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  1. Perrin Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Perrin Ranch Jump to: navigation, search Name Perrin Ranch Facility Perrin Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra...

  2. CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH PROJECT SUMMARY In September 2011, the Department of Energy issued a $1.2 billion loan guarantee to finance California Valley Solar Ranch, a 250-MW photovoltaic (PV)

  3. Coulee Area Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    entity proposing to develop, own and operate a large-scale corn-to-ethanol plant in Sparta, Wisconsin. References: Coulee Area Renewable Energy1 This article is a stub. You...

  4. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gates Replacement This project is part of the Third Powerplant overhaul at Grand Coulee Dam. The full overhaul effort involves a mechanical overhaul of units G19 - G24. The...

  5. ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH PROJECT SUMMARY In September 2011, the Department of Energy issued a 646 million loan guarantee to finance ...

  6. Hyder Ranch Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hyder Ranch Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hyder Ranch Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hyder Ranch Sector...

  7. Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hot Springs Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1...

  8. King Mountain Wind Ranch I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain Wind Ranch I Jump to: navigation, search Name King Mountain Wind Ranch I Facility King Mountain Wind Ranch Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility...

  9. Coulee Region Bio Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region Bio Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Coulee Region Bio-Fuels LLC Place: Ettrick, Wisconsin Zip: 54627 Sector: Biofuels Product: LLC created by PrairieFire...

  10. ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_PV_AVSR.pdf (633.27 KB) More Documents & Publications CRESCENT DUNES ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH Powering New Markets: Utility-scale Photovoltaic Solar Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations

  11. CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_PV_CVSR.pdf (898.61 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-1840: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment

  12. Caldwell Ranch: Innovative Exploration Technologies Yield Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential | Department of Energy Caldwell Ranch: Innovative Exploration Technologies Yield Geothermal Potential Caldwell Ranch: Innovative Exploration Technologies Yield Geothermal Potential July 11, 2013 - 4:55pm Addthis Photo of a ranch in the mountains. As part of a geothermal exploration effort to search for geothermal resources nationwide, a $5 million U.S. Department of Energy investment to Calpine Corporation this year culminated in the confirmation of an initial 11.4 MW of equivalent

  13. AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name AV Solar Ranch I Solar Power Plant Facility AV Solar Ranch I Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer...

  14. First Solar AVSR Solar Ranch Technical Eligibility Re-Evaluation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    First Solar AVSR Solar Ranch Technical Eligibility Re-Evaluation Memo First Solar AVSR Solar Ranch Technical Eligibility Re-Evaluation Memo FirstSolarAVSRSolarRanchOneTechnic...

  15. Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Photo of Photovoltaic System at Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are

  16. Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  17. Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  18. Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hot Springs Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  19. Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Warner Springs Ranch Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  20. Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Donlay Ranch Hot Spring Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  1. Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Dann Ranch Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  2. Furnace Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Furnace Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Furnace Creek...

  3. Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Drakesbad Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  4. Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Cement Creek Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Cement...

  5. 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility 4 UR Guest...

  6. High Plains Ranch Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Solar Power Plant Facility High Plains Ranch Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Sun Power Location Carizzo Plain, California Coordinates 35.1913858,...

  7. EIS-0344: Grand Coulee-Bell 500 kV Transmission Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action for the construction and operation of the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project.

  8. California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment Biological Assessment for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project San Luis Obispo County, California High Plains Ranch II, LLC (HPR II), a wholly owned subsidiary of SunPower Corporation, Systems ("SunPower") proposes to construct a 250-megawatt (MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) energy plant, the California Valley Solar Ranch Project (CVSR Project or Project), on a 4,747acre site in

  9. EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington.

  10. Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Aerial shot of the California Valley Solar Ranch in San Luis Obispo County, California. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. According to NRG Energy, the California Solar Valley Ranch ...

  11. McCormick Ranch Wind Park | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Wind Park Jump to: navigation, search Name: McCormick Ranch Wind Park Place: Montana Sector: Wind energy Product: 2,200 acre, 120 MW planned wind project on Larry McCormick's...

  12. Precision welding cuts downtime at Grand Coulee Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Light, S.; White, E.

    1997-03-01

    The three large 700-MW generators at Grand Coulee Dam--originally built and installed by Canadian General Electric in the late 1970s--are being upgraded using precision welding techniques and leading edge installation technology. These generators suffered from numerous water leaks at and around the bar water connections, resulting in a significant number of forced repair outages that were increasing in frequency. The US Bureau of Reclamation, in conjunction with the Bonneville Power Administration, decided to overhaul these machines. The design from Siemens Power Corp. provided state-of-the-art materials and included a rating increase from 700 to 805 MW, which would make these three machines the highest output single-unit hydrogenerators in the world. The upgrade was to be accomplished with only the replacement of the stator components; there would be no changes to the rotating element. The cost for all three machines is approximately $27.5 million. This project is described in this paper.

  13. Geothermometry At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Ten water samples were collected...

  14. Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waunita Hot Springs Ranch Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Waunita Hot...

  15. Students From Highlands Ranch Triumph in Colorado Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlands Ranch; Grand Junction High School, Grand Junction; Pueblo South High School, Pueblo; Christian Fellowship High School, Lakewood and Doherty High School, Colorado Springs. ...

  16. Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.426248, -110.79844 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  17. Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity...

  18. J Bar L Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name J Bar L Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility J Bar L Guest...

  19. Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merker, Christopher

    1993-04-01

    This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

  20. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  1. Comparative flow measurements: Grand Coulee pumping-generating plant unit P/G9. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heigel, L.; Lewey, A.B.; Greenwood, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    In extensive testing, two acoustic flow measurement systems compared well in accuracy and repeatability with conventional methods at a power plant at Grand Coulee Dam. Acoustic flow measurement systems offer utilities an inexpensive, real-time method for optimizing hydro plant efficiency.

  2. Feasibility Study for Paragon - Bisti Solar Ranch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benally, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO) and Navajo Nation (NN) plan to develop renewable energy (RE) projects on the Paragon-Bisti Ranch (PBR) lands, set aside under the Navajo Hopi Land Settlement Act (NHLSA) for the benefit of Relocatees. This feasibility study (FS), which was funded under a grant from DOE’s Tribal Energy Program (TEP), was prepared in order to explore the development of the 22,000-acre PBR in northwestern New Mexico for solar energy facilities. Topics covered include: • Site Selection • Analysis of RE, and a Preliminary Design • Transmission, Interconnection Concerns and Export Markets • Financial and Economic Analysis • Environmental Study • Socioeconomic and Cultural Factors • Next Steps.

  3. Pine Creek Ranch, FY 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Mark E.

    2001-11-01

    Pine Creek Ranch was purchased in 1999 by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs using Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation funds. The 25,000 acre property will be managed in perpetuity for the benefit of fish and wildlife habitat. Major issues include: (1) Restoring quality spawning and rearing habitat for stealhead. Streams are incised and fish passage barriers exist from culverts and possibly beaver dams. In addition to stealhead habitat, the Tribes are interested in overall riparian recovery in the John Day River system for wildlife habitat, watershed values and other values such as recreation. (2) Future grazing for specific management purposes. Past grazing practices undoubtedly contributed to current unacceptable conditions. The main stem of Pine Creek has already been enrolled in the CREP program administered by the USDA, Natural Resource Conservation Service in part because of the cost-share for vegetation restoration in a buffer portion of old fields and in part because of rental fees that will help the Tribes to pay the property taxes. Grazing is not allowed in the riparian buffer for the term of the contract. (3) Noxious weeds are a major concern. (4) Encroachment by western juniper throughout the watershed is a potential concern for the hydrology of the creek. Mark Berry, Habitat Manager, for the Pine Creek Ranch requested the Team to address the following objectives: (1) Introduce some of the field staff and others to Proper Functioning Condition (PFC) assessments and concepts. (2) Do a PFC assessment on approximately 10 miles of Pine Creek. (3) Offer management recommendations. (4) Provide guidelines for monitoring.

  4. EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site, Okanogan County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    proved infeasible, so the Yakama Nation is proposing a new site at Eightmile Ranch. Young coho would be held in the pond from March to May and then released into the Chewuch...

  5. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million Cubic Feet) Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 12 40 77 59 55 47 43 41 ...

  6. Cinco Ranch, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by expanding it. Cinco Ranch is a census-designated place in Fort Bend County and Harris County, Texas.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA Retrieved...

  7. AmeriFlux US-FR3 Freeman Ranch- Woodland

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Heilman, Jim [Texas A& M University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-FR3 Freeman Ranch- Woodland. Site Description - Dense canopy of live oak and Ashe juniper

  8. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  9. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2005-02-25

    This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  10. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  11. Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texico phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Facility Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type...

  12. EA-1826: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, CA EA-1826: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, CA EA-1826: Final Environmental Assessment ...

  13. EA-1826: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, CA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, CA EA-1826: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, CA August 1, 2011 EA-1826: Final Environmental Assessment AV Solar Ranch One Project, Los Angeles and Kern Counties, California August 2, 2011 EA-1826: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee for the AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, California

  14. EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CA | Department of Energy 0: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to High Plains II, LLC for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County and Kern

  15. AmeriFlux US-Var Vaira Ranch- Ione

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Var Vaira Ranch- Ione. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains on privately owned land, the Vaira Ranch site is classified as a grassland dominated by C3 annual grasses. Managed by local rancher, Fran Vaira, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. Species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. Growing season is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May.

  16. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert L. ); Simmons, Mary Ann ); Simmons, Carver S. ); McKinstry, Craig A. ); Cook, Chris B. ); Thorsten, Susan L. ); Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2003-01-29

    This report describes the work conducted during the second year of a multi-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

  17. Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2005-03-31

    This report describes a study conducted by PNNL for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterized the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL used the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish who are pulled through the pumps and turbines at Grand Coulee Dam's pump generation station and transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the pump generating plant's new 9-bladed turbines was also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The highest pressure experienced by the Sensor Fish was estimated at 157 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of kokanne would be carried through the pump without being struck and most likely without injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish would be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without injury.

  18. Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, Mark A.

    2013-04-25

    The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. � Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. � The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

  19. EA-1959: Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site; Okanogan County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration and USDA Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, are jointly preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of funding a proposal by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to construct and operate a coho salmon acclimation pond at Eightmile Ranch, which is owned and operated by the Forest Service. BPA's Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0425) addressed the overall coho restoration program, with 11 acclimation sites. Some of these sites proved infeasible, so the Yakama Nation is proposing a new site at Eightmile Ranch. Young coho would be held in the pond from March to May and then released into the Chewuch River approximately 10 miles above its confluence with the Methow River.

  20. AmeriFlux US-FR2 Freeman Ranch- Mesquite Juniper

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-FR2 Freeman Ranch- Mesquite Juniper. Site Description - Freeman Ranch is a 4200 ha research area owned by Texas State University. It is located on the easter Edwards Plateau in central Texas and overlies and recharges the Edwards Aquifer. Most of the ranch is occupied by upland habitats.

  1. Grand Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project, Draft Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2002-08-09

    BPA is proposing to construct a 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line that would extend approximately 84 miles between the Grand Coulee 500-kV Switchyard, near Grand Coulee Dam, and the Bell Substation, in Mead just north of Spokane. The new line would cross portions of Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane counties. In addition to the transmission line, new equipment would be installed at the substations at each end of the new line and at other facilities. The proposed action would remove an existing 115-kV transmission line and replace it with the new 500-kV line on existing right-of-way for most of its length. Additional right-of-way would be needed in the first 3.5 miles out of the Grand Coulee Switchyard to connect to the existing 115-kV right-of-way. Since the mid-1990s, the transmission path west of Spokane, called the West of Hatwai transmission pathway, has grown increasingly constrained. To date, BPA has been able to manage operation of the path through available operating practices, and customer needed have been met while maintaining the reliability of the path. however, in early 2001, operations showed that the amount of electricity that needs to flow from east to west along this path creates severe transmission congestion. Under these conditions, the system is at risk of overloads and violation of industry safety and reliability standards. The problem is particularly acute in the spring and summer months because of the large amount of power generated by dams east of the path. Large amounts of water cannot be spilled during that time in order for BPA to fulfill its obligation to protect threatened and endangered fish. The amount of power that needs to move through this area during these months at times could exceed the carrying capacity of the existing transmission lines. In additional capacity is not added, BPA will run a significant risk that it will not be able to continue to meet its contractual obligations to deliver power and maintain reliability

  2. Power council cites Tacoma homes - the Grand Coulee Dam of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, M.

    1984-07-01

    The energy-efficient building codes adopted by Tacoma, Washington will give the city a reservoir of power comparable to the water stored behind Grand Coulee Dam. The code standards reduce energy requirements 60%, a saving that will continue through the 50- to 60-year service life of the houses. The first to adopt the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Model Conservation Stardards, Tacoma recognized that current electric power surpluses are temporary and that conservation is the cheapest way to get new power. The city adopted the plan despite its low rates because economic growth is likely to come from power-intensive industries. A support package for the plan combines building code compliance, an information system, marketing, and financial incentives.

  3. Geology of Pitchfork Ranch field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J.S.; Broten, J.J.; Matthews, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    The Pitchfork Ranch field, Lea County, New Mexico, was discovered by HNG Oil Company with the successful completion of the Madera 32 State Com 1 well (Sec. 32, T24S, r34number), in May 1982, from Morrow sand perforations between 14,723 and 15,018 ft (IPCAOF = 8485 MCFGD). The exploratory well was based on seismic and surface geology in search of Morrow channel sands that occur 4 mi north in the South Bell Lake field. Because the federal lease was expiring, HNG drilled a step-out well 1 mi east, which was completed in the same Morrow sand zone (IPF = 1800 MCFGD, 16/64-in. choke, final tubing pressure = 6200 lb). At that time, our concept of the stratigraphic environments model changed from a channel system to a submarine fan that was fed by channels from the Central Basin platform, which lies 12 mi east. Other Morrow sand pay zones in the field vary from channel facies to small fans. Development drilling has continued since mid-1982. As of July 1, 1985, 24 wells had been completed and one rig was drilling. The field operators are HNG Oil Company and Southland Royalty Company. Several additional zones are productive in this field, besides the Morrow sands, including the Wolfcamp (oil) and two Atoka sands (gas). The production history of this field is summarized. The Pitchfork Ranch field is the largest deep gas field discovered in southeast New Mexico since Ralph Lowe discovered the Indian Basin field in Eddy County in 1962. The giant Indian Basin field has produced more than 1 tcf of gas. All the large gas fields in the Permian basin have not been found, as evidenced by the discovery of the Pitchfork Ranch field. The limits of this field have not been determined - it is still growing.

  4. Forrest Ranch Acquisition, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2003-08-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The

  5. Forrest Ranch Management and Implementation, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2004-01-01

    Through their John Day Basin Office, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Ranch during July of 2002. The property consists of two parcels located in the John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The mainstem parcel consists of 3,503 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem of the John Day River. The middle fork parcel consists of 820 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the middle fork John Day River. The Forrest Ranch Project is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. The Forrest Ranch acquisition was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by the operation of their hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Following lengthy negotiations with the BPA and property owner, the Tribes were able to conclude the acquisition of the Forrest Ranch in July of 2002. The intent of the acquisition project was to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, section 11.1, section 7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of program funding through a memorandum of agreement and annual statement of work. As early as 1997, the Tribes identified this property as a priority for restoration in the John Day basin. In 2000, the Tribes arranged an agreement with the landowner to seek funds for the acquisition of both the Middle Fork and upper Mainstem John Day River holdings of Mr. John Forrest. This property had been a priority of not only the Tribes, but of many other basin natural resource agencies. The

  6. EA-1679: Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates potential environmental impacts from the construction and operation of six new 500-kV overhead transmission lines to replace six existing underground lines at Grand Coulee Dam. DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), a cooperating agency, was asked by the U. S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Reclamation to design and construct the proposed new transmission lines. A Finding of No Significant Impact was issued by BPA in December 2011.

  7. AmeriFlux US-Ton Tonzi Ranch

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ton Tonzi Ranch. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the Tonzi Ranch site is classified as an oak savanna woodland on privately owned land. Managed by local rancher, Russell Tonzi, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. The overstory is dominated by blue oak trees (40% of total vegetation) with intermittent grey pine trees (3 trees/ha). Understory species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. These two distinctive layers operate in and out from one another. Growing season of the understory is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May. In contrast, the deciduous blue oak trees are dormant during the rainy winter months and reach maximum LAI in April. The blue oak ecosystem rings the Great Central Valley of California, inhabiting the lower reaches of the Sierra Nevada foothills.

  8. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crossley, Brian; Lockwood, Jr., Neil W.; McLellan, Jason G.

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  9. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  10. Application and testing of a fiber optic communication system at Grand Coulee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osburn, G.D.; Arnold, R.G.

    1988-03-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) operates the world's largest, fully operational hydroelectric facility at Grand Coulee Dam located on the Columbia River in eastern Washington state. Data transmitted for control, protection, and communication between this facility's Third Powerplant and 500-kv switchyard are essential for the safe and efficient operation of the Bureau's equipment and the integrity of the connected power systems. To accomplish the reliable, high speed transmission of such data over the relatively long distance between these two locations having unequal ground potential rise (GPR) a fiber optic communication system was installed, tested, and placed into service. The paper discusses the rationale for applying fiber optic technology in this application with emphasis on the related design considerations important in control and protection of this large hydroelectric facility. Brief summaries of hardware used and installation considerations are given. Fundamentals and principles of fiber optic system design are not intended or covered. Discussion of factory and unique field testing, including electromagnetic interference (EMI) induced transient influence and timing tests, is included. Operating experience and projected future use are summarized.

  11. EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Finding of No ...

  12. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  13. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  14. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; O'Connor, Dick

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan (1998

  15. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connor, Jason M.; McLellan, Jason G.; Butler, Chris

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  16. Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Todd; Stewart, Royce

    2014-12-16

    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy (DOE) to study the feasibility of a wind and/or solar renewable energy project at the Whitewater Ranch (WWR) property of ACBCI. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was engaged to conduct the study. The ACBCI tribal lands in the Coachella Valley have very rich renewable energy resources. The tribe has undertaken several studies to more fully understand the options available to them if they were to move forward with one or more renewable energy projects. With respect to the resources, the WWR property clearly has excellent wind and solar resources. The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has continued to upgrade and refine their library of resource maps. The newer, more precise maps quantify the resources as among the best in the world. The wind and solar technology available for deployment is also being improved. Both are reducing their costs to the point of being at or below the costs of fossil fuels. Technologies for energy storage and microgrids are also improving quickly and present additional ways to increase the wind and/or solar energy retained for later use with the network management flexibility to provide power to the appropriate locations when needed. As a result, renewable resources continue to gain more market share. The transitioning to renewables as the major resources for power will take some time as the conversion is complex and can have negative impacts if not managed well. While the economics for wind and solar systems continue to improve, the robustness of the WWR site was validated by the repeated queries of developers to place wind and/or solar there. The robust resources and improving technologies portends toward WWR land as a renewable energy site. The business case, however, is not so clear, especially when the potential investment portfolio for ACBCI has several very beneficial and profitable alternatives.

  17. Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal Aircraft Accident on the Grand Coulee-Bell No.6, 500 kV Line

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 17, 2004, at approximately 0940, a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) pilot was killed in the crash of a Bell 206BIII helicopter while stringing "sock line" to enable the subsequent stringing of new conductors and static wire on the Grand Coulee-Bell #6 500-kV line between tower 84/2 and BPA’s Bell Substation in Mead, Washington. (See Appendix 7, Site Map.)

  18. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Characterization of Pump Flow at the Grand Coulee Dam Pumping Station for Fish Passage, 2004-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, T.; Duncan, J.; Johnson, R.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes a study conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Bonneville Power Administration to characterize the conditions fish experience when entrained in pump flow at the Grand Coulee Dam. PNNL conducted field studies at Grand Coulee Dam in 2004 using the Sensor Fish to measure the acceleration and pressure conditions that might be experienced by fish that pass through pumps at Grand Coulee Dam's Pump-Generating Plant and are transported up into the feeder canal leading to Banks Lake. The probability that fish would be struck by the Pump-Generating Plant's new nine-bladed turbines was also estimated. Our measurements showed relatively low turbulence except in the immediate vicinity of the runner environment. The lowest and highest pressures experienced by the Sensor Fish were 6.4 and 155 psi (the pressure gauge saturated at 155 psi). The probability of strike was also calculated, based on the average length of hatchery-reared juvenile kokanee (land-locked sockeye). Strike probabilities ranged from 0.0755 for 2.36-inch fish to 0.3890 for 11.8-inch fish. The probability of strike estimates indicate that the majority (77%) of recently released hatchery kokanee would be carried through the test pump without being struck and most likely with low risk of injury resulting from pressure and turbulence exposure. Of the 23% that might be struck it is expected that 60% would arrive in Banks Lake without visible external injuries. Thus more than 90% of entrained fish could be expected to arrive in Banks Lake without significant injury, assuming that no kokanee were injured or killed by pressure exposure during passage.

  19. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project -- Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Anglea, Steven M.; Simmons, Carver S.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Lecaire, R; Francis, S

    2002-01-29

    This report describes the work conducted during the first year of a long-term study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system in eliciting a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The strobe light system is being evaluated as a means to prevent entrainment (and subsequent loss) of fish at the entrance to the forebay adjacent to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Colville Confederated Tribes are collaborating on the three-year study being conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration and the Northwest Power Planning Council.

  20. Factors affecting the failure of copper connectors brazed to copper bus bar segments on a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator at Grand Coulee Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atteridge, D.G.; Klein, R.F.; Layne, R.; Anderson, W.E.; Correy, T.B.

    1988-01-01

    On March 21, 1986, the United States Bureau of Reclamation experienced a ground fault in the main parallel ring assembly of Unit G19 - a 615-MVA hydroelectric generator - at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington. Inspection of the unit revealed that the ground fault had been induced by fracture of one or more of the copper connectors used to join adjacent segments of one of the bus bars in the north half of the assembly. Various experimental techniques were used to detect and determine the presence of cracks, crack morphology, corrosion products, and material microstructure and/or embrittlement. The results of these inspections and recommendations are given. 7 refs., 27 figs.

  1. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING

  2. Wake deficit measurements on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nierenburg, R. (Altamont Energy Corp., San Rafael, CA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This report is ninth in a series of documents presenting the findings of field test under DOE's Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) with the wind industry. This report provides results of a project conducted by Altamont Energy Corp. (AEC) to measure wake deficits on the Jess and Sousa Ranches in Altamont Pass, CA. This research enhances and complements other DOE-funded projects to refine estimates of wind turbine array effects. This project will help explain turbine performance variability caused by wake effects. 4 refs., 28 figs., 106 tabs.

  3. DOE Zero Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes, Pronghorn Ranch,Prescott Valley, AZ

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes Pronghorn Ranch Prescott Valley, AZ DOE ZERO ENERGY READY HOME(tm) The U.S. Department of Energy invites home builders across the country to meet the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specified in DOE's Zero Energy Ready Home program (formerly known as Challenge Home). Every DOE Zero Energy Ready Home starts with ENERGY STAR Certified Homes Version 3.0 for an energy-efficient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Advanced technologies are designed in

  4. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville Tribal

  5. EA-1840: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the SunPower, Systems California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the California Valley Solar Ranch (CVSR) project, a...

  6. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or

  7. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam

  8. Permian {open_quotes}Wolfcamp{close_quotes} limestone reservoirs: Powell Ranch field, Eastern Midland Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    Deep-water carbonate channel reservoirs form important oil reservoirs along the toe of the Eastern Shelf of the Permian basin in west Texas. In northwestern Glasscock County, these `Wolfcamp` reservoirs are Leonardian (Early Permian) in age and define high-energy channels incised into surrounding carbonate detritus and basinal shale. Porous grain-flow material filling these channels, along with encasing detritus, was derived from the shallow shelf located six miles to the east. Reservoirs are in packstone and grainstone facies and have significant interparticle and moldic porosity. Relevant exploration began in the 1960s, but expanded slowly thereafter due to lack of success caused by complex patterns of channel occurrence. Results of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey conducted in 1990 have greatly enhanced the identification and mapping of productive channels in the Powell Ranch field complex. Wells in this complex are capable of flowing 400-1200 bbl of oil per day, and have reserves ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MBO. The new 3-D data have improved the relevant geologic model and dramatically increased rates of drilling success. Application of such data to this setting offers a potential model for other parts of the Permian basin.

  9. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a

  10. Preliminary Assessment for CAU 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and DU Site CAS No. TA-39-001-TAGR: Soil Contamination, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 485, Corrective Action Site TA-39-001-TAGR, the Cactus Spring Ranch Soil Contamination Area, is located approximately six miles southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the eastern mouth of Sleeping Column Canyon in the Cactus Range on the Tonopah Test Range. This site was used in conjunction with animal studies involving the biological effects of radionuclides (specifically plutonium) associated with Operation Roofer Coaster. The location had been used as a ranch by private citizens prior to government control of the area. According to historical records, Operation Roofer Coaster activities involved assessing the inhalation uptake of plutonium in animals from the nonnuclear detonation of nuclear weapons. Operation Roofer Coaster consisted of four nonnuclear destruction tests of a nuclear device. The four tests all took place during May and June 1963 and consisted of Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1, 11, and 111. Eighty-four dogs, 84 burros, and 136 sheep were used for the Double Tracks test, and ten sheep and ten dogs were used for Clean Slate 11. These animals were housed at Cactus Spring Ranch. Before detonation, all animals were placed in cages and transported to the field. After the shot, they were taken to the decontamination area where some may have been sacrificed immediately. All animals, including those sacrificed, were returned to Cactus Spring Ranch at this point to have autopsies performed or to await being sacrificed at a later date. A description of the Cactus Spring Ranch activities found in project files indicates the ranch was used solely for the purpose of the Roofer Coaster tests and bioaccumulation studies and was never used for any other project. No decontamination or cleanup had been conducted at Cactus Spring Ranch prior to the start of the project. When the project was complete, the pits at Cactus Spring Ranch were filled with soil, and trailers where dogs were housed and animal autopsies had been performed were removed

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C.

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock

  12. Remote Sensing Analysis of the Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, Hudspeth County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeMone, D. V.; Dodge, R.; Xie, H.; Langford, R. P.; Keller, G. R.

    2002-02-26

    Remote sensing images provide useful physical information, revealing such features as geological structure, vegetation, drainage patterns, and variations in consolidated and unconsolidated lithologies. That technology has been applied to the failed Sierra Blanca (Faskin Ranch) shallow burial low-level radioactive waste disposal site selected by the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority. It has been re-examined using data from LANDSAT satellite series. The comparison of the earlier LANDSAT V (5/20/86) (30-m resolution) with the later new, higher resolution ETM imagery (10/23/99) LANDSAT VII data (15-m resolution) clearly shows the superiority of the LANDSAT VII data. The search for surficial indications of evidence of fatal flaws at the Sierra Blanca site utilizing was not successful, as it had been in the case of the earlier remote sensing analysis of the failed Fort Hancock site utilizing LANDSAT V data. The authors conclude that the tectonic activity at the Sierra Blanca site is much less recent and active than in the previously studied Fort Hancock site. The Sierra Blanca site failed primarily on the further needed documentation concerning a subsurface fault underneath the site and environmental justice issues. The presence of this fault was not revealed using the newer LANDSAT VII data. Despite this fact, it must be remembered that remote sensing provides baseline documentation for determining future physical and financial remediation responsibilities. On the basis of the two sites examined by LANDSAT remote sensing imaging, it is concluded that it is an essential, cost-effective tool that should be utilized not only in site examination but also in all nuclear-related facilities.

  13. Burlingame Ranch Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-02-17

    This case study describes the construction of energy efficient community-scale, affordable housing for Aspen, Colorado, residents meeting a 40% energy-savings target.

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting {sup 238}U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected {sup 241}Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area.

  15. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferranti generator step-up (GSU) transformers and Central Transformer Corporation fish unit transformers with new air cooled GSU transformers. The specific banks proposed for...

  16. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems are vitally important to BPA operations as they are used to collect real- time reservoir operations and water release data, provide operational tools for management of...

  17. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rebuild based on performance (outage reports), type of conductor and condition of the poles. The condition is evidenced by the fact that over 60 of the line's 366 poles have been...

  18. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lower Valley load area is located in eastern Idaho and western Wyoming and includes Jackson, Wyoming as well as a number of smaller communities. Customers served are Lower...

  19. Grand Coulee Transmission Line | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on and near the ROW during construction to limit the potential for nuisance shocks. Air Quality "NEPAResourceAnalysis" is not in the list of possible values (Not Present,...

  20. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as an arc extinguishing medium and each contains approximately 210 gallons of insulating oil. There are three or more breakers for each pair of generators and they pose a...

  1. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extensive maintenance and repairs. The turbine hubs on these units have experienced chronic oil leaks. The history of problems led to a decision to replace the turbine runners...

  2. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    over half of the plant's generation capacity. While Unit 3 provides significant financial value, it is also critical to successful environmental operations. An outage during the...

  3. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spare Transformers for Hub Wind Sites This project includes the installation of a spare, single phase transformer at four existing "hub" facilities. These "hub" facilities, as...

  4. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Granite Unit 1 Linkage Upgrade This investment will refurbish the U1 turbine runner linkage at Lower Granite and return it to full Kaplan (adjustable) capability. On January 10,...

  5. Grand Coulee & Hungry Horse SCADA Replacement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and six draft tube bulkheads to completely dewater the unit. With the current complement of bulkheads and gates, three units can be dewatered at John Day. The additional...

  6. Preliminary Assessment for CAU 485: Cactus Spring Ranch Pu and Du Site, CAS No. TA-39-001-TAGR: Soil Contamination, Tonapah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ITLV

    1998-07-01

    Corrective Action Unit 485, Corrective Action Site TA-39-001-TAGR, the Cactus Spring Ranch Soil Contamination Area, is located approximately six miles southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the eastern mouth of Sleeping Column Canyon in the Cactus Range on the Tonopah Test Range. This site was used in conjunction with animal studies involving the biological effects of radionuclides (specifically plutonium) associated with Operation Roller Coaster. According to field records, a hardened layer of livestock feces ranging from 2.54 centimeters (cm) (1 inch [in.]) to 10.2 cm (4 in.) thick is present in each of the main sheds. IT personnel conducted a field visit on December 3, 1997, and noted that the only visible feces were located within the east shed, the previously fenced area near the east shed, and a small area southwest of the west shed. Other historical records indicate that other areas may still be covered with animal feces, but heavy vegetation now covers it. It is possible that radionuclides are present in this layer, given the history of operations in this area. Chemicals of concern may include plutonium and depleted uranium. Surface soil sampling was conducted on February 18, 1998. An evaluation of historical documentation indicated that plutonium should not be and depleted uranium could not be present at levels significantly above background as the result of test animals being penned at the site. The samples were analyzed for isotopic plutonium using method NAS-NS-3058. The results of the analysis indicated that plutonium levels of the feces and surface soil were not significantly elevated above background.

  7. Cascadia Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  8. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  9. Busch Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric (50%) - Altagas (50%) Developer EUI and Black Hills Colorado Electric Energy Purchaser Black Hills Energy Location Pueblo CO Coordinates 37.781886, -104.471858...

  10. Linden Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  11. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  12. Grand Coulee-Creston_FONSI_and_MAP_27May2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bonneville Power Administration DOEEA-1950 May 2014 SUMMARY Bonneville Power ... of mitigation measures, such as wash stations, mulching, and revegetation, would ...

  13. Hueco Mountain Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner El Paso Electric Co Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser El Paso Electric Co...

  14. Caprock Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Quay County NM...

  15. Clark Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Environmental Issues Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Exploration History First Discovery Well Completion Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow...

  16. Spinning Spur Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    W 161,000,000,000 mW 0.161 GW Number of Units 70 Commercial Online Date 2012 Wind Turbine Manufacturer Siemens References AWEA 2012 Market Report1 Loading map......

  17. Caldwell Ranch: Innovative Exploration Technologies Yield Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    steam field, validating universally applicable technologies that bear immediate implications for other geothermal-rich regions of California-Coso, Salton Sea, and Medicine Lake. ...

  18. Hudson Ranch Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ectangles":,"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":,"controls":"pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview","zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoi...

  19. Lubbock Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mW 0.0125 GW Number of Units 5 Commercial Online Date 2010 Wind Turbine Manufacturer Samsung References AWEA1 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","ty...

  20. Brazos Wind Ranch Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind EnergyMitsui Developer Cielo Wind PowerOrion Energy Energy Purchaser Green...

  1. Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at White Deer | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location White...

  2. Caprock Wind Ranch phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown Developer Cielo Wind Power Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Quay County NM...

  3. Solar/Wind Feasibility Study at Whitewater Ranch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... will begin this summer. * Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) - The Tribe currently receives a 1MW annual allocation of power from the ParkerDavis Hydroelectric Dams. ...

  4. Solar/Wind Feasibility Study at Whitewater Ranch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    review has been completed. * Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) - The Tribe currently receives a 1MW annual allocation of power from the ParkerDavis Hydroelectric Dams. ...

  5. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2014 View History Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) 2,915 2014-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 173 2014-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 233 2014

    Approved 0MB No. 1905-0092. El A 457B (Expires May 31, 1990.) This survey is voluntary and authorized under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275} as amended. Information about specific households will be kept strictly confidential. The data will be summarized within

  6. Cuttings Analysis At Bacca Ranch Geothermal Area (1976) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and overlying cap rock. References Pratt, H. R.; Simonson, E. R. (1 January 1976) Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Cuttings Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    description of the cuttings was prepared. Afterwards, the samples were packed in small cotton bags, transported to the warehouse located at the Nevada Geothermal office in...

  8. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.27 3.34 2.85 3.28 3.41 3.38 3.44 3.42 2.94 2.82 2.55 2.41 2012 2.17 1.80 1.56 1.27 1.15 1.52 1.86 2.09 1.76 2.09 2.80 ...

  9. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 2.69 2010's 3.52 3.12 1.87 2.66 3.45 1.71

  10. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    225 501 314 1,046 1,426 933 2007-2015 Pipeline Prices 3.52 3.12 1.87 2.66 3.45 1.71 2007

  11. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  12. Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure...

  13. Exploration Of The Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. Ten water samples...

  14. Thermal Gradient Holes At Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area (Benoit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Hot Creek Canyon where challenges such as topography, a wilderness study area, and wetlands issues will make further exploration time consuming and costly. References Dick...

  15. Del Ranch (Hoch) Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map Geothermal Resource Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area Geothermal Region Gulf of California Rift Zone Plant Information Facility Type Double Flash Owner CalEnergy...

  16. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of two distinct waters in this group of samples (Tom Powell of Thermochem Inc., personal communication, 2005). Powell found that MDH, TRS-1 and TRS-6 are the most prospective...

  17. Geothermometry At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of two distinct waters in this group of samples (Tom Powell of Thermochem Inc., personal communication, 2005). Powell found that MDH, TRS-1 and TRS-6 are the most prospective...

  18. DOE Tour of Zero: Pronghorn Ranch by Mandalay Homes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The foundation water barrier system includes a heavy-duty plastic liner installed under and around the slab-on-grade foundation. An energy-saving slab edge with R-10 rigid foam ...

  19. Hudson Ranch Power I LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dallas, Texas Zip: 75204 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: A company proposing to build a 49.9MW geothermal energy plant in southern California. Coordinates: 32.778155,...

  20. Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Cielo Wind Power Developer Cielo Wind Power- RES Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Curry...

  1. Golden Spread Panhandle Wind Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Developer Cielo Energy Purchaser Golden Spread Electric Cooperative Location Wildarado TX Coordinates...

  2. APM Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH PROJECT SUMMARY In September 2011, the Department of Energy issued a $646 million loan guarantee to finance Antelope Valley Solar Ranch 1, a 242-MW photovoltaic (PV) solar generation project.

  3. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nichols Ranch ISR Project, Smith Ranch-Highland Operation, and Willow Creek Project). ... Ranch ISR Project, Smith Ranch-Highland Operation, and Willow Creek Project in Wyoming). ...

  4. 2015 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... Nichols Ranch ISR Project, Smith Ranch-Highland Operation, and Willow Creek Project). ... Ranch ISR Project, Smith Ranch-Highland Operation, and Willow Creek Project in Wyoming). ...

  5. Experimental determination of lateral vibration of the 708 MVA Westinghouse vertical hydro generators at Grand Coulee Dam, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    The damped rotor bearing system of large vertical shaft systems presents special problems for high speed storage installations. The results of the first test of its kind have given experimental data contributing to this technology. Synchronous and non-synchronous vibrations were found to contribute to runout loading. Measurements on the pivot pad hydrodynamic bearings gave stiffness characteristics. Measurements showed that balancing the rotor reduced vibration levels. 1 ref.

  6. EA-1950: Final Environmental Assessement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington ... line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. ...

  7. Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district Able Energy Co. Biogas Direct LCC Coulee Area Renewable Energy Coulee Region Bio Fuels LLC Dairyland Power Cooperative INOV8 International Inc Polymer Technology Corp...

  8. Grant County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Banks Lake South, Washington Cascade Valley, Washington Coulee City, Washington Coulee Dam, Washington Desert Aire, Washington Electric City, Washington Ephrata, Washington...

  9. Best Practices Case Study: Shaw Construction Burlingame Ranch Ph.1, Aspen, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Shaw Construction built 84 energy efficient, affordable condominiums forthe City of Aspen that achieved HERS scores of less than 62 with help from Building America’s research team lead Building Science Corporation.

  10. Best Practices Case Study: Imagine Homes - Stillwater Ranch, San Antonio, TX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    This case study describes Imagine Homes, who met Builders Challenge criteria on more than 200 homes in San Antonio with rigid foam exterior sheathing, ducts and air handler in conditioned space in a spray-foam insulated attic, and high-efficiency HVAC, windows, and appliances.

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Mandalay Homes — Pronghorn Ranch, Prescott Valley, AZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    The builder has certified 20 homes to DOE Zero Energy Ready Home program and plans are underway for 50 more. Winner of a Production Builder prize in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, the homes achieved a HERS score of 48 without photovoltaics (PV) or HERS 25 with 3.5 kW PV included.

  12. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... point of contact for emergency notification is the GJPO ... the public can notify the DOE, if problems are discovered. ... specifies the following requirements: Program planning. ...

  13. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- 2.69 2010's 3.52 3.12 1.87 2.66 3.45 1.71 Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.27 3.34 2.85 3.28 3.41 3.38 3.44 3.42 2.94 2.82 2.55 2.41 2012 2.17 1.80 1.56 1.27 1.15 1.52 1.86 2.09 1.76 2.09 2.80 2.76 2013 2.42 2.34 2.53 2.53 3.21 3.21 2.77 2.52 2.61 2.56 2.56 2.85 2014 3.41 4.55 3.79 3.58 3.77 3.61 3.41 2.84 3.00 3.02 2.74 3.30

  14. Free-flow variability on the Jess and Souza Ranches, Altamont Pass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nierenberg, R.

    1989-03-01

    This report is one of a series of such documents that present the findings of field tests conducted under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Cooperative Field Test Program with the US wind industry. The report provides the results of a study to collect data at two windfarms. The two wind turbine arrays, located in the Altamont Pass east of San Francisco, were instrumented with anemometers and a central monitoring computer. To obtain a high spatial density of wind-speed measurements, every other turbine in both arrays was instrumented. Wind-speed data were collected over a period of four days during the summer high-wind season with all turbines shut down. The resultant data set was analyzed to determine the spatial variability of the wind resource in the two arrays. Because no turbine wakes were present, variation in the flow was caused by the interaction of the flow with the terrain and was not a function of turbine wake interaction. The free-flow data sets can be used by other researchers to refine numerical free-flow computer models. The data sets will be used to fine tune and validate these computer models. In addition, the free-flow data will be compared to results of a wake energy deficit study also under way on these turbine arrays. 56 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Galvan Ranch, TX Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Mexico (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 245 2010's 225 501 314 1,046 1,426 933

  16. DOE Tour of Zero: The Pronghorn Ranch by Mandalay Homes | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The foundation water barrier system includes a heavy-duty plastic liner installed under and around the slab-on-grade foundation. An energy-saving slab edge with R-10 rigid foam ...

  17. Permian `Wolfcamp` limestone reservoirs: Powell ranch field, eastern Midland basin: Discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.

    1997-10-01

    The {open_quotes}E&P Notes{close_quotes} paper by S.L. Montgomery (1996) on Wolfcamp resedimented carbonates in the Permian basin concerns an exploration play with the potential for significant reserves; however, its economic importance and geological complexity, and the question of whether his model can be extended to other areas in the Permian basin warrant this discussion.

  18. EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1

  19. Line Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Coulee Transmission Line Replacement Project Hooper Springs McNary-John Day Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project - M2W Olympia-Grand Coulee No. 1...

  20. EIS-0049: Geothermal Demonstration Program 50-MW Power Plant-Baca Ranch, Sandoval and Rio Arriba Counties, New Mexico

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) developed this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of joint funding by DOE and commercial partners of a 50-megawatt demonstration geothermal power plant at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico, including construction of the geothermal well field and transmission line.

  1. EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

  2. EA-1679: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Coulee's Third Powerplant 500-kV Transmission Line Replacement Project, Grant and Okanogon Counties, Washington

  3. Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

  4. Lawrence Livermore National National Security. LLC Consent Order

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Photo of Photovoltaic System at Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are

  5. Laura Wilkerson | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Photo of Photovoltaic System at Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are

  6. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crow Butte Operation (Nebraska) Lost Creek Project (Wyoming) Nichols Ranch ISR Project (Wyoming) Ross CPP (Wyoming) Smith Ranch-Highland Operation (Wyoming) Willow Creek Project ...

  7. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Power Resources Inc., dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  8. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Resources, Inc. dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, Wyoming ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  9. 2nd Quarter 2016 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Power Resources, Inc. dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  10. 2nd Quarter 2016 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Resources, Inc. dba Cameco Resources","Smith Ranch-Highland Operation","Converse, ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  11. 2014 Domestic Uranium Production Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Resources Inc., dba Cameco Resources","Smith Ranch-Highland Operation","Converse, ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  12. Domestic Uranium Production Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Resources, Inc., dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, Wyoming ... Uranium is first processed at the Nichols Ranch plant and then transported to the Smith ...

  13. Domestic Uranium Production Report 2nd Quarter 2016

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... (Wyoming) 4. Ross CPP (Wyoming) 5. Smith Ranch-Highland Operation (Wyoming) 6. ... Resources, Inc. dba Cameco Resources Smith Ranch-Highland Operation Converse, Wyoming ...

  14. EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington Bonneville Power Administration issued a finding of no significant impact and a mitigation action plan for rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and

  15. OF THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    public-owned distribution agencies, Government agencies and private utility enterprises. The ene1gy of the two great dams on the Columbia river-Grand Coulee and...

  16. EIS-0344: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to construct the proposed Grand Coulee-Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project in Douglas, Grant, Lincoln, and Spokane Counties, Washington and implement the proposed action...

  17. ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. ... In 2010, ORISE conducted an exercise at Shasta Dam, which spans California's Sacramento ...

  18. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS ...

  19. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS ...

  20. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND ...

  1. Libby (FEC)-Troy 115kV Line Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    includes four separate capital investments at the Grand Coulee Third Power Plant (TPP): * Stator core and winding replacement on units G19 and G20 * Refurbishment of six...

  2. Managements Discussion and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13 million in federal hydro operations and maintenance, including projects at Grand Coulee Dam, and 5 million for Transmission Services maintenance were offset partially by...

  3. EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Coulee - Bell 500-kV Transmission Line Project This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) discloses the potential impacts associated with construction and operation of the proposed...

  4. Solar Integration Data Sets | Grid Modernization | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch Solar Goes Big: Launching the California Valley Solar Ranch October 31, 2013 - 4:14pm Addthis The California Valley Solar Ranch produces clean, renewable electricity at the scale of traditional power plants. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. The California Valley Solar Ranch produces clean, renewable electricity at the scale of traditional power plants. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. Aerial shot of the California Valley Solar Ranch in

  5. CX-006304: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Coulee-Bell #3/Grand Coulee-Westside #1 Insulator Replacement and Access Road MaintenanceCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/21/2011Location(s): Grant County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-005379: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Insulator Replacement in Agricultural Lands Along the Grand Coulee-Bell Number 3/Grand Coulee-Westside No. 1 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/02/2011Location(s): Lincoln County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. EA-1826: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee for the AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, California AV Solar Ranch One Project, Los Angeles and Kern...

  8. EA-1840: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Loan Guarantee to High Plains II, LLC for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County and Kern County, California California Valley Solar Ranch Project in ...

  9. Property:Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 3 3-D Metals + 3-D Metals + 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 4 UR Guest Ranch + A AB...

  10. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... techniques - Managed pressure drilling (offshore) - Underbalanced drilling techniques * Agua Caliente Walker Ranch drilling dataset * Integrate new team members - Graduating the ...

  11. First-of-a-Kind Sequestration Field Test Begins in West Virginia |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy First Solar AVSR Solar Ranch Technical Eligibility Re-Evaluation Memo First Solar AVSR Solar Ranch Technical Eligibility Re-Evaluation Memo First_Solar_AVSR_Solar_Ranch_One_Technical_Eligibility_Re-Evaluation.pdf (81.63 KB) More Documents & Publications ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH EA-1826: Final Environmental Assessment REEE Solicitation Public Meeting Presentation Department of Energy

    First Step to Spur U.S. Manufacturing of Small Modular Nuclear Reactors

  12. EIS-0049: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Geothermal Demonstration Program 50-MW Power Plant-Baca Ranch, Sandoval and Rio Arriba Counties, New Mexico

  13. EA-1846-FONSI-2011.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CA | Department of Energy 0: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to High Plains II, LLC for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County and Kern

  14. Rural Communities Benefit from Wind Energy's Continued Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    John Stulp, Colorado Interbasin Compact Committee chairman, discusses how wind energy benefits rural communities, farms, and ranches.

  15. CX-005409: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympia-Grand Coulee Number 1 Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/03/2011Location(s): WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. BPA-2015-00301-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BPA) We are interested in the communications (as outlined in the FOIA) related to (1) fish reintroduction and passage above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams and blocked areas...

  17. CX-010424: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Grand Coulee District Wood Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/07/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. CX-009789: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coulee-Westside Transfer Trip Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 02/06/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  19. CX-010735: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Coulee-Bell No.5 Dead End Insulator Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2013 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  20. CX-008679: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Olympia-Grand Coulee Structure 85/5 Relocation Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/19/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. Microsoft Word - Woody.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a vision of paradise. He saw the majestic Grand Coulee Dam as the creation of the common man to harness the river for the common good - work for the jobless, power to ease...

  2. Level 1 Accident Investigation Report of August 17, 2004, Fatal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    wire on the Grand Coulee-Bell 6 500-kV line between tower 842 and BPA's Bell Substation in Mead, Washington. (See Appendix 7, Site Map.) Level 1 Accident Investigation ...

  3. CX-011999: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Burial of Overhead Fiber Optic Cable at Grand Coulee Radio Station CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 04/21/2014 Location(s): Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-008704: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grand Coulee-Bell No. 3 Double Circuit 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Reconductoring Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/31/2012 Location(s): Washington, Washington, Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. Bonneville Power Administration Overview As of December 1, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration Overview As of August 11, 2015 Grand Coulee Dam High Voltage Transmission Columbia Generating Station Moody's: Aa1Stable S&P: AA-Stable Fitch: AA...

  6. EA-1950: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1950: Draft Environmental Assessment Bonneville Power Administration prepared a draft EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington. EA-1950-DEA-2013.pdf (7.21 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1950: Finding of No Significant Impact and Mitigation Action Plan EA-1950: Final

  7. Photovoltaic Solar Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    646 Million Sep 2011 CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH TITLE XVII Photovoltaic Solar NRG Energy, Inc. & NRG Solar, LLC San Luis Obispo, California Loan Guarantee 1.2 ...

  8. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    staff Wilson Hall Cafe Tuesday, Feb. 3 - Breakfast: all-American breakfast - Breakfast: bacon, egg and cheese bagel - Ranch chicken breast sandwich - Egyptian barbecue chicken...

  9. Manhattan Project Sites at Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about the role Los Alamos played during the Cold War. Los Alamos Historical Society Arts and Crafts Building 4. ARTS & CRAFTS BUILDING Originally classrooms for the Ranch...

  10. Teton County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TriLateral Energy LLC Places in Teton County, Wyoming Alta, Wyoming Hoback, Wyoming Jackson, Wyoming Moose Wilson Road, Wyoming Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming South Park, Wyoming Teton...

  11. Mohave County, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Creek, Arizona Mohave Valley, Arizona Mojave Ranch Estates, Arizona New Kingman-Butler, Arizona Peach Springs, Arizona Willow Valley, Arizona Retrieved from "http:...

  12. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the US * LPO financed the first six utility-scale solar projects in the US in 2011 Agua Caliente Antelope Valley Solar Ranch Project Amp California Valley Solar ...

  13. AK-CHIN INDIAN COMMUNITY BIOMASS FEASIBILITY STUDY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Egg Ranch as fertilizer for its agricultural crops. - The Ak-Chin Indian Community ... Dairy Manure - Potato Processing Wastes - Food Waste - Other potential sources nearby ? ...

  14. 2016 Tribal Energy and Economic Development February Webinar...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    about exploring energy markets, wholesale price drivers, and other factors involved in ... Land Commission: the Paragon-Bisti Solar Ranch (3.32 MB) Todd Hegwer, Public Power ...

  15. Comal County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Canyon Lake, Texas Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas Garden Ridge, Texas New Braunfels, Texas San Antonio, Texas Schertz, Texas Selma, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  16. Calvert County, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Calvert County, Maryland Calvert Beach-Long Beach, Maryland Chesapeake Beach, Maryland Chesapeake Ranch Estates-Drum Point,...

  17. Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE Grant to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advance Solar Ranch Project | Department of Energy Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE Grant to Advance Solar Ranch Project Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE Grant to Advance Solar Ranch Project October 22, 2015 - 12:04pm Addthis Watch this video to learn about other tribal solar energy successes in the Southwest. 08022_winningthefuture.jpg Under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act of 1974, the Paragon-Bisti Ranch was set aside for the benefit of Navajo

  18. Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (136C), Buffalo Valley (130C), Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Ranch; 125C), and Smith Creek Valley (119C). Authors Lisa Shevenell and Larry Garside Conference GRC Annual...

  19. Federal Energy and Water Management Award winner poster | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications EIS-0496: Draft Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Moves toward Net-Zero Buildings California Valley Solar Ranch...

  20. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Shaw Construction, Aspen...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shaw Construction Burlingame Ranch Phase 1 | Aspen, CO PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New home Type: Single- and multi-family Builder: Shaw Construction, Grand Junction, CO, ...

  1. NREL: News - High School Students Gear Up for Battle of the Brains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eaglecrest High School (two teams) George Washington High School (two teams) Grand Junction High School Gunnison High School (two teams) Highlands Ranch High School (two ...

  2. Real Goods Solar Ukiah | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Logo: Real Goods Solar Ukiah Name: Real Goods Solar Ukiah Address: 301 L Kunzler Ranch Rd Place: Ukiah, California Zip: 95482 Sector: Solar Year Founded: 1978...

  3. EA-1826: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1826: Final Environmental Assessment AV Solar Ranch One Project, Los Angeles and Kern Counties, California The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is...

  4. Recovery Act:Rural Cooperative Geothermal development Electric...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The geothermal resource had been discovered in 1980 when the ranch was developing supplemental irrigation water wells. The 240F resource was used for irrigation until developed ...

  5. Our Evolving Knowledge Of Nevada'S Geothermal Resource Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    systems at Bonham Ranch, and Rhodes and Teels Marshes, NV. Collaboration with the gold mining industry has led to the announcement of two new significant geothermal...

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    White Bluffs Orchard People Railroad Recreation Richland River Riverboat School Sheep Sports Structure Structures Sunnybank Ranch Transportation Water White Bluffs Settlers...

  7. Douglas County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estates, Colorado Highlands Ranch, Colorado Larkspur, Colorado Littleton, Colorado Lone Tree, Colorado Louviers, Colorado Meridian, Colorado Parker, Colorado Perry Park, Colorado...

  8. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a ranch, dairy or aquaculture business that breeds or raises domestic livestock, poultry, game animals, fish, oysters and the like. The Northwest Power and Conservation Council's...

  9. EA-1959: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1959: Final Environmental Assessment Eightmile Ranch ... EA-1959: Draft Environmental Assessment EIS-0425: Draft Environmental Impact Statement ...

  10. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii DOE Technical Assistance Program Procuring and ... Solar America Communities Solar America Communities is a ...

  11. Department of Energy Offers Conditional Commitment for $1.187...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "The efficiencies created by the California Valley Solar Ranch project will help lower the cost of solar power and encourage more utility-scale solar deployment," said Secretary ...

  12. Lincoln County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Barge, Wyoming Oakley, Wyoming Opal, Wyoming Smoot, Wyoming Star Valley Ranch, Wyoming Taylor, Wyoming Thayne, Wyoming Turnerville, Wyoming Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... (e) Plumbing, electrical utility, lighting, and ... 230-kV Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project (j) ... calibration of facility components, subsystems, or portable ...

  14. EXPO 2014 Booth Winners Award Winner Best Corporate Presence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EXPO 2014 Booth Winners Award Winner Best Corporate Presence CHPRC Best Health Message Kidney Trust Best Offsite Ranch & Home Best Overall WRPS Best Safety Message HFD Kids'...

  15. Bexar County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Converse, Texas Cross Mountain, Texas Elmendorf, Texas Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas Grey Forest, Texas Helotes, Texas Hill Country Village, Texas Hollywood Park, Texas Kirby,...

  16. EA-1853: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of No Significant Impact EA-1853: Finding of No Significant Impact Perrin Ranch Wind Energy Interconnection Project, Coconino County, Arizona Based on findings and analysis in...

  17. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    FERTILE PRAIRIE SCORIA TRAVERS RANCH CHATEAU HEART RIVER GREEN RIVER CABERNET FAYETTE ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  18. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BLOOMFIELD SCORIA TRAVERS RANCH HEART RIVER GREEN RIVER CHATEAU DUTCH HENRY BUTTE CABERNET ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  19. CX-013918: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Archer Terry Ranch and North Park Terry Ranch Road 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Vegetation Management, Larimer and Jackson Counties, CO and Albany County, WY CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 06/10/2015 Location(s): ColoradoOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  20. FINAL REPORT VELA UNIFORM PROJECT SPONSORED BY THE ADVANCED RESEARCH...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... U S A r m y Raymond Moore, MD Donald Smith, DVM USPHS, Medical Officer USPHS, V e t e ... Ranch 2 1 Schur z 0709 - - - 2 1 3 4 2 Seyler R e s e r v o i r 1 1 Smith C r e e k Ranch ...

  1. CX-000600: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Upgrades at Bonneville Power Administration's Hungry Horse, Bonneville, and Grand Coulee SubstationsCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 01/12/2010Location(s): Grant County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. Microsoft Word - RNP answers.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    373,000 MWh of spill at Coulee and 234,000 MWh at Chief Joseph for a total of roughly 607,000 MWh of spill. Does all that sound close to being right? On the wind side, I see...

  3. CX-006583: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood Pole Replacement Along Portions of the Grand Coulee-Chief Joseph #1 and #2 230-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13Date: 08/22/2011Location(s): Douglas County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-006580: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wood Pole Replacement Along the Grand Coulee-Okanogan #2 115-Kilovolt Transmission LineCX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.13Date: 08/22/2011Location(s): Grant County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (PV) renewable energy project on the 22,000-acre Paragon-Bisti Solar Ranch in northwestern New Mexico. ... to develop renewable energy resources on our lands," said NHLCO ...

  6. Pueblo of Laguna- 1999 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Pueblo of Laguna's renewable energy program is to establish the Majors Ranch, a Laguna owned operation, as a self-contained community with its own source of electrical power utilizing its solar and wind resources.

  7. How did contaminants get there?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    comparison of Ashley Pond in the 1940s and 60 years later. Ashley Pond was named after Detroit businessman Ashley Pond who started the Los Alamos Ranch School in 1917. A comparison...

  8. MESQUITE | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MESQUITE MESQUITE DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_PV_Mesquite.pdf (329.18 KB) More Documents & Publications MESQUITE Powering New Markets: Utility-scale Photovoltaic Solar UTILITY-SCALE PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH

  9. EA-279_UNS__MX.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9UNSMX.pdf EA-279UNSMX.pdf EA-279 PDF icon EA-279UNSMX.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-004879: Categorical Exclusion Determination ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH ...

  10. Woodward Mountain I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain I & II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodward Mountain I & II Wind Farm Facility Woodward Mountain Wind Ranch I and II Sector Wind energy Facility Type...

  11. Project Reports for Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2012 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) plans to complete a feasibility study to evaluate a combined wind/solar power generation project on its Whitewater Ranch trust lands in southern California.

  12. Funding for state, city, and county governments in the state...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indian Colony of Nevada 25,000 NV Yerington Paiute Tribe of the Yerington Colony & Campbell Ranch, Nevada 26,200 NV Yomba Shoshone Tribe of the Yomba Reservation, Nevada ...

  13. EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern Counties, California EA-1840-FEA-vol1-2011.pdf (6.43 MB) EA-1840CVSRFinalEAAppendices08-2011.pdf (27.76 MB) ...

  14. CX-008525: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agua Caliente Wind/Solar Project at Whitewater Ranch CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 05/22/2012 Location(s): California Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  15. Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) plans to complete a feasibility study to evaluate a combined wind/solar power generation project on its Whitewater Ranch trust lands in southern California.

  16. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants in production (state) Crow Butte Operation (Nebraska) Lost Creek Project (Wyoming) Nichols Ranch ISR Project (Wyoming) Ross CPP (Wyoming) Smith ...

  17. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRIEST RAPIDS I I I LOST CREEK SAVAGE RAPIDS I I I I I I I CHANDLER BIG CLIFF DETROIT GREEN PETER COUGAR FOSTER BLACK CANYON ANDERSON RANCH I DEXTER LOOKOUT POINT HILLS...

  18. Property:Coordinates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -122.329439 + 3rd Rock Systems and Technologies + 38.753055, -95.834619 + 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 37.8491662,...

  19. Manhattan Project: Fuller Lodge

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fuller Lodge was one of the main structures of the Los Alamos Boys Ranch School, serving as its headquarters in its later years. It was converted into a mess hall and guest ...

  20. CX-008407: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Terry Ranch Road Substation CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B4.11 Date: 03/29/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. Manhattan Project: The "Big House"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The "Big House" was the dormitory for the Los Alamos Boys Ranch School. Students slept year-round on its unheated porches. During the Manhattan Project, the Big House contained, ...

  2. Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. Authors Pratt, H. R.; Simonson and E. R....

  3. History Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manhattan Project. August 18, 2014 museum plan showing the history gallery Los Alamos, once the site of a boys' ranch school, became the focus of the secret project to develop a...

  4. UTILITY-SCALE PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UTILITY-SCALE PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR UTILITY-SCALE PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR SOLAR: UTILITY-SCALE PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR POSTER (1.07 MB) More Documents & Publications UTILITY-SCALE PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR Download LPO's Illustrated Poster Series ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH MESQUITE

  5. EA-1853: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Perrin Ranch Wind submitted an interconnection request to Western in 2010 to interconnect the proposed project to the existing Moenkopi-Yavapai 500-kV transmission line. Western is...

  6. Episode 2: The Clean Energy Geek Squad | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... PHEAR: Yeah, it's actually an incredible venue for learning. We start in coal country and tour a coal-fired power plant and oil refinery, bike up through the ranch lands, staying ...

  7. EMAB Meeting - February 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Valley Ranch * La Sirena II 2300 Paseo Verde Parkway * Henderson, Nevada 89052 Documents Available for Download Meeting Minutes (416.13 KB) Meeting Agenda (50.35 KB) More ...

  8. EA-1959: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1959: Draft Environmental Assessment Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site; Okanogan County, Washington Bonneville Power Administration and USDA Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, jointly issued a draft EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to construct and operate a coho salmon acclimation pond at Eightmile Ranch, which is owned and operated by the Forest

  9. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project April 12, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis An artist rendering of what the California Valley Solar Ranch project will look like post-construction . | courtesy of SunPower Corporation An artist rendering of what the California Valley Solar Ranch project will look like post-construction . | courtesy of SunPower Corporation Ginny Simmons

  10. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Solar Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PASCUA YAQUI TRIBE SOLAR FEASIBILITY STUDY MARCH 26, 2014 PRESENTATION OVERVIEW * Introduction * Tortuga Ranch * Casino Del Sol * Camino de Oeste Site * Summary of Recommendations 2 INTRODUCTION * Vast potential for Pascua Yaqui to participate in the solar industry and work towards - Energy self-sufficiency - Diversifying bankable investments - Minimizing impacts on the environment * Energy prices for solar dropped significantly * Conventional energy pricing steadily rising 3 TORTUGA RANCH

  11. EA-2043: Draft Environmental Assesment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Draft Environmental Assesment EA-2043: Draft Environmental Assesment EA-2043: Columbia Stock Ranch Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project; Columbia County, Oregon The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a draft EA that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposed tidal floodplain ecosystem restoration project at Columbia Stock Ranch, located in Columbia County, Oregon. Bonneville Power Administration, a cooperating agency, proposes to provide funding for the project. For more

  12. EA-2043: Final Environmental Assesment | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Environmental Assesment EA-2043: Final Environmental Assesment EA-2043: Columbia Stock Ranch Section 536 Ecosystem Restoration Project; Columbia County, Oregon The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a final EA that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposed tidal floodplain ecosystem restoration project at Columbia Stock Ranch, located in Columbia County, Oregon. Bonneville Power Administration, a cooperating agency, proposes to provide funding for the project. For more

  13. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-AVSR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH By scaling up innovative inverter technology, Antelope Valley Solar Ranch demonstrates that utility-scale photovoltaic solar can reliably deliver electricity. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNER Exelon LOCATION Lancaster, California LOAN AMOUNT $646 Million ISSUANCE DATE September 2011 GENERATION CAPACITY 242 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 482,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 279,000 Metric Tons of CO 2 Prevented Annually

  14. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-PV-CVSR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    boost output, California Valley Solar Ranch uses innovative single-axis trackers and a wireless monitoring and control system. CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNERS NRG Energy, Inc. & NRG Solar, LLC LOCATION San Luis Obispo, California LOAN AMOUNT $1.2 Billion ISSUANCE DATE September 2011 GENERATION CAPACITY 250 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 650,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 370,000 Metric Tons of CO 2 Prevented Annually

  15. Conducting a school energy audit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project April 12, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis An artist rendering of what the California Valley Solar Ranch project will look like post-construction . | courtesy of SunPower Corporation An artist rendering of what the California Valley Solar Ranch project will look like post-construction . | courtesy of SunPower Corporation Ginny Simmons

  16. California Schools Sweep the 2011 National Science Bowl | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Schools Sweep the 2011 National Science Bowl California Schools Sweep the 2011 National Science Bowl May 2, 2011 - 6:23pm Addthis The Gale Ranch Middle School of San Ramon, CA, received first place at the 2011 National Science Bowl. | Energy Department Image | Photo by Dennis Brack, Contractor The Gale Ranch Middle School of San Ramon, CA, received first place at the 2011 National Science Bowl. | Energy Department Image | Photo by Dennis Brack, Contractor Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons

  17. Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project Conditional Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project April 12, 2011 - 3:08pm Addthis An artist rendering of what the California Valley Solar Ranch project will look like post-construction . | courtesy of SunPower Corporation An artist rendering of what the California Valley Solar Ranch project will look like post-construction . | courtesy of SunPower Corporation Ginny Simmons

  18. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2003-03-01

    The Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Galbraith Springs) project originated from the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of this project is to aid in the restoration and enhancement of the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries adversely affected by the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam. The objective is to produce kokanee salmon and rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt for maintaining a viable fishery. The goal and objective of this project adheres to the NPPC Resident Fish Substitution Policy and specifically to the biological objectives addressed in the NPPC Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to mitigate for hydropower related fish losses in the blocked area above Chief Joseph/Grand Coulee Dams.

  19. US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On the cover: Trans-Alaska oil pipeline; aerial view of New Jersey refinery; coal barges on Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota; power plant in Prince George's County, Maryland; Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State; corn field near Somers, Iowa; wind turbines in Texas. Photo credits: iStockphoto U.S. ENERGY SECTOR VULNERABILITIES TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND EXTREME WEATHER Acknowledgements This report was drafted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Policy and International Affairs

  20. CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    845: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005845: Categorical Exclusion Determination Selected Wood Pole Replacement and Minor Access Road Maintenance Along the Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line at Miles 14, 15, 21 and 28 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): Lincoln County, Washington Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to replace deteriorating wood poles and associated structural/electrical components (e.g. cross arms,

  1. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  2. H.R. 599: A Bill to provide for the reconstitution of outstanding repayment obligations of the Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration for the appropriated capital investments in the Federal Columbia River Power System. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This bill proposes to give the administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration the rights to refinance certain capital investments in the Federal Columbia River Power System. The act spells out how to distinguish old and new capital investments, how new principal amounts for old investments are calculated, interest rates and repayment dates. It also deals with interest rates for new capital investments during and after construction, appropriations for the Colville Reservation Grand Coulee Dam Settlement Act, and suggested contract provisions regarding future contracts.

  3. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Preliminary Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    This preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities are analyzed: Habitat protection; Habitat enhancement; Operation and maintenance; and Monitoring and evaluation. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  4. Columbia basin project, Washington: Adams, Douglas, Franklin, Grant, Lincoln, and Walla Walla Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The Columbia Basin Project is a multipurpose development utilizing a portion of the resources of the Columbia River in the central part of the State of Washington. The key structure, Grand Coulee Dam, is on the main stem of the Columbia River about 90 miles west of Spokane, Wash. The extensive irrigation works extend southward on the Columbia Plateau 125 miles to the vicinity of Pasco, Wash., where the Snake and Columbia Rivers join.

  5. Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a

  6. More grapes, less wrath: hybrid antimicrobial protein protects grapevines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Than 350 Now at Work Building CA Valley Solar Plant More Than 350 Now at Work Building CA Valley Solar Plant February 27, 2012 - 12:13pm Addthis The California Valley Solar Ranch facility is creating clean energy jobs in San Luis Obispo County, California. Sonia Taylor Loan Programs Office What are the key facts? About 350 skilled workers are busy constructing the 250-megawatt California Valley Solar Ranch. The facility is expected to avoid over 425,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide

  7. More Than 350 Now at Work Building CA Valley Solar Plant | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Than 350 Now at Work Building CA Valley Solar Plant More Than 350 Now at Work Building CA Valley Solar Plant February 27, 2012 - 12:13pm Addthis The California Valley Solar Ranch facility is creating clean energy jobs in San Luis Obispo County, California. Sonia Taylor Loan Programs Office What are the key facts? About 350 skilled workers are busy constructing the 250-megawatt California Valley Solar Ranch. The facility is expected to avoid over 425,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide

  8. Navajo-Hopi Land Commission

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Power at the Paragon-Bisti Ranch DOE TEP Review, Golden, CO May 7, 2015   THE NAVAJO-HOPI LAND SETTLEMENT ACT  Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act passed 1974  Required relocation of Navajo and Hopi families living on land partitioned to other tribe.  Set aside lands for the benefit of relocates  Proceeds from RE development for Relocatee Project Background   Paragon-Bisti Ranch is selected lands :  Located in northwestern New Mexico.  22,000 acres of land 

  9. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In 1914, Detroit businessman Ashley Pond constructed a log cabin on the Pajarito Plateau in north-central New Mexico. The one-room structure served as the office for the Pajarito Club, a guest ranch for well-heeled city folk looking for a little Wild West adventure. Although the Pajarito Club was short-lived (it disbanded in 1916), Pond remained in the area and went on to found the Los Alamos Ranch School in 1917. The elite prep school offered classical education and rigorous outdoor activity

  10. Whole-House Systems Approach | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design » Design for Efficiency » Whole-House Systems Approach Whole-House Systems Approach The whole-house systems approach used to design this ultra-efficient home at Lone Star Ranch in Frisco, Texas, resulted in a home that consumes no more energy that its renewable energy systems produce. Photo from Building Science Corporation. The whole-house systems approach used to design this ultra-efficient home at Lone Star Ranch in Frisco, Texas, resulted in a home that consumes no more energy that

  11. 5 Super-Sized Solar Projects Transforming the Clean Energy Landscape |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Super-Sized Solar Projects Transforming the Clean Energy Landscape 5 Super-Sized Solar Projects Transforming the Clean Energy Landscape April 8, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis The California Valley Solar Ranch has a capacity of 250 MW -- enough energy to power the equivalent of every home in San Luis Obispo County. | Photo courtesy of SunPower. The California Valley Solar Ranch has a capacity of 250 MW -- enough energy to power the equivalent of every home in San Luis Obispo

  12. EA-184-A_Morgan_Stanley_MX.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4: Record Hill Wind Project in Roxbury, ME EA-1824: Record Hill Wind Project in Roxbury, ME July 1, 2011 EA-1824: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Record Hill Wind, LLC for Construction of a Wind Energy Project in Roxbury, Maine July 11, 2011 EA-1824: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee to Record Hill Wind, LLC, for the Record Hill Wind Project, Maine Department of Energy

    6: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties, CA EA-1826: AV Solar Ranch

  13. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Chief Joseph","Hydroelectric","USACE Northwestern Division",2456.2 3,"Transalta Centralia Generation","Coal","TransAlta Centralia Gen LLC",1340 4,"Rocky

  14. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Grand Coulee","Hydroelectric","U S Bureau of Reclamation",7079 2,"Palo Verde","Nuclear","Arizona Public Service Co",3937 3,"Martin","Natural gas","Florida Power & Light Co",3695 4,"W A Parish","Coal","NRG Texas Power LLC",3675

  15. Bonneville upgrades lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-30

    A stretch of Bonneville Power Administration transmission line between Spokane and the Grand Coulee Dam is an 82-mile bottleneck as it is the last 115-kv section of [open quotes]road[close quotes] along a 500-kv transmission [open quotes]highway[close quotes]. Soon the administration will change all that. A number of independent and utility powerplants have been proposed in Idaho, Montana and the Spokane, Wash., area during the 1990s. As the operators will need to move their power, Bonneville is planning to build a $144-million, 500-kv line to upgrade the 115-kv section. The agency is planning to use its existing right-of-way.

  16. Ute Mountain Tribe- 1994 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Ute Mountain Ute tribe in southwestern Colorado brings in considerable income from its cattle-ranching operation, with a herd of nearly 2,000 head. Since annual rainfall is only 10-15 inches and the only stream is dry part of the year, the tribe must rely on groundwater for cattle watering.

  17. AmeriFlux US-Wjs Willard Juniper Savannah

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wjs Willard Juniper Savannah. Site Description - The Juniper Savanna site is located in the Southwestern Tablelands in central New Mexico on a private ranch. Its vegetation is composed of Juniperus monosperma and intermittently grazed C4 perennial grasses of which the dominant species is Bouteloua gracilis.

  18. CX-009230: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Curecanti-Rifle 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Sullivan Ranch Irrigation Water Pipeline Project Between Structures 25/5 to 26/1 CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 09/28/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. EERE Interagency Activities related to Siting and Permitting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Interagency Activities related to Siting and Permitting STEAB Presentation June 27, 2012 Laura Morton Senior Advisor Administration Initiatives to improve permitting and review of renewable energy projects * Rapid Response Teams (Transmission & Renewable Energy Generation) created 2011 * Presidential Memorandum on Speeding Infrastructure

  20. CX-003218: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program RO Ranch Hydro ProjectCX(s) Applied: B1.15, B4.11, B5.1Date: 08/02/2010Location(s): Nye County, NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2001-03-01

    This report covers calendar year 2000 activities for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Shoshone Bannock Tribes wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  2. Southern idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottum, Edward; Mikkelsen, Anders

    2000-04-01

    This report is for the Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Implementation project. This project, implemented by IDFG and SBT wildlife mitigation staff, is designed to protect, enhance and maintain wildlife habitats to mitigate construction losses for Palisades, Anderson Ranch, Black Canyon and Minidoka hydroelectric projects. Additional project information is available in the quarterly reports.

  3. CX-003694: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation ProjectCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B5.12Date: 09/09/2010Location(s): Sonoma County, CaliforniaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  4. Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; Van Geet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

    2012-04-01

    This abbreviated report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project.

  5. CX-011620: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Terry Ranch Road Substation (Amended) CX(s) Applied: B1.24, B4.1, B4.11 Date: 12/04/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  6. CX-006852: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program - Clan Alpine Ranch Hydro Generation ProjectCX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 09/19/2011Location(s): NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  7. Leaders of DOE Environmental Management Advisory Group to Meet in Henderson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chairs and Vice-Chairs of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Site-Specific Advisory Board (SSAB) will meet in Henderson, NV, April 13-14, at Green Valley Ranch located at 2300 Paseo Verde Parkway.

  8. Retrofitting America: A 1970s Home Energy Efficiency Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-17

    This paper describes a modeling tool that Building America research team CARB developed to identify the energy benefits of various retrofit energy efficiency measures for a typical 1970s ranch home in ten cities across four climate zones in the United States.

  9. CRESCENT DUNES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CRESCENT DUNES CRESCENT DUNES DOE-LPO_Project-Posters_CSP_Crescent-Dunes.pdf (1.09 MB) More Documents & Publications Hearing Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations 2014 Concentrating Solar Power Report ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH

  10. Flexible stainless steel hose liner used to rehab drain pipe for seal gates and outlet tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sauer, S.J.; Monsanto, R. )

    1993-08-01

    Not unlike other dams, the Bureau of Reclamation's 6,500-MW Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State has a large amount of embedded piping, conduits, and drains. Typically, these features were constructed of ductile iron, cast iron, or carbon steel materials. Over the years, excessive internal corrosion of the drains for 102-inch ring seal gates and outlet tubes created leaks that required attention. Reclamation performed a number of temporary repairs before it became evident that the drain system must be rehabilitated. After considering several alternatives for rehabilitation, Reclamation selected stainless steel flexible hose liners for the job. Reclamation is satisfied with the performance of the stainless steel flexible hose liner. The total cost for installing the liners for nine drain lines (for three outlet tubes) was $15,000. Of that, materials cost $7,500, and labor and overhead cost $7,500. The inserts themselves cost from $640 for an 18-foot by 6-inch section. While this was not the least expensive option, it was the best choice for this job. The procedure will be repeated for other outlet tubes at Grand Coulee. Information used in this rehabilitation is being made available to other Reclamation projects.

  11. U N I T E D S T A T E S F O R E S T S E R V I C E B O N N E

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U N I T E D S T A T E S F O R E S T S E R V I C E B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site Final Environmental Assessment March 2016 DOE/EA-1959 This page left intentionally blank Eightmile Ranch Coho Acclimation Site Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1959 Bonneville Power Administration U.S. Forest Service, Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest Methow Valley Ranger District March 2016 This final EA shows edits that were made to the draft

  12. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake Playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-12-01

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the US Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition. 72 refs., 59 figs., 26 tab.

  13. Geohydrology and evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa, Inyo County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czarnecki, J.B.

    1997-12-31

    Franklin Lake playa is one of the principal discharge areas of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system in southern Nevada and adjacent California. Yucca Mountain, Nevada, located within this flow system, is being evaluated by the US Department of Energy to determine its suitability as a potential site for a high-level nuclear-waste repository. To assist the U.S. Department of Energy with its evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site, the US Geological Survey developed a parameter-estimation model of the Furnace Creek Ranch-Alkali Flat ground-water-flow system. Results from sensitivity analyses made using the parameter-estimation model indicated that simulated rates of evapotranspiration at Franklin Lake playa had the largest effect on the calculation of transmissivity values at Yucca Mountain of all the model-boundary conditions and, therefore, that evapotranspiration required careful definition.

  14. Newsletter Features | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Newsletter Features Newsletter Features Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter. October 22, 2015 Leading the Charge: Doug MacCourt Advises Tribes on Energy Policy Leading the Charge is a regular feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. October 22, 2015 Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE Grant to Advance Solar Ranch Project Under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement

  15. Facilities and Places

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities and Places Manhattan Project in Los Alamos: Facilites and Places The Manhattan Project National Historical Park tells the story of the people, the events, and the science and engineering that led to the creation of the atomic bombs that helped bring an end to World War II. The park allows visitors to explore how the creation of these weapons changed the world. Ice House Memorial 2. Ice House Memorial This memorial contains original stone from the Ranch School's ice house, which was

  16. Distributed Wind Ordinances: Slides

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    an introduction to distributed wind projects and a brief overview of topics to consider when developing a distributed wind energy ordinance. Distributed Wind Ordinances Photo from Byers and Renier Construction, NREL 18820 Distributed Wind Ordinances The U.S. Department of Energy defines distributed wind projects as: (a) The use of wind turbines, on- or off-grid, at homes, farms and ranches, businesses, public and industrial facilities, or other sites to offset all or a portion of the local

  17. Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

  18. Rosebud Sioux Tribe - Owl Feather War Bonnet Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anticipated Time Lines * Nov. 2005, Complete NEPA and Submit to BIA * Dec. 2005 Obtain Power Purchase Agreement * Jan 2006, BIA issues FONSI * Nov. 05- Jan 2006, Dev. financial structure, LLC and secure RST Tribal approval * Dec.05- Feb 2006, Engage Investors/Rural Utilities Service, USDA, Secure Loan, Est. Proj. Costs 46 million * July 2006 Construction underway * Dec 2006 Wind farm on line Old Bristow Ranch Met tower Tribal lands North Antelope Met Tower Tribal lands

  19. EIS-0427: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposed wind energy generation project in Coconino County, Arizona, on privately owned ranch lands and trust lands administered by the Arizona State Land Department. The proposed project includes a new transmission tie-line that would cross lands administered by Coconino National Forest and interconnect with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration’s existing Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak transmission lines.

  20. Loan Guarantees Can Play a Role in Rural Opportunity Investment |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Guarantees Can Play a Role in Rural Opportunity Investment Loan Guarantees Can Play a Role in Rural Opportunity Investment July 24, 2014 - 3:52pm Addthis In September 2011, the Department of Energy issued a $1.2 billion loan guarantee to support the construction of California Valley Solar Ranch (CVSR), a 250 MWac photovoltaic (PV) solar generating facility in rural San Luis Obispo County, California. The project reached commercial operation in October 2013. In September

  1. Microinstabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy » Hydropower » Microhydropower Basics Microhydropower Basics August 15, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis Microhydropower systems are small hydroelectric power systems of less than 100 kilowatts (kW) used to produce mechanical energy or electricity for farms, ranches, homes, and villages. How a Microhydropower System Works All hydropower systems use the energy of flowing water to produce electricity or mechanical energy. Although there are several ways to harness moving water to produce

  2. Project Reports for Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Green Extreme Homes & Carl Franklin Homes — First DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Retrofit, Garland, TX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-09-01

    This builder was honored with an Affordable Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, for the first retrofit home certified to the DOE Zero Energy Ready home requirements.The 60-year-old, three-bedroom ranch home is expected to save its homeowner more than $1,000 a year in utility bills compared to a home built to the current 2009 International Energy Conservation Code.

  4. Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO): Navajo Hopi Land Commission Office (NHLCO)- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  5. MCR Jetties Rehab Draft EA

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE COLUMBIA STOCK RANCH SECTION 536 ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION PROJECT The environmental review, consultation, and other actions required in accordance with applicable Federal laws for this project is being, or has been, carried-out by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, under its assumption of responsibility pursuant to 33 C.F.R. Part 230. 5 July 2016 This page left blank intentionally Environmental Assessment for the Columbia

  6. BCD/CPS: An event-level GEANT3 parallelization via CPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, L.A.

    1991-04-01

    BCD/CPS is an implementation of the Bottom Collider Detector GEANT3 simulation for CPS processor ranches. BCD/CPS demonstrates some of the capabilities of event-parallel applications applicable to current SSC detector simulations using the CPS and CZ/CPS communications protocols. Design, implementation and usage of the BCD/CPS simulation are presented along with extensive source listings for novice GEANT3/CPS programmers. 11 refs.

  7. CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010109: Categorical Exclusion Determination Curecanti-Poncha 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to fund off right-of-way (ROW) vegetation restoration treatments immediately adjacent to Western's Curecanti-Poncha 230-kilovolt Transmission Line (CCI-PON) in

  8. Overview of Battery R&D Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii US Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program Overview of Battery R&D Activities May 15, 2012 David Howell Team Lead, Hybrid & Electric Systems Vehicle Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington DC 20585 eere.energy.gov VTP Battery R&D  Battery affordability and performance are the keys. Program targets include: - Increase performance (power, energy, durability) - Reduce weight & volume -

  9. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy.gov/diversity The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) USWCC / ASBCC Energy Connect Network - March 7, 2013 Presenter: John Hale III Deputy Director, OSDBU energy.gov/diversity 2 | energy.gov/diversity Site and Facility Management Contractors (FMCs) 3 | energy.gov/diversity  Energy Security - Protection of high risk, high payoff RD&D of cleaner more affordable and reliable alternate energy sources, e.g. Advanced

  10. Preliminary Notice of Violation (WEA-2015-02) Pacific Data Electric, Inc.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2015 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Ms. Shelley Keltner Chief Executive Officer Pacific Data Electric, Inc. 9970 Bell Ranch Drive #109 Santa Fe Springs, California 90670 WEA-2015-02 Dear Ms. Keltner: This letter refers to the Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with a 277-volt electrical shock received by a Pacific Data Electric (PDE) apprentice electrician at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  11. Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe - Geothermal Energy Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribe Geothermal Energy Project Donna Marie Noel Project Manager Water Resources Department (775) 574-0101 x16 dnoel@plpt.nsn.us GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Bonham Ranch Sutcliffe Pyramid Rock Astor Pass Needles Rocks Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation PYRAMID LAKE PAIUTE TRIBE * Largest Nevada Reservation in land base and population, 2300 members * Reservation encompasses 470,000 acres & 330,000 acres cattle range * Pyramid Lake 115,000 acre lake surface * Terminus lake with Truckee River connector

  12. FY2012 EERE Congressional Budget Request

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii The FY 2012 Budget Request February 2011 Henry Kelly Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for EERE 2 | Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov "This is our generation's Sputnik moment. We'll invest in ... clean energy technology - an investment that will strengthen our security, protect our planet, and create countless new jobs for our people. Maintaining our leadership in research and technology is crucial to America's success."

  13. Newsletter Feb draft 012512_V3.pub

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Newsletter Features Newsletter Features Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter. October 22, 2015 Leading the Charge: Doug MacCourt Advises Tribes on Energy Policy Leading the Charge is a regular feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. October 22, 2015 Winning the Future: Navajo-Hopi Land Commission Leverages DOE Grant to Advance Solar Ranch Project Under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement

  14. TEP Technical Asssistance 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gov The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii Tribal Energy Program TEP Technical Assistance 2010 Sandra Begay-Campbell Principal Member of the Technical Staff Sandia National Laboratories October 25, 2010 2 | Tribal Energy Program eere.energy.gov Navajo: NTUA Solar Customer Providing rural Navajo families ACCESS to electricity 3 | Tribal Energy Program eere.energy.gov Hopi: Off-Grid Resident Living off-grid does not mean sacrificing comfort but understanding your limits 4 | Tribal Energy Program

  15. U.S. Battery R&D Progress and Plans

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Parker Ranch installation in Hawaii U.S. Battery R&D Progress and Plans May 14, 2013 David Howell, Team Leader Hybrid & Electric Vehicles R&D Vehicle Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington DC 20585 2 Advance the development of batteries to enable a large market penetration of hybrid and electric vehicles. Program targets focus on enabling market success (increase performance at lower cost while meeting weight, volume & safety).

  16. Students from Aurora Triumph in Denver Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Denver Regional Science Bowl For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., Feb. 27, 1999 — Students from Aurora's Smoky Hill High School won top honors at the 1999 Denver Regional Science Bowl today at the Colorado School of Mines in Golden. In the final round of rapid-fire questions about physics, math, biology, astronomy, chemistry, computers and the earth sciences, students from Smoky Hill High School were victorious over Highlands Ranch High School. Twenty-one student

  17. Recovery Act:Rural Cooperative Geothermal development Electric &

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Agriculture (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Recovery Act:Rural Cooperative Geothermal development Electric & Agriculture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recovery Act:Rural Cooperative Geothermal development Electric & Agriculture Surprise Valley Electric, a small rural electric cooperative serving northeast California and southern Oregon, developed a 3mw binary geothermal electric generating plant on a cooperative member's ranch. The geothermal

  18. Navajo Hopi Nation- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Navajo Hopi Land Commission (NHLCO), together with its partners, will conduct a feasibility study (FS) of a program to develop renewable energy on the Paragon-Bisti ranch lands in northwestern New Mexico, which were set aside under the Navajo-Hopi Land Settlement Act for the benefit of relocatees (defined as Navajo families living on Hopi Partitioned Lands as of December 22, 1974).

  19. LPO5-002-Proj-Poster-WIND-ShepardsFlat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SHEPHERDS FLAT Spanning two counties of working heritage ranch land in eastern Oregon, Shepherds Flat is one of the world's largest wind farms. INVESTING in AMERICAN ENERGY OWNER Caithness Energy, LLC LOCATIONS Gilliam County & Morrow County, Oregon LOAN AMOUNT $1.3 Billion ISSUANCE DATE December 2010 GENERATION CAPACITY 845 MW PROJECTED ANNUAL GENERATION 1,800,000 MWh CLIMATE BENEFIT 1,000,000 Metric Tons of CO 2 Prevented Annually

  20. Bathtub Row Houses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bathtub Row Houses Manhattan Project in Los Alamos: Bathtub Row Houses Los Alamos was where efforts of the Manhattan Project came together to discover the science necessary to succeed-inventing the technical processes then producing and testing two nuclear devices. In Los Alamos, the park experience is a partnership among the Department of Energy, the National Park Service, private landowners, and Los Alamos County. Guest Cottage, Los Alamos Ranch School, 1942 6. Historical Museum Built as the

  1. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Imagine Homes, San

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Antonio, Texas | Department of Energy Imagine Homes, San Antonio, Texas Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Imagine Homes, San Antonio, Texas Case study of Imagine Homes, who worked with the Building America research partner IBACOS to build HERS-52 homes with spray foam-insulated attics and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Imagine Homes: Stillwater Ranch - San Antonio, TX (662.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for New

  2. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring, Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    2003-03-01

    A slightly dryer than normal year yielded flows in Lake Roosevelt that were essentially equal to the past ten year average. Annual mean inflow and outflow were 3,160.3 m3/s and 3,063.4 m3/s respectively. Mean reservoir elevation was 387.2 m above sea level at the Grand Coulee Dam forebay. The forebay elevation was below the mean elevation for a total of 168 days. During the first half of the 2000 forebay elevation changed at a rate of 0.121 m/d and during the last half changed at a rate of 0.208 m/d. The higher rate of elevation change earlier in the year is due to the drawdown to accommodate spring runoff. Mean annual water retention time was 40 days. Annual mean total dissolved gas was 108%. Total dissolved gas was greatest at upriver locations (110% = US/Canada Border annual mean) and decreased moving toward Grand Coulee Dam (106% = Grand Coulee Dam Forebay annual mean). Total dissolved gas was greatest in May (122% reservoir wide monthly mean). Gas bubble trauma was observed in 16 fish primarily largescale suckers and was low in severity. Reservoir wide mean temperatures were greatest in August (19.5 C) and lowest in January (5.5 C). The Spokane River and Sanpoil River Arms experienced higher temperatures than the mainstem reservoir. Brief stratification was observed at the Sanpoil River shore location in July. Warm water temperatures in the Spokane Arm contributed to low dissolved oxygen concentrations in August (2.6 mg/L at 33 m). However, decomposition of summer algal biomass was likely the main cause of depressed dissolved oxygen concentrations. Otherwise, dissolved oxygen profiles were relatively uniform throughout the water column across other sampling locations. Annual mean Secchi depth throughout the reservoir was 5.7 m. Nutrient concentrations were generally low, however, annual mean total phosphorus (0.016 mg/L) was in the mesotrophic range. Annual mean total nitrogen was in the meso-oligotrophic range. Total nitrogen to total phosphorus ratios were

  3. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2005-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Fish produced by this project in 2004 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 1,655,722 kokanee fingerlings, 537,783 rainbow trout fingerlings and 507,660 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2004 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to have a negative impact on adult kokanee returns and limits the

  4. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  5. The Texas concurrent characterization, licensing, and development process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avant, R.V. Jr.

    1993-03-01

    The 72nd Texas Legislature specifically delineated a 400-square-mile area in southeast Hudspeth County where siting activities would be limited. The Authority was given unprecedented powers of property access and eminent domain and expanded budget authority to conduct site selection, characterization, and licensing. In the summer of 1991, the Authority identified five general siting areas in the prescribed region, and in the fall of 1991, the Authority narrowed the siting area to one large ranch composed of about 16,000 acres--called the Faskin Ranch. Site characterization began in 1991 and will be complete by September 1993. In September 1991, Authority staff began preparing the license application and included all available information on the Faskin Ranch. At its February meeting, the Authority`s board directed staff to submit the license application to the Texas Water Commission (the new Texas radiation control agency). The license application was submitted on March 2, 1992, and on April 15, 1992, the Commission determined that the application was sufficiently complete to begin review. Discrete technical packages such as groundwater hydrology, surface water hydrology, design, etc., will be submitted to the agency for review on the completion of each package. A schedule has been developed to allow the regulators the maximum time possible to review critical technical areas while minimizing the total review period.

  6. Colville Confederated Tribes' Performance Project Wildlife Mitigation Acquisitions, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard; Berger, Matthew; Tonasket, Patrick

    2006-12-01

    The Colville Confederated Tribes Wildlife Mitigation Project is protecting lands as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. The Mitigation Project protects and manages 54,606 acres for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species that are important to the Colville Tribes. With the inclusion of 2006 acquisitions, the Colville Tribes have acquired approximately 32,018 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. This annual report for 2006 briefly describes that four priority land acquisitions that were considered for enrollment into the Colville Tribes Mitigation Project during the 2006 contract period.

  7. Annual Report on Wildlife Activities, September 1985-April 1986, Action Item 40.1, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1986-04-01

    This annual report addresses the status of wildlife projects Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has implemented from September 1985 to April 1986. This report provides a brief synopsis, review, and discussion of wildlife activities BPA has undertaken. BPA's effort has gone towards implementing wildlife planning. This includes measure 1004 (b)(2), loss statements and measure 1004 (b)(3), mitigation plans. Loss statements have been completed for 14 facilities in the Basin with 4 additional ones to be completed shortly. Mitigation plans have been completed for 5 hydroelectric facilities in Montana. The Northwest Power Planning Council is presently considering two mitigation plans (Hungry Horse and Libby) for amendment into the Program. Currently, mitigation plans are being prepared for the 8 Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon, Grand Coulee Dam in the state of Washington, and Palisades Dam on the Snake River in Idaho.

  8. Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Record of Decision, Summary..

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-01-01

    The US Entity (the Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Division Engineer, North Pacific Division of the US Army Corps of Engineers) has decided to fulfill its obligation under the Columbia River Treaty (Treaty) between the US and Canada by delivering Canada`s Entitlement under the Treaty to a point on the US/Canada border near Oliver, British Columbia (BC). Delivering the Entitlement at that location will require BPA to construct and operate a new single-circuit 500-kV transmission line from Grand Coulee or Chief Joseph Substation to the US/Canada border, a distance of 135 to 155 kilometers (85 to 95 miles), depending on the alignment selected. This paper describes the decision process and its environmental impacts.

  9. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  10. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2006-03-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting harvestable fisheries for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). The Spokane Tribe, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Colville Confederated Tribes and Lake Roosevelt Development Association/Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pen Project are cooperating in a comprehensive artificial production program to produce kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for annual releases into the project area. The program consists of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. The Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake Fisheries Evaluation Program monitor and evaluates release strategies and production methods for the aforementioned projects. Between 1985 and 2005 the projects have collectively produced up to 800,000 rainbow trout and 4 million kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry for Banks Lake annually. In 2005, the annual release goal included 3.3 million kokanee fry, 475,000 kokanee yearlings and 500,000 rainbow trout yearlings. Fish produced by this project in 2005 to meet collective fish production and release goals included: 3,446,438 kokanee fingerlings, 347,730 rainbow trout fingerlings and 525,721 kokanee yearlings. Kokanee yearlings were adipose fin clipped before release. Stock composition consisted of Meadow Creek and Lake Whatcom kokanee, diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and

  11. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservaton 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeCaire, Richard

    1998-01-01

    In the early 1980's the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife developed a management plan for Lake Roosevelt on the restoration and enhancement of kokanee salmon populations using hatchery out plants and the restoration of natural spawning runs. The plan was incorporated into the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) in their 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife program as partial mitigation for hydropower caused fish losses resulting from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project, as part of a basin wide effort, is evaluating the status of the natural production kokanee in streams tributary to Lakes Roosevelt and Rufus Woods and is examining entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam. The goal of this project is the protection and enhancement of the natural production kokanee in these two lakes. The project is currently collecting data under four phases or parts. Since 1991, Lake Whatcom Washington origin kokanee have been planted in considerable numbers into the waters of Lake Roosevelt. A natural production kokanee fishery has persisted in the lake since the early 1970's(Cash, 1995), (Scholz, 1991). Historical information alludes to wild Kokanee production in the San Poil River, Nespelem River, Big Sheep Creek, Ora-Pa-Ken Creek, Deep Creek and Onion Creeks. The genetic makeup of the fish within the fishery is unknown, as is their contribution to the fishery. The level of influence by the hatchery out planted stock on wild fish stocks is unknown as well. Project outcomes will indicate the genetic fitness for inclusion of natural production kokanee stocks into current Bonneville Power Administration funded hatchery programs. Other findings may determine contribution/interaction of/between wild/hatchery kokanee stocks found in the waters of Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt.

  12. Movements of White Sturgeon in Lake Roosevelt : Final Report 1988-1991.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brannon, E.L.; Setter, Ann L.

    1992-06-01

    Historically, white sturgeon moved throughout the Columbia River system, ranging freely from the estuary to the headwaters, with the possible exception of limited passage at Cascades, Celilo and Kettle Falls during spring floods. Construction of Rock Island Dam in 1933, followed by Bonneville in 1938 and Grand Coulee in 1941, completely disrupted sturgeon migratory opportunity, and with the 17 successive Columbia and Snake river dams constructed over the next 32 years an entirely different river system was created for the species. Sturgeon caught between dams were essentially isolated populations with severely limited reproduction potential. Some reservoirs ran from dam to dam with no river habitat remaining, while other reaches had various lengths of free running river, but drastically reduced from historical situations. However, if reservoirs provide habitat for sturgeon use, and therefore compensate to some degree for river loss, the major limiting factors associated with population viability may be reduced spawning success, either from lack of suitable area or poor incubation environments. The most upstream impoundment of the Columbia River in the United States is Lake Roosevelt, behind Grand Coulee Dam. If sturgeon don`t use Lake Roosevelt the capacity of the system to sustain a large sturgeon population would be understandably limited, and much reduced from the pre-dam era. In general this study found that sturgeon spawner aggregations from early spring to mid- summer depend most heavily on the timing of increasing water temperature. In the spring the water temperatures seem to stimulate the fish to start feeding and leave deep pools. The summer provides access to broader and shallower areas for food. The study on sturgeon movement was an attempt to define habitat use in such a reservoir/river system.

  13. Making the transition to automation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, D.J. )

    1992-10-01

    By 1995, the Bureau of Reclamation's hydropower plant near Hungry Horse, Montana, will be remotely operated from Grand Coulee dam (about 300 miles away) in Washington State. Automation at Hungry Horse will eliminate the need for four full-time power plant operators. Between now and then, a transition plan that offers employees choices for retraining, transferring, or taking early retirement will smooth the transition in reducing from five operators to one. The transition plan also includes the use of temporary employees to offset risks of reducing staff too soon. When completed in 1953, the Hungry Horse structure was the world's fourth largest and fourth highest concrete dam. The arch-gravity structure has a crest length of 2,115 feet; it is 3,565 feet above sea level. The four turbine-generator units in the powerhouse total 284 MW, and supply approximately 1 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity annually to the federal power grid managed by the Bonneville Power Administration. In 1988, Reclamation began to automate operations at many of its hydro plants, and to establish centralized control points. The control center concept will increase efficiency. It also will coordinate water movements and power supply throughout the West. In the Pacific Northwest, the Grand Coulee and Black Canyon plants are automated control centers. Several Reclamation-owned facilities in the Columbia River Basin, including Hungry Horse, will be connected to these centers via microwave and telephone lines. When automation is complete, constant monitoring by computer will replace hourly manual readings and equipment checks. Computers also are expected to increase water use efficiency by 1 to 2 percent by ensuring operation for maximum turbine efficiency. Unit efficiency curves for various heads will be programmed into the system.

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Progam; Thyroid-Induced Chemical Imprinting in Early Life Stages and Assessment of Smoltification in Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1993 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Galloway, Heather; Scholz, Allan T.

    1994-06-01

    In 1991, two hatcheries were built to provide a kokanee salmon and rainbow trout fishery for Lake Roosevelt as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead caused by construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Sherman Creek Hatchery, located on a tributary of Lake Roosevelt to provide an egg collection and imprinting site, is small with limited rearing capability. The second hatchery was located on the Spokane Indian Reservation because of a spring water source that supplied cold, pure water for incubating and rearing eggs.`The Spokane Tribal Hatchery thus serves as the production facility. Fish reared there are released into Sherman Creek and other tributary streams as 7-9 month old fry. However, to date, returns of adult fish to release sites has been poor. If hatchery reared kokanee imprint to the hatchery water at egg or swim up stages before 3 months of age, they may not be imprinting as 7-9 month old fry at the time of stocking. In addition, if these fish undergo a smolt phase in the reservoir when they are 1.5 years old, they could migrate below Grand Coulee Dam and out of the Lake Roosevelt system. In the present investigation, which is part of the Lake Roosevelt monitoring program to assess hatchery effectiveness, kokanee salmon were tested to determine if they experienced thyroxine-induced chemical imprinting and smoltification similar to anadromous salmonids. Determination of the critical period for olfactory imprinting was determined by exposing kokanee to different synthetic chemicals (morpholine or phenethyl alcohol) at different life stages, and then measuring the ability to discriminate the chemicals as sexually mature adults. Whole body thyroxine content and blood plasma thyroxine concentration was measured to determine if peak thyroid activity coincided with imprinting or other morphological, physiological or behavioral transitions associated with smoltification.

  15. NREL Hosts Free Workshops on Solar and Wind Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshops on Solar and Wind Energy For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., Dec. 15, 1999 - Engineers from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) next month will host three workshops on "Solar and Wind Power for Farms and Ranches" at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. The workshops will feature hands-on displays of clean, renewable energy systems that farmers and ranchers can use today. The consumer-oriented

  16. WINDExchange: Distributed Wind

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Distributed Wind Photo of a small wind turbine next to a farm house with a colorful sunset in the background. The distributed wind market includes wind turbines and projects of many sizes, from small wind turbines less than 1 kilowatt (kW) to multi-megawatt wind farms. The term "distributed wind" describes off-grid or grid-connected wind turbines at homes, farms and ranches, businesses, public and industrial facilities, and other sites. The turbines can provide all of the power used at

  17. WINDExchange: How Do I Get Wind Power?

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    How do I get Wind Power? Learn how you can own, partner with, host, and support wind power. Construct A Wind Project On Your Own Land There are wind turbines designed for everyone from residential homeowners to utilities, and from private to corporate use. Small wind turbines can be bought with cash, and commercial-scale projects can be financed. To learn more about small projects, such as those for a home or ranch or business that are less than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW), see the small wind

  18. SREL Reprint #3194

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Spatial ecology and core-area protection of Blanding's Turtle (Emydoidea blandingii) J. D. Congdon1,2, O. M. Kinney1,3, and R. D. Nagle1,4 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Bar Boot Ranch, Box 1128, Douglas, AZ 85608, USA 3Darlington School, 1014 Cave Spring Road, Rome, GA 30161, USA 4Environmental Science, Juniata College, 601 17th Street, Huntingdon, PA 16652, USA Abstract: We documented sizes of terrestrial protection zones around wetlands that are

  19. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul William

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  20. EERE Success Story-Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households EERE Success Story-Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Nevada-based contracting firm Nevada Controls, LLC used a low-interest loan from the Nevada State Office of Energy's Revolving Loan Fund to help construct a hydropower project in the small Nevada town of Kingston. The Kingston Creek Project-benefitting the Young Brothers Ranch-is a 175-kilowatt hydro generation plant

  1. U.S. Total Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    St. Clair, MI International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    St. Clair, MI International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake

  3. Effects of differential compaction fracturing shown in four reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, G.E. )

    1992-02-03

    With the advent of horizontal drilling in the U.S., fractured reservoirs have become a major target in the ongoing search for hydrocarbons. This paper will examine four fractured-reservoir fields in the U.S.: Silo (Niobrara), Wyoming; Elkhorn Ranch (Bakken), North Dakota; Pearsal (Austin chalk), Texas; and the Syndicated Options Ltd. 9372 Ferguson Brothers well (Ordovician carbonates), Kentucky. The paper will show that differential compaction fracturing is more of a major factor in long-term, sustainable production in a fractured reservoir than is tectonic fracturing. In this paper, a general discussion of the two types of fracturing and how they affect reservoir production is provided.

  4. How did contaminants get there?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How did contaminants get there? How did contaminants get there? During the Manhattan Project, Los Alamos hosted thousands of employees, including many Nobel Prize-winning scientists. Historical operations used the best available waste handling methods for that time. August 1, 2013 A comparison of Ashley Pond in the 1940s and 60 years later. Ashley Pond was named after Detroit businessman Ashley Pond who started the Los Alamos Ranch School in 1917. A comparison of Ashley Pond in the 1940s and 60

  5. June 1, 2015: Trinity Site Visit | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2015: Trinity Site Visit June 1, 2015: Trinity Site Visit June 1, 2015 The joint DOE/NPS team tours the Trinity Site on the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico where the world's first nuclear explosion occurred on July 16, 1945. The team visits ground zero and the restored McDonald ranch house where the device's plutonium core was assembled. DOE/NPS team approaches ground zero at the Trinity Site Obelisk made of black lava rock at ground zero, with attached commemorative sign

  6. 1997 News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 News Releases Access news stories about the laboratory and renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Search Local Middle School Receives School-to-Career Grant - (12/24/97) Free Consumer Workshops On Solar & Wind Power For Farm & Ranch At National Western Stock Show - (12/9/97) NREL Funds Research into Low-Cost Solar Electricity - (12/8/97) NREL Provides PV Holiday Lights for Christmas Tree - (12/2/97) Energy Saving Buildings Win National and Local Honors - (11/21/97)

  7. June 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2015: Trinity Site Visit June 1, 2015: Trinity Site Visit June 1, 2015 The joint DOE/NPS team tours the Trinity Site on the White Sands Missile Range in southern New Mexico where the world's first nuclear explosion occurred on July 16, 1945. The team visits ground zero and the restored McDonald ranch house where the device's plutonium core was assembled. DOE/NPS team approaches ground zero at the Trinity Site Obelisk made of black lava rock at ground zero, with attached commemorative sign

  8. Pascua Yaqui Tribe Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arvayo, Maria

    2014-05-30

    In 2012, PYT was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program to conduct a Renewable Energy Development and Deployment Feasibility Study that would define the technical and economic viability of renewable energy on tribal lands. Red Mountain Energy Partners (RMEP) was hired by PYT to complete the study. Through this study, Red Mountain concluded that there are viable opportunities for solar at Tortuga Ranch, the Casino del Sol and a third site near the Justice Center on Camino de Oeste.

  9. Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we

  10. Spokane Tribal Hatchery, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.

    2004-05-01

    Due to the construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam (1939), anadromous salmon have been eradicated and resident fish populations permanently altered in the upper Columbia River region. Federal and private hydropower dam operations throughout the Columbia River system severely limits indigenous fish populations in the upper Columbia. Artificial production has been determined appropriate for supporting a harvestable fishery for kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake (Grand Coulee Dam impoundments). A collaborative multi-agency artificial production program for the Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake fisheries exists consisting of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery, Ford Trout Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Kokanee and Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Projects. These projects operate complementary of one another to target an annual release of 1 million yearling kokanee and 500,000 yearling rainbow trout for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fry/fingerlings for Banks Lake. Combined fish stocking by the hatcheries and net pen rearing projects in 2003 included: 899,168 kokanee yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt; 1,087,331 kokanee fry/fingerlings released into Banks Lake, 44,000 rainbow trout fingerlings and; 580,880 rainbow trout yearlings released into Lake Roosevelt. Stock composition of 2003 releases consisted of Lake Whatcom kokanee, 50:50 diploid-triploid Spokane Trout Hatchery (McCloud River) rainbow trout and Phalon Lake red-band rainbow trout. All kokanee were marked with either thermal, oxytetracyline or fin clips prior to release. Preliminary 2003 Lake Roosevelt fisheries investigations indicate hatchery/net pen stocking significantly contributed to harvestable rainbow trout and kokanee salmon fisheries. An increase in kokanee harvest was primarily owing to new release strategies. Walleye predation, early maturity and entrainment through Grand Coulee Dam continues to

  11. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1991-09-01

    As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the

  12. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a devastating impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas were completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, causing the native people who's number one food resource was salmon to rely entirely upon resident fish to replace lost fisheries resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses in the ''Blocked Area'' above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 as a resident fish substitution measure and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout. To achieve this quota the Colville Tribal Hatchery was scheduled to produce 174,000 fingerling rainbow trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 sub-yearling rainbow trout (15 grams/fish), 80,000 legal size rainbow trout (90 grams/fish), 196,000 fingerling brook trout (5 grams/fish), 330,000 subyearling brook trout (15 grams/fish) and 60,000 lahontan cutthroat trout (15 grams/fish) in 2001. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence /recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members as well as a successful non-member sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to provide a ''carry-over'' fishery. Fish produced at the facility are intended to be capable of contributing to the natural production component of the reservation fish populations. Contribution to the natural production component will be achieved by producing and releasing fish of sufficient quality and quantity for fish to survive to spawning maturity, to spawn

  13. Assessment of the Fishery Improvement Opportunities on the Pend Oreille River: Recommendations for Fisheries Enhancement: Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1992-03-01

    This report recommends resident fish substitution projects to partially replace anadromous fish losses caused by construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. These recommendations involve enhancing the resident fishery in the Pend Oreille River as a substitute for anadromous fish losses. In developing these recommendations we have intentionally attempted to minimize the impact upon the hydroelectric system and anadromous fish recovery plans. In this report we are recommending that the Northwest Power Planning Council direct Bonneville Power Administration to fund the proposed enhancement measures as resident fish substitution projects under the NPPC's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The Pend Oreille River, located in northeast Washington, was historically a free flowing river which supported anadromous steelhead trout and chinook salmon, and large resident cutthroat trout and bull trout. In 1939, Grand Coulee Dam eliminated the anadromous species from the river. In 1955, Box Canyon Dam was constructed, inundating resident trout habitat in the river and creating many back water and slough areas. By the late 1950's the fishery in the reservoir had changed from a quality trout fishery to a warm water fishery, supporting largemouth bass, yellow perch and rough fish (tenth, suckers, squawfish). The object of this study was to examine the existing fishery, identify fishery improvement opportunities and recommend fishery enhancement projects. Three years of baseline data were collected from the Box Canyon portion of the Pend Oreille River to assess population dynamics, growth rates, feeding habits, behavior patterns and factors limiting the fishery. Fishery improvement opportunities were identified based on the results of these data. Relative abundance surveys in the reservoir resulted in the capture of 47,415 fish during the study. The most abundant species in the reservoir were yellow perch, composing 44% of the fish captured. The perch population in

  14. Texas' lightly drilled Dalhart basin getting more oil exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-06-24

    The Dalhart basin of the northwestern Texas Panhandle, the state's least drilled prospective area, is showing signs of another round of exploratory drilling. Horizon Oil and Gas Co., Dallas, opened ERT (Granite Wash) field in Potter County at 102 Bivins Ranch 9 miles north of Amarillo in early June. The discovery well pumped 105 b/d of 37.7{degrees} gravity oil and 48 b/d of water with gas too small to measure from perforations at 5,820-5,913 ft. Total depth is 7,516 ft in granite. In Hartley County, McKinney Operating Co., Amarillo, is pumped testing a second well in a field it discovered in 1990 that opened the first commercial Permian oil production in the Dalhart basin. The discovery well, McKinney's 1 Proctor, in section 63, block 22, CSL Survey, 19 miles west of Channing, pumped 12 b/d of oil and 15 b/d of water from Wolfcamp perforations at 4,038-50 ft. The well, which opened Proctor Ranch field, is producing about 35 b/d of oil.

  15. Protective barrier materials analysis: Fine soil site characterization: A research report for Westinghouse Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, G.V.; Glennon, M.A.; Young, M.A.; Gee, G.W.

    1987-11-01

    We collected soil samples for the physical characterization of a potential fine-soil quarry site at the McGee Ranch, which is located approximately 1 km northwest of the Hanford Site's Yakima Barricade. Forty test borings were made using a hollow-stem auger. Field moisture content and grain-size distribution were determined. The samples were classified into one of 19 sediment classes based on their grain-size distributions. Maps and cross sections were constructed from both the field and laboratory data to delineate the distributions of the various sediment classes. Statistical evaluations were made to determine the variations within the fine-soil fraction of the various sediment classes. Volume estimates were then made of the amounts of soil meeting the preliminary grain-size criteria. The physical characterization of the fine soils sampled near the McGee Ranch site indicated that approximately 3.4 million cubic meters of soil met or exceeded the minimum grain-size criteria for the fine soils needed for the protective barriers program. 11 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Sharp-tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  17. Sharp-Tailed Grouse and Pygmy Rabbit Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Untied States. Bonneville Power Adminsitration.

    1992-10-01

    The Proposed Action is needed to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus), Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis), and other indigenous wildlife species. The purpose of the Proposed Action is to compensate, in part, for wildlife habitat lost from the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and the inundation of Lake Roosevelt. Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund management agreements, conservation easements, acquisition of fee title, or a combination of these on as many as 29,000 acres in Lincoln and Douglas Counties to improve shrub-steppe and riparian habitat for sharp-tailed grouse and pygmy rabbits. The BPA also proposes to fund habitat improvements (enhancements) on project lands including existing public lands. Proposed habitat treatments would include control of grazing; planting of native trees, shrubs, forbs and grasses; protection of wetlands and streambanks; herbicide use; fire prescriptions; and wildfire suppression. Proposed management activities may include predator control, population introductions, and control of crop depredation.

  18. The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, Frederick

    2012-03-01

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  19. Scotch Creek Wildlife Area 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, Jim

    2008-11-03

    The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area is a complex of 6 separate management units located in Okanogan County in North-central Washington State. The project is located within the Columbia Cascade Province (Okanogan sub-basin) and partially addresses adverse impacts caused by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee hydroelectric dams. With the acquisition of the Eder unit in 2007, the total size of the wildlife area is now 19,860 acres. The Scotch Creek Wildlife Area was approved as a wildlife mitigation project in 1996 and habitat enhancement efforts to meet mitigation objectives have been underway since the spring of 1997 on Scotch Creek. Continuing efforts to monitor the threatened Sharp-tailed grouse population on the Scotch Creek unit are encouraging. The past two spring seasons were unseasonably cold and wet, a dangerous time for the young of the year. This past spring, Scotch Creek had a cold snap with snow on June 10th, a critical period for young chicks just hatched. Still, adult numbers on the leks have remained stable the past two years. Maintenance of BPA funded enhancements is necessary to protect and enhance shrub-steppe and to recover and sustain populations of Sharp-tailed grouse and other obligate species.

  20. Blue Creek Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project : Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs; Spokane Tribe of the Spokane Reservation, Washington

    1994-11-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Agreement pertaining to the Blue Creek Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Spokane Tribe, Upper Columbia United Tribes, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). If fully implemented, the proposed action would allow the sponsors to protect and enhance 2,631 habitat units of big game winter range and riparian shrub habitat on 2,185 hectares (5,400 acres) of Spokane Tribal trust lands, and to conduct long term wildlife management activities within the Spokane Indian Reservation project area. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of securing land and conducting wildlife habitat enhancement and long term management activities within the boundaries of the Spokane Indian Reservation. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam and its reservoir.

  1. BPA Committed to Northwest Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-01

    The Columbia River has been called the “crown jewel” of the Pacific Northwest. There is no question it is among the region’s greatest assets — supplying low-cost clean hydropower, making deserts bloom thanks to irrigation and providing navigation, recreation and a home for many species of fish and wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration is proud to be a steward of this great resource. Our mission is to serve the people and environment of the Pacific Northwest. We sell wholesale power from Grand Coulee Dam and 30 other Northwest federal dams to Northwest utilities, including public utility districts, rural electric cooperatives and municipal utility departments, as well as investor-owned utilities. We operate three-fourths of the region’s high voltage transmission system that delivers that power. But, as a federal agency, we are not just a power marketer. We have public responsibilities that include, among many, promoting energy efficiency, facilitating development of renewable power, protecting fish and wildlife affected by hydro development, honoring treaty obligations to tribes and promoting a reliable energy future through collaboration and partnerships. This document describes our responsibilities to citizens in the Pacific Northwest.

  2. West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

  3. Case studies of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power: South Columbia Basin Irrigation District, Pasco, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.

    1980-05-01

    The case study concerns two modern human uses of the Columbia River - irrigation aimed at agricultural land reclamation and hydroelectric power. The Grand Coulee Dam has become synonomous with large-scale generation of hydroelectric power providing the Pacific Northwest with some of the least-expensive electricity in the United States. The Columbia Basin Project has created a half-million acres of farmland in Washington out of a spectacular and vast desert. The South Columbia River Basin Irrigation District is seeking to harness the energy present in the water which already runs through its canals, drains, and wasteways. The South District's development strategy is aimed toward reducing the costs its farmers pay for irrigation and raising the capital required to serve the remaining 550,000 acres originally planned as part of the Columbia Basin Project. The economic, institutional, and regulatory problems of harnessing the energy at site PEC 22.7, one of six sites proposed for development, are examined in this case study.

  4. Lake Roosevelt Volunteer Net Pens, Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pens, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Gene

    2003-11-01

    The completion of Grand Coulee Dam for power production, flood control, and irrigation resulted in the creation of a blocked area above the dam and in the loss of anadromous fish. Because of lake level fluctuations required to meet the demands for water release or storage, native or indigenous fish were often threatened. For many years very little effort was given to stocking the waters above the dam. However, studies by fish biologists showed that there was a good food base capable of supporting rainbow and kokanee (Gangmark and Fulton 1949, Jagielo 1984, Scholz etal 1986, Peone etal 1990). Further studies indicated that artificial production might be a way of restoring or enhancing the fishery. In the 1980's volunteers experimented with net pens. The method involved putting fingerlings in net pens in the fall and rearing them into early summer before release. The result was an excellent harvest of healthy fish. The use of net pens to hold the fingerlings for approximately nine months appears to reduce predation and the possibility of entrainment during draw down and to relieve the hatcheries to open up available raceways for future production. The volunteer net pen program grew for a few years but raising funds to maintain the pens and purchase food became more and more difficult. In 1995 the volunteer net pen project (LRDA) was awarded a grant through the Northwest Power Planning Council's artificial production provisions.

  5. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; Artificial Imprinting and Smoltification in Juvenile Kokanee Salmon Implications for Operating Lake Roosevelt Kokanee Salmon Hatcheries; 1994 Supplement Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilson, Mary Beth; Scholz, Allan T.; White, Ronald J.

    1995-02-01

    At the kokanee salmon hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt, constructed as partial mitigation for effects from Grand Coulee Dam, adult returns have been poor. The reason may be in the imprinting or in the smoltification. A study was initiated in 1992 to determine if there was a critical period for thyroxine induced alfactory imprinting in kokanee salmon; experiments were conducted on imprinting to morpholine and phenethyl alcohol. Other results showed that chemical imprinting coincided with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992. In this report, imprinting experiments were repeated; results showed that imprinting occurred concomitant with elevated thyroxine levels in 1991 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1992 and tested in 1994 as age 3 spawners. Imprinting also occurred at the same time as thyroxine peaks in 1992 kokanee exposed to synthetic chemicals in 1993 and tested as age 2 spawners. In both groups fish that had the highest whole body thyroxine content (swimup stage) also had the highest percentage of fish that were attracted to their exposure odor in behavioral tests. So, kokanee salmon imprinted to chemical cues during two sensitive periods during development, at the alevin/swimup and smolt stages. A field test was conducted in Lake Roosevelt on coded wire tagged fish. Smoltification experiments were conducted from 1992 to 1994. Recommendations are made for the Lake Roosevelt kokanee hatcheries.

  6. West Foster Creek 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    A follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the West Foster Creek (Smith acquisition) wildlife mitigation site in May 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance and maintain the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The West Foster Creek 2007 follow-up HEP survey generated 2,981.96 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for a 34% increase (+751.34 HUs) above baseline HU credit (the 1999 baseline HEP survey generated 2,230.62 habitat units or 1.13 HUs per acre). The 2007 follow-up HEP analysis yielded 1,380.26 sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) habitat units, 879.40 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) HUs, and 722.29 western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta) habitat units. Mule deer and sharp-tailed grouse habitat units increased by 346.42 HUs and 470.62 HUs respectively over baseline (1999) survey results due largely to cessation of livestock grazing and subsequent passive restoration. In contrast, the western meadowlark generated slightly fewer habitat units in 2007 (-67.31) than in 1999, because of increased shrub cover, which lowers habitat suitability for that species.

  7. Statistical assessment of fish behavior from split-beam hydro-acoustic sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Simmons, Carver S.; Johnson, Robert L.

    2005-04-01

    Statistical methods are presented for using echo-traces from split-beam hydro-acoustic sampling to assess fish behavior in response to a stimulus. The data presented are from a study designed to assess the response of free-ranging, lake-resident fish, primarily kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to high intensity strobe lights, and was conducted at Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River in Northern Washington State. The lights were deployed immediately upstream from the turbine intakes, in a region exposed to daily alternating periods of high and low flows. The study design included five down-looking split-beam transducers positioned in a line at incremental distances upstream from the strobe lights, and treatments applied in randomized pseudo-replicate blocks. Statistical methods included the use of odds-ratios from fitted loglinear models. Fish-track velocity vectors were modeled using circular probability distributions. Both analyses are depicted graphically. Study results suggest large increases of fish activity in the presence of the strobe lights, most notably at night and during periods of low flow. The lights also induced notable bimodality in the angular distributions of the fish track velocity vectors. Statistical summaries are presented along with interpretations on fish behavior.

  8. Assessment of the Fishery Improvement Opportunities on the Pend Oreille River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Michael R.; Willms, Roger A.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the fishery improvement opportunities on the Box Canyon portion of the Pend Oreille River. This report contains the findings of the first year of the study. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss (Richardson)) were present in the Pend Oreille River prior to the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The river also contained native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki (Richardson)), bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus (Walbaum)) and mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni (Girard)). Rainbow trout were planted in the river and some grew to lengths in excess of 30 inches. With the construction of Box Canyon Dam, in 1955, the most productive section of the river was inundated. Following the construction of the dam the trout fishery declined and the populations of spiny ray fish and rough fish increased. The objectives of the first year of the study were to determine the relative abundance of each species in the river and sloughs; the population levels in fish in the river and four selected tributaries; fish growth rates; the feeding habits and abundance of preferred prey; the migration patterns; and the total fishing pressure, catch per unit effort, and total harvest by conducting a year-round creel survey. 132 refs.

  9. Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-0307-SA-01)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-10-02

    The Bonneville Power Administration prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-0307) for the Colville Resident Hatchery Project (Project) and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) in the Federal Register on September 8, 1986 (Vol. 51, No.173). The Project involved the design, site selection, construction, operation and maintenance of a resident trout hatchery on the Colville Indian Reservation to partially mitigate for anadromours and other fish losses resulting from the construction and operation of the Chief Joseph Dam and Grand Coulee Dam hydroelectric projects. Since the hatchery was constructed, ongoing Operation and Maintenance (O&M) and Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) activities have been funded by BPA. The O&M and M&E activities examined in the EA were very general in nature due to the fact the project was in the conceptual stage. Since that time the hatchery has refined the need for specific O&M and M&E activities, proposed for fiscal year 2004, (funding for projects runs from October 2003 to September 2004). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze the environmental impacts that would result from the specific O&M and M&E activities proposed for fiscal year 2004.

  10. Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

  11. Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). The proposed action would allow the sponsors to secure property and conduct wildlife management activities within the boundaries of the Colville Indian Reservation. This Final Environmental Assessment (EA) examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. This area consists of several separated land parcels, of which 2,000 hectares (4,943 acres) have been purchased by BPA and an additional 4,640 hectares (11,466 acres) have been identified by the Colville Confederated Tribes for inclusion in the Project. Four proposed activities (habitat protection, habitat enhancement, operation and maintenance, and monitoring and evaluation) are analyzed. The proposed action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

  12. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  13. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model included: quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report summarized the data collected on Lake Roosevelt for 1991 and includes limnological, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, fishery, and reservoir operation data. Discussions cover reservoir operation affect upon zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Reservoir operations brought reservoir elevations to a low of 1,221.7 in April, the result of power operations and a flood control shift from Dworshak Dam, in Idaho, to Grand Coulee Dam. Water retention times were correspondingly low reaching a minimum of 14.7 days on April 27th.

  14. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  15. Shoal, Nevada Site Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    The Shoal Site is situated on 2,560 acres of withdrawn federal lands located within the north-central portion of the Sand Springs Range in Churchill County, Nevada. The town of Fallon is the largest populated area in the region and is about 30 miles northwest of the site. The region around the Shoal Site is sparsely populated; military installations, recreation, ranching, and mining provide the dominant commercial interests. The Project Shoal underground nuclear test was part of the Vela Uniform program sponsored jointly by the U.S Department of Defense and U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Vela Uniform was a research and development program directed toward locating, detecting, and identifying underground detonations. The objective of Project Shoal was to detonate a nuclear device underground in an active seismic area to improve the United States' ability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations.

  16. Radionuclide chain transport through heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadermann, J.; Patry, J.

    1982-04-01

    A one-dimensional radionuclide chain transport model is developed, taking into account sorption, longitudinal dispersion, and arbitrary repository concentrations. For piecewise constant geologic parameters, a semianalytic solution can be written down, when, at the layer boundaries, mass conservation is considered rigorously and flux conservation to a good approximation. The solution consists of a superposition of terms that are easily interpreted and is invariant under layer permutation and parameter scaling. A corresponding computer code RANCH has been developed. The /sup 245/Cm chain has been investigated for a broad variation of parameters of a three-layer geology. For very small retention factors only, /sup 245/Cm and /sup 241/Am can survive migration in the geologic medium, while /sup 237/Np is reduced by at most three orders of magnitude.

  17. Thermal project to heat Paluxy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickey, V.

    1984-05-01

    A steam injection project aimed at encouraging low gravity crude to the surface is reported for the Devil's River (Paluxy) field in Val Verde County, Texas. By using natural gas produced in the field from the 9000-ft Strawn Formation steam can be produced economically for injection into the 300- to 350-ft Paluxy Formation where 17 gravity crude is found. Petro Imperial conducted a thermal pilot test on its Glasscock Ranch lease 32 miles southwest of Sonora. Steam and oxygen were injected in a huff-and-puff mode on 2 of the 11 wells--each for ca 15 hr. The wells responded with a 6 bopd flow rate that declined in a few hours subsequent to the steam injection. A permit has been granted that will allow steam injection through a central location in a 5-spot pattern.

  18. Big ones needed to 'sweeten the pot'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rountree, R.

    1983-09-01

    Up to the present, there has been little encouragement outside the 20-mile-wide, 60-mile-long producing western in Northeastern Utah and south-trend Wyoming. There is, however, a lot of real estate left to explore and a number of companies remain aggressive in the search. Within the Utah-Wyoming Fairway there still is a considerable amount of work to do in and around established field areas. The emphasis is on exploration and development drilling from Pineview Field in Summit County, Utah to the Glasscock Hollow area in Uinta County, Wyoming. In early August, there were eleven drillings rigs at work in Anschutz Ranch East Field, including two drilling for The Anschutz Corp. in the east lobe of the field, one drilling for Champlin Petroleum in the southern portion of the west lobe, and eight rigs were drilling for Amoco Production Co.

  19. EIS-0473: W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project (PCCS), Fort Bend County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide financial assistance for a project proposed by NRG Energy, Inc (NRG). DOE selected NRG’s proposed W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project for a financial assistance award through a competitive process under the Clean Coal Power Initiative Program. NRG would design, construct and operate a commercial-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture facility at its existing W.A. Parish Generating Station in Fort Bend County, Texas; deliver the CO2 via a new pipeline to the existing West Ranch oil field in Jackson County, Texas, for use in enhanced oil recovery operations; and demonstrate monitoring techniques to verify the permanence of geologic CO2 storage.

  20. PRB mines mature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2007-08-15

    Already seeing the results of reclamation efforts, America's largest surface mines advance as engineers prepare for the future. 30 years after the signing of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act by Jimmy Carter, western strip mines in the USA, especially in the Powder River Basin, are producing more coal than ever. The article describes the construction and installation of a $38.5 million near-pit crusher and overland belt conveyor system at Foundation Coal West's (FCW) Belle Ayr surface mine in Wyoming, one of the earliest PRB mines. It goes on to describe the development by Rio Tinto of an elk conservatory, the Rochelle Hill Conservation Easement, on reclaimed land at Jacobs Ranch, adjacent to the Rochelle Hills. 4 photos.

  1. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Operational Environmental Monitoring Plan (OEMP) monitors a comprehensive set of parameters in order to detect any potential environmental impacts and establish baselines for future quantitative environmental impact evaluations. Surface water and groundwater, soil, and biotics are measured for background radiation. Nonradiological environmental monitoring activities include meteorological, air quality, soil properties, and the status of the local biological community. Ecological studies focus on the immediate area surrounding the site with emphasis on the salt storage pile, whereas baseline radiological surveillance covers a broader geographic area including nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Since the WIPP is still in a preoperational state, no waste has been received; therefore, certain elements required by Order DOE 5400.1 are not presented in this report. 15 figs. 19 tabs.

  2. Ruminant methane reduction through livestock development in Tanzania. Final report for US Department of Energy and US Initiative on Joint Implementation--Activities Implemented Jointly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Roderick

    1999-07-01

    This project was designed to help develop the US Initiative on Joint Implementation activities in Eastern Africa. It has been communicated in meetings with representatives from the Ministry of Environment of Tanzania and the consultant group that developed Tanzania's National Climate Change Action Plan, the Centre for Energy, Environment, Science and Technology, that this project fits very well with the developmental and environmental goals of the Government of Tanzania. The goal of the Activities Implemented Jointly ruminant livestock project is to reduce ruminant methane emissions in Eastern Africa. The project plans a sustainable cattle multiplication unit (CMU) at Mabuki Ranch in the Mwanza Region of Tanzania. This CMU will focus on raising genetically improved animals to be purchased by farmers, developmental organizations, and other CMUs in Tanzania. Through the purchase of these animals farmers will raise their income generation potential and reduce ruminant methane emissions.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amaris Custom Homes, St. Paul, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-06-01

    For this project, Amaris worked with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team, NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership, to develop the first Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) in Minnesota's cold climate using reasonable, cost-effective, and replicable construction materials and practices. The result is a passive solar, super-efficient 3542-ft2 walkout ranch-style home with all the creature comforts. Along with meeting ZERH standards, Amaris also achieved certifications for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design for Homes v4, MN Green Path Emerald, and a Builders Association of the Twin Cities Reggie Award of Excellence. The home achieves a HERS score of 41 without photovoltaics; with PV, the home achieves a HERS score of 5.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.9 On-Site Power

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 United States Small Wind Units and Capacity On-Grid Off-Grid Capacity On-Grid Units Units Units kW kW kW 2001 (1) 2100 - 2002 (1) 3100 - 2003 (1) 3200 - 2004 4671 17.2 2005 4324 11.1 2006 8330 35.8 2007 9102 43.1 2008 10386 73.5 2009 9820 91.0 2010 7811 139.2 65% 2% 16% 40% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Estimates. 2) Turbines under 1 kW are often used on marine vehicles to charge batteries and to pump water for irrigation or ranching. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), Stimmel, Ron, 2008 AWEA

  5. Earthquake geology of the northern San Andreas Fault near Point Arena, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    Excavations into a Holocene alluvial fan provided exposures of a record of prehistoric earthquakes near Point Arena, California. At least five earthquakes were recognized in the section. All of these occurred since the deposition of a unit that is approximately 2000 years old. Radiocarbon dating allows constraints to be placed on the dates of these earthquakes. A buried Holocene (2356-2709 years old) channel has been offset a maximum of 64 {plus minus} 2 meters. This implies a maximum slip rate of 25.5 {plus minus} 2.5 mm/yr. These data suggest that the average recurrence interval for great earthquakes on this segment of the San Andreas fault is long - between about 200 and 400 years. Offset marine terrace risers near Point Arena and an offset landslide near Fort Ross provide estimates of the average slip rate since Late Pleistocene time. Near Fort Ross, an offset landslide implies a slip rate of less than 39 mm/yr. Correlation and age estimates of two marine terrace risers across the San Andreas fault near Point Arena suggest slip rates of about 18-19 mm/yr since Late Pleistocene time. Tentative correlation of the Pliocene Ohlson Ranch Formation in northwestern Sonoma County with deposits 50 km to the northwest near Point Arean, provides piercing points to use in calculation of a Pliocene slip rate for the northern San Andreas fault. A fission-track age 3.3 {plus minus} 0.8 Ma was determined for zicrons separated from a tuff collected from the Ohlson Ranch Formation. The geomorphology of the region, especially of the two major river drainages, supports the proposed 50 km Pliocene offset. This implies a Pliocene slip rate of at least 12-20 mm/yr. These rates for different time periods imply that much of the Pacific-North American plate motion must be accommodated on other structures at this latitude.

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Net Zero Energy Low-Income Residential Housing Development in Lafayette, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.; VanGeet, O.; Simkus, S.; Eastment, M.

    2012-03-01

    This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra low energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. Affordable housing development authorities throughout the United States continually struggle to find the most cost-effective pathway to provide quality, durable, and sustainable housing. The challenge for these authorities is to achieve the mission of delivering affordable housing at the lowest cost per square foot in environments that may be rural, urban, suburban, or within a designated redevelopment district. With the challenges the U.S. faces regarding energy, the environmental impacts of consumer use of fossil fuels and the increased focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions, housing authorities are pursuing the goal of constructing affordable, energy efficient and sustainable housing at the lowest life-cycle cost of ownership. This report outlines the lessons learned and sub-metered energy performance of an ultra-low-energy single family ranch home and duplex unit, called the Paradigm Pilot Project and presents the final design recommendations for a 153-unit net zero energy residential development called the Josephine Commons Project. In addition to describing the results of the performance monitoring from the pilot project, this paper describes the recommended design process of (1) setting performance goals for energy efficiency and renewable energy on a life-cycle cost basis, (2) using an integrated, whole building design approach, and (3) incorporating systems-built housing, a green jobs training program, and renewable energy technologies into a replicable high performance, low-income housing project development model.

  7. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  8. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2005-07-01

    The runoff volume for 2004 was below average throughout the Columbia Basin. At The Dalles the January-July runoff volume was 77% of average or 83.0 MAF. Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, and Libby were below their Biological Opinion reservoir target elevations on April 10 at the beginning of the spring salmon migration season. All major storage reservoirs except Libby, Grand Coulee, Hungry Horse, Dworshak, and Brownlee were within a few feet of full by the end of June and early July. Overall, NOAA Biological Opinion seasonal flow targets were not met at any project for either spring or summer migrations of salmon and steelhead. Overall, spill was reduced in 2004. Implementation of Biological Opinion spill for fish passage measures was wrought with contention in 2004, particularly for summer spill which was finally the subject of litigation. The spring migration spill season began with debate among the fishery mangers and tribes and action agencies regarding spill at Bonneville Dam for the Spring Creek Hatchery release. The USFWS agreed to a spill test versus a corner collector operation to determine the best route for survival for these fish. The USFWS agreement includes no spill for early Spring Creek Hatchery releases for the next two years. Spring spill at Snake River transportation sites was eliminated after April 23, and transportation was maximized. The federal operators and regulators proposed to reduce Biological Opinion summer spill measures, while testing the impact of those reductions. This proposal was eventually rejected in challenges in the Federal Ninth Circuit Court. The Corps of Engineers reported that spill at Bonneville Dam in the 2002 to 2004 period was actually lower than reported due to a spill calibration error at the project. Because flows were low and spill levels were easily controlled few fish were observed with any signs of Gas Bubble Trauma. The annual Smolt Monitoring Program was implemented and provided in-season timing and passage

  9. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

    1990-10-01

    In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

  10. Q AS A LITHOLOGICAL/HYDROCARBON INDICATOR: FROM FULL WAVEFORM SONIC TO 3D SURFACE SEISMIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge O. Parra; C.L. Hackert; L. Wilson; H.A. Collier; J. Todd Thomas

    2006-03-31

    The goal of this project was to develop a method to exploit viscoelastic rock and fluid properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic measurements to the presence of hydrocarbon saturation. To reach the objective, Southwest Research Institute scientists used well log, lithology, production, and 3D seismic data from an oil reservoir located on the Waggoner Ranch in north central Texas. The project was organized in three phases. In the first phase, we applied modeling techniques to investigate seismic- and acoustic-frequency wave attenuation and its effect on observable wave attributes. We also gathered existing data and acquired new data from the Waggoner Ranch field, so that all needed information was in place for the second phase. During the second phase, we developed methods to extract attenuation from borehole acoustic and surface seismic data. These methods were tested on synthetic data constructed from realistic models and real data. In the third and final phase of the project, we applied this technology to a full data set from the Waggoner site. The results presented in this Final Report show that geological conditions at the site did not allow us to obtain interpretable results from the Q processing algorithm for 3D seismic data. However, the Q-log processing algorithm was successfully applied to full waveform sonic data from the Waggoner site. A significant part of this project was technology transfer. We have published several papers and conducted presentations at professional conferences. In particular, we presented the Q-log algorithm and applications at the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) Development and Production Forum in Austin, Texas, in May 2005. The presentation attracted significant interest from the attendees and, at the request of the SEG delegates, it was placed on the Southwest Research Institute Internet site. The presentation can be obtained from the following link: http://www.swri.org/4org/d15/elecsys

  11. Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polacek, Matt

    2009-07-15

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout

  12. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the Intermountain Province of the Columbia Basin, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielgus, Robert B.; Shipley, Lisa

    2002-07-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the subbasins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are not ranked as target species and are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated ''press'' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM subbasins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates

  13. Effects of Cougar Predation and Nutrition on Mule Deer Population Declines in the IM Province of the Columbia Basin, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielgus, Robert; Shipley, Lisa; Myers, Woodrow

    2003-09-01

    Construction of the Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams has resulted in inundation and loss of 29,125 total habitat units for mule deer and irrigation agriculture in many parts the Intermountain Province (IM) of the Columbia Basin. Mule deer in the Shrub-Steppe are ranked high priority target species for mitigation and management and are declining in most portions of the sub basins of the IM. Reasons for the decline are unknown but believed to be related to habitat changes resulting from dams and irrigation agriculture. White-tailed deer are believed to be increasing throughout the basin because of habitat changes brought about by the dams and irrigation agriculture. Recent research (1997-2000) in the NE IM and adjacent Canadian portions of the Columbia Basin (conducted by this author and funded by the Columbia Basin Fish & Wildlife Compensation Program B.C.), suggest that the increasing white-tailed deer populations (because of dams and irrigation agriculture) are resulting in increased predation by cougars on mule deer (apparent competition or alternate prey hypothesis). The apparent competition hypothesis predicts that as alternate prey (white-tailed deer) densities increase, so do densities of predators, resulting in increased incidental predation on sympatric native prey (mule deer). Apparent competition can result in population declines and even extirpation of native prey in some cases. Such a phenomenon may account for declines of mule deer in the IM and throughout arid and semi-arid West where irrigation agriculture is practiced. We will test the apparent competition hypothesis by conducting a controlled, replicated 'press' experiment in at least 2 treatment and 2 control areas of the IM sub basins by reducing densities of white-tailed deer and observing any changes in cougar predation on mule deer. Deer densities will be monitored by WADFW personnel using annual aerial surveys and/or other trend indices. Predation rates and population growth rates of deer

  14. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

    2002-05-01

    1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

  15. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Charles D.

    2000-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI

  16. Ford Hatchery; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fish Program, Hatcheries Division, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovrak, Jon; Ward, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Bonneville Power Administration's participation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ford Hatchery, provides the opportunity for enhancing the recreational and subsistence kokanee fisheries in Banks Lake. The artificial production and fisheries evaluation is done cooperatively through the Spokane Hatchery, Sherman Creek Hatchery (WDFW), Banks Lake Volunteer Net Pen Project, and the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Ford Hatchery's production, together with the Sherman Creek and the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, will contribute to an annual goal of one million kokanee yearlings for Lake Roosevelt and 1.4 million kokanee fingerlings and fry for Banks Lake. The purpose of this multi-agency program is to restore and enhance kokanee salmon and rainbow trout populations in Lake Roosevelt and Banks Lake due to Grand Coulee Dam impoundments. The Ford Hatchery will produce 9,533 lbs. (572,000) kokanee annually for release as fingerlings into Banks Lake in October. An additional 2,133 lbs. (128,000) kokanee will be transferred to net pens on Banks Lake at Electric City in October. The net pen raised kokanee will be reared through the fall, winter, and early spring to a total of 8,533 lbs and released in May. While the origin of kokanee comes from Lake Whatcom, current objectives will be to increase the use of native (or, indigenous) stocks for propagation in Banks Lake and the Upper Columbia River. Additional stocks planned for future use in Banks Lake include Lake Roosevelt kokanee and Meadow Creek kokanee. The Ford Hatchery continues to produce resident trout (80,584 lb. per year) to promote the sport fisheries in trout fishing lakes in eastern Washington (WDFW Management, Region 1). Operation and maintenance funding for the increased kokanee program was implemented in FY 2001 and scheduled to continue through FY 2010. Funds from BPA allow for an additional employee at the Ford Hatchery to assist in the operations and maintenance associated with

  17. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Meadow Creek vs. Lake Whatcom Stock Kokanee Salmon Investigations in Lake Roosevelt Annual Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly J.; Scholz, Allan T.

    2001-07-01

    Lake Roosevelt has been stocked with Whatcom stock kokanee since 1989 to mitigate for anadromous salmon losses caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The primary objective of the hatchery plantings was to create a self-sustaining recreational fishery. Due to low return numbers, it was hypothesized a native stock of kokanee might perform better than the coastal Whatcom strain. Therefore, kokanee from Meadow Creek, a tributary of Kootenay Lake, British Columbia were selected as an alternative stock. Matched pair releases of Whatcom stock and Meadow Creek kokanee were made from Sherman Creek in late June 2000. Stock performance between Lake Whatcom and Meadow Creek kokanee was evaluated through three performance measures (1) returns to Sherman Creek, the primary egg collection facility, (2) returns to other tributaries, indicating availability for angler harvest, and (3) returns to the creel. A secondary objective was to evaluate the numbers collected at downstream fish passage facilities. Age 2 kokanee were collected during five passes through the reservoir, which included 89 tributaries between August 17th and November 7th, 2000. Sherman Creek was sampled once a week because it was the primary egg collection location. A total of 2,789 age 2 kokanee were collected, in which 2,658 (95%) were collected at Sherman Creek. Chi-square analysis indicated the Meadow Creek kokanee returned to Sherman Creek in significantly higher numbers compared to the Whatcom stock ({chi}{sup 2} = 734.4; P < 0.01). Reservoir wide recoveries indicated similar results ({chi}{sup 2} = 733.1; P < 0.01). No age 2 kokanee were collected during creel surveys. Age 3 kokanee are expected to recruit to the creel in 2001. No age 2 kokanee were collected at the fish passage facilities due to a 170 mm size restriction at the fish passage centers. Age 3 kokanee are expected to be collected at the fish passage centers during 2001. Stock performance cannot be properly evaluated until 2001, when

  18. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project : Annual Report 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Charles D.

    1999-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Personnel of three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and

  19. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program; Evaluation of Limiting Factors for Stocked Kokanee and Rainbow Trout in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt

    2009-03-01

    Hatchery supplementation of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka and rainbow trout O. mykiss has been the primary mitigation provided by Bonneville Power Administration for loss of anadromous fish to the waters above Grand Coulee Dam (GCD). The hatchery program for rainbow trout has consistently met management goals and provided a substantial contribution to the fishery; however, spawner returns and creel survey results for kokanee have been below management goals. Our objective was to identify factors that limit limnetic fish production in Lake Roosevelt by evaluating abiotic conditions, food limitations, piscivory, and entrainment. Dissolved oxygen concentration was adequate throughout most of the year; however, levels dropped to near 6 mg/L in late July. For kokanee, warm water temperatures during mid-late summer limited their nocturnal distribution to 80-100 m in the lower section of the reservoir. Kokanee spawner length was consistently several centimeters longer than in other Pacific Northwest systems, and the relative weights of rainbow trout and large kokanee were comparable to national averages. Large bodied daphnia (> 1.7 mm) were present in the zooplankton community during all seasons indicating that top down effects were not limiting secondary productivity. Walleye Stizostedion vitreum were the primary piscivore of salmonids in 1998 and 1999. Burbot Lota lota smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieui, and northern pikeminnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis preyed on salmonids to a lesser degree. Age 3 and 4 walleye were responsible for the majority (65%) of the total walleye consumption of salmonids. Bioenergetics modeling indicated that reservoir wide consumption by walleye could account for a 31-39% loss of stocked kokanee but only 6-12% of rainbow trout. Size at release was the primary reason for differential mortality rates due to predation. Entrainment ranged from 2% to 16% of the monthly abundance estimates of limnetic fish, and could account for 30% of total

  20. Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arteburn, John; Christensen, David

    2003-03-01

    Federal hydropower projects as well as private power utility systems have had a major negative impact upon anadromous fish resources that once flourished in the Columbia River and it's tributaries. Several areas have been completely blocked to anadromous fish by dams, destroying the primary food resource (salmon) for many native people forcing them to rely heavily upon resident fish to replace these lost resources. The Colville Tribal Fish Hatchery is an artificial production program that addresses the loss of anadromous fish resources in the Upper Columbia Sub-Region within the ''blocked area'' created by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. This project enhances resident fisheries located in the Intermountain and Columbia Cascade Provinces, specifically within the Colville Reservation portion of the Upper Columbia, SanPoil and Oakanogan Sub-Basins. The project partially mitigates for anadromous fish losses through protection/augmentation of resident fish populations to enhance fishery potential (i.e. in-place, out-of-kind mitigation) pursuant to Resident Fish Substitution Policy of the Northwest Power Planning Councils Fish and Wildlife Program. The hatchery was accepted into the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program in 1984 and the hatchery was completed in 1990. The Colville Tribal Hatchery (CTH) is located on the northern bank of the Columbia River just down stream of the town of Bridgeport, Washington that is just down stream of Chief Joseph Dam. The hatchery is located on land owned by the Colville Tribes. The minimum production quota for this facility is 22,679 kg (50,000 lbs.) of trout annually. All fish produced are released into reservation waters, including boundary waters in an effort to provide a successful subsistence/recreational fishery for Colville Tribal members and provide for a successful nonmember sport fishery. The majority of the fish distributed from the facility are intended to support ''carry-over'' fisheries. Fish

  1. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout : Habitat/Passage Improvement Project Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sear, Sheri

    2001-02-01

    Lake Franklin D. Roosevelt was created with the completion of the Grand Coulee Dam in 1942. The lake stretches 151 miles up-stream to the International border between the United States and Canada at the 49th parallel. Increased recreational use, subsistence and sport fishing has resulted in intense interest and possible exploitation of the resources within the lake. Previous studies of the lake and its fishery have been limited. Early studies indicate that natural reproduction within the lake and tributaries are not sufficient to support a rainbow trout (Onchoryhnchus mykiss) fishery (Scholz et. al., 1988). These studies indicate that the rainbow trout population may be limited by lack of suitable habitat for spawning and rearing (Scholz et. al., 1988). The initial phase of this project (Phase I, baseline data collection- 1990-91) was directed at the assessment of limiting factors such as quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other limiting factors. Population estimates were conducted using the Seber/LeCren removal/depletion method. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, several streams were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation-1992-96). At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring) began. This phase will assess changes and gauge the success achieved through the improvements. The objective of the project is to correct passage barriers and improve habitat conditions of selected tributaries to Lake Roosevelt for adfluvial rainbow trout that utilize tributary streams for spawning and rearing. Streams with restorable habitats were selected for improvements. Completion of improvement efforts should increase the adfluvial rainbow trout contribution to the resident fishery in Lake Roosevelt. Three co-operating agencies, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CCT), the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI

  2. Viability of Small Wind Distributed Generation for Farmers Who Irrigate (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, B.; Forsyth, T.; Johnson, S.; Healow, D.

    2010-05-01

    About 14% of U.S. farms are irrigated, representing 55 million acres of irrigated land. Irrigation on these farms is a major energy user in the United States, accounting for one-third of water withdrawals and 137 billion gallons per day. More than half of the Irrigation systems use electric energy. Wind energy can be a good choice for meeting irrigation energy needs. Nine of the top 10 irrigation states (California, Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas, Washington, and Oregon) have good to excellent wind resources. Many rural areas have sufficient wind speeds to make wind an attractive alternative, and farms and ranches can often install a wind energy system without impacting their ability to plant crops and graze livestock. Additionally, the rising and uncertain future costs of diesel, natural gas, and even electricity increase the potential effectiveness for wind energy and its predictable and competitive cost. In general, wind-powered electric generation systems generate more energy in the winter months than in the summer months when most crops need the water. Therefore, those states that have a supportive net metering policy can dramatically impact the viability of an onsite wind turbine. This poster presentation highlights case studies that show favorable and unfavorable policies that impact the growth of small wind in this important sector and demonstrate how net metering policies affect the viability of distributed wind generation for farmers who irrigate.

  3. Low Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development Reaction Injection Molded 7.5 Meter Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David M. Wright; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2007-07-31

    An optimized small turbine blade (7.5m radius) was designed and a partial section molded with the RIM (reaction-injection molded polymer) process for mass production. The intended market is for generic three-bladed wind turbines, 100 kilowatts or less, for grid-assist end users with rural and semi-rural sites, such as the farm/ranch market, having low to moderate IEC Class 3-4 wind regimes. This blade will have substantial performance improvements over, and be cheaper than, present-day 7.5m blades. This is made possible by the injection-molding process, which yields high repeatability, accurate geometry and weights, and low cost in production quantities. No wind turbine blade in the 7.5m or greater size has used this process. The blade design chosen uses a RIM skin bonded to a braided infused carbon fiber/epoxy spar. This approach is attractive to present users of wind turbine blades in the 5-10m sizes. These include rebladeing California wind farms, refurbishing used turbines for the Midwest farm market, and other manufacturers introducing new turbines in this size range.

  4. Short-Term Monitoring Results for Advanced New Construction Test House - Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.; Imm, C.

    2013-09-01

    A builder (K. Hovnanian® Homes®), design consultant, and trades collaborated to identify a systems integrated measures package for a 2,253-ft² slab-on-grade ranch house to achieve a modeled energy savings of 60% with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols, while minimizing construction costs and without requiring changes to the drawing that would impact local code or zoning approval. The key building improvements were applying R-10 insulation to the slab edge, increasing exterior wall cavity insulation from R-13 to R-15, and increasing attic insulation from R-30 to R-38. Also, the air handling unit was relocated from the attic to conditioned space, and ductwork was relocated along the attic floor with an insulated bulkhead built above it. Short-term testing results showed that duct air leakage was low due to short duct runs and the placement of ductwork in conditioned space. However, during commissioning, the lack of access for servicing the ductwork and dampers in the bulkhead area prevented retroactive balancing of individual branches, resulting in significant differences between specified and measured airflow values for some duct runs. Thermal imaging results performed on the house when operating in both heating and cooling modes validated historic stratification issues of ceiling supply registers with high supply air temperatures. Long-term monitoring results will be detailed in a future report.

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site environmental report, for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 General Environmental Protection Program, requires DOE facilities, that conduct environmental protection programs, to annually prepare a Site Environmental Report (SER). The purpose of the SER is to provide an abstract of environmental assessments conducted in order to characterize site environmental management performance, to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit. The content of this SER is not restricted to a synopsis of the required data, in addition, information pertaining to new and continued monitoring and compliance activities during the 1995 calendar year are also included. Data contained in this report are derived from those monitoring programs directed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). The EMP provides inclusive guidelines implemented to detect potential impacts to the environment and to establish baseline measurements for future environmental evaluations. Surface water, groundwater. air, soil, and biotic matrices are monitored for an array of radiological and nonradiological factors. The baseline radiological surveillance program encompasses a broader geographic area that includes nearby ranches, villages, and cities. Most elements of nonradiological assessments are conducted within the geographic vicinity of the WIPP site.

  6. Comfort and HVAC Performance for a New Construction Occupied Test House in Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01

    K. Hovnanian® Homes constructed a 2,253-ft2 single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

  7. Comfort and HVAC Performance for a New Construction Occupied Test House in Roseville, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-10-01

    K. Hovnanian(R) Homes(R) constructed a 2,253-ft2 single-story slab-on-grade ranch house for an occupied test house (new construction) in Roseville, California. One year of monitoring and analysis focused on the effectiveness of the space conditioning system at maintaining acceptable temperature and relative humidity levels in several rooms of the home, as well as room-to-room differences and the actual measured energy consumption by the space conditioning system. In this home, the air handler unit (AHU) and ducts were relocated to inside the thermal boundary. The AHU was relocated from the attic to a mechanical closet, and the ductwork was located inside an insulated and air-sealed bulkhead in the attic. To describe the performance and comfort in the home, the research team selected representative design days and extreme days from the annual data for analysis. To ensure that temperature differences were within reasonable occupant expectations, the team followed Air Conditioning Contractors of America guidance. At the end of the monitoring period, the occupant of the home had no comfort complaints in the home. Any variance between the modeled heating and cooling energy and the actual amounts used can be attributed to the variance in temperatures at the thermostat versus the modeled inputs.

  8. Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

  9. Reservoir facies architecture of microtidal barrier systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1986-06-01

    Sandstone reservoirs deposited in microtidal barrier systems contain large oil and gas reserves in several Gulf Coast basin plays. Three representative Frio Sandstone reservoirs in West Ranch field show that barrier-island sand bodies are complex mosaics of barrier-core, inlet-fill, flood-tidal-delta, washover-fan, barrier-flat, and shoreface facies. The proportions of these facies differ within progradational, aggradational, and transgressive barrier sand bodies. The 41-A reservoir is a progradational barrier sand body. The most important producing facies include the barrier core and crosscutting inlet fill. Permeability and distributions of irreducible water saturation reveal depositional patterns and subdivisions of the sand body into numerous facies-controlled compartments. Both original hydrocarbon saturation and irregularities in water encroachment show that the facies compartments locally affect fluid movement within the reservoir. The Greta reservoir is an aggradational barrier complex. This massive sand body consists of intermixed barrier-core and inlet-fill units. Prominent resistivity compartments are dip oriented, indicating the importance of inlet development during barrier aggradation. Despite the uniform appearance of the Greta reservoir, water encroachment has been irregular. The Glasscock reservoir is characterized by comparatively low permeability and is an atypically thin and discontinuous Frio reservoir. It is interpreted to be a transgressive barrier deposit that consists mainly of large washover-fan and associated barrier-flat sands. Hydrocarbon saturation, drainage, and injection response all reflect the facies geometry typical of a transgressive barrier complex.

  10. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  11. Product transfer service chosen over LPG flaring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, J.; Powers, M.

    1994-07-01

    Seadrift Pipeline Corp. recently decommissioned its Ella Pipeline, an 108-mile, 8-in. line between the King Ranch and a Union Carbide plant at Seadrift, Texas. The pipeline company opted for the product transfer services of pipeline Dehydrators Inc. to evacuate the ethane-rich LPG mixture from the pipeline instead of flaring the LPG or displacing it with nitrogen at operating pressures into another pipeline. The product transfer system of Pipeline Dehydrators incorporates the use of highly specialized portable compressors, heat exchangers and interconnected piping. The product transfer process of evacuating a pipeline is an economically viable method that safely recovers a very high percentage of the product while maintaining product purity. Using positive-displacement compressors, PLD transferred the LPG from the idled 8-in. Ella line into an adjacent 12-in. ethane pipeline that remained in service at approximately 800 psig. Approximately 4.3 million lb of LPG (97% ethane, 2.7% methane and 0.3% propane) were transferred into the ethane pipeline, lowering the pressure on the Ella Pipeline from 800 psig to 65 psig.

  12. Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NOSR 1 & 3, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Oil Shales Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 (NOSR 1 and 3) in Garfield County, Colorado (Figure 0.1). The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study. Additional details are provided in the Addendum (the Phase 1 Property Description and Fact Finding Report). The key property elements that positively affect the estimated value of NOSR 1 and 3 include the following: working interest income from producing oil and gas leases, income from grazing or leasing of grazing rights, potential income from oil and gas leasing on exploratory (or nonprospective) acreage, potential value of trading surface real estate as ranch land for livestock grazing (56,577 acres). Key elements that negatively impact the estimated value include: environmental assessment costs, gas prices, operating budgets, and lease sale expenses.

  13. Reevaluation of Stevens sand potential - Maricopa depocenter, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, M.M.; Parks, S.L. )

    1991-02-01

    During the upper Miocene in the Southern San Joaquin basin surrounding highlands contributed coarse material to a deep marine basin dominated by fine grained silicious bioclastic deposition. these coarse deposits became reservoirs isolated within the silicious Antelope Shale Member of the Monterey Formation. In the southern Maricopa depocenter these Stevens sands are productive at Yowlumne, Landslide, Aqueduct, Rio Viejo, San Emidio Nose, Paloma, and Midway-Sunset fields, and are major exploration targets in surrounding areas. In the ARCO Fee lands area of the southern Maricopa depocenter, Stevens sands occur as rapidly thickening lens-shaped bodies that formed as channel, levee, and lobe deposits of deep-marine fan systems. These fans were fed from a southerly source, with apparent transport in a north-northwesterly direction. Sands deflect gently around present-day structural highs indicating that growth of structures influenced depositional patterns. Correlations reveal two major fan depositional intervals bounded by regional N, O, and P chert markers. Each interval contains numerous individual fan deposits, with many lobes and channels recognizable on three-dimensional seismic data. In addition to these basinal sand plays presently being evaluated, ARCO is pursuing a relatively new trend on Fee lands along the southern basin margin, where correlation to mountain data reveals Stevens sands trend into the steeply dipping beds of the mountain front. This area, the upturned Stevens,' has large reserve potential and producing analogies at Metson, Leutholtz, Los Lobos, and Pleito Ranch fields.

  14. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  15. Simplified method for calculating heating and cooling energy in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.C.; Garnier, J.Y.

    1981-10-01

    A microcomputer-based program, Computerized, Instrumented, Residential Audit (CIRA), for determining economically optimal mixes of energy-saving measures in existing residential buildings was developed which requires extensive calculation of heating and cooling energy consumptions. In this paper, a simplified method of calculation that satisfies the requirements of speed and memory imposed by the type of microcomputer on which CIRA runs is presented. The method is based on monthly calculations of degree days and degree nights for both heating and cooling seasons. The base temperatures used in calculating the degree days and degree nights are derived from thermostat settings, solar and internal gains, sky radiation losses, and the thermal characteristics of the building envelope. Thermostat setbacks are handled by using the concept of effective thermal mass of the house. Performance variations of HVAC equipment with changes of part load and ambient conditions are taken into account using correlation curves based on experimental data. Degree days and nights for different base temperatures are evaluated by using a climate-specific empirical correlation with monthly average daily and nightly temperatures. Predictions obtained by this method and by DOE-2.1 are compared for the so-called Hastings ranch house for seven different climates in the United States. Heating and cooling energy consumptions predicted by CIRA lie generally within +- 10% of DOE-2.1 predictions.

  16. Sustainable management of the Gran Chaco of South America: Ecological promise and economic constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, E.H.; Huszar, P.C.

    1999-10-01

    The vast plain known as the Gran Chaco is a natural region of more than 1--3 million square kilometers, the second largest natural biome in south America, with only the Amazon region being larger. It extends over parts of Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and, marginally, Brazil. The original landscape of the region was mostly a park land with patches of hardwoods intermingled with grasslands. Increasing human encroachment, largely by poor campesinos, with associated overgrazing, excessive timber harvesting, charcoal production and over-exploitation of wildlife, is transforming the region into a dense and unproductive shrub land and is contributing to increasing rural poverty. A management system for the sustainable use of the Chaco has been developed based on a multiple-species ranching system that includes beef, timber, charcoal and wildlife production. An evaluation of the management system finds that it is capable of protecting and enhancing the resource base, while providing higher economic returns in a sustainable manner. However, high initial costs, as well as a divergence between the best interests of campersinos and society, jeopardize the feasibility of the managed system.

  17. Dalhart's only Permian field gets best oil well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-20

    This paper reports that activity is picking up in Proctor Ranch oil field in the northwestern Texas panhandle, the only Permian producing field in the lightly drilled Dalhart basin. During the last 2 1/2 months, the field has a new operator and a new producing well, the best of five drilled since discovery in 1990. Corlena Oil Co., Amarillo, acquired the field from McKinney Oil Co. in May and tested its first well in early July. The 1-64 Proctor, 18 miles west of Channing, pumped at rates as high as 178 bd of oil and 6 b/d of water from Permian Wolfcamp dolomite perforations at 4,016-29 ft. Corlena plans to drill another well south of the field soon. The lease requires that the next well be spudded by early November. The field appears to be combination structural-stratigraphic trap in which the dolomite pinches out against the Bravo Domes-Oldham nose to the west.

  18. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: FY 1990 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Thiede, M.E.; Lettau, D.J.; Twaddell, T.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Black, R.A. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are working together to develop for the US Department of Energy (DOE) protective barriers for the near-surface disposal of hazardous waste at the Hanford Site. The proposed barrier design consists of a layer of fine-textured soil overlying a series of layers grading from sand to basalt riprap. A multiyear research program is being conducted to assess the long-term performance of barrier configurations in restricting plants, animals, and water from contacting buried wastes. The purpose of this report is to review work done up to July 31 in FY 1990 on the evapotranspiration subtask of the water infiltration task. As stated in the test plan, specific objectives of PNL's evapotranspiration work were to (1) develop and test an environmentally controlled whole-plant gas exchange system, (2) collect evapotranspiration data at the whole-plant level on the small-tube lysimeters, (3) collect transpiration data on the shrubs at McGee Ranch, (4) collect data necessary to parameterize the plant component of the UNSAT-H code.

  19. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: FY 1990 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Thiede, M.E.; Lettau, D.J.; Twaddell, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Black, R.A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1992-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) are working together to develop for the US Department of Energy (DOE) protective barriers for the near-surface disposal of hazardous waste at the Hanford Site. The proposed barrier design consists of a layer of fine-textured soil overlying a series of layers grading from sand to basalt riprap. A multiyear research program is being conducted to assess the long-term performance of barrier configurations in restricting plants, animals, and water from contacting buried wastes. The purpose of this report is to review work done up to July 31 in FY 1990 on the evapotranspiration subtask of the water infiltration task. As stated in the test plan, specific objectives of PNL`s evapotranspiration work were to (1) develop and test an environmentally controlled whole-plant gas exchange system, (2) collect evapotranspiration data at the whole-plant level on the small-tube lysimeters, (3) collect transpiration data on the shrubs at McGee Ranch, (4) collect data necessary to parameterize the plant component of the UNSAT-H code.

  20. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

  1. Exterior Rigid Foam Insulation at the Edge of a Slab Foundation, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01

    Exterior rigid foam insulation at the edge of the slab foundation was a unique feature for this low-load, unoccupied test house in a hot-dry climate and may be more appropriate for climates with higher heating loads. U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS worked with National Housing Quality Award winner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes, Inc., to assess the performance of this feature in a single-family detached ranch house with three bedrooms and two full bathrooms constructed on a slab-on-grade foundation in Fresno, California. One challenge during installation of the system was the attachment of the butyl flashing to the open framing. To solve this constructability issue, the team added a nailer to the base of the wall to properly attach and lap the flashing. In this strategy, R-7.5, 1.5-in.-thick extruded polystyrene was installed on the exterior of the slab for a modeled savings of 4,500 Btu/h on the heating load.

  2. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of

  3. Impacts of alternative residential energy standards - Rural Housing Amendments Study, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balistocky, S.; Bohn, A.A.; Heidell, J.A.; Hendrickson, P.L.; Lee, A.D.; Pratt, R.G.; Taylor, Z.T.

    1985-11-01

    This report has examined the role of manufactured housing in the housing market, the energy impacts of three manufactured housing standards and three site-built standards in 13 cities, and the economic impacts of those standards in 6 cities. The three standards applied to manufactured housing are the HUD Title VI standard (Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards, or MHCSS), the Hud Title II-E standard, and the existing FmHA Title V standard. Those applied to site-built homes are the HUD Minimum Property Standards (MPS), the ASHRAE 90A-80 standard, and the FmHA Title V standard. Based on energy consumption alone, these analyses show that the FmHA Title V standard is the most stringent standard for both housing types (a single-section menufactured home and a single-story detached ''ranch house''). The HUD Title VI standard is the least stringent for manufactured homes, while the HUD Minimum Property Standards are the least stringent for site-built homes. Cost-effectiveness comparisons required by the Act were made for the two prototypical homes. Results of this preliminary economic analysis indicate that none of the site-built standards reflect minimum life-cycle cost as a basic criterion of their development. For manufactured homes, both the FmHA standard and the HUD Title II-E standard reduce life-cycle cost and effect positive first-year cash flows in all cities analyzed when electric resistance heating is assumed. When natural gas heating is used, both standards pass the life-cycle cost test in all cities, but the FmHA standard fails the cash flow test in all but one city. However, in the worst case, net monthly expenditures in the first year are increased by less than $9.

  4. Isotopic evidence for reductive immobilization of uranium across a roll-front mineral deposit

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Shaun T.; Basu, Anirban; Christensen, John N.; Reimus, Paul; Heikoop, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth; Woldegabriel, Giday; Maher, Kate; Weaver, Karrie; Clay, James; et al

    2016-05-20

    We use uranium (U) isotope ratios to detect and quantify the extent of natural U reduction in groundwater across a roll front redox gradient. Our study was conducted at the Smith Ranch-Highland in situ recovery (ISR) U mine in eastern Wyoming, USA, where economic U deposits occur in the Paleocene Fort Union formation. To evaluate the fate of aqueous U in and adjacent to the ore body, we investigated the chemical composition and isotope ratios of groundwater samples from the roll-front type ore body and surrounding monitoring wells of a previously mined area. The 238U/235U of groundwater varies by approximatelymore » 3‰ and is correlated with U concentrations. Fluid samples down-gradient of the ore zone are the most depleted in 238U and have the lowest U concentrations. Activity ratios of 234U/238U are ~5.5 up-gradient of the ore zone, ~1.0 in the ore zone, and between 2.3 and 3.7 in the down-gradient monitoring wells. High-precision measurements of 234U/238U and 238U/235U allow for development of a conceptual model that evaluates both the migration of U from the ore body and the extent of natural attenuation due to reduction. We find that the premining migration of U down-gradient of the delineated ore body is minimal along eight transects due to reduction in or adjacent to the ore body, whereas two other transects show little or no sign of reduction in the down-gradient region. Lastly, these results suggest that characterization of U isotopic ratios at the mine planning stage, in conjunction with routine geochemical analyses, can be used to identify where more or less postmining remediation will be necessary.« less

  5. Reservoir facies architecture in a micro-tidal barrier system, Frio formation, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1984-04-01

    Barrier-bar sand bodies are a complex mosaic of barrier-core, shore-face, inlet-fill, tidal-delta, and back-barrier facies. In addition, sandbody stratigraphy and internal depositional architecture are determined by the progradational, aggradational, or transgressive origin of the barrier complex. The Frio barrier/strandplain system of the middle Texas Gulf Coast has produced more than 3 billion bbl of oil. Examination of the Greta, Glasscock, and 41-A sands in West Ranch field illustrates the variability of barrier reservoirs. Each reservoir is a mosaic of variably interconnected compartments having sheet, tab, pod, or channel geometries. Conventional facies analysis (isolith and log-pattern mapping and limited core examination) combined with semiquantitative delineation of hydrocarbon-saturation distribution using resistivity logs defined the facies components of each reservoir. The 41-A sand consists of juxtaposed progradational barrier-core, inlet-fill, and flood tidal-delta units. The Glasscock sand is largely a transgressive barrier-flat and washover-fan deposit. The Greta sand is a complex of aggradational barrier-core and inlet-fill facies. Productive attributes of each reservoir are influenced by its facies architecture and attendant relative permeabilities. Natural water drive is ineffective in the volumetrically restricted transgressive Glasscock reservoir. Permeability distribution in the 41-A reservoir is facies defined. Erratic injection response, irregular oil-water contact advance, and variable water/oil ratios observed during the productive history of individual reservoirs document localized facies effects on fluid flow. Spatial variation of the gas/oil ratio may also reflect facies distribution.

  6. Phase 1 archaeological investigation, cultural resources survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana districts, south shore of Maui, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erkelens, C.

    1995-04-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. The survey team documented a total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features. Archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Maonakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. Twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bones from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area.

  7. Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Allen

    2002-03-01

    This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

  8. Strategic Energy Planning (Area 1) Consultants Reports to Citizen Potawatomi Nation Federally Recognized Indian Tribe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Marvin; Bose, James; Beier, Richard; Chang, Young Bae

    2004-12-01

    The assets that Citizen Potawatomi Nation holds were evaluated to help define the strengths and weaknesses to be used in pursuing economic prosperity. With this baseline assessment, a Planning Team will create a vision for the tribe to integrate into long-term energy and business strategies. Identification of energy efficiency devices, systems and technologies was made, and an estimation of cost benefits of the more promising ideas is submitted for possible inclusion into the final energy plan. Multiple energy resources and sources were identified and their attributes were assessed to determine the appropriateness of each. Methods of saving energy were evaluated and reported on and potential revenue-generating sources that specifically fit the tribe were identified and reported. A primary goal is to create long-term energy strategies to explore development of tribal utility options and analyze renewable energy and energy efficiency options. Associated goals are to consider exploring energy efficiency and renewable economic development projects involving the following topics: (1) Home-scale projects may include construction of a home with energy efficiency or renewable energy features and retrofitting an existing home to add energy efficiency or renewable energy features. (2) Community-scale projects may include medium to large scale energy efficiency building construction, retrofit project, or installation of community renewable energy systems. (3) Small business development may include the creation of a tribal enterprise that would manufacture and distribute solar and wind powered equipment for ranches and farms or create a contracting business to include energy efficiency and renewable retrofits such as geothermal heat pumps. (4) Commercial-scale energy projects may include at a larger scale, the formation of a tribal utility formed to sell power to the commercial grid, or to transmit and distribute power throughout the tribal community, or hydrogen production

  9. Truss-Integrated Thermoformed Ductwork Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Winter; Dianne Griffiths; Ravi Gorthala

    2007-08-30

    This report summarizes a multi-year research effort to develop a leak-free duct system that can be readily installed within the thermal envelope. There are numerous efforts underway to improve duct system efficiency. Most of these involve modifications to current technology such as air sealing techniques like mastic and aeroseal, snap together duct connections, and greater levels of insulation. This project sought to make a more significant stride forward by introducing a duct system of a material that can be more readily sealed and can exhibit lower friction losses. The research focused on the use of smooth internal surface, low friction plastic ducts that could be easily installed with very low air leakage. The initial system concept that was proposed and researched in Phase I focused on the use of thermoformed plastic ducts installed in a recessed roof truss underneath the attic insulation. A bench top thermoformed system was developed and tested during Phase I of the project. In Phase II, a first generation duct system utilizing a resin impregnated fiberglass duct product was designed and specified. The system was installed and tested in an Atlanta area home. Following this installation research and correspondence with code officials was undertaken to alleviate the continued concern over the code acceptance of plastic ducts in above ground applications. A Committee Interpretation response was received from the International Code Council (ICC) stating that plastic ducts were allowed, but must be manufactured from materials complying with Class 0 or Class 1 rating. With assurance of code acceptance, a plastic duct system using rotomolded high density polyethylene ducts that had passed the material test requirements by impregnating the material with a fire retardant during the molding process was installed in the basement of a new ranch-style home in Madison, WI. A series of measurements to evaluate the performance benefits relative to a similar control house with

  10. Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

  11. Sedimentology of Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming, and a comparison to the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Fox, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    Outcrops of the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation near Beulah, Wyoming consist of dolomite, gypsum, and sandstone units deposited in transgressive-regressive cycles. Three depositional cycles are partly exposed in the Simons Ranch anticline near Beulah, and provide an opportunity to view fades of the upper Minnelusa Formation in three dimensions. The cycles observed in outcrop were informally labelled cycle 1, cycle 2, and cycle 3 in ascending stratigraphic order. Cycle 2 contains a basal, laterally extensive sabkha sandstone and an overlying, laterally restricted sandstone that represents a preserved eolian-dune complex. The eolian-dune sandstone of cycle 2 was partially reworked during the marine transgression that initiated cycle 3. The eolian-dune deposit grades laterally into an apron of contorted and massive-bedded sandstones that formed as water-saturated sands liquified and slumped from the margins of the eolian dune. The partially reworked eolian-dune topography was covered by gypsum beds of cycle 3. The sandstone of cycle 3 is interpreted as a laterally continuous sabkha sandstone. West Mellott field (secs. 8, 9, T52N, R68W) represents a subsurface example of the facies and facies relationships observed in outcrop. The eolian-dune sandstone of the C cycle, which was partially reworked by the transgression of the B cycle, produces oil at West Mellott. The draping of dolomite and anhydrite of the B cycle on the eolian-dune sandstone of the C cycle is analogous to the draping of gypsum on dune sand in cycle 2 in outcrop.

  12. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  13. QER- Comment of Jim Casperson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern, I live in Winchendon Massachusetts and have received requests by a Tennessee company to survey my humble two acre paradise of PROTECTED WETLANDS. When I moved here 25 years ago, I was compelled by the Town Conservation Commission to 'reconstruct' an area of wetlands at the back of my property to replicate the amount of land cleared for my 3 bedroom ranch house. Since that time I have had to upgrade my failed septic system to the tune of $16,640 (but who's counting) not only to comply with Title V requirements but also so I can do my own laundry without everything backing up into my basement. When my family grew I happily expanded my home upward as I wasn't to change the footprint of my family print. I can't build a garage or ANYTHING else on my own property. Conservation Land, you see. I am a staunch believer that gas pipelines and other traditional 'energy solutions' show no imagination and can't believe someone might infringe on my little piece of life with such a violation. I (and my spouse) have dedicated our careers to a non-profit that supports mentally and intellectually challenged individuals, I for 35+ years. I mention this to illustrate that I'm not your typical NIMBY. My life is always about improving life...certainly not just for my self. I believe there is legal action taking form and I will join. I respectfully request your careful consideration of allowing such an infringement on such fragile land that has been so cherished and preserved for (literally) centuries. Thank you, Jim Casperson

  14. Corrrective action decision document for the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (Corrective Action Unit No. 426). Revision No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 426) has been prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project. This CADD has been developed to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996, stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Cactus Spring Waste Trenches Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. RG-08-001-RG-CS is included in CAU No. 426 (also referred to as the {open_quotes}trenches{close_quotes}); it has been identified as one of three potential locations for buried, radioactively contaminated materials from the Double Tracks Test. The trenches are located on the east flank of the Cactus Range in the eastern portion of the Cactus Spring Ranch at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nye County, Nevada, on the northern portion of Nellis Air Force Range. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The trenches were dug for the purpose of receiving waste generated during Operation Roller Coaster, primarily the Double Tracks Test. This test, conducted in 1963, involved the use of live animals to assess the biological hazards associated with non-nuclear detonation of plutonium-bearing devices (i.e., inhalation uptake of plutonium aerosol). The CAS consists of four trenches that received solid waste and had an overall impacted area of approximately 36 meters (m) (120 feet [ft]) long x 24 m (80 ft) wide x 3 to 4.5 m (10 to 15 ft) deep. The average depressions at the trenches are approximately 0.3 m (1 ft) below land surface.

  15. Subtask – CO2 storage and enhanced bakken recovery research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, James; Hawthorne, Steven; Smith, Steven; Braunberger, Jason; Liu, Guoxiang; Klenner, Robert; Botnen, Lisa; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John; Doll, Thomas

    2014-05-31

    Small improvements in productivity could increase technically recoverable oil in the Bakken Petroleum System by billions of barrels. The use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in tight oil reservoirs is a relatively new concept. The large-scale injection of CO2 into the Bakken would also result in the geological storage of significant amounts of CO2. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has conducted laboratory and modeling activities to examine the potential for CO2 storage and EOR in the Bakken. Specific activities included the characterization and subsequent modeling of North Dakota study areas as well as dynamic predictive simulations of possible CO2 injection schemes to predict the potential CO2 storage and EOR in those areas. Laboratory studies to evaluate the ability of CO2 to remove hydrocarbons from Bakken rocks and determine minimum miscibility pressures for Bakken oil samples were conducted. Data from a CO2 injection test conducted in the Elm Coulee area of Montana in 2009 were evaluated with an eye toward the possible application of knowledge gained to future injection tests in other areas. A first-order estimation of potential CO2 storage capacity in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota was also conducted. Key findings of the program are as follows. The results of the research activities suggest that CO2 may be effective in enhancing the productivity of oil from the Bakken and that the Bakken may hold the ability to geologically store between 120 Mt and 3.2 Gt of CO2. However, there are no clear-cut answers regarding the most effective approach for using CO2 to improve oil productivity or the storage capacity of the Bakken. The results underscore the notion that an unconventional resource will likely require unconventional methods of both assessment and implementation when it comes to the injection of CO

  16. Subtask1.10 – CO2 storage and enhanced bakken recovery research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorensen, James

    2014-05-31

    Small improvements in productivity could increase technically recoverable oil in the Bakken Petroleum System by billions of barrels. The use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in tight oil reservoirs is a relatively new concept. The large-scale injection of CO2 into the Bakken would also result in the geological storage of significant amounts of CO2. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has conducted laboratory and modeling activities to examine the potential for CO2 storage and EOR in the Bakken. Specific activities included the characterization and subsequent modeling of North Dakota study areas as well as dynamic predictive simulations of possible CO2 injection schemes to predict the potential CO2 storage and EOR in those areas. Laboratory studies to evaluate the ability of CO2 to remove hydrocarbons from Bakken rocks and determine minimum miscibility pressures for Bakken oil samples were conducted. Data from a CO2 injection test conducted in the Elm Coulee area of Montana in 2009 were evaluated with an eye toward the possible application of knowledge gained to future injection tests in other areas. A first-order estimation of potential CO2 storage capacity in the Bakken Formation in North Dakota was also conducted. Key findings of the program are as follows. The results of the research activities suggest that CO2 may be effective in enhancing the productivity of oil from the Bakken and that the Bakken may hold the ability to geologically store between 120 Mt and 3.2 Gt of CO2. However, there are no clear-cut answers regarding the most effective approach for using CO2 to improve oil productivity or the storage capacity of the Bakken. The results underscore the notion that an unconventional resource will likely require unconventional methods of both assessment and implementation when it comes to the injection of CO

  17. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated

  18. Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, Michele

    2002-07-01

    Extremely poor water conditions within the Columbia River Basin along with extraordinary power market conditions created an exceptionally poor migration year for juvenile salmon and steelhead. Monthly 2001 precipitation at the Columbia above Grand Coulee, the Snake River above Ice Harbor, and the Columbia River above The Dalles was approximately 70% of average. As a result the 2001 January-July runoff volume at The Dalles was the second lowest in Columbia River recorded history. As a compounding factor to the near record low flows in 2001, California energy deregulation and the resulting volatile power market created a financial crisis for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Power emergencies were first declared in the summer and winter of 2000 for brief periods of time. In February of 2001, and on April 3, the BPA declared a ''power emergency'' and suspended many of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Biological Opinion (Opinion) measures that addressed mainstem Columbia and Snake Rivers juvenile fish passage. The river and reservoir system was operated primarily for power generation. Power generation requirements in January through March coincidentally provided emergence and rearing flows for the Ives-Pierce Islands spawning area below Bonneville Dam. In particular, flow and spill measures to protect juvenile downstream migrant salmon and steelhead were nearly totally suspended. Spring and summer flows were below the Opinion migration target at all sites. Maximum smolt transportation was implemented instead of the Opinion in-river juvenile passage measures. On May 16, the BPA Administrator decided to implement a limited spill for fish passage at Bonneville and The Dalles dams. On May 25, a limited spill program was added at McNary and John Day dams. Spill extended to July 15. Juvenile migrants, which passed McNary Dam after May 21, experienced a noticeable, improved survival, as a benefit of spill at John Day Dam. The suspension of Biological Opinion

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types

  20. Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

    2003-11-01

    State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

  1. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part C; Lake Roosevelt Pelagic Fish Study: Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, Casey; Polacek, Matt; Bonar, Scott

    2002-11-01

    Pelagic fishes, such as kokanee and rainbow trout, provide an important fishery in Lake Roosevelt; however, spawner returns and creel results have been below management goals in recent years. Our objective was to identify factors that potentially limit pelagic fish production in Lake Roosevelt including entrainment, food limitation, piscivory, and other abiotic factors. We estimated the ratio of total fish entrained through Grand Coulee Dam to the pelagic fish abundance for September and October, 1998. If the majority of these fish were pelagic species, then entrainment averaged 10-13% of pelagic fish abundance each month. This rate of entrainment could impose considerable losses to pelagic fish populations on an annual basis. Therefore, estimates of species composition of entrained fish will be important in upcoming years to estimate the proportion of stocked pelagic fish lost through the dam. Food was not limiting for kokanee or rainbow trout populations since growth rates were high and large zooplankton were present in the reservoir. Estimates of survival for kokanee were low (< 0.01 annual) and unknown for rainbow trout. We estimated that the 1997 standing stock biomass of large (>1.1 mm) Daphnia could have supported 0.08 annual survival by kokanee and rainbow trout before fish consumption would have exceeded available biomass during late winter and early spring. Therefore, if recruitment goals are met in the future there may be a bottleneck in food supply for pelagic planktivores. Walleye and northern pikeminnow were the primary piscivores of salmonids in 1996 and 1997. Predation on salmonid prey was rare for rainbow trout and not detected for burbot or smallmouth bass. Northern pikeminnow had the greatest individual potential as a salmonid predator due to their high consumptive demand; however, their overall impact was limited because of their low relative abundance. We modeled the predation impact of 273,524 walleye in 1996, and 39,075 northern pikeminnow in

  2. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated

  3. Phase I Archaeological Investigation Cultural Resources Survey, Hawaii Geothermal Project, Makawao and Hana Districts, South Shore of Maui, Hawaii (DRAFT )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erkelens, Conrad

    1994-03-01

    This report details the archaeological investigation of a 200 foot wide sample corridor extending approximately 9 miles along the southern portion of Maui within the present districts of Hana and Makawao. A total of 51 archaeological sites encompassing 233 surface features were documented. A GPS receiver was used to accurately and precisely plot locations for each of the documented sites. Analysis of the locational information suggests that archaeological sites are abundant throughout the region and only become scarce where vegetation has been bulldozed for ranching activities. At the sea-land transition points for the underwater transmission cable, both Ahihi Bay and Huakini Bay are subjected to seasonal erosion and redeposition of their boulder shorelines. The corridor at the Ahihi Bay transition point runs through the Moanakala Village Complex which is an archaeological site on the State Register of Historic Places within a State Natural Area Reserve. Numerous other potentially significant archaeological sites lie within the project corridor. It is likely that rerouting of the corridor in an attempt to avoid known sites would result in other undocumented sites located outside the sample corridor being impacted. Given the distribution of archaeological sites, there is no alternative route that can be suggested that is likely to avoid encountering sites. A total of twelve charcoal samples were obtained for potential taxon identification and radiocarbon analysis. Four of these samples were subsequently submitted for dating and species identification. Bird bone from various locations within a lava tube were collected for identification. Sediment samples for subsequent pollen analysis were obtained from within two lava tubes. With these three sources of information it is hoped that paleoenvironmental data can be recovered that will enable a better understanding of the setting for Hawaiian habitation of the area. A small test unit was excavated at one habitation site

  4. ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul M. Sharma

    2005-03-01

    The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those

  5. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo, Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2003-12-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River

  6. Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation; Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish, Water, and Wildlife Program, REVISED 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Scott, Jason

    2004-04-01

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed by the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake (Staff Communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. The declines in native salmonid fish populations, particularly cutthroat and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), in the Coeur d'Alene basin have been the focus of study by the Coeur d' Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. It appears that there are a number of factors contributing to the decline of resident salmonid stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Ellis 1932; Oien 1957; Mallet 1969; Scholz et. al. 1985, Lillengreen et. al. 1993). These factors include: construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906; major changes in land cover types, agricultural activities and introduction of exotic fish species. Over 100 years of mining activities in the Coeur d'Alene River drainage have had devastating effects on the quality of the water in the Coeur d'Alene River

  7. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur dAlene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.

    2009-09-08

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic diversity, and increase the probability of persistence

  8. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25

    gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  9. San Joaquin River Up-Stream DO TMDL Project Task 4: MonitoringStudy Interim Task Report #3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stringfellow, William; Borglin, Sharon; Dahlgren, Randy; Hanlon,Jeremy; Graham, Justin; Burks, Remie; Hutchinson, Kathleen

    2007-03-30

    The purpose of the Dissolved Oxygen Total Maximum Daily LoadProject (DO TMDLProject) is to provide a comprehensive understanding ofthe sources and fate of oxygen consuming materials in the San JoaquinRiver (SJR) watershed between Channel Point and Lander Avenue (upstreamSJR). When completed, this study will provide the stakeholders anunderstanding of the baseline conditions of the basin, provide input foran allocation decision, and provide the stakeholders with a tool formeasuring the impact of any waterquality management program that may beimplemented as part of the DO TMDL process. Previous studies haveidentified algal biomass as the most significant oxygen-demandingsubstance in the DO TMDL Project study-area between of Channel Point andLander Ave onthe SJR. Other oxygen-demanding substances found in theupstream SJR include ammonia and organic carbon from sources other thanalgae. The DO TMDL Project study-area contains municipalities, dairies,wetlands, cattle ranching, irrigated agriculture, and industries thatcould potentially contribute biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) to the SJR.This study is designed to discriminate between algal BOD and othersources of BOD throughout the entire upstream SJR watershed. Algalbiomass is not a conserved substance, but grows and decays in the SJR;hence, characterization of oxygen-demanding substances in the SJR isinherently complicated and requires an integrated effort of extensivemonitoring, scientific study, and modeling. In order to achieve projectobjectives, project activities were divided into a number of Tasks withspecific goals and objectives. In this report, we present the results ofmonitoring and research conducted under Task 4 of the DO TMDL Project.The major objective of Task 4 is to collect sufficient hydrologic (flow)and water quality (WQ) data to characterize the loading of algae, otheroxygen-demanding materials, and nutrients fromindividual tributaries andsub-watersheds of the upstream SJR between Mossdale and

  10. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Over the course of the entire project, field visits were made to 117 geothermal systems in the Great Basin region. Major field excursions, incorporating visits to large groups of systems, were conducted in western Nevada, central Nevada, northwestern Nevada, northeastern Nevada, east‐central Nevada, eastern California, southern Oregon, and western Utah. For example, field excursions to the following areas included visits of multiple geothermal systems: - Northwestern Nevada: Baltazor Hot Spring, Blue Mountain, Bog Hot Spring, Dyke Hot Springs, Howard Hot Spring, MacFarlane Hot Spring, McGee Mountain, and Pinto Hot Springs in northwest Nevada. - North‐central to northeastern Nevada: Beowawe, Crescent Valley (Hot Springs Point), Dann Ranch (Hand‐me‐Down Hot Springs), Golconda, and Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Hot Springs) in north‐central to northeast Nevada. - Eastern Nevada: Ash Springs, Chimney Hot Spring, Duckwater, Hiko Hot Spring, Hot Creek Butte, Iverson Spring, Moon River Hot Spring, Moorman Spring, Railroad Valley, and Williams Hot Spring in eastern Nevada. - Southwestern Nevada‐eastern California: Walley’s Hot Spring, Antelope Valley, Fales Hot Springs, Buckeye Hot Springs, Travertine Hot Springs, Teels Marsh, Rhodes Marsh, Columbus Marsh, Alum‐Silver Peak, Fish Lake Valley, Gabbs Valley, Wild Rose, Rawhide‐ Wedell Hot Springs, Alkali Hot Springs, and Baileys/Hicks/Burrell Hot Springs. - Southern Oregon: Alvord Hot Spring, Antelope Hot Spring‐Hart Mountain, Borax Lake, Crump Geyser, and Mickey Hot Spring in southern Oregon. - Western Utah: Newcastle, Veyo Hot Spring, Dixie Hot Spring, Thermo, Roosevelt, Cove Fort, Red Hill Hot Spring, Joseph Hot Spring, Hatton Hot Spring, and Abraham‐Baker Hot Springs. Structural controls of 426 geothermal systems were analyzed with literature research, air photos, google‐Earth imagery, and/or field reviews (Figures 1 and 2). Of the systems analyzed, we were able to determine the structural settings

  11. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30

    production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  12. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan, Technical Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashe, Becky L.; Concannon, Kathleen; Johnson, David B.

    2000-04-01

    conjunct ion with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. Each alternative was evaluated based on criteria developed for rearing fish for a conservation program. After this review, the Nez Perce Tribe determined the only alternative that meets the needs of the program is the alternative to use new facilities in conjunction with a modified Lookingglass Hatchery. This is the Proposed Alternative. The Proposed Alternative would require: Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Imnaha River and modifications of the existing Gumboot facility to accommodate the Imnaha component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; Construction of a new incubation and rearing facility in the Lostine River to accommodate the Lostine component of the Lookingglass Hatchery production; and Modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery to accommodate the Upper Grande Ronde and Catherine Creek components of the Lookingglass Hatchery production. After an extensive screening process of potential sites, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes the Marks Ranch site on the Imnaha River and the Lundquist site on the Lostine River for new facilities. Conceptual design and cost estimates of the proposed facilities are contained in this master plan. The proposed facilities on the Imnaha and Lostine rivers would be managed in conjunction with the existing adult collection and juvenile acclimation/release facilities. Because this master plan has evolved into an endeavor undertaken primarily by the Nez Perce Tribe, the focus of the document is on actions within the Imnaha and Lostine watersheds where the Nez Perce Tribe have specific co-management responsibilities. Nevertheless, modifications at Lookingglass Hatchery could make it possible to provide a quality rearing environment for the remainder of the CPP. The Nez Perce Tribe will assist co-managers in further evaluating facility needs and providing other components of the NPPC master planning process to develop a solution for the entire CPP. Although the fish

  13. Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

    2008-09-29

    Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and

  14. The Effects of Fire on the Function of the 200-BP-1 Engineered Surface Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Link, Steven O.; Hasan, Nazmul; Draper, Kathryn E.

    2009-09-01

    A critical unknown in use of barrier technology for long-term waste isolation is performance after a major disturbance especially when institutional controls are intact, but there are no resources to implement corrective actions. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of wild fire on alterations the function of an engineered barrier. A controlled burn September 26, 2008 was used to remove all the vegetation from the north side of the barrier. Flame heights exceeded 9 m and temperatures ranged from 250 oC at 1.5 cm below the surface to over 700 oC at 1 m above the surface. Post-fire analysis of soil properties show significant decreases in wettability, hydraulic conductivity, air entry pressure, organic matter, and porosity relative to pre-fire conditions whereas dry bulk density increased. Decreases in hydraulic conductivity and wettabilty immediately after the fire are implicated in a surface runoff event that occurred in January 2009, the first in 13 years. There was a significant increase in macro-nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity. After one year, hydrophobicity has returned to pre-burn levels with only 16% of samples still showing signs of decreased wettability. Over the same period, hydraulic conductivity and air entry pressure returned to pre-burn levels at one third of the locations but remained identical to values recorded immediately after the fire at the other two thirds. Soil nutrients, pH, and electrical conductivity remain elevated after 1 year. Species composition on the burned surface changed markedly from prior years and relative to the unburned surface and two analog sites. An increase in the proportion of annuals and biennials is characteristic of burned surfaces that have become dominated by ruderal species. Greenhouse seedling emergence tests conducted to assess the seed bank of pre- and post-burn soils and of two analog sites at the McGee Ranch show no difference in the number of species emerging from soils collected

  15. Final Technical Report: Hawaii Hydrogen Center for Development and Deployment of Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.

    2008-09-30

    Hydrogen power park experiments in Hawai‘i produced real-world data on the performance of commercialized electrochemical components and power systems integrating renewable and hydrogen technologies. By analyzing the different losses associated with the various equipment items involved, this work identifies the different improvements necessary to increase the viability of these technologies for commercial deployment. The stand-alone power system installed at Kahua Ranch on the Big Island of Hawaii required the development of the necessary tools to connect, manage and monitor such a system. It also helped the electrolyzer supplier to adapt its unit to the stand-alone power system application. Hydrogen fuel purity assessments conducted at the Hawai‘i Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) fuel cell test facility yielded additional knowledge regarding fuel cell performance degradation due to exposure to several different fuel contaminants. In addition, a novel fitting strategy was developed to permit accurate separation of the degradation of fuel cell performance due to fuel impurities from other losses. A specific standard MEA and a standard flow field were selected for use in future small-scale fuel cell experiments. Renewable hydrogen production research was conducted using photoelectrochemical (PEC) devices, hydrogen production from biomass, and biohydrogen analysis. PEC device activities explored novel configurations of ‘traditional’ photovoltaic materials for application in high-efficiency photoelectrolysis for solar hydrogen production. The model systems investigated involved combinations of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). A key result of this work was the establishment of a robust “three-stage” fabrication process at HNEI for high-efficiency CIGS thin film solar cells. The other key accomplishment was the development of models, designs and prototypes of novel ‘four-terminal’ devices integrating high

  16. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide gels, chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels, silicate-polymer, and chromium-xanthan gum gels did not alter an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution's ability to produce incremental oil. Incremental oil was reduced with the resorcinol-formaldehyde gel system. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were generally similar. Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow.