risk to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne's research indicates that disposal of NOW into salt caverns is feasible and, in most cases, would not be prohibited by state agencies (although those agencies may need to revise their wastes management regulations). A risk analysis of several cavern leakage scenarios suggests that the risk from cavern disposal of NOW and NORM wastes is below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J. A.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

Probing Asphaltene Aggregation in Native Crude Oils with Low-Field NMR  

SciTech Connect

We show that low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation and diffusion experiments can be used to study asphaltene aggregation directly in crude oils. Relaxation was found to be multiexponential, reflecting the composition of a complex fluid. Remarkably, the relaxation data for samples with different asphaltene concentrations can be collapsed onto each other by a simple rescaling of the time dimension with a concentration-dependent factor {zeta}, whereas the observed diffusion behavior is unaffected by asphaltene concentration. We interpret this finding in terms of a theoretical model that explains the enhanced relaxation by the transitory entanglement of solvent hydrocarbons within asphaltene clusters and their subsequent slowed motion and diffusion within the cluster. We relate the measured scaling parameters {zeta} to cluster sizes, which we find to be on the order of 2.2-4.4 nm for an effective sphere diameter. These sizes are in agreement with the typical values reported in the literature as well as with the small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments performed on our samples.

Zielinski, Lukasz; Saha, Indrajit; Freed, Denise E.; Hrlimann, Martin D.; Liu, Yongsheng (BU-M); (Schlumberger-Doll)

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

307

Earth stress measurements in the South Belridge oil field, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within Sections 33 and 34 of the South Belridge oil field, where the principal earth stresses are assumed to lie in vertical or horizontal planes, the azimuth of the greater horizontal earth stress as measured or inferred by several different techniques is N15/sup 0/E +. 15/sup 0/. This agrees with values reported in the literature for the regional stress orientation, which range from N-S to NNE-SSW. At depths of about 850 and 1300 feet, the magnitude of the vertical stress (overburden) lies between those of the greater and lesser horizontal stresses determined from open-hole microfrac tests. At about 2100 feet, however, the vertical and lesser horizontal stresses are equal, to within the limits of accuracy of the authors' measurements. If trends of stress versus depth established at the three measurement points continue downward, there is the possibility that at depths below 2100 feet the minimum stress may be vertical. The most reliable methods used for determining in-situ stress orientation at South Belridge are surface tiltmeters and orientation of out-of-round (elliptical) boreholes. Study of natural fractures in the nearby Chico-Martinez Creek outcrop provided important supporting evidence of stress orientation. Impression packers run during the microfrac tests and seismic data recorded during routine hydraulic fracturing procedures yielded much less definitive information concerning fracture and stress direction.

Hansen, K.S.; Purcell, W.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated reservoir characterization of a Tulare steamflood finds bypassed oil - South Belridge Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir quality and producibility are directly related to the characteristics of the depositional lithofacies. Electric log gamma ray/resistivity profiles were used to define facies trends within the Tulare steamflood at South Belridge. Channel and non-channel facies profiles are distinctive across the lease with the channel sands having the better quality reservoir and greater net pay values. Sidewall core permeabilities were averaged over the main producing Tulare intervals with the channels averaging 2000-3000 millidarcies and non-channels 200-500 millidarcies. This supports the lithofacies trend and net pay maps. Although the approach is qualitative, it illustrates the dramatic permeability contrast between the channel and non-channel lithofacies. Temperature maps using downhole temperature surveys and flowline temperatures indicate channel facies temperatures up to 300[degrees] with the non-channel facies having 90[degrees] to 100[degrees] temperatures (near ambient). Higher temperatures also relate to higher average daily production rates for channel associated wells. Channel wells averaged greater than 30 BOPD while non-channel wells averaged 10 BOPD or less. New and replacement well nations have been high graded resulting in favorable production responses. Integration of the lithofacies, permeability and temperature data plus ongoing preventive production optimization work has led to a more efficient Tulare steamflood and identification of bypassed oil on the King-Ellis lease in the South Belridge Field.

Walter, D.R.; Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Broussard, K.A. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ground water and oil field waste sites: a study in Vermilion Parish  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water samples were obtained from 128 private water wells surrounding eight oil field waste sites in Vermilion Parish. The specimens were analyzed for five heavy metals: barium, arsenic, chromium, lead, and cadmium. Half of the specimens were then analyzed for 16 volatile organic compounds. A blood sample was obtained from healthy adults drinking water from the wells tested for volatile organic compounds and this blood sample was also analyzed for volatile organic compounds. None of the water samples had levels of heavy metals or volatile organic compounds that exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards. Barium levels in excess of 250 parts per billion suggested that styrene, toluene, and chloroform might be present. Blood levels of volatile organic compounds were significantly higher than could be accounted for by water consumption with levels in smokers significantly higher than in nonsmokers. These data suggest that as yet there is no contamination of ground water supplies around these sites. Volatile organic accumulation in humans probably occurs from a respiratory rather than from an oral route.

Rainey, J.M.; Groves, F.D.; DeLeon, I.R.; Joubert, P.E. (LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

3D Atlas vertical plate oil transmission line field calculations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of questions regarding current density and inductance estimates of the Atlas oil transmission line in the region where the vertical plates connect to the disk line, calculations using the 3D FE program Flux3d were initiated. Flux3d inductance values are nearly that estimated by D. Scudder. Calculations for three base designs of E. Ballard and D. Pierce were completed where several variations for each base design were used to determine the important parameters affecting inductance and to check inductance consistency. Flux3d showed for the first base design a very high current density of 36MA/m at the connection between the vertical and horizontal ground plates resulting in a magnetic pressure of 120 kpsi. The second base design modified this connection to reduce the current density to 20MA/m and 36 kpsi and for design 3 current density is 17MA/m. Maximum current density on the hot plates is 20MA/m for all 3 designs. These values assumed 1.2MA per VTL or 45.6MA total system current. Electrical fields on the top of the hot plate near the disk line connection is about 50% greater than the nominal value near the center of the vertical plates.

NONE

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

311

Super-giant oil fields and future prospects in the Middle East  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper Jurassic carbonates, Lower Cretaceous sands, Lower Cretaceous carbonates and Tertiary carbonates of the Middle East contain more than 50% of the worlds oil. Our area of interest covers SE Turkey and Syria in the north to the borders of Yemen and Oman in the south, and from the Red Sea across Saudi Arabia, the Emirates and the Arabian/Persian Gulf to Iran in the East. There are over 80 fields in this region with over 1 billion barrels of recoverable reserves. Yet only around 30,000 wells have been drilled in this territory. Regional structure and stratigraphy are discussed within the context of three major plays in the region as well as a new play in the Permo-Carboniferous. Numerous opportunities are available and countries such as Iraq and Iran may one day open their doors more to the industry than is presently the case. The dramatic petroleum geology of the region will stamp its influence on the nature of business and opportunities for years to come. While fiscal systems here already offer some of the toughest terms in the world, future deals in the more prolific areas will be even tougher. But, the economies of Middle Eastern scale will provide some of the great mega-opportunities of future international exploration.

Christian, L. [Consultant, Dallas, TX (United States); Johnston, D. [Daniel Johnston & Co., Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

of oil yields from enhanced oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO oil yields from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO 2 storage capacity in depleted oil reservoirs. The primary goal of the project is to demonstrate that remaining oil can be economically produced using CO 2 -EOR technology in untested areas of the United States. The Citronelle Field appears to be an ideal site for concurrent CO 2 storage and EOR because the field is composed of sandstone reservoirs

313

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 29, quarter ending December 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Highlights of progress accomplished during the quarter ending December, 1981, are summarized in this report. Discussion is presented under the following headings: chemical flooding - field projects; chemical flooding - supporting research; carbon dioxide injection - field projects; carbon dioxide injection - supporting research; thermal/heavy oil - field projects and supporting research; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental aspects; petroleum processing technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and improved drilling technology. (DMC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Comment and response document for the long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, Lakeview, Oregon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains comments made by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission addressing their concerns over the long-term monitoring program for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, UMTRA project. Responses are included as well as plans for implementation of changes, if any are deemed necessary.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Many new ventures in the Middle East focus on old oil, gas fields  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the oil and supplies of the world and then focuses on the Middle East as the primary source of oil and gas for the world in the future. It provides data on the total world production and reserves and compares that to the Middle East production and reserves. Data is also provided on pricing and consumption from 1965 to 1995. It goes on to provide information on petroleum exports for the major users and makes predictions on future trends. Finally the paper presents aspects of investment opportunities, sources or needs for capital investments, and the politics associated with the Middle East oil and gas industry.

Takin, M. [Centre for Global Energy Studies, London (United Kingdom)

1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California  

SciTech Connect

A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (Dept. of Energy, Tupman, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Permian `Wolfcamp` limestone reservoirs: Powell ranch field, eastern Midland basin: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The {open_quotes}E&P Notes{close_quotes} paper by S.L. Montgomery (1996) on Wolfcamp resedimented carbonates in the Permian basin concerns an exploration play with the potential for significant reserves; however, its economic importance and geological complexity, and the question of whether his model can be extended to other areas in the Permian basin warrant this discussion.

Mazzullo, S.J. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 27, for quarter ending June 30, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Progress review No. 24: contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress report, quarter ending September 30, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection and thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: extraction technology; resource assessment technology; environmental; petroleum technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 30, quarter ending March 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology, and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 35, quarter ending June 30, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal/heavy oil; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improved drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Progress review No. 25: contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress report, quarter ending December 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports are presented of contracts for field projects and supporting research on chemical flooding, carbon dioxide injection, thermal/heavy oil, as well as for the following areas of research: resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental; microbial enhanced oil recovery; improving drilling technology; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

DOE field test produces more oil, royalties from the Green River Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews a waterflood demonstration project that Lomax Exploration Company performed in the Monument Butte area of Utah. The results of this project were so successful that the methodology is being extended to other similar properties of Utah with oil shale deposits. The paper describes the reservoir characterization methods, methods of sampling and analyzing the reservoir data, the cost of designing and performing the waterflood projects, and the future of such a technology on the declining domestic oil production.

Lomax, J.D. [Lomax Energy LLC, Laguna Beach, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

329

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 37, quarter ending December 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

Project reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal methods; resource assessment technology; extraction technology; environmental and safety; microbial enhanced oil recovery; and general supporting research.

Linville, B. (ed.)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using the rotating cylinder electrode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications in defined flow conditions. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force, December 1990--February 1991; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, April--June 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oil Implementation Task Force was appointed to implement the US DOE's new oil research program directed toward increasing domestic oil production by expanded research on near- or mid-term enhanced oil recovery methods. An added priority is to preserve access to reservoirs that have the largest potential for oil recovery, but that are threatened by the large number of wells abandoned each year. This report describes the progress of research activities in the following areas: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; microbial technology; geoscience technology; and environmental technology. (CK)

Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

334

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

335

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope crude oil; (3) ...

336

Influence of irrigation and weathering reactions on the composition of percolates from retorted oil shale in field lysimeters  

SciTech Connect

Major cations, anions, trace elements and dissolved organic C were measured in percolate from retorted oil shale collected from irrigated lysimeters in the field at Anvil Points, Colorado, over a two year period. The investigations indicated that chemical equilibrium was not established over the monitoring period and major changes occurred in percolate composition as a function of applied water volume and water residence time in the shale. Field and laboratory studies indicated that several factors contributed to changes in the chemistry of the shale on weathering, including recarbonization of the surface horizons with atmospheric CO/sub 2/ and the activities of microorganisms in surface and subsurface horizons. However, the principal mechanism responsible for the decreases in pH and salt concentrations appeared to be the conversion of major quantities of sulfide in the retorted shale to sulfate through a thiosulfate intermediate.

Garland, T. R.; Wildung, R. E.; Harbert, H. P.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Development and field application of a mathematical model for predicting the kinematic viscosity of crude oil/diluter mixture under continuous production conditions  

SciTech Connect

Experience producing medium to heavy oil areas has demonstrated that most conventional artificial production systems are inefficient. This situation has been improved by mixing diluter fluids or light crude oil with medium to heavy crude oil downhole. The mixing increases production efficiency, crude oil selling value, and conditions crude to meet minimum selling conditions. An analytical model has been developed to analyze the behavior of crude oil/diluter mixtures under continuous production conditions. The model developed for this study has practical application in field operations. The most important applications are: to select the proper diluter fluid to be used in a specific area; to calculate the exact amount of diluter to be mixed with crude oil to obtain a specific viscosity; to forecast the amount of diluter fluid required for normal and continuous oilfield operations; to predict crude oil-diluter mixture kinematic viscosity under any proportion of the components for economic evaluation; and to calculate API gravities of the produced mixture under continuous operation. The crude oils used in this study have a gravity between 8.6/sup 0/API and 14.3/sup 0/API. The diluters used have a gravity between 31.4/sup 0/API and 63/sup 0/API. The paper presents the analytical model and one application to Venezuelan field in the Orinoco Petroleum Belt, one of the largest oil reserves in the world. Each well in the field has a different viscosity and different production rate. The production rate was considered continuous and under exponential decline.

Alcocer, C.F.; Menzie, D.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian Clinton sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (Huff-n-Puff) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a Clinton-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day soak period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the Clinton sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the Clinton in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic- CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the Clinton reservoir in the ECOF.

Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 1/2 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the 'Clinton' in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic-CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the 'Clinton' reservoir in the ECOF.

Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Experimental study of enhancement of injectivity and in-situ oil upgrading by steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experiments were conducted to study the feasibility of using propane as a steam additive to accelerate oil production and improve steam injectivity in the Hamaca (more)

Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

342

Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability trends. The Lower Grandstand sand consists of two coarsening-upward shoreface sands sequences while the Upper Grandstand consists of a single coarsening-upward shoreface sand. Each of the shoreface sands shows a distinctive permeability profile with high horizontal permeability at the top getting progressively poorer towards the base of the sand. In contrast, deltaic sandstones in the overlying Ninuluk are more permeable at the base of the sands, with decreasing permeability towards the sand top. These trends impart a strong permeability anisotropy to the reservoir and are being incorporated into the reservoir model. These observations also suggest that horizontal wells should target the upper part of the major sands. Natural fractures may superimpose another permeability pattern on the Umiat reservoir that need to be accounted for in both the simulation and in drilling. Examination of legacy core from Umiat field indicate that fractures are present in the subsurface, but don't provide information on their orientation and density. Nearby surface exposures of folds in similar stratigraphy indicate there are at least three possible fracture sets: an early, N/S striking set that may predate folding and two sets possibly related to folding: an EW striking set of extension fractures that are parallel to the fold axes and a set of conjugate shear fractures oriented NE and NW. Analysis of fracture spacing suggests that these natural fractures are fairly widely spaced (25-59 cm depending upon the fracture set), but could provide improved reservoir permeability in horizontal legs drilled perpendicular to the open fracture set. The phase behavior of the Umiat fluid needed to be well understood in order for the reservoir simulation to be accurate. However, only a small amount of Umiat oil was available; this oil was collected in the 1940s and was severely weathered. The composition of this dead Umiat fluid was characterized by gas chromatography. This analysis was then compared to theoretical Umiat composition derived using the Pedersen method with original Umiat

Hanks, Catherine

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 2000 - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

respondents to Form FPC 15, Interstate Pipelines Annual ... conventions imposed by the data block length on DOE forms and by the field naming ...

344

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field tests and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding, gas displacement; thermal methods; resource assessment technology; environmental technology and microbial technology.

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

Peggy Robinson

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Experimental and Computational Studies of Fluid Flow Phenomena in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine and Oil Fields  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA IN CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE AND OIL FIELDS Chuang Ji ( chuang.ji@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Goodarz Ahmadi ( ahmadi@clarkson.edu ) BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Duane H. Smith ( duane.smith@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 2 INTRODUCTION Sequestration of CO 2 by injection into deep geological formations is a method to reduce CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, when CO 2 is injected underground, it forms fingers extending into the rock pores saturated with brine or petroleum. This flow

347

U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Parker, Jack C [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

New Acid Stimulation Treatment to Sustain Production - Los Angeles Downtown Oil Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrochloric acid stimulation was successfully used on several wells in the Los Angeles Downtown Field, in the past. The decline rates after stimulation were relatively high and generally within six months to a year, production rates have returned to their prestimulation rates. The wells in Los Angeles Downtown Field have strong scale producing tendencies and many wells are treated for scale control. Four wells were carefully selected that are representative of wells that had a tendency to form calcium carbonate scale and had shown substantial decline over the last few years.

Russell, Richard C.

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 89  

SciTech Connect

Summaries are presented for the DOE contracts related to supported research for thermal recovery of petroleum, geoscience technology, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Data included for each project are: title, contract number, principal investigator, research organization, beginning date, expected completion date, amount of award, objectives of the research, and summary of technical progress.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Numerical calculation of thermal field distribution in oil immersed power transformer: a comparison of methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarise a few computational methods and engineering models proposed for transformer thermal analysis and the accurate prediction of transformer thermal characteristics. The paper presents different approach for numerical calculation of thermal ... Keywords: hot-spot temperature, numerical calculation, power transformer, thermal field

Vlado Madzarevic; Izudin Kapetanovic; Majda Tesanovic; Mensur Kasumovic

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 82, quarterly report, January--March 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document consists of a list of projects supporting work on oil recovery programs. A publications list and index of companies and institutions is provided. The remaining portion of the document provides brief descriptions on projects in chemical flooding, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, resource assessment, and reservoir class field demonstrations.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, reporting period January--March 1991. Progress review No. 66, quarter ending March 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on Enhanced Oil Recovery for the quarter ending March 31, 1991 are reviewed. A list of available publications is listed. Research topics include microbial EOR, foam injection, thermal recovery, surfactant flooding, reservoir rock characterization, and more.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Disposal of NORM-Contaminated Oil Field Wastes in Salt Caverns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Petroleum Technology Office National Petroleum Technology Office under Contract W -31-109- under Contract W -31-109- Eng Eng -38 -38 Prepared by: Prepared by: John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David John A. Veil, Karen P. Smith, David Tomasko Tomasko , , Deborah Deborah Elcock Elcock , Deborah L. Blunt, and , Deborah L. Blunt, and Gustavious Gustavious P. W illiams P. W illiams Argonne National Laboratory August 1998 August 1998 Disposal of NORM - Disposal of NORM - Contam inated O il Contam inated O il Field Wastes in Salt Field Wastes in Salt Caverns Caverns Disposal of NORM in Salt Caverns Page i Table of Contents Acronyms and Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

354

Constitutive models for the Etchegoin Sands, Belridge Diatomite, and overburden formations at the Lost Hills oil field, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development of constitutive material models for the overburden formations, reservoir formations, and underlying strata at the Lost Hills oil field located about 45 miles northwest of Bakersfield in Kern County, California. Triaxial rock mechanics tests were performed on specimens prepared from cores recovered from the Lost Hills field, and included measurements of axial and radial stresses and strains under different load paths. The tested intervals comprise diatomaceous sands of the Etchegoin Formation and several diatomite types of the Belridge Diatomite Member of the Monterey Formation, including cycles both above and below the diagenetic phase boundary between opal-A and opal-CT. The laboratory data are used to drive constitutive parameters for the Extended Sandler-Rubin (ESR) cap model that is implemented in Sandia's structural mechanics finite element code JAS3D. Available data in the literature are also used to derive ESR shear failure parameters for overburden formations. The material models are being used in large-scale three-dimensional geomechanical simulations of the reservoir behavior during primary and secondary recovery.

FOSSUM,ARLO F.; FREDRICH,JOANNE T.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Exploration of the Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource, Nye County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Upper Hot Creek Ranch (UHCR) geothermal system had seen no significant exploration activity prior to initiation of this GRED III project. Geochemical geothermometers calculated from previously available but questionable quality analyses of the UHCR hot spring waters indicated possible subsurface temperatures of +320 oF. A complex Quaternary and Holocene faulting pattern associated with a six mile step over of the Hot Creek Range near the UHCR also indicated that this area was worthy of some exploration activity. Permitting activities began in Dec. 2004 for the temperature-gradient holes but took much longer than expected with all drilling permits finally being received in early August 2005. The drilling and geochemical sampling occurred in August 2005. Ten temperature gradient holes up to 500 deep were initially planned but higher than anticipated drilling and permitting costs within a fixed budget reduced the number of holes to five. Four of the five holes drilled to depths of 300 to 400 encountered temperatures close to the expected regional thermal background conditions. These four holes failed to find any evidence of a large thermal anomaly surrounding the UHCR hot springs. The fifth hole, located within a narrow part of Hot Creek Canyon, encountered a maximum temperature of 81 oF at a depth of 105 but had cooler temperatures at greater depth. Temperature data from this hole can not be extrapolated to greater depths. Any thermal anomaly associated with the UHCR geothermal system is apparently confined to the immediate vicinity of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples were collected for chemical analysis and interpretation. Analyses of three samples of the UHCR thermal give predicted subsurface temperatures ranging from 317 to 334 oF from the Na-K-Ca, silica (quartz), and Na-Li geothermometers. The fact that all three thermometers closely agree gives the predictions added credibility. Unfortunately, the final result of this exploration is that a moderate temperature geothermal resource has been clearly identified but it appears to be restricted to a relatively small area that would be difficult to develop.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Novel Cleanup Agents Designed Exclusively for Oil Field Membrane Filtration Systems Low Cost Field Demonstrations of Cleanup Agents in Controlled Experimental Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of our project is to develop innovative processes and novel cleaning agents for water treatment facilities designed to remove fouling materials and restore micro-filter and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane performance. This project is part of Texas A&M University's comprehensive study of the treatment and reuse of oilfield brine for beneficial purposes. Before waste water can be used for any beneficial purpose, it must be processed to remove contaminants, including oily wastes such as residual petroleum hydrocarbons. An effective way of removing petroleum from brines is the use of membrane filters to separate oily waste from the brine. Texas A&M and its partners have developed highly efficient membrane treatment and RO desalination for waste water including oil field produced water. We have also developed novel and new cleaning agents for membrane filters utilizing environmentally friendly materials so that the water from the treatment process will meet U.S. EPA drinking water standards. Prototype micellar cleaning agents perform better and use less clean water than alternate systems. While not yet optimized, the new system restores essentially complete membrane flux and separation efficiency after cleaning. Significantly the amount of desalinated water that is required to clean the membranes is reduced by more than 75%.

David Burnett; Harold Vance

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery, July--September 1990  

SciTech Connect

The report contains a general introduction and background to DOE's revised National Energy Strategy Advanced Oil Recovery Program and activities of the Oil Implementation Task Force; a detailed synopsis of the symposium, including technical presentations, comments and suggestions; a section of technical information on deltaic reservoirs; and appendices containing a comprehensive listing of references keyed to general deltaic and geological aspects of reservoirs and those relevant to six selected deltaic plays. Enhanced recovery processes include chemical floodings, gas displacement, thermal recovery, geoscience, and microbial recovery.

Tiedemann, H.A. (ed.) (USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Depositional setting and reservoir geology of Kuparuk River oil field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kuparuk River field is located approximately 20 mi (32 km) west of the Prudhoe Bay field and produces from the Lower Cretaceous Kuparuk River formation. The lower member of the Kuparuk is a sequence of interbedded sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone. Individual sandstone beds in the lower member are up to 5 ft (1.5 m) thick and consist of fine-grained, well-sorted quartzarenite. The basal part of the lower member contains five sandstone-rich cycles that prograde to the southeast. Each individual cycle strikes northeast-southwest and is up to 80 ft (254 m) thick, 40 mi (64 km) long, and 15 mi (25 km) wide. The lower member sandstones are interpreted to be storm deposits derived from a northerly source and deposited on a broad marine shelf. The upper member was deposited on an erosional unconformity and contains two sandstone intervals. These sandstone intervals are quartzose, glauconitic, very fine to coarse grained, poorly to moderately sorted, and intensely bioturbated. Both upper member sandstones are interpreted to have been deposited as subtidal sand bodies. The upper and lower member sandstones have similar average porosities (23%), but the average permeability of upper member sandstone is considerably higher than the average permeability of the lower member. Natural fractures in siderite-demented zones enhance the permeability of the upper member sandstone. Reservoir performance indicates that permeability is greatest in a north-south direction in upper member sandstones, and that a north-south directional permeability may also exist in lower member sandstone. North-south-oriented line-drive waterflood patterns will be utilized in areas where a north-south directional permeability is suspected.

Paris, C.E.; Masterson, D.W.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Experimental studies of steam and steam-propane injection using a novel smart horizontal producer to enhance oil production in the San Ardo field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 16??16??5.6 in. scaled, three-dimensional, physical model of a quarter of a 9-spot pattern was constructed to study the application of two processes designed to improve the efficiency of steam injection. The first process to be tested is the use of propane as a steam additive with the purpose of increasing recovery and accelerating oil production. The second process involves the use of a novel production configuration that makes use of a vertical injector and a smart horizontal producer in an attempt to mitigate the effects of steam override. The experimental model was scaled using the conditions in the San Ardo field in California and crude oil from the same field was used for the tests. Superheated steam at 190 â?? 200?ºC was injected at 48 cm3/min (cold water equivalent) while maintaining the flowing pressures in the production wells at 50 psig. Liquid samples from each producer in the model were collected and treated to break emulsion and analyzed to determine water and oil volumes. Two different production configurations were tested: (1) a vertical well system with a vertical injector and three vertical producers and (2) a vertical injector-smart horizontal well system that consisted of a vertical injector and a smart horizontal producer divided into three sections. Runs were conducted using pure steam injection and steam-propane injection in the two well configurations. Experimental results indicated the following. First, for the vertical configuration, the addition of propane accelerated oil production by 53% and increased ultimate recovery by an additional 7% of the original oil in place when compared to pure steam injection. Second, the implementation of the smart horizontal system increased ultimate oil recovery when compared to the recovery obtained by employing the conventional vertical well system (49% versus 42% of the OOIP).

Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Dolomitization and dedolomitization models in a fractured reservoir, Reed City oil field, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production in the Michigan basin is essentially from pinnacle reefs or fractured reservoirs. The epigenetically formed porous dolomite reservoir rock is intimately related to the shear faults (channelways for rising high Mg/Ca ratio fluids) and to the resulting shear folds, the latter showing dolomite/calcite ratios increasing generally from outer closure to the fold axes. The Reed City field (anticline) of western Michigan represents a dramatic exception to this picture with the dolomite/calcite ratio increasing from outer closure to maximum part way up the limbs then decreasing to the axis. This lowest zone is the only unit not dedolomitized, a fact perhaps commensurate with its low stratigraphic position at the bottom of (and apparently beyond the reach of) the descending high-calcium, low-magnesium waters what brought about the dedolomitization. The dedolomitization model would call for a shallow water to exposed oxidizing environment, possible with the position of this area astride the West Michigan Barrier that separates a lagoonal facies from a more open sea facies to the east. Thus, waters with a high Ca/Mg ratio passed down the same shear faults that earlier were channelways for the rising high Mg/Ca ratio waters. On the bases of isopach, structure and dolomite/calcite (Isodol) maps, one can piece together a reasonably chronological sequence of pre-Dundee shear faulting and folding, post-Traverse upward migration of dolomitizing fluids, upward migration of hydrocarbons along the shear faults, downward-moving dedolomitizing fluids, and a later episode of faulting (especially shear cross-faults).

Carlton, R.R.; Prouty, C.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Investigating Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO2 Monitoring Project)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO 2 Monitoring and Storage Project) G. Burrowes (Geoffrey_Burrowes@pancanadian.ca; 403-290-2796) PanCanadian Resources 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850 Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2S5 C. Gilboy (cgilboy@sem.gov.sk.ca; 306-787-2573) Petroleum Geology Branch, Saskatchewan Energy and Mines 201 Dewdney Avenue East Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 4G3 Introduction In Western Canada the application of CO 2 injection for enhanced, 'tertiary' oil recovery is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal available to reservoir engineers. The first successful application of CO 2 as a miscible fluid in Western Canada began in 1984 at Joffre Field, a

365

Principal facts for a gravity survey of the Fly Ranch Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area, Pershing County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During July 1977, forty-four gravity stations were obtained in the Fly Ranch Extension Known Geothermal Resource Area and vicinity, northwestern Nevada. The gravity observations were made with a Worden gravimeter having a scale factor of about 0.5 milligal per division. No terrain corrections have been applied to these data. The earth tide correction was not used in drift reduction. The Geodetic Reference System 1967 formula (International Association of Geodesy, 1967) was used to compute theoretical gravity. Observed gravity is referenced to a base station in Gerlach, Nevada, having a value based on the Potsdam System of 1930 (fig. 1). A density of 2.67 g per cm/sup 3/ was used in computing the Bouguer anomaly.

Peterson, D.L.; Kaufmann, H.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 52 quarter ending September 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This progress review on enhanced oil recovery covers: Chemical Flooding /emdash/ Supporting Research; Gas Displacement /emdash/ Supporting Research; Thermal Recovery /emdash/ Supporting Research; Resource Assessment Technology; Geoscience Technology; Environmental Technology; Microbial Technology.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols  

SciTech Connect

Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

368

NETL: Oil & Gas Program Solicitation Partnering Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Business Opportunities Partnering Sheet Oil & Gas Program Solicitation DE-PS-26-05NT15600 Partnering Sheet Closing date: March 01, 2005 University: Industry (Oil field...

369

The Senescent Mimbres Population: An Application of the Transition Analysis to the NAN Ranch Ruin Skeletal Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study uses Transition Analysis on the Mimbres skeletal remains of the NAN Ranch Ruin to provide a more complete picture of its demography. Previous attempts to reconstruct the demographic structure of prehistoric populations have been hindered by aging methods that provide biased age distribution. Early methods had a tendency to produce age distribution similar to that of the reference sample that was used to create them. In addition, they often overlooked sexual dimorphism and left out the senescent portion of the population which in turns produced inaccurate population structures. Transition Analysis is a multifactorial approach to estimate the age-at-death of adult skeletons that focuses on the cranium, the pubic symphysis and the auricular surface of the ilium. The method relies heavily on the Bayesian probability that a given trait or a given combination of traits is displayed at a given age, it recognizes sexual dimorphism, performs well on fragmentary skeletons and allows for the age estimation of older individuals. The NAN Ranch Ruin sample consists of over 240 individuals, including 185 from the Classic Period. A previous study focused on the 81 individuals from the Classic period that were collected during the first five years of excavations. Following age estimation of adult skeleton I constructed composite abridged life tables. For the Classic Period, I found a high infant mortality rate (47%) and low life expectancy at birth (21.14 years) as expected. However, this analysis produced different mortality patterns than older demographic studies, where mid adult mortality increases only slightly, decreases in late adulthood (40-55 years old) and increases again in senescence (55-80 years old), instead of increasing steadily in adulthood to culminate at age 50. This difference is a consequence of the aging methods that have been used to analyze other southwestern prehistoric samples. Finally, while I was not able to confirm different mortality patterns between males and females, I found that people from the east roomblock enjoyed greater longevity than those from the south roomblock, though the difference is not statistically significant.

Lovings, Aline

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Using Flue Gas Huff 'n Puff Technology and Surfactants to Increase Oil Production from the Antelope Shale Formation of the Railroad Gap Oil Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was designed to test cyclic injection of exhaust flue gas from compressors located in the field to stimulate production from Antelope Shale zone producers. Approximately 17,000 m{sup 3} ({+-}600 MCF) of flue gas was to be injected into each of three wells over a three-week period, followed by close monitoring of production for response. Flue gas injection on one of the wells would be supplemented with a surfactant.

McWilliams, Michael

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

371

OpenEI - oil  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

/0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas /0 en AEO2011: Oil and Gas End-of-Year Reserves and Annual Reserve Additions http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/805 This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 134, and contains only the reference case. The data is broken down into Crude oil, dry natural gas. 

License
field field-type-text field-field-license-type"> Type of License: 

372

Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barrels) Product: Crude Oil Liquefied Petroleum Gases Distillate Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Oil Still Gas Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Other...

373

OIL PRODUCTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OIL PRODUCTION Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a term applied to methods used for recovering oil from a petroleum reservoir beyond that recoverable by primary and secondary methods....

374

Crude Oil Analysis Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

Shay, Johanna Y.

375

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Steven Schamel

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

376

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

377

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document presents brief descriptions of research programs concerned with enhanced oil recovery.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 47, Quarter ending June 1986  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for field projects and supporting research for the following: chemical flooding; gas displacement; thermal recovery; resource assessment; environmental technology; and microbial technology. (AT)

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radon (Rn-222) and thoron (Rn-220) emanation fractions from three separate formations of oil field pipe scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the course of normal oil well operations, pipes used downhole in the oil and petroleum industry tend to accumulate a mineral deposit on their interior, which restricts the flow of oil. This deposit, termed scale, will eventually occlude the interior diameter of the pipe making removal from service and descaling a cost effective option. The pipes are sent to cleaning yards where they remain until descaling can be performed. This storage period can potentially create a health concern not only because of the external radiation exposure but also because of the radon gas emissions, both of which are due to the radioactive minerals contained in the scale. It was believed that the structure of the scale is formed tightly enough to prevent much of the radon from becoming airborne. The goal of this research was to determine the emanation fractions for the rattled scale samples from three formations. A high purity germanium detector was used to measure the activities of the parents and progeny of radon, and electret ion chambers were used to measure the concentration of radon emanated from the scale. The emanation fractions of between 4.9x10-5 and 1.08x10-3 for radon were a factor of approximately 100 smaller than previous research results. For thoron, the fractions were and 5.72x10-8 and 4.92x10-7 for thoron with no previous research to compare. However, information that pertains to the temperature dependence of emanation was included in this research and was not available for previous, similar research. Therefore, differences in the environment (e.g., temperature, humidity, etc.) in which the previous experiments were conducted, as well as differences in the scale formation types used, could account for the discrepancy. In addition, measuring the emanation fractions of the rattled scale was a method of determining whether surface to volume ratio dependence existed. After acquiring the emanation fractions, insufficient evidence of any surface to volume ratio dependence could be found.

Fruchtnicht, Erich Harold

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

An Environmental Assessment of Proposed Geothermal Well Testing in the Tigre Lagoon Oil Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an environmental assessment of the proposed testing of two geopressured, geothermal aquifers in central coastal Louisiana. On the basis of an analysis of the environmental setting, subsurface characteristics, and the proposed action, potential environmental impacts are determined and evaluated together with potential conflicts with federal, state, and local programs. Oil and gas wells in coastal Louisiana have penetrated a potentially productive geothermal zone of abnormally high-pressured aquifers that also yield large volumes of natural gas. To evaluate the extent to which the geothermal-geopressured water can be used as an alternative energy source and to what extent withdrawal of geopressured water can enhance gas production, it is necessary that flow rates, composition and temperature of fluids and gases, recharge characteristics, pressures, compressibilities, and other hydrodynamic and boundary conditions of the reservoir be determined by means of production tests. Tests are further necessary to evaluate and seek solutions to technological problems.

None

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of shallow reservoirs. This makes Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Little is known about how to produce conventional oil...

382

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 44, quarter ending September 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for: field projects and supporting research for chemical flooding and gas displacement; supporting research for thermal methods; microbial technology; research assessment technology; and environmental technology.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 48, Quarter ending September 30, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for: (1) chemical flooding (field projects and supporting research); (2) gas displacement (supporting research); (3) thermal methods (supporting research); (4) resource assessment technology; (5) environmental technology; and (5) microbial technology.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review No. 78, quarter ending March 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents descriptions of various research projects and field projects concerned with the enhanced recovery of petroleum. Contract numbers, principal investigators, company names, and project management information is included.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling technology. Progress review No. 22, quarter ending March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains statements of objectives and summaries of technical progress on all DOE contracts pertaining to enhanced oil recovery and improved drilling techniques. Subject categories include chemical flooding; carbon dioxide injection; thermal recovery of heavy oil; resource assessment; improved drilling technology; residual oil; environmental; petroleum technology; and microbial enhanced oil recovery. An index containing the names of the companies and institutions involved is included. Current publications resulting from the DOE contractual program are listed. (DMC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review quarter ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. A list of available publications is also included.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery: Progress review No. 74, Quarter ending March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: chemical flooding--supporting research; gas displacement--supporting research; thermal recovery--supporting research; geoscience technology; resource assessment technology; microbial technology; field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes; and novel technology. A list of available publication is also provided.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Enhanced oil recovery utilizing high-angle wells in the Frontier Formation, Badger Basin Field, Park County, Wyoming. Final report for the period October 1992--October 1993  

SciTech Connect

Badger Basin Field, discovered in 1931, produces at stripper rates from low-permeability fractured sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation. Only 15% of the estimated 25 million barrels of oil originally in-place will be produced from the twenty-two attempted vertical completions. This project will increase recoverable reserves through a better understanding of the reservoir and factors which control production. Characterization of the reservoir has been accomplished through an integrated engineering, geological and geophysical approach. Production data, drilling and completion techniques, and relative location of wells on the anticline were reviewed and related to productivity. Literature was reviewed for interpretations on preferred flow directions on anticlinal structures. A structure map of the producing Frontier reservoir was constructed. Porosity development and its relationship to fracture networks was examined petrographically. Fractures in core were described and oriented using paleomagnetic techniques. Azimuths of fractures in outcrop were compared to fracture azimuths measured in the core. A 17 square-mile 3D seismic survey was designed, acquired and processed. Interpretation is being performed on a Sun workstation using Landmark Graphics software. Time-structure and amplitude-distribution maps will be constructed on three Frontier horizons. A location for a high-angle well will be chosen. The slant/horizontal test will be drilled and completed to increase recovery of reserves. Transfer of successful technologies will be accomplished by technical publications and presentations, and access to project materials, data, and field facilities.

Walker, J.P.; Fortmann, R.G.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Undiscovered Oil and Gas in the Central North1993) Mathematical theory of oil and gas recovery: withapplications to ex-USSR oil and gas fields, Boston: Kluwer

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used the cost of onshore oil wells and dry holes (i.e. , weCosts Alaska onshore oil wells and dry holes Cost per well (field, and the number of oil wells on the cost of production

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Heavy crude oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The oil crisis of the past decade has focused most of the attention and effort of researchers on crude oil resources, which are accepted as unrecoverable using known technology. World reserves are estimated to be 600-1000 billion metric tons, and with present technology 160 billion tons of this total can be recovered. This book is devoted to the discussion of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) techniques, their mechanism and applicability to heavy oil reservoirs. The book also discusses some field results. The use of numerical simulators has become important, in addition to laboratory research, in analysing the applicability of oil recovery processes, and for this reason the last section of the book is devoted to simulators used in EOR research.

Okandan, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the United States. Appendix, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains appendices for the following: Overview of improved oil recovery methods (enhanced oil recovery methods and advanced secondary recovery methods); Benefits of improved oil recovery, selected data for the analyzed states; and List of TORIS fields and reservoirs.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly progress review No. 85, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This documents presents progress on enhanced oil recovery programs and reservoir characterization programs. Information is presented on contract numbers, awards, investigators, and project managers.

Godley, P.; Waisley, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Oil and Oil Derivatives Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for international connection of oiled residues discharge ... C to + 163C, fuels, lubricating oils and hydraulic ... fuel of gas turbine, crude oil, lubricating oil ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

395

An application of Crosswell Tomography using a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source to monitor steam migration in an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone, West Coalinga Field, California  

SciTech Connect

This crosswell tomography field trial demonstrates the viability and cost- reducing benefits of a hydrophone receiver array and airgun source for monitoring steam (heat) migration within an unconsolidated, heavy-oil sandstone. This project represents one of the first applications of hydrophone receivers in such an environment. Data quality from the hydrophone array proved more than adequate for P-wave tomography while costs were reduced dramatically from estimates using a clamped geophone array. Additionally, the resolution provided by the capture of travel-time data from interwell areas offered a distinct advantage over conventional monitoring techniques limited to observation wells. Two crosswell surveys were conducted in the vicinity of a new, infill steam injector. The purpose was to monitor steam migration within an 80-foot thick, sandstone interval by detecting the heat-induced velocity decrease between the first survey, conducted just before steam injection, and the second survey conducted approximately three months later. Difference plots of the two surveys clearly define regions of significant temperature change and contact temperature logs corroborate the zone of peak change. The crosswell tomography data and the inferred steam migration characteristics immediately altered an operational strategy for the drive and were later a factor in the abandonment of continuous steam injection.

Blevens, D.M. (Chevron USA Production Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Fairborn, J.W. (Wellseismic Computing Services, Balboa, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting {sup 238}U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected {sup 241}Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area.

Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

399

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

400

Application of geostatistical reservoir description for maximizing waterflood infill drilling recovery from La Cira Field, Colombia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One of the prospective ways to increase the oil production is to maximize the oil recovery from mature oil fields. In this study we apply (more)

Cubillos Gutierrez, Helber

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ranch oil field" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Symposium on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Second Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 5 to 8, 1981. Forty-four technical papers were presented which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery. Field tests, laboratory investigations, and mathematical analyses of tertiary recovery methods such as microemulsion flooding, carbon dioxide injection, in-situ combustion, steam injection, and gas injection are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

Nelson, Donald G.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Oil reserves  

SciTech Connect

As of March 1988, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory totaled 544.9 million barrels of oil. During the past 6 months the Department of Energy added 11.0 million barrels of crude oil to the SPR. During this period, DOE distributed $208 million from the SPR Petroleum Account. All of the oil was purchased from PEMEX--the Mexican national oil company. In FY 1988, $164 million was appropriated for facilities development and management and $439 million for oil purchases. For FY 1989, DOE proposes to obligate $173 million for facilities development and management and $236 million for oil purchases. DOE plans to postpone all further drawdown exercises involving crude oil movements until their effects on cavern integrity are evaluated. DOE and the Military Sealift Command have made progress in resolving the questions surrounding nearly $500,000 in payments for demurrage charges.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Illinois Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ... They many differ from the official Energy Information Administration production data for crude oil ...

405

Kentucky Crude Oil Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ... They many differ from the official Energy Information Administration production data for crude oil ...

406

Michigan Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production (Million Barrels) Area: ... New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields ...

407

Selected Abstracts & Bibliography of International Oil Spill Research, through 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Michigan, Oil Spills, Underground Storage, Monitoring Two column tests were conducted using aquifer material to simulate the nitrate field

Louisiana Applied Oil Spill Research & Development Program Electronic Bibliography

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Microbiology for enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy has sponsored several projects to investigate the feasibility of using microorganisms to enhance oil recovery. Microbes from the Wilmington oilfield, California, were found to be stimulated in growth by polyacrylamide mobility-control polymers and the microbes also can reduce the viscosity of the polyacrylamide solutions. Microbes have been discovered that produce surface active molecules, and several mixed cultures have been developed that make low viscosity, non-wetting, emulsions of heavy oils (/sup 0/API oil deposits, in China for enhanced recovery of light oils and successful field tests have been conducted in Romania and Arkansas.

Donaldson, E.C.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil)...

410

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska Last Reviewed 3272013 DE-FC26-08NT0005641...

411

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steam was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objective of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

Schamel, Steven

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

412

Faculty of MANAGEMENT Alberta Oil & Gas Company1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's producing wells, the history of their wells in producing oil, and the geologists' and engineers' estimateFaculty of MANAGEMENT Alberta Oil & Gas Company1 Daphne Jackson, operations manager for Alberta Oil's interest in the Waptaman oil field. Ordinarily, Will would lead such negotiations himself, but he has been

Nakayama, Marvin K.

413

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the project were: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs.

Mancini, Ernest, A.; Crate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

2002-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

414

Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils  

agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil, grapeseed oil, coconut oil, corn oil, cottonseed oil, olive oil, palm oil, palm kernel oil, peanut oil, ...

415

Getty mines oil sands in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large deposit of oil-laden diatomaceous earth in the McKittrick oil field 40 miles west of Bakersfield, California, has resisted all efforts at production by standard means. Getty Oil Co. is in the pilot phase of a project to recover the Diatomite's oil by an open pit mining operation. It also could have significant implications for other California oil fields, possibly setting the stage for the mining of oil sands in shallow fields like Kern River, S. Belridge, and Lost Hills to maximize oil recovery. A report on the project is summarized. The Diatomite is estimated to have 500 million bbl of oil in reserves, of which 380 million bbl are recoverable. The estimated amount of recoverable oil exceeds the McKittrick field's cumulative production of 240 million bbl. A pilot plant was built to test solvent extraction method of recovering heavy oil. The multistep process involves a series of 6 extractors. The Lurgi retorting plant employs a 2-step heating process to separate hydrocarbons from crushed ore.

Rintoul, B.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1994--December 1994. Progress review No. 81  

SciTech Connect

This document consists of a publications list for field projects and brief descriptions of research projects on enhanced petroleum recovery.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating Oil) PIA - Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve System (Heating...

418

Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new fields to answer our energy needs. Oil companies are keen to use novel techniques) techniques represent arguably the most significant technological advance in the field of oil exploration

Anderson, Jim

419

OIl Speculation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Investor Flows and the 2008 BoomBust in Oil Prices Kenneth J. Singleton 1 August 10, 2011 1 Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, kenneths@stanford.edu. This research...

420

Fossil Energy Research Benefits Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Research Benefits Energy Research Benefits Enhanced Oil Recovery EOR helps increase domestic oil supplies while also providing a way to safely and permanently store CO 2 underground. Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) is a way to squeeze out additional, hard- to-recover barrels of oil remaining in older fields following conventional production operations. It can also be used to permanently store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) underground. Thanks in part to innovations supported by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past 30 years, the United States is a world leader in the number of EOR projects (200) and volume of oil production (over

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421

Kuparuk startup: oil flows this month  

SciTech Connect

A 26-mile pipeline on Alaska's North Slope is scheduled to have 70,000 bpd of oil flowing through it in December 1981 when production at the Kuparuk River oil field starts 3 months ahead of the original schedule. In late 1981, Atlantic Richfield Co. (Arco), Sohio, and BP Alaska had reached an agreement to unitize the field, but other leaseholders had to formally enter the unit agreement. Discussions centered around the issue of equity. When an agreement is reached, Arco will continue as the operator of the 200-sq mile field. Arco's progress in 1981 and its 1982 plans for the Kuparuk River oil field are outlined.

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Solar retorting of oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First, in an overview, we outline and discuss the potential applications of solar energy to the production of fuels. We show that, starting from a fossil feedstock, there are four areas in which solar energy can have a major impact in the production of fuels: in solar retorting of oil shale, in solar coal gasification, in solar steam flooding of oil fields, and in solar steam-reforming of methane. We performed a detailed technical and economic analysis of solar retorting of oil shale. The analysis shows that this solar process not only should be technically feasible but also should improve the fuel yield from the oil-shale feedstock by 10 to 40%, depending on the grade of the shale, compared to the most efficient competing (nonsolar) process. The improved oil yield should more than pay for the incremental cost associated with adding the solar collection system (field of focusing heliostats). The results from an experiment in which solar energy was used to retort oil shale show that yields of better than 110% Fischer Assay are achievable. An advanced design for a solar oil-shale retort is also presented.

Gregg, D.W.; Taylor, R.W.; Grens, J.Z.; Aiman, W.R.; Marsh, L.E.

1980-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

NETL: News Release - Submersible Oil Pump, More Revealing Seismic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

seven days a week.Enerdyne projects that, if the submersible pump succeeds in reducing oil field costs, an additional 780 million barrels of oil from the Red Mountain Reservoir...

424

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

site Abstract: About 1.5 billion standard cubic feet of CO2 is injected into US oil fields each day, resulting in the recovery of about 200,000 barrels per day of oil, but...

425

Heavy Oil Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Select Reports from Heavy Oil Projects Project Number Performer Title Heavy Oil Recovery US (NIPERBDM-0225) BDM-Oklahoma, Inc. Feasibility Study of Heavy Oil Recovery in the...

426

3. Crude Oil Statistics  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3. Crude Oil Statistics The United States had 21,371 million barrels of crude oil proved reserves as of December 31, 2004. Crude oil proved reserves ...

427

Burning desires An obsession with oil distorts an account of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Systems Figure 3 100 mb/d Crude oil: currently producing fields Unconventional oil Natural gasAvailable online at www.sciencedirect.com Future world oil production: growth, plateau, or peak? Larry Hughes and Jacinda Rudolph With the exception of two oil shocks in the 1970s, world oil production

Smil, Vaclav

428

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project was to: increase the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. Efforts for Year 1 of this project has been reservoir characterization, which has included three (3) primary tasks: geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, and microbial characterization.

Mancini, Ernest A.; Cate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

429

5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

430

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

431

Transgenetic algorithm for the periodic mobile piston pump unit routing problem with continuous oil replenishment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the application of a transgenetic algorithm to the periodic mobile piston pump unit routing problem with continuous oil replenishment, a complex problem that occurs in the exploitation of onshore oil fields. The transgenetic algorithms ... Keywords: continuous oil replenishment, evolutionary algorithm, mobile pumps, onshore oil fields, periodic mobile piston pump unit routing, piston pumps, routing, scheduling, transgenetic algorithms

Marco Cesar Goldbarg; Elizabeth Ferreira Gouvea Goldbarg; Herbert De Melo Duarte

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Oil | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Oil Oil Prices, 2000-2008 For the first time since 1995, U.S. oil production has surpassed imports. Explore the trend with our interactive chart. |...

433

EIA Oil price timeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, ... Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions.

434

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

435

Oil-shale material properties  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical properties of oil shale have been under examination at Sandia since 1975 in a program which has involved laboratory and field experimentation along with complementary analytical activities. The dependence of the fragmentation phenomenon on strain rate is important in explosive applications because strain rates realized in typical blasting events extend over a wide range. The model has been used to calculate a variety of explosive geometries in oil shale, with results compared to small- and large-scale experiments, including a small block test with 80 g of explosive and a field test with 5 kg explosive.

Kipp, M.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

RMOTC - Testing - Enhanced Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery Enhanced Oil Recovery Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC will play a significant role in continued enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology development and field demonstration. A scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) enhanced oil recovery

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